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In a rare showing of complete bipartisanship, a bill that would allow families to monitor activities inside loved ones’ nursing home rooms with cameras and other electronic equipment, passed through the Ohio Legislature unanimously.

Senate Bill 58, known as Esther’s Law, has been in the works since 2011, when an activist named Steven Piskor used a hidden camera to catch employees at a nursing home facility run by MetroHealth Medical Center abusing his mother, Esther.

Since then, Piskor has been fighting for the passage of a law that would legally allow all families in Ohio, and elsewhere, to monitor the goings on in the nursing homes of their loved ones.

This week, his work was realized when Esther’s Law unanimously passed the Ohio House of Representatives. The bill passed the Ohio Senate unanimously in October.

Piskor celebrated when the bill passed the House.

“Esther’s Law is coming to Ohio,” he said. “This groundbreaking legislation is Ohio’s first for stopping abuse. It will allow residents to put a camera in their nursing home room. Families will be able to monitor their daily care.”

Esther’s Law Ohio Senate Bill 58 for camera’s in nursing homes is coming to Ohio. https://t.co/FLgd4b5eTU pic.twitter.com/qmoPBWQFoz

— Steve Piskor (@gypsyviolins) October 10, 2021

It will now head to Republican Gov. Mike DeWine’s desk to be signed into law or vetoed.

“Anybody’s that’s walked the path with their own parents as they age understand the need for special protection as people get older,” State Sen. Nickie Antonio (D-Lakewood), a co-sponsor of the bill, said upon its introduction in 2019. “Not only is it important today, it’s going to be important tomorrow.”

There would only be two requirements for families and guardians to monitor the nursing home rooms of their loved ones if the bill is signed into law.

They would be required to fill out a form disclosing to the nursing home that they are monitoring the room, and pay for the surveillance equipment themselves.

Illinois, Kansas and Minnesota all have their own versions of Esther’s Law.

– – –

Pete D’Abrosca is a contributor at The Ohio Star and The Star News Network. Follow Pete on Twitter. Email tips to [email protected].
Photo “Retirement Home” by Etan J. Tal. CC BY 3.0.

 

 

 

 

News Source: tennesseestar.com

Tags: bipartisanship elder abuse esther s law gov mike dewine nursing homes their loved ones the bill passed the bill passed the nursing home signed into law to monitor nursing homes senate bill ohio senate

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WATCH: Guatemalan Found Hiding in Landing Gear When Plane Arrives in Florida

A Guatemalan man was transported to a hospital after he was discovered hiding inside the landing gear compartment of a plane arriving in Florida, authorities said.

Agents working for the U.S. Customs and Border Protection explained the 26-year-old was apprehended once the flight from Guatemala landed early Saturday outside the Miami International Airport, WFTV reported.

 Video footage showed the man with airport employees as he sat on the ground beneath the plane’s wing:

Authorities said the individual got into the compartment to “evade detection.”

Once medical staff evaluated the man, he was transported to a hospital to receive treatment, a news release said.

According to border patrol agents, “Persons are taking extreme risks when they try to conceal themselves in confined spaces such as an aircraft.”

Authorities said the incident is currently being investigated.

The flight was American Airlines number 1182, and the airline told Local 10 News the aircraft “was met by law enforcement due to a security issue.”

The airline is now cooperating with local authorities but did not provide more information.

Meanwhile, Saman Gonzalez, an attorney who has practiced immigration law for the past 18 years, told the outlet she never witnessed such an incident.

“This is quite a miraculous story for this man to put himself in such a dangerous situation,” the attorney commented.

Gonzalez also explained the man will probably be classified as a stowaway, which meant his only chance of staying in the United States was to win a potential asylum case.

“Once he asks for asylum and specifically states there is a fear of returning to his country, he will be designated a credible fear interview,” Gonzalez noted.

However, if the man was not given asylum, he will be returned to Guatemala in the near future at the expense of the airline, according to Gonzalez.

“Technically, they are supposed to be returned to their country at the cost of the carrier,” she added.

In April, Sen. Tom Cotton (R-AR) told Breitbart News migrants he talked with at the southern border acknowledged they did not have legitimate asylum claims but were looking for economic benefits in America relative to their home countries.

“Not a single person claimed a genuine claim of asylum, something like, ‘I was persecuted because of my race or sex or I was persecuted because my political views,'” he noted.

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