Friday, Dec 03, 2021 - 10:21:38
199 results - (0.001 seconds)

Congress can’t:

latest news at page 1:
    Have you guys subscribed yet to The Brief, our weekly podcast about politics? We film live on Tuesdays, 1:30 PM PT/4:30 PM ET.  Today, we take a look at last week’s electoral wreckage and what it means for next year’s 2022 midterm elections. Joining us are Drew Linzer, who runs Civiqs, our data and research arm, and David Nir, who runs Daily Kos Elections. We’ll look at the results, the data, and the current polling, and explore whether Democrats have any chance of holding Congress next year.  x x YouTube Video You can watch the show live right here on Tuesdays at 1:30 PM PT/4:30 PM ET, but I realize that’s not always the most convenient, so the podcast is a great alternative. It goes live Wednesday mornings at all the usual places, including Apple Podcasts and Spotify. A full list of places to download the show is available here. Daily Kos relies on readers like you. We don't have billionaire backers like some right-wing media outlets. Half our revenue comes from readers like you, meaning we literally couldn't...
    (CNN)Will the House select committee investigating the January 6 insurrection succeed in uncovering the truth about that awful day?The committee has issued subpoenas to several loyalists of the former President, and their deadlines for cooperating have arrived. Will they be able to block or delay Congressional oversight, the way Trump and his allies did for all four years of his presidency? We don't think so. With Trump out of office, we believe the committee will get the information it wants on the timetable it needs.Under the committee's first wave of four subpoenas, key Trump loyalists Dan Scavino, Steve Bannon, Mark Meadows and Kash Patel are due to produce documents on Thursday and their testimony is due no later than October 15.Meadows, the former White House chief of staff, was a witness to, and deeply involved in, Trump's machinations to attack the election results, including pushing the Department of Justice to investigate baseless conspiracy theories and fraud claims about the 2020 presidential election, according to documents obtained by CNN and reported on in June. A spokesperson for Meadows then said Trump's...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — Some politicians think they’ve found a silver bullet for the impasse over the debt limit, except the bullet is made of platinum: Mint a $1 trillion coin, token of all tokens, and use it to flood the treasury with cash and drive Republicans crazy. Even its serious proponents — who are not that many — call it a gimmick. They say it is an oddball way out of an oddball accounting problem that will have severe consequences to average people’s pocketbooks and the economy if it is not worked out in coming days. But despite all the jokes about who should go on the face of the coin — Chuck E. Cheese? Donald Trump, to tempt or taunt the GOP? — there’s scholarship behind it, too. However improbable, it is conceivable the government could turn $1 trillion into a coin of the realm without lawmakers having a say. How is this possible when the treasury secretary can’t simply print money to pay public debts? It’s because a quirky law from more than 20 years ago seems to...
    Chuck Todd asked Rep. David Cicilline (D-RI) how Congress can “make” Facebook surrender proprietary algorithms to the government. “Let me ask you this, if Boeing comes up with a new way of using an automatic pilot mode in their airplane and they believe it’s a proprietary invention, they still have to disclose everything this invention does and how it works to the FAA to get that approval,” said Todd during a segment on MTP Daily on MSNBC. “It’s seems as if we don’t — if — if — if Facebook comes up with a proprietary algorithm that enhances their business capabilities they don’t seem to think they have to share that. How do you make them share that?” “Well, I mean, there’s a number of ways,” replied Cicilline. “You can require algorithmic audits to be sure they’re doing what they claim they do, you can require greater transparency for algorithms, you can, you know permit an agency responsible for looking at their practices, either its impact on competition or on fairness to the consumers are two obvious places. But that’s...
    The fight for D.C. statehood is far from over, even after the Supreme Court issued a ruling Monday that may have left statehood advocates feeling defeated. “The issue is alive and well,” said Thomas Cooke, a law professor at Georgetown University. Justices upheld a lower court’s ruling that said Congress is not constitutionally required to give the District voting representation. While that may have been disappointing for those fighting for representation, Cooke said simply having the court mention the case could be considered a win. “This is a subject that comes and goes in terms of local and national attention,” said Cooke. “Getting attention to the issue is incredibly important.” The court’s ruling does not have a direct impact on the push for statehood, nor does it prevent Congress from passing legislation that would grant the District voting representation in Congress at some point. “According to the Supreme Court’s decision, it is not a constitutional right, but that doesn’t mean that the issue can’t be picked up through the legislative process,” Cooke said. D.C. has long chafed under its relationship...
    (CNN)Congress is staring down a potential financial catastrophe with no clear resolution in sight. The debt limit must be either raised or suspended soon with Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen warning lawmakers that the federal government will likely run out of cash by October 18 unless Congress raises the debt ceiling. But they might not even have that long.And Democrats and Republicans are at an impasse over how to fix the problem. Republicans argue that Democrats, who control both chambers of Congress and the White House, should address the issue on their own without GOP votes, while Democrats insist the issue is a shared bipartisan responsibility. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer have made clear they don't want to do this on their own using a special budget process known as reconciliation. That leaves little option for a path forward amid a fast-approaching deadline. Senate Democrats have already tried to pass legislation to suspend the debt limit, but Republicans blocked it. Read MoreDuring a press conference Monday morning, Biden emphasized it was his preference to simply put...
    House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer said Tuesday morning that Democrats in the Senate can raise the debt ceiling and fund the federal government through the budget reconciliation process. “We may have to use reconciliation. I think that would be a sad statement of Republican responsibility,” he told reporters at the Capitol. The comments contradicted the position of top Senate Democrats, including Majority Leader Chuck Schumer and Whip Dick Durbin, both of whom have called the legislative maneuver a “non-starter.” Hoyer quickly walked back his comments. Raising the debt limit via reconciliation “is certainly not the best option, nor the option we’re pursuing,” he tweeted Tuesday afternoon. Today I was asked whether reconciliation is an option to address the debt limit. It is certainly not the best option, nor the option we’re pursuing. Senate GOP are putting our economy & families at risk. They have a responsibility to the country to ensure the US does not default. — Steny Hoyer (@LeaderHoyer) September 28, 2021 Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell has urged Democrats to use the reconciliation process, which allows bills...
    Allan Lichtman has a track record of accurately predicting presidential elections, and is generally an astute observer of the American political scene. So I paid attention when Lichtman, a political science professor at American University, told me it would be disastrous for President Biden to go war against Joe Manchin, Kyrsten Sinema and the other centrist Democrats jamming him up in Congress. Lichtman was fully aware that progressives were eager to purge obstructionist Democrats, or at least punish them somehow for constricting or defeating Biden's legislative agenda. I had already spoken to a historian — Harvey J. Kaye, the editor of "FDR on Democracy" — who pithily summed up the logic behind that point of view. "Look, there's two choices," Kaye said. "For the sake of the future, he should literally go after them, period." His "them" clearly referred to Manchin and Sinema. "But for the sake of democracy in the near term, what happens if the Republicans win?" Kaye added that he could not understand "why Biden hasn't called Manchin" and the others and told them that their...
    (CNN)In the torrent of books published about Donald Trump's presidency, few have offered recommendations for both repairing the damage done by his norm-busting term and addressing the vulnerabilities he revealed in our existing system of checks and balances. Michael D'AntonioTake tax returns, for example: Whereas previous presidents made their tax returns public to assure the country they brought no financial conflicts of interest to the Oval Office, Trump declined to follow this tradition. Similarly, he issued pardons to a variety of personal friends -- including Roger Stone, Steve Bannon and Paul Manafort. This too departed from presidential norms. In "After Trump: Reconstructing the Presidency," legal scholars Bob Bauer and Jack Goldsmith offer a blueprint that the government could follow to correct those weaknesses.The pair advise amending laws so that, contrary to practices established by a Justice Department memo, it's crystal clear that US presidents are subject to obstruction of justice charges while in office. They also recommend that when Congress authorizes a president to use military force abroad, that authorization should be subject to a two or three-year "sunset" clause....
    Just 56% of adults can name all three branches of government , and that's an improvement, according to a new survey. The 2021 figure is the highest it has been since 2006, according to the 2021 Annenberg Constitution Day Civics Survey . It's up 5 percentage points from 2020. But the survey also found that 1 in 5 adults could not name even one of the executive, legislative, or judicial branches. FORTY-NINE PERCENT OF PARENTS SUPPORT TEACHING CRITICAL RACE THEORY IN SCHOOLS: POLL The study of the nation's representative knowledge of civics is conducted every year ahead of Constitution Day on Sept. 17. "Higher proportions of the public have a foundational awareness of the three branches and the protections in the First Amendment," said Kathleen Jamieson, the director of the Annenberg Public Policy Center of the University of Pennsylvania . "But this knowledge appears to have been purchased at a real cost." That cost was a quarrelsome 2021 during which the executive, legislative, and judicial branches were "stress-tested," she said. The analysis also...
    The House of Representatives just took a much-needed first step in preparing for the next pandemic. The Energy and Commerce Committee announced that the Build Back Better Act will include $15 billion for pandemic preparedness. This modest investment -- less than .5% of the Build Back Better package -- will massively pay off in helping us avoid another calamity like COVID-19. $15 billion isn't enough, but it is an important starting point. We must come to terms with the grim certainty that another pandemic will devastate our country in our lifetimes. Our government cannot afford another scramble for vaccine technology and personal protective equipment. We must prepare for the next pandemic today. Should Congress fail to pass at least $15 billion of pandemic preparedness funding, Americans will suffer more the next time we face a pandemic. COVID-19 has killed over 600,000 Americans and cost this country $16 trillion dollars, and experts say that the next pandemic could be right around the corner. That's not to mention that COVID-19 has had disproportionate, devastating effects on disabled Americans, communities of color,...
    NEWBERRY, Florida — Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis (R) on Monday pointed out the unscientific nature of President Biden’s vaccine mandates, noting that he is imposing intrusive requirements on private sector employees yet exempting postal workers and members of Congress. Speaking at a packed press conference in Newberry, Florida, on Monday, DeSantis affirmed his position that coronavirus vaccines should not be mandated — neither at the local, nor the federal level. U.S. President Joe Biden speaks about the coronavirus pandemic in the State Dining Room of the White House on September 9, 2021 in Washington, DC. (Kevin Dietsch/Getty Images). “If a government agency in the state of Florida forces a vaccine as a condition of employment, that violates the Florida law,” he told the crowd, referencing the Florida law prohibiting the use of vaccine passports in the Sunshine State. But, Biden’s federal mandate, DeSantis said, is grossly problematic. “It’s not constitutional what he’s doing,” the governor said before pointing to some of the glaring issues, including the fact that it does not apply to the legislative or judicial branches. “So they’re...
    The insanity of governing while Democrat was on full display Wednesday as numerous political figures fought over how much money is okay to spend on helping people have better lives. In a rational world, policymakers would look at a problem—say, nearly half of senior and disabled people not having dental care—and determine how much it would cost to fix that, then find that money. Like from raising taxes on rich people. Or maybe just enforcing the tax laws already on the books and getting the money from fat-cat tax dodgers. It's how it works for defense spending. "Look—there's a shiny new plane which may or may not work and costs $100 million per pop! Let's get it!" Then the nation sinks $1.62 trillion into a black hole over three decades even though the damn thing doesn’t work, and has to spend billions more on yet another plane. That just keeps happening. But making sure a senior citizen has teeth with which they can eat? Allowing them to age in their own homes with adequate, paid assistance? That we have to pinch pennies on. These...
    Fox News' Kayleigh McEnany broke down the implications of a new report on the origins of COVID-19. On "Outnumbered," McEnany explained that if the virus did leak from a lab in Wuhan, then U.S. taxpayer money was used to fund the research that led to a pandemic. She also said that if Dr. Fauci was aware of the risk involved with the Wuhan research and approved the funding, then he likely lied to Congress. RAND PAUL SAYS NEW WUHAN DOCUMENTS SHOW FAUCI LIED KAYLEIGH MCENANY: He can't be truthful because the truth would mean that very likely, if this did originate in the lab, U.S. taxpayer dollars helped to fund a pandemic that was unleashed upon the world out of a lab in Wuhan, China. What is so galling to me is when you read these 900 pages of documents that were obtained by The Intercept, the grant request actually acknowledges the dangers of this research.  So Dr. Fauci, I presume he read the application for the grant which said this: 'The grant proposal acknowledges some of these dangers. Field...
    (CNN)President Joe Biden, who enjoyed strong approval ratings in his first six months in office, is now running up against the difficult reality of being commander-in-chief. Julian ZelizerIn addition to mounting disapproval, which tends to set in once the honeymoon period of a presidency wears off, Biden faces an array of obstacles. The pandemic continues to ravage the country, the jobs report in August and the threat of the Delta variant have bulldozed any hopes of a swift economic recovery, and extreme weather events have exposed just how vulnerable we are to climate change. It still remains to be seen how Biden's decision to withdraw from Afghanistan will play out.As we approach the 2022 midterm elections, the President faces a critical juncture. He will need to maneuver carefully to pass key legislation and retain the Democratic majorities in Congress that will allow him to plow on with his agenda while Republicans are undertaking a massive effort to curtail voting rights and recapture control of Congress in order to make the second half of his term a living hell.Right now,...
    It’s normal for Republicans and Democrats to disagree and even quarrel on various issues — that is, after all, the foundation of a two-party system. But ever since January 6, when a pro-Trump mob stormed the U.S. Capitol and threatened the lives of Democratic lawmakers, tensions in Congress have been high, to say the least. Partisan tensions have been simmering in the House since the insurrection, leading to outbursts, retaliatory tit-for-tats and a backlogged legislative pipeline. Despite the deep partisan divides plaguing the current Congress, some organizations are working to bridge the gap. The Bipartisan Policy Center, a Washington, D.C.-based think tank, runs the American Congressional Exchange Program: a planned visit with two members of the opposite party and different states aimed at building connections across the aisle. Second District Rep. Angie Craig participated in the exchange program in her home district, inviting Michigan Republican Rep. Peter Meijer to join her for a full day of meeting with constituents. Article continues after advertisement The grocery scion and the corporate exec The Bipartisan Policy Center, the D.C.-based think tank that...
    House staffers will now be able to earn higher salaries than the members of Congress for whom they work under a new order announced by Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiBernie Sanders says he plans to persuade progressives to help pass .5T spending package House Democrats press leaders to include more funding for electric vehicles in spending plan On The Money: Pelosi says no vote on infrastructure this month | Senate Democrats approve budget resolution MORE (D-Calif.) on Thursday in an effort to help retain top talent on Capitol Hill.  Staff salaries have remained stagnant for more than a decade thanks to the lawmaker pay freeze that's been in place since 2009, leading many people to leave Capitol Hill for higher-paying jobs at lobbying groups or in the executive branch. But under the new policy unveiled by Pelosi, the salary cap for House staffers will be $199,300, up from the maximum salary of $173,900 in 2020 for both the House and Senate. That means some top staffers will be in the position of earning more money than their bosses. Rank-and-file members of...
    A federal judge has ruled that an accounting firm representing former President Donald Trump must hand over some, but not all, of his tax returns and other financial records to House Democrats investigating Trump and his business dealings. U.S. District Court Judge Amit Mehta determined in a ruling Wednesday that the House Oversight Committee can proceed with a subpoena to get financial records from Mazars, the accounting firm, but can only seek records from after Trump became president. House Democrats are seeking Trump’s financial records to assess whether he violated the Constitution’s emoluments clauses by accepting payments from foreign governments, NBC News reported. The committee also wants to audit the lease granted to a Trump-owned business in 2013 to operate the Trump International Hotel in Washington, D.C. The Trump International Hotel is seen on June 02, 2021 in Washington, DC (Kevin Dietsch/Getty Images) Mehta said the committee’s subpoena to get financial records dating back to 2011 seemed to exceed the scope of its authority, noting that Trump did not become president until 2017 and thus could not have received any...
    President Joe Biden conceded on Thursday he can't guarantee the courts won't find his new eviction moratorium unconstitutional but noted it will at least buy renters some time. Biden told reporters at the White House he spoke to 'a number of legal scholars' about the moratorium and there was a 'split' in their opinion.   'I can't guarantee you the court won’t rule that we don't have that authority but at least we'll have the ability to, if we have to appeal, to keep this going for a month - at least. I hope longer,' he said.  He added that he hoped it would give states time to distribute funds they have in their possession from an earlier allocation by Congress. Distribution of rental assistance that Congress allocated in December and March has been painfully slow. The $47 billion Emergency Rental Assistance program has, to date, disbursed only $3 billion. President Joe Biden conceded he can't guarantee the courts won't find his new eviction moratorium unconstitutional Housing advocates protest outside Governor Andrew Cuomo's office on the eviction moratorium on...
    The Department of Justice on Friday said former President Trump’s tax returns must be released by the IRS to the House Ways and Means Committee. The DOJ's Office of Legal Counsel said the committee – which first requested the returns over two years ago – showed "sufficient reasons" to validate its bid to review the former president’s taxes. FORMER TRUMP ADVISER TOM BARRACK RELEASED ON $250M BAIL "The Chairman of the House Ways and Means Committee has invoked sufficient reasons for requesting the former President’s tax information," Dawn Johnsen, acting assistant attorney general wrote in an opinion Friday. "Under section 6103(f)(1), Treasury must furnish the information to the Committee." The Office of Legal Counsel argued that when a congressional committee requests access to a president’s tax returns, "the executive branch should conclude that the request lacks a legitimate legislative purpose only in exceptional circumstances." The opinion by the DOJ is a reversal of stance from the Trump administration’s 2019 judgment, which alleged the congressional committee lacked legitimate justification for reviewing the tax returns. Ways and Means Committee Chairman Richard Neal, D-Mass., applauded...
    Former U.S. President Donald Trump leaves Trump Tower in Manhattan on July 19, 2021 in New York City.James Devaney | GC Images | Getty Images The income tax returns of former President Donald Trump can be released by the IRS to Congress, the Department of Justice said Friday. The DOJ's Office of Legal Counsel said that Congess had made a legitimate request to see Trump's tax returns. This is breaking news. Please check back for updates.
    Five retired Navy SEALS are running for Republican seats in the House of Representatives in a collective effort to get more veterans in Congress.  Retired SEALs Brady Duke (R-Fla.), Derrick Van Orden (R-Wis.), Eli Crane (R-Ariz.), Morgan Luttrell (R-Texas) and Ryan Zinke (R-Mt.) joined Fox News’ Steve Doocy on "Fox & Friends" to discuss why they are running and what they plan to accomplish. Ryan Zinke, the former interior secretary, plans to address the division in America. SEN. KENNEDY: IF PARTISANSHIP WERE AN OLYMPIC SPORT, PELOSI WOULD TAKE HOME THE GOLD "A lot of my friends say, ‘look, the U.S. is falling apart. It can't be fixed.’ It certainly can be fixed," he said. "There’s no one better in crisis than SEALs Special Forces. We're going to win, and we're going to save America." When asked why he wants to run for Congress, 14-year military veteran Morgan Luttrell said, "I don’t." "It's just most certainly out of necessity," Luttrell said. "We have to bring our country back to center. That's why we're all running, because we believe so much in...
    The Biden administration is calling on Congress to extend pandemic protections for renters facing eviction past the end of this week, arguing that it is unable to do so on its own after the Supreme Court signaled it could only be extended until the end of the month. The White House said President Joe Biden would have liked to extend the federal eviction moratorium due to the spread of the highly contagious Delta variant of the coronavirus. Instead, Biden called on "Congress to extend the eviction moratorium to protect such vulnerable renters and their families without delay." The moratorium was put in place last September by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and has been extended several times since then. "Given the recent spread of the Delta variant, including among those Americans both most likely to face evictions and lacking vaccinations, President Biden would have strongly supported a decision by the CDC to further extend this eviction moratorium to protect renters at this moment of heightened vulnerability," the White House said in a statement. "Unfortunately, the Supreme...
    When Luis Grijalva finished second in the men's 5,000-meter final at the NCAA track and field championships earlier this summer, he thought he had finally overcome every obstacle to make it to the Tokyo Olympics. But then he realized one major problem — he wasn't allowed to leave the U.S.  Grijalva, a track star at Northern Arizona University, earned a personal best of 13:13:14 during that race, fast enough to qualify to represent his home country, Guatemala, at this year's Games. But as a recipient of Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, better known as DACA, he cannot leave the country.  In most circumstances, recipients of DACA — an Obama-era policy to protect hundreds of thousands of immigrants who came to the U.S. when they were kids — are not permitted to return if they leave the U.S. But Grijalva has spent weeks petitioning the government to make an exception for his Olympic debut.  Luis Grijalva at the Division I Men's and Women's Cross Country Championships held at the OSU Cross Country Course on March 15, 2021, in Stillwater, Oklahoma. Shane...
    President Joe Biden urged Democrats and Republicans to unite on the House select committee to investigate the Jan. 6 Capitol Hill riot during a town hall event Wednesday night in Cincinnati, Ohio.  'I don't care if you think I'm Satan reincarnated,' Biden said during the event televised on CNN. 'The fact is you can't look at that television and say nothing happened on the 6th. You can't listen to people who say this was a peaceful march.'  His comments came after Speaker Nancy Pelosi rejected two Republicans selected by House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy to serve on the committee because of their ties to former President Donald Trump. In response, McCarthy pulled all five Republican members from the committee, calling the investigation a 'sham.'  Biden addressed the need for Democrats and Republicans to work together and investigate the Jan. 6 Capitol Hill riots during a town hall event Wednesday in Cincinnati, Ohio CNN's Don Lemon, right, asked how can the parties unite amid constant clashes and the rise of partisanship During the Jan. 6 riot at the...
    A new report commissioned by four Republican members of Congress claims that the United States Navy is unfocused on warfighting. This isn’t the first time such a concern has reared its head, though the problem in this instance is uniquely ideological.
    A super PAC supporting President Biden warns that Democrats could face defeat in the 2022 midterm elections if they don't campaign more "aggressively" on Biden's policies.  A June strategy memo from Unite the Country, obtained by Politico, raised serious concerns that voters are virtually clueless about the successes so far under the Biden Administration. Democrats need to tout the $1.9 trillion coronavirus stimulus bill that Biden signed into law in March and do a better job selling the two infrastructure plans that Biden is currently trying to usher through Congress, the group says. "Even among voters who have a favorable view of Joe Biden, there is a real lack of information about the specifics of the Biden Agenda," the memo reads. VP HARRIS TALKS ABOUT MULTIPLE ASSIGNMENTS FROM BIDEN: 'MAYBE I DON'T SAY 'NO' ENOUGH' The party in power in the White House traditionally loses seats in Congress during the first midterm election. With Democrats holding the slimmest of majorities in both the House and Senate, Republicans were already optimistic about winning back power in Congress in 2022.  ...
    Anchiy | E+ | Getty Images Many people have hired a tax professional to make sure they do not run afoul of the IRS. But who is regulating those tax preparers? You may be surprised to find out there are few government controls in place. Now, a bill that was just reintroduced in Congress last week — the Taxpayer Protection and Preparer Proficiency Act — aims to change that and allow the IRS to regulate these professionals. The bill, which was introduced by Reps. Jimmy Panetta, D-Calif., and Tom Rice, R-S.C., would put minimum competency standards in place that tax preparers would have to meet. More from Personal Finance:How to spend smarter as consumer prices rise More people plan to quit rather than return to the office How to disaster-proof your personal finances That would include demonstrating they are able to prepare returns and process refunds, along with other criteria. Additionally, tax preparers would face continuing education requirements. Professionals who fall short of those requirements could have their preparer tax identification numbers, or PTINs, taken away by the IRS. The...
    The infrastructure talks roiling Washington may test a core conceit of President Joe Biden’s bid for the White House: His 36 years in the Senate uniquely prepared him to govern by cutting legislative deals across partisan lines. Lyndon Johnson’s tenure as Senate majority leader and vice president helped him shepherd the Great Society social welfare programs and stalled civil rights legislation through Congress. “I know the Senate and the House better than most of you know it,” Biden told reporters after announcing his support for the bipartisan infrastructure framework. “My whole life, that’s what I’ve done.” Johnson is still called the "master of the Senate." However, Biden has yet to flash a similar prowess. Presidential leadership through the executive branch during 24/7 news cycles is different than backroom Senate dealings. It didn’t take long after coming out for an agreed-upon bipartisan deal for Biden to illuminate these differences. BIDEN MAY HAVE OUTSMARTED HIMSELF ON INFRASTRUCTURE “If this is the only thing that comes to me, I’m not signing it,” Biden said of the bipartisan infrastructure deal. “It’s in tandem.”...
    (CNN)By the standards Democratic Sens. Joe Manchin and Kyrsten Sinema have set for federal action on voting rights, the 14th and 15th amendments to the Constitution -- two pillars of the post-Civil War effort to ensure equality for all Americans -- would never have become law.Every Democrat in Congress at the time voted against both the 14th Amendment, which sought to guarantee all Americans (including the freed slaves) equal treatment under the law, and the 15th Amendment (which attempted to ensure the freed slaves the right to vote). Yet, despite that opposition, the Abraham Lincoln-era Republican Party considered the amendments so critical to expunging the legacy of slavery and creating a new national floor of civil rights for all Americans that they muscled them through Congress with barely any dissenting votes from their members in each chamber.Today, by insisting on preserving the filibuster, Manchin, Sinema (and perhaps some other less visible Democrats) are, in effect, declaring that Washington should not act to protect voting rights against the restrictive laws advancing across red states unless 10 Senate Republicans agree to do...
    (CNN)In late 2008, while on a popular dating site, I received a message in my inbox from a good-looking, dark-haired man with gorgeous blue eyes saying, "Hi, how are you?" I responded, and before I knew it, we were chatting regularly for weeks. He told me that he used to be in the Air National Guard, was originally from New Jersey, and was nearing the end of his training to be a US Capitol Police Officer. It was Brian D. Sicknick.When we finally were ready to meet for our first date, he made an odd request. Meet for breakfast? I came to learn that breakfast was his favorite meal of the day, particularly blueberry pancakes. Brian was very quiet, shy almost, and had an innocence about him that was incredibly endearing. We bonded over our love of animals, our military experience, and our passion for helping others -- he as an officer, me as a clinical social worker. Soon, we moved in together — for 11 years, through the good, the bad and the ugly, the belly laughs, birthdays, Thanksgivings,...
    The internet has been a great unifier, enabling people to join others around the globe in pursuit of common interests. And now, the internet’s largest platform operators — Facebook, Amazon, Apple and Google — are uniting Democrats and Republicans on the House antitrust subcommittee in pursuit of their common interest: reining in Big Tech’s power. Members of the subcommittee on Friday introduced five bills, each with bipartisan co-sponsors, that aim to bar platform operators from using those platforms to benefit their other businesses and to increase competition in their markets. They zero in on some of the biggest problems these companies pose, but their proposed fixes are partial at best — not surprising, given that they look at the companies through the lens of antitrust policy. For example, nothing in the bills would address the thorny speech-related issues raised by lawmakers on both sides of the aisle — the complaints by Republicans that the platforms are censoring conservatives (a bias that some researchers have refuted) and by Democrats that the platforms aren’t doing enough to stop the spread of misinformation...
    The same senators also defended former President Donald Trump over his illegal blocking of funding for aid to Ukraine. Republican senators on Tuesday angrily denounced a government agency's ruling that President Joe Biden acted legally when he froze funds for his predecessor's border wall project. But they defended then-President Donald Trump when he was impeached on counts that included illegally freezing funds for the Ukraine. Shelley Moore Capito of West Virginia and Richard Shelby of Alabama released a statement accusing the Government Accountability Office, the nonpartisan investigative arm of Congress, of using a double standard. "GAO's decision today makes clear that there are two sets of rules when it comes to executing funds appropriated by Congress: one for Democrat administrations and one for Republican administrations," the statement reads. "The decision splits hairs to justify actions that, just two years ago, were determined to be contrary to 'the faithful execution of the law.'" "We hope our colleagues in Congress recognize this overreach by the executive branch and don't excuse it just...
    Regulation of e-cigarettes by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) can continue after the Supreme Court declined to hear a case on Monday that would have limited the government's authority to oversee the vaping industry. The appeal from Big Times Vapes Inc, a Mississippi vape shop, centers around the 2009 Tobacco Control Act (TCA), in which Congress gave the FDA broad authority to regulate tobacco products. This allowed the federal agency to restrict ingredients, block the sales of certain products and limit advertising. In 2016, the FDA said it would start regulating e-cigarettes, vape pens, cigars and hookah because, under federal law they were all classified as 'tobacco products.' Big Time Vapes argued that Congress had violated the U.S. Constitution by giving the FDA such sweeping power.  Big Times Vapes Inc, a Mississippi vape shop, filed an appeal before the Supreme Court arguing that Congress violated the Constitution by giving the FDA power to regulate the vaping industry, but the high court rejected the case (file image) 'The authority to decide the circumstances under which a given activity...
    REUTERS/Adam BettcherMinneapolis police officers shown gathered around the Third Precinct during a protest on May 27, 2020.Since the rise of the Black Lives Matter movement and massive protests in 2020 in response to the murder of George Floyd, there has been widespread interest in the problems of racism in American policing. Whether calls for reform or for wholesale defunding of police departments, there appears to be substantial appetite for change. Just past the first anniversary of George Floyd’s killing, people are looking to the federal government to address this issue of national importance. Article continues after advertisement But as a law professor who studies policing and constitutional law, I have seen how essential local and state reform efforts are, because the federal government has limited power to regulate policing. With few notable exceptions, the Constitution does not allow the federal government to control state or local government agencies. In accordance with federalism, a core principle that underlies the organization of American government, the federal government has only the powers expressly provided to it in the Constitution. For example, Congress...
    More On: ufos Whistleblower threatens run for Congress if Pentagon UFO report watered down Harvard scientist advocates for more funding into alien life, UFO research Long-awaited Pentagon UFO report could be released as soon as Tuesday Astrophysicist explains why UFO videos fail to impress him The truth is out there, but it might not be in this report. The US intelligence community has not found evidence that unexplained aerial phenomena seen by Navy pilots are from outer space, but they can’t rule out the possibility or explain the mysterious vehicles, said officials who viewed a classified version of a report to Congress detailing everything the government knows about UFOs. The report said most of the more than 120 UFO incidents examined over the past two decades were not the work of the US military or government, officials said, according to The New York Times. The explanation means that the military eyewitnesses who encountered UFOs on an almost “daily basis,” off the coast of California in 2017, and shot footage that was verified by defense officials, were not seeing programs the US...
    (CNN)President Joe Biden on Tuesday laid out his most comprehensive plan yet for shrinking the nation's longstanding racial wealth gap, the latest step in his promise to infuse more equity in government policies and in the rebuilding of the economy after the coronavirus pandemic. Some measures -- including changes to deal with housing discrimination and directing federal support to small businesses -- he can take on his own, but many of his proposals require congressional approval that could be very tough to secure.That includes pouring tens of billions of dollars into communities of color to improve transportation infrastructure, develop more neighborhood amenities, build and rehabilitate affordable housing and support small businesses. All of these proposals are contained in Biden's massive infrastructure package, called the American Jobs Act. That package has run into trouble in Congress, with members of both parties concerned about its roughly $2 trillion size -- as well as about the corporate tax increases that would be used to pay for it. The White House is currently negotiating with a group of Republicans in hopes of finding agreement...
    Loading the player... A group of dozens of congressional scholars sent a letter to the U.S. Congress imploring and advising them to use its authority to make the District of Columbia the nation’s 51st state. Its 39 signatories — which include renowned professors from Harvard Law, UC Berkeley Law and University of Michigan Law School — assert that “As scholars of the United States Constitution, we write to correct claims that the D.C. Admission Act is vulnerable to a constitutional challenge in the courts.” A protester rallies in March in support of District of Columbia statehood near the U.S. Capitol. Washington D.C. has a population of nearly 700,000 residents with zero congressional representation. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images) They add that there is “no constitutional barrier” to D.C. “entering the Union through a congressional proclamation, pursuant to the Constitution’s Admissions Clause, just like the 37 other states that have been admitted since the Constitution was adopted.” The Washington D.C. Admission Act, HR 51, was introduced in January of 2021 and passed the House of Representatives on April 22. If...
    PARENTS can receive their $3,600 child tax credit aid in one lump sum rather than monthly payments. Americans who would prefer to cash in the large check all at once can receive it with their 2022 tax refund. 2Parents can get their check in one lump sumCredit: Getty Once the IRS opens its portal on July 1, people can change their preferences of how often they receive the cash. For those who have had a baby this year or have gained a qualified dependent, the portal will also give you the option of adding this in to receive the correct amount of cash. However, if you do not update your information and file your taxes before May 17, then you will automatically be set to receive the monthly checks. Families who qualify for the credit can receive $3,600 for children 5 and under, $3,000 for children under the age of 17, and may qualify for a partial payment for those older than 17. President Joe Biden has expressed that he would like to extend the child tax credit as part of...
    Majorie Taylor Greene has blasted her colleagues in Congress, claiming the country is 'crumbling' because of the government's gross mismanagement.  The Georgia Rep. made the remarks during an interview on Tucker Carlson Today Wednesday, adding that she is 'disgusted' by the way Congress 'wastes' taxpayers' money.  'This is a system that is severely failing the American people and the American people don't know how bad it is,' Greene declared.  The outspoken Republican not only took aim at her Democrat rivals, she also blasted fellow members of the GOP.  'Republican voters and donors are sick and tired and fed up with weak Republicans that never accomplish what they claim they're going to do,' Greene stated, without naming specific people.  Fox News Privacy Policy Majorie Taylor Greene blasted her colleagues in Congress during an interview on Tucker Carlson Today Wednesday Greene - who was elected last November - revealed she decided to run for office because she was 'so angry' with Republicans for not taking bold action after Trump's win back in 2016.  'We had a Republican-controlled House and Senate...
    House Energy and Commerce Committee Chairman Frank Pallone (D-N.J.) on Tuesday said he would use “whatever vehicle I can” to pass the Democrats’ drug pricing bill, known as H.R.3, that would allow the federal government to negotiate for decreased prices on behalf of Medicare.  Pallone joined health advocates from Protect Our Care New Jersey in calling for Congress to move forward with H.R.3, or the Elijah E. Cummings Lower Drug Costs Now Act, to reduce prescription drug prices.  “The problem is that you have millions of Americans right now who can’t afford their medicines and at the same time drug companies are making huge profits, and it’s just not fair,” Pallone said during a press conference.  The press conference comes after President BidenJoe BidenGarland to emphasize national security, civil rights in first congressional appearance as attorney general Afghan president: 'Critically important' for US, NATO to fulfill security funding commitments Schumer 'exploring' passing immigration unilaterally if talks unravel MORE’s administration unveiled its $1.8 trillion American Families Plan proposal last week, which did not include the Democrats’ drug pricing measure. Pallone, along...
    Third-term North Carolina Rep. Ted Budd is no 'outsider.' Rep. Ted Budd (R-NC) is running for his party's nomination for an open Senate seat as a self-proclaimed "outsider." But already his campaign is heavily fueled by the insiders he claims cannot buy him. The three-term representative announced last Wednesday that he will run for the seat of retiring Republican Sen. Richard Burr in 2022. "I am a political outsider who can't be bought by the swamp and I don't give a rip about their Washington game," he said in his kickoff video. "I've shoveled a lot of manure on my family's farm, and it's not the dirtiest job I've had now that I've been in Congress." He vowed to be a "liberal agenda crusher." But a review of his campaign's first-quarter financial filings with the Federal Election Commission conducted American Bridge 21st Century, a Democratic opposition research organization based in Washington, D.C., casts doubt on that claim of independence from powerful monied interests. The review finds that this year alone...
    Politicians and pundits from both parties are tearing into President Joe Biden's massive spending proposals as questions arise over how the president plans to pay for it all. 'The words of this speech sounded like what you would hear from a 15-year-old if you gave him a credit card with no credit limit on it,' former New Jersey Governor Chris Christie said Wednesday night during a discussion on ABC News. 'Except the words came out of the mouth of an adult who should know better,' the Republican added. Biden unveiled in his first address to a joint session of Congress Wednesday evening yet another multi-trillion-dollar plan – this time aimed at 'human infrastructure' or economic and social welfare plans. Senator Joe Manchin, a centrist Democrat who could derail any Biden proposal, said he isn't super 'comfortable' with the price tag of Biden's new plan. 'It's a lot of money, a lot of money,' the West Virginia senator told reporters on Capitol Hill after the speech. 'That makes you very uncomfortable.' 'We're at $28.2 trillion now, debt, so you have to...
    PRESIDENT Biden will deliver his first address to Congress since taking office. The speech is not a State of the Union because presidents don't deliver the address until their second year as president. 3President Joe Biden will address CongressCredit: Getty When is President Biden's first speech to Congress? President Biden will deliver his speech on Wednesday, April 28, 2021. Earlier this year, Biden made it clear that he would not deliver his speech on his presidential policy goals until the coronavirus relief package was passed. Once the package was passed and vaccinations began to roll out across the United States, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi invited Biden to address Congress. 3Biden will deliver his first address to Congress on April 28, 2021Credit: Reuters “Nearly 100 days ago, when you took the oath of office, you pledged in a spirit of great hope that ‘Help Is On The Way’. Now, because of your historic and transformative leadership, Help Is Here!” Ms Pelosi wrote. “In that spirit, I am writing to invite you to address a Joint Session of Congress on Wednesday,...
    (CNN)President Joe Biden said Wednesday he views the challenges ahead of the country as a question of whether democracy can succeed in the 21st century.Speaking in the afternoon as he approached his 100th day in office, and just hours before his first address to a joint session of Congress, Biden said this moment in time is pivotal.Bidens First 100 Days Biden's moved fast since his swearing-in. Here's an interactive look at what he's gotten done. Majority of Americans approve of Biden and his priorities in first 100 days, a new CNN poll finds. This is how the Biden presidency looks from one pivotal Pennsylvania county, 100 days in. "They're going to write about this point in history," Biden told a small group of network and cable news anchors assembled at the White House. "Not about any of us in here, but about whether or not democracy can function in the 21st century."Biden continued, "You know, things are moving so damn rapidly. Things are changing so rapidly in the world, in science and technology and a whole range of other...
    Since Joe Biden was sworn in as president, Democrats have taken advantage of their narrow majority in Congress and their control of the White House to ram through a radical agenda. From passing a $2 trillion socialist “stimulus” bill under the guise of pandemic relief, to enacting a flurry of job-killing executive orders, President Biden and his leftist allies in the House and Senate have abandoned their talking points urging “unity” in favor of pushing partisan legislation. The policies promoted by Democrats in the few months have been extraordinarily destructive. President Biden and his allies have shown themselves to be catastrophically wrong on every important issue, ranging from tax policy to climate change, and Republicans can learn some crucial lessons from how the far left has governed. It’s clear that Democrats are attempting to consolidate as much power in the hands of the federal government as possible — a goal antithetical to protecting individual liberty and the Constitution. While some of this change can be undone if Republicans regain their congressional majority, we know all too well that the GOP...
    Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez said Friday she likely won’t be able to attend President Biden’s first address to Congress next week because of COVID safety restrictions in place in the House chamber. Ocasio-Cortez, during a virtual town hall meeting, said House leadership and the most senior members of Congress will get first dibs to be in the chamber for Biden’s Wednesday night speech– and the second-termer representing portions of The Bronx and Congress won’t make the cut. “I would love to attend the joint address. Unfortunately there are very strict COVID provisions that the House has put in place,” Ocasio-Cortez said. “So, I do not believe I will be able to enter the chamber for the joint address.” The Democratic Socialist firebrand said because of the social distancing restrictions attendance will largely be limited to “senior members of House leadership” and Senate leaders. Only about 200 people will be in attendance, House of Representative officials told Bloomberg News. The House chamber has enough space to accommodate 1,100 people.
    House Budget Committee Chairman John Yarmuth (D-KY) said he is “not sure” Congress can pass a budget necessary for President Joe Biden’s infrastructure program during an interview with Punchbowl News Friday. Yarmuth said Biden’s $2.3 trillion infrastructure bill faces significant political headwinds. Democrats will likely pass the infrastructure bill using budgetary reconciliation with the fiscal year 2022 budget. Budgetary reconciliation allows Congress to pass a spending-related bill with only a simple majority in the Senate, not 60 voters. However, to use reconciliation, Congress must first pass a budget containing budgetary reconciliation instructions. Republicans used reconciliation to pass the Trump Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, and they wanted to use reconciliation to repeal parts of the Affordable Care Act (ACA). Democrats successfully used reconciliation to pass their partisan $1.9 trillion coronavirus bill early in the Biden administration. The Democrats’ headache arises because they have to pass a budget resolution both Yarmuth and Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-VT), the Senate Budget Committee chairman, agree to. Yarmuth said his budget resolution would likely not mirror Sanders’, meaning they would likely have to strike a compromise that...