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    (CNN)A Tennessee judge this week vacated the death sentences of Pervis Payne, who has spent more than three decades on death row for two murders he says he did not commit, due to the inmate's intellectual disability. As a result, Payne now faces two life sentences, though it remains to be decided whether he will serve them concurrently or consecutively. "Thirty-four years of trauma and pain and fear just released themselves in that courtroom," Payne's attorney, Supervisory Assistant Federal Public Defender Kelley Henry, said in an interview Friday, describing the moments before Tuesday's hearing when Payne wept as he hugged her. "It was really just an astounding moment for all of us," she said. Pervis Payne, center, hugs his attorney, Kelley Henry, before a court hearing on Tuesday, November 23, 2021, in Memphis, Tennessee.Payne maintains he is innocent of the 1987 murders of 28-year-old Charisse Christopher and her 2-year-old daughter, who were fatally stabbed in an attack at their apartment in Millington, a Memphis suburb. Payne received two death sentences after being convicted on two counts of first-degree murder, as...
    President BidenJoe BidenBiden to meet House Dems before Europe trip: report 21 House Democrats call for removing IRS bank reporting proposal from spending bill Overnight Health Care — Presented by Altria — Vulnerable House Dems push drug pricing plan MORE announced on Thursday that he has appointed Sara Minkara to serve as U.S. special adviser on international disability rights. The senior-level position, which is housed within the State Department, is meant to lead the U.S.’s strategy when it comes to promoting and protecting the rights of individuals with disabilities throughout the U.S. and in the department, according to a statement from the White House. Minkara, who lost her eyesight when she was seven years old, is the founder and a board member of Empowerment Through Integration, a nonprofit organization she founded when she was still an undergraduate student. The group, according to the White House, works to “disrupt the narrative surrounding disability through both empowering youth with disabilities individually and accelerating authentic inclusion globally.” Former President ObamaBarack Hussein ObamaBiden's finishing what Obama started with early learning Cotton tells Garland: 'Thank...
    A woman fired from her job for a medical disability is getting an overdue payday. TriMark Foodcraft, a commercial kitchen equipment corporation, is paying a former employee $25,000 to settle a disability discrimination lawsuit related to necessary medical equipment. The corporation will also modify its current anti-discrimination policy to include examples of job modifications for employees with disabilities under the Americans with Disabilities Act, according to the United States Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. EEOC's complaint alleges Jean S. Perry, the former employee, was hospitalized in December 2018 for breathing complications related to her disability. When she tried to return to work, she notified TriMark she needed to use a personal oxygen device while on the clock. TriMark then fired her, with the EEOC suing the corporation in response. MAINE LIBERAL ARTS COLLEGE PROHIBITS CASTE-BASED DISCRIMINATION "This settlement represents a step forward in ensuring that the dream of equal opportunity in the workplace is realized by all employees regardless of their protected status," EEOC District Director Thomas Colclough said. "I applaud TriMark in taking this step...
    2019 Atlanta Jingle Bell Run Team, Wilsey Warriors The 2021 Jingle Bell Run for arthritis is bringing holiday cheer to Atlanta on December 11th with the goal of raising $120,000 this year. As almost 1,000 people gather at Brook Run Park to join the movement to conquer arthritis, this annual, holiday-themed 5K run participants to dress in festive costumes and get moving to raise awareness and funds to cure America’s #1 cause of disability. Taking place in more than 100 cities nationwide, the Arthritis Foundation’s Jingle Bell Run benefits the more than 54 million Americans (1 in 4 adults), including 300,000 children (1 in every 250), living with arthritis every day. From funding cutting-edge research for new treatments and ultimately a cure, to advocating for health care access, the Arthritis Foundation helps those living with arthritis score everyday victories, one step at a time. “Jingle Bell Run is a 37 year tradition in Atlanta and known nationally as the original festive race for charity,” said Carrie Mapp, Arthritis Foundation Georgia Associate Director. “Our honorees and volunteers are what make this event successful and memorable every...
    PALO ALTO, Calif. (KGO) -- It's another typical day in Palo Alto. Get your favorite coffee, cookie or sandwich.But it's not your typical café. Behind the mask and smile is someone unique. Someone who has a disability.It all started with a vision. Kathleen Foley-Hughes, a wife and mother of four."Our mission is to hire adults with disabilities to provide them training and to elevate them," said Kathleen Hughes, founder and owner of Ada's Café. "We have folks on our staff that have down syndrome, Autism spectrum disorders, traumatic brain injury.""I've been working here at Ada's café for almost seven years," said Todd Cerf."We knew when Todd was very little, we knew he had some issues but we didn't know what they were," said Emmylou Cerf, mother of Ada's employee, Todd Cerf. "Finally, when he was 12, he was diagnosed with Asperger's.""I have Asperger's syndrome as my disability," Todd said."When Todd was diagnosed, we took him to a reputable place, they told 'we're sorry to tell you this, but your son isn't going to develop really well. In fact, the best...
    LONG BEACH, Calif. (KABC) -- Melissa Bauguess has been working at Handel's Homemade Ice Cream in Long Beach for a year."Awesome. I love this work so much," said Bauguess, a Handel's employee.Bauguess is 32 and has Down Syndrome."She's just fun, and funny, and vivacious, and sweet and kind of a lot of fun to be around," said Gayle Godana, Bauguess's mom.Godana says Bauguess didn't have a job in quite a while.To help her daughter find a job, Gayle registered her with the ICAN California Abilities Network.It's a nonprofit that empowers people with disabilities to get careers in their community."The unemployment rate for people with disabilities is about 82% and so societally, there is a sense of misunderstanding of what they can achieve and what they can become in this world. Everyone deserves to have a meaningful life producing and being a part of the work force," said Scott Elliot, executive director of ICAN.In order to find Bauguess a job, ICAN asked her what she loved and she said ice cream."I love it here so much because I break Oreos," Bauguess...
    Twelve disability ambassadors have completed a zero-gravity flight 32,000ft above Earth as part of an initiative to advance disability inclusion in space. The crew, who have mobility, vision and hearing disabilities, experienced weightlessness and carried out a series of tests in an effort to better understand how spacesuits and space vessels can be made more accessible. They included scientists, veterans, engineers and artists. Twelve disability ambassadors have completed a zero-gravity flight 32,000ft above Earth as part of an initiative to advance disability inclusion in space. Centra Mazyck, an Army veteran and former Paralympian, is pictured floating during a weightless parabola The 12 ambassadors in front of 'G-Force One'. From left to right, back row: Mary Cooper, Cheri Wells-Jensen, Eric Shear, Apurva Varia, Sina Bahram, Zuby Onwuta, Mona Minkara and Viktoria Modesta. Front row: Sawyer Rosenstein, Dana Bolles, Eric Ingram and Centra Mazyck What is AstroAccess?  AstroAccess is an initiative dedicated to advancing disability inclusion in space exploration. On Sunday, a group of disabled scientists, veterans, students, athletes, and artists took part in a parabolic flight with the Zero Gravity Corporation...
    MORE than half of Americans have encountered some form of discrimination against people with disabilities, according to new research. A new survey reveals that out of 2,000 respondents, only 43 percent said they’ve never witnessed any examples of a disabled person being discriminated against. 3Over 56 percent of Americans have witnessed discrimination against someone with a disabilityCredit: Getty 3Not many people are involved in efforts to make things easier for disabled peopleCredit: Getty Meanwhile, 56 percent said they’ve seen discrimination taking place, most frequently at restaurants (30 percent), malls or stores (27 percent), and public transport (24 percent). But despite these sobering numbers, most Americans think the country is becoming more inclusive towards people with disabilities. The survey was conducted by OnePoll on behalf of Morgan’s Inclusion Initiative, a 501 c3 nonprofit dedicated to creating places for people of all abilities. Results found that only 28 percent of respondents are involved with a local disability advocacy group in their community – and out of those who aren’t, 24 percent cited a lack of personal connection to the issue. When there is...
    DENVER (CBS4) — A pair of artists proudly unveiled their new mural on Saturday morning to a captivated crowd. They are using their art to bring awareness to National Disability Employment Awareness Month in October. “Our hearts are overjoyed,” Chloé Duplessis told CBS4’s Mekialaya White. Her partner in the project, Valerie Rose, translated alongside her in American Sign Language. READ MORE: Police: Stolen Vehicle Ran Down Man, People Inside It Then Kidnapped Him (credit: CBS) The two artists with Denver ties couldn’t imagine a better time to debut their creation. They know the struggles of navigating disability first-hand. Duplessis is legally blind, and Rose is half-deaf. Their mural, now on display, is called “Holding Hope.” “We have work to do for marginalized communities, but we can do it, and we’re holding out for that,” said Duplessis. The artists’ journey to complete the mural has spanned about two months. “It’s been extraordinary. From the first day when we were sharing our intentions for the mural people were like, ‘That blesses me. Thank you.’ Or ‘I have a loved one who...
    A new study confirms that people who stutter don't do so when they believe they are alone. The phenomenon — referred to as the 'talk-alone-effect' — has been referenced anecdotally before, but never supported by scientific evidence, 'mainly because it's difficult to create conditions in which people believe that they are truly alone,' New York University speech expert Eric Jackson said in a statement. Jackson and a team of researchers came up with a novel approach to overcome that obstacle: they asked two dozen volunteers with stutters to complete a challenging computer-programming task and told them that people who talked to themselves during it performed better.   The team then observed the participants when they thought no one was listening, as well as during conversational speech, spontaneous speech, reading aloud and when repeating their private speech for two listeners. The private speech condition was the only time in which stuttering was almost completely absent. According to Jackson, the perception of being heard by a listener plays a key role in whether a person stutters. Scroll down for video Researchers at...
    Missouri Democratic lawmakers have joined the chorus of voices urging Gov. Mike Parson to stop the upcoming execution of a death row inmate missing a fifth of his brain and widely believed to be intellectually disabled. “The fact of the matter is that these death sentences are not about justice,” Reps. Emanuel Cleaver (D-MO) and Cori Bush (D-MO) wrote in a letter to Parson about the imminent execution of Ernest Lee Johnson, per the Kansas City Star. “They are about who has institutional power and who doesn’t. Like slavery and lynching did before it, the death penalty perpetuates cycles of trauma, violence and state-sanctioned murder in Black and brown communities.” Johnson is scheduled to die by lethal injection at the state prison in Bonne Terre on Tuesday evening. He was convicted of first-degree murder in 1995 for killing three employees of a convenience store—46-year-old Mary Bratcher, 57-year-old Mable Scruggs, and 58-year-old Fred Jones—with a claw hammer. Prosecutors said he was trying to score money for drugs. Johnson’s planned execution has sparked protests from critics who say it would be...
    Advocates of persons with disabilities have warned of “plummeting” numbers of people with Down syndrome because they are being systematically eliminated through abortion, the Daily Telegraph reported Friday. “In countries where early screening is routinely offered, almost all women opt to abort the affected unborn baby and try again,” states the article’s author, Lois Rogers. “The global Down’s syndrome population is therefore plummeting.” While well-known utilitarians like Peter Singer and Richard Dawkins insist that mothers should abort their children with disabilities or genetic anomalies and “try again,” other bioethicists disagree, Rogers observes. “It is extraordinary that instead of supporting our fellow human beings with Down’s syndrome, and their parents, unconditionally, we are inviting their parents to end their lives,” said Dr. Helen Watts of the Anscombe Bioethics Centre. Pope Francis has advanced the cause for the canonization of Jérôme Lejeune, a French pro-life scientist best known for his groundbreaking work on Down syndrome. https://t.co/zojvmocnEL — Breitbart News (@BreitbartNews) January 25, 2021 “The absence from our community of people with Down’s syndrome leaves those individuals who do succeed in being born with...
    U.S. adults with disabilities are less likely to have been vaccinated against COVID-19 despite being more likely to say they want the shots, a new report finds. Researchers from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) compared disabled over-18s to able-bodied adults. They found that those with disabilities were twice as likely to say they would definitely get vaccinated and more likely to say the vaccines offered protection - but they were less likely to have received at least one vaccine dose. Disabled adults reported challenges including difficulty scheduling an appointment online, not knowing where to go to get vaccinated and difficulty getting to a vaccination site.    The CDC team says the findings show that more effort needs to be made when it comes to reducing barriers such as scheduling and making vaccination sites accessible to increase immunization rates among the disabled population.   A new CDC study found disabled adults were less likely to have received at least one COVID-19 vaccine dose compared to able bodies adults. Pictured: Everlean Jackson, 75, pushes her husband Elton in his wheelchair on arrival for...
    VIDEO2:3202:32Why disability inclusion is good for a company's bottom lineFinding Solutions Ted Kennedy Jr., co-chair of the Disability Equality Index and board member of the American Association of People with Disabilities, told CNBC that companies' changing views toward remote-working and hybrid-working following the Covid-19 pandemic will allow more people with disabilities to enter the labor force. The Disability Equality Index in the U.S. describes itself as the leading corporate benchmarking tool which measures and discloses participating company's efforts in disability inclusion. "Hybrid work and remote work are just a couple of the accommodations that many people with disabilities have been asking for. So, we think that companies' views now of remote work will allow more people with disabilities to enter the labor force," he said. "It will make it easier for them to accommodate somebody, for example, with a mobility impairment for whom it is difficult to travel to and from work ... Many employers are now looking, because of the tight labor market, are looking to this great untapped labor pool of people with disabilities," he continued. Over 1...
    Chris Cummins  Two weeks before voters decide whether to remove Gov. Gavin Newsom, a second round of stimulus payments is landing in the bank accounts of Californians who make less than $75,000 per year — with one glaring carve-out. To get the money, you must have earned income last year — for example, from work, interest, rental income or private pensions — and filed tax returns. That excludes potentially hundreds of thousands of low-income retirees, veterans and disabled Californians who receive government benefits and do not work. They live on fixed incomes — and they’re asking why they were left out. Nearly 700 people have signed a petition to urge Newsom to send the benefit to people on Social Security Disability Insurance. More than 60 elderly and disabled readers have contacted CalMatters to express their frustration. In interviews and emails, 13 of them said that being left out of the Golden State Stimulus has caused them to doubt Newsom’s leadership if they didn’t already. “I’m very upset at him for that,” said Chris Cummins, 64, who rents a house...
    Cheryl Drymon, 72, has been using mobility aids for four years. It started when she tore her Achilles tendon and then her meniscus. Now she has trouble with tasks like getting in and out of a car. After learning about disabled seniors who died in 2018’s Paradise fire, the Santa Monica resident fears that when the Big One strikes, she’ll be forgotten. For those dependent on medications or who need mobility assistance like Drymon, evacuating at a moment’s notice or stockpiling supplies can be complicated. Everyone should have certain supplies on hand, but a person with a disability will have to customize emergency kits, evacuation plans and recovery models to their individual needs. Here’s how to start. Something for everyone There are things everyone can do, no matter their ability or needs, said Ted Horton-Billard III, through an ASL interpreter. Horton-Billard is the disaster management coordinator for the Disability Community Resource Center. Unshaken Earthquakes are a fact of life in Southern California. Here’s what you need to know. This article is part of the...
    The world of cinema is a dream for many, and on several occasions it would seem that this goal is not made for everyone. Although there are always obstacles in the way and for some it is more difficult to get there than for others, there are people who have shown that anything is possible. In recent years the word “inclusion” has made enough echo in the film industry, especially when it comes to race or gender, but it has also become a controversial term because of how forced these stories tend to seem, and more so when an existing character undergoes major changes. Keep reading: Candyman already has a critical rating But on the inclusion of actors with disabilities it still seems something that has not been given enough attention, and it is a sensitive issue. For performers with a physical or mental disability, getting an important role would seem impossible by industry standards. At times, some filmmakers have made the decision to put neurotypical actors, for example, to play characters who live with the autism spectrum, and their...
    The world of cinema is a dream for many, and on several occasions it would seem that this goal is not made for everyone. Although there are always obstacles in the way and for some it is more difficult to get there than for others, there are people who have shown that anything is possible. In recent years the word “inclusion” has made enough echo in the film industry, especially when it comes to race or gender, but it has also become a controversial term because of how forced these stories tend to seem, and more so when an existing character undergoes major changes. Keep reading: Candyman already has a critical rating But on the inclusion of actors with disabilities it still seems something that has not been given enough attention, and it is a sensitive issue. For performers with a physical or mental disability, getting an important role would seem impossible by industry standards. At times, some filmmakers have made the decision to put neurotypical actors, for example, to play characters who live with the autism spectrum, and their...
    These USB-C Wall Chargers Will Bring Your Devices Back to Life Quickly Clevelands Triston McKenzie on IL with shoulder fatigue Anne Mensah U.K. public service broadcaster BBC and Netflix have formed a partnership to develop and fund “new, ambitious dramas” featuring disabled creatives both in front of and behind the camera. The five-year collaboration is designed “to increase representation of disabled talent both on-screen and off-screen, to widen the range of stories produced and give disabled writers and creatives greater choice when it comes to the sort of stories they wish to tell.” The partners said they would consider projects from U.K. producers that have been created or co-created by writers who identify as deaf, disabled and/or neurodivergent. “Pitches can draw imaginatively on any genre, precinct or world,” they said. “We are looking for ideas which feel ambitious and elevated, and which challenge the limits that the industry might unconsciously put on disability. The intention of the partnership is to firmly place the shows alongside our most talked about and original dramas already being developed.” All projects will be...
    NEW YORK (CBSNewYork) — Disability advocates rallied Tuesday at MTA headquarters, calling for the suspension of shared rides on Access-A-Ride. Shared rides were suspended in March 2020 due to the pandemic, but earlier this summer, the MTA announced they would return on July 6. READ MORE: New Jersey Poison Control Center Warns Parents, Pet Owners To Keep An Eye Out For Poisonous Wild Mushrooms The agency said in part that shared rides help “fully meet trip demand for all customers at all times.” Opponents to the move say this puts disabled riders’ health at risk. READ MORE: CDC Investigating Series Of Salmonella Outbreaks Tied To Italian-Style Meats “Many of us are immunocompromised, and we’re at a great risk of contracting COVID-19 and the Delta variant, assuming we’re able to be vaccinated in the first place,” said Jessica de la Rosa, with the Brooklyn Center for Independence of the Disabled. In a statement Tuesday, the MTA’s chief accessibility officer says measures are being taken to keep customers safe when using Access-A-Ride. MORE NEWS: Phil Murphy Signs Anti-Hazing Law Named For Timothy...
    G-7 grapples with Afghanistan, an afterthought not long ago Indian Kashmir: Police kill top commander and deputy of militant group I adore travelling. For me, there’s no better feeling than sitting down, opening a book and being whisked off to another part of the country, or the world. Load Error As a comedian, it’s safe to say that I do my fair share of moving about, whether that’s on a train around the UK to do a gig a hundred miles away from my house, or flying 6,000 miles to Tokyo to report on the Paralympics (which I did, a few days ago!). However, sometimes travel isn’t straightforward. I have cerebral palsy, which affects my speech and mobility. Because of my disability, I can’t drive, and I find it difficult to walk long distances, so I have to rely on public transport a great deal. My personal experience of travelling with a disability, on the whole, has been a positive one. When I ask for help, I receive it without much fuss or hassle, and I love...
    This company manufactures prostheses for Paralympic athletes 3:59 (CNN Spanish) – If you continue to be nostalgic because the Olympic Games are over, it is time for you to leave it behind, because we are one day away from the start of the Tokyo 2020 Paralympic Games (2021). The opening ceremony of the Tokyo Paralympic Games will take place on Tuesday, August 24 at 07:00 am ET (6:00 am Mexico and Colombia time; 08:00 am Argentina time). From August 24 to September 5, you will be able to see the 162 delegations that go to Tokyo compete in 23 different sports. There will be a lot of competitions in those days and it can surely cause a bit of confusion as multiple categories are involved in each sport. And it is not only divided by categories in the Paralympic Games: there is also a wide diversity of disabilities that are taken into account for an athlete to compete. So that you can better understand the magnitude that this Olympic fair means, we leave you the following 6 points. Zion...
    ANNAPOLIS, Md. (WJZ) — Maryland is looking to hire its first statewide autism coordinator. The position within the Governor’s Office of Community Initiatives would work on services and programming for Marylanders with autism and caregivers. READ MORE: Vehicle Fire On Northbound I-895 Near Exit 11 Shuts Down All Lanes “Maryland is a leader in finding and promoting the ability within disability for our children and families, by providing support to those in our community who are addressing disability challenges every day,” Steven McAdams, the office’s director, said in a statement. “Children with autism are already accomplishing great things, and I’m proud to build on our state’s commitment through our first Autism Coordinator who will focus on this important issue for parents, children, and caregivers.” READ MORE: 27-Year-Old Travon Henderson Pleads Guilty To Drug Trafficking In Brooklyn Neighborbood The position was created under a bill Gov. Larry Hogan signed into law last year. The coordinator would be tasked with developing a plan to address autism-related needs in employment, housing, health care and training for first responders and criminal justice professionals. MORE NEWS:...
    Former Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe (D), who is running for governor again, disappeared abruptly from a virtual forum for the disabled community to make it to a campaign fundraiser on Thursday in Las Vegas with Nevada Gov. Steve Sisolak (D), who is accused of abusing his ex-wife. McAuliffe was supposed to participate on a Zoom call, hosted by the Arc of Northern Virginia, about disability issues alongside Virginia’s Republican gubernatorial candidate, Glenn Youngkin, and other statewide candidates. The Virginia Democrat, however, experienced a scheduling conflict between the forum for the disabled community and his Vegas event. An invitation obtained by Breitbart News revealed McAuliffe, a longtime Clinton ally and former chair of the Democratic National Committee, had a Thursday evening fundraiser to go to at an undisclosed location in Vegas. The fundraiser cost a minimum of $500 to attend as a guest and up to $5,000 to be a “sponsor.” Then-Sen. Hillary Clinton and then-campaign chairman Terry McAuliffe celebrate at Clinton’s primary election night celebration on May 13, 2008, in Charleston, West Virginia. (Robyn Beck/Getty Images). During the Zoom meeting, a clip of which...
    ESAs are tasked with providing comfort but not necessarily technical tasks. Samantha Crozier An emotional support dog provides comfort and companionship for its owner.  You can qualify for an ESA if you have anxiety, PTSD, cancer, epilepsy, diabetes, and more. ESAs are allowed to live with you despite "no pets" policies from buildings or landlords.  Visit Insider's Health Reference library for more advice. Business Insider: A daily selection of curated stories Loading Something is loading. Email address By clicking ‘Sign up’, you agree to receive marketing emails from Insider as well as other partner offers and accept our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Pets can be a source of immense comfort, but they can be especially helpful for people with conditions like depression or epilepsy.  If you have a qualifying condition, you can opt to register your furry friend as an emotional support animal (ESA). Emotional support animals are often dogs because dogs have been bred for centuries to connect with humans. Here's what you need to know about what qualifies you for an emotional support...
    As a temporary program associate at Borealis Philanthropy, Adam Fishbein helps track payments the organization makes through its pooled funds. He uses transcription software to identify keywords and themes that are repeated in Zoom calls and other communications with grantees so Borealis can try to respond to their needs. The entry-level job, which Fishbein landed after serving as a fellow in 2019 at RespectAbility, a disability advocacy and leadership development nonprofit, puts Fishbein at the center of some of the most significant social-justice philanthropy in the nation. Over the past year, Borealis Philanthropy’s Black-led Movement and Communities Transforming Policing funds have attracted millions of dollars. Fishbein, who has Tourette Syndrome and attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, hopes that his presence on the staff at Borealis helps influence grant-making decisions. He wants to ensure that future grants are made for efforts that recognize that people with disabilities are a big share of Americans who live in poverty, struggle to transition into society after incarceration, or move out of foster care. “I’m not the one making decisions on grants, but I have their ear,”...
    Best camera drone under $100 gets a rare extra discount at Amazon Suni Lee has a very interesting reason for disappointing uneven bars performance: Twitter ACCESSIBILITY The 2021 Oscars featured audio description for the blind (spoken narration that describes onscreen visual elements) for the first time in the telecast’s history, while the in-person ceremony experience included a ramp to the stage and an ASL interpreter in the media room. Meanwhile, the Academy has received $1 million from the Ruderman Family Foundation to ensure accessibility at its upcoming museum as well as to support disability inclusion in its programming and educational initiatives. The year began with Sundance partnering with Easterseals to make the snowy film festival more accessible to attendees, including closed-captioning on every film, ASL interpreters at events and shuttle drivers trained to assist with wheelchairs. FELLOWSHIPS RespectAbility’s annual summer lab, which recently added Final Draft as a multiyear sponsor, provides workshops, mentorship and networking opportunities for emerging and mid-career entertainment professionals who have gone on to work at such companies as Disney, Netflix, Paramount and Showtime. The Center...
    An Arkansas woman left her breast cancer patient mother to die and mummify in a feces-filled home while fraudulently collecting her disability checks, the Washington County Sherriff's office says.  Officers searched the shared home of Geanne Pike, 54, and Gloria Pike, 73, on suspicion of identity fraud after Gloria was reported missing and Geanne was spotted using her mother's disability check card last month. In the home, officers found Gloria's mummified corpse wrapped in newspapers from 2020.   Officers described the home as being in 'deplorable living conditions,' with no running water and human feces and urine collected in buckets and jugs stored all throughout the house.   Geanee, of Lincoln, was arrested on Monday for abuse of her mother's corpse and allegedly continuing to cash in on her disability benefits nearly eight months after Gloria's death. Geanee Pike, left, was arrested on Monday for abuse of the corpse belonging to her mother, Gloria Pike, right, after police found her living with her mother's mummified body and using her disability checks Gloria had been reported missing by her brother, George...
    To reduce mobility and prevent the risks of COVID-19 infection, the Mexican Institute of Social Security (IMSS) enabled electronic platforms to process the COVID-19 Permit online since March 2020, which is equivalent to a temporary disability for the job. This permit allows the worker to protect himself from the employer for being absent from his work for a certain period and to receive a subsidy when he meets the requirements established in the Social Security Law. The application for the Covid-19 Permit is made on the website of the Institute http://www.imss.gob.mx/covid-19/permiso, or through the IMSS Digital app, selecting the COVID-19 Permission questionnaire , now with the possibility of processing it with a positive test from a laboratory outside the IMSS. The mechanism to obtain this new version of the permit for 10 days came into force in January of this year and consists of attaching the positive COVID test from an external laboratory to the IMSS, to validate this, a group of doctors from the Institute will review the authenticity of this test, as well as its validity. An official...
    President Joe Biden on Monday pleaded with Americans to get their vaccine as the number of COVID cases has risen nearly 300% over the past three weeks. 'We have to,' Biden said during an event in the Rose Garden, when asked how the administration will get the unvaccinated vaccinated. Biden was marking the 31st anniversary of the signing of the Americans With Disabilities Act. In his remarks, he announced his administration would find some cases of 'long COVID' to be a disability.   He noted this was 'the first of its kind to help Americans grappling with long term effects of COVID-19 that doctors call long COVID.' 'Many Americans who seemingly recovered from the virus still face lingering challenges, like breathing problems, brain fog, chronic pain or fatigue. These conditions can sometimes - can sometimes - rise to the level of a disability,' Biden noted. 'So we're bringing agencies together to make sure Americans who have long COVID who have a disability, have access to the rights and resources that are due under the disability law,' he said. 'Long COVID' includes those...
    BOSTON (CBS) — The Boston Red Sox on Monday will celebrate “Disability Awareness Night” at Fenway Park. Before the game against the Toronto Blue Jays, the organization “will recognize several local families and children of different abilities, as well as Paralympics and Special Olympics athletes during pregame ceremonies.” READ MORE: Rachael Rollins Nominated To Be U.S. Attorney For Massachusetts Hana Coppenrath, a 16-year-old from Quincy, will sing the national anthem. She was diagnosed with autism at age 2 and ADHD when she was 9 years old. READ MORE: Pilot Program For Free MBTA Rides On Route 28 To Begin August 29 Paralympians Cailin Currie of Salem, Femita Ayanbeku of Randolph and Noelle Lambert of Manchester, New Hampshire will get special recognition, as will Special Olympics athlete Lumene “Lightning” Montissol of Boston. The Red Sox have worked to make Fenway “sensory inclusive”; ans can download the KultureCity mobile app for a list of resources available at the ballpark. MORE NEWS: Massachusetts Gas Prices Remain Above $3 Per Gallon; Could Be Less Expensive In August  
    (CNN)The Biden administration on Monday released guidance and resources to support people experiencing long-term effects of Covid-19, known as "long Covid," as the condition shapes up to be a major, long-term public health issue.The announcement comes as President Joe Biden will mark the 31st anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act. Biden and Vice President Kamala Harris on Monday will deliver remarks in the Rose Garden at the White House. Some people with long Covid may have a disability under various civil rights laws that entitles them to protection from discrimination, according to guidance released by the Office for Civil Rights at the US Department of Health and Human Services and the US Department of Justice. The administration also provided guidance that addresses the needs of children with long Covid who may be children with disabilities, and updated information about where people can access resources and accommodations. Long Covid, or post-Covid, is an umbrella term that describes a variety of physical and mental problems that can follow four or more weeks after a Covid-19 infection, according to the US Centers...
    ANNAPOLIS, Md. (WJZ) — Maryland state agencies will coordinate services and policies that ensure compliance with state and federal civil rights laws and provide community-based supports, emergency preparedness, housing, transportation, employment, health care, accessible technology, education, and family support to Marylanders with disabilities under the new Maryland Disabilities Plan released Wednesday. The plan, announced by Gov. Larry Hogan and the Maryland Department of Disabilities, also will provide a framework for delivering, monitoring, and striving to improve these services, according to a department statement. The department will monitor the progress yearly. READ MORE: 29-Year-Old Angelo Harrod Charged In Death Of USNA Mom Michelle Cummings, Who Was Killed By Stray Bullet In Annapolis The Interagency Disabilities Board, made up of cabinet secretaries from key state agencies, develops the plan every four years. The board must make recommendations, assess funding and service needs for people with disabilities, identify performance measures and work with the Secretary of Disabilities to create a coordinated delivery system. READ MORE: Black Yield Institute To Run Community Farm At Cherry Hill Homes Through 2021 The plan’s five guiding principles...
    A Helpful Guide for Shopping a New Apple MacBook in 2021 Brooks Koepka said his feud with Bryson DeChambeau is fair game ahead of British Open © Matt Winkelmeyer/Getty Images Matt Winkelmeyer/Getty Images The ACLU and disability rights groups submitted a legal brief in support of Britney Spears. Spears asked an LA court for permission to pick her own lawyer in a bid to end her conservatorship. Samuel Ingram, Spears' longtime court-appointed counsel, stepped down as her lawyer last week. Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. The American Civil Liberties Union of Southern California on Tuesday filed an amicus brief in a Los Angeles court in support of Britney Spears's effort to secure her own legal counsel in her bid to end her conservatorship, which began in 2008. "Britney Spears has said that she wants to pick her own lawyer and the court should respect that wish," Zoë Brennan-Krohn, a staff attorney with the ACLU's Disability Rights Project, said in a statement. "The court should ensure Spears has access to the tools she needs to make that...
    CHICAGO (CBS) — A child was recently told to leave the Crown Fountain at Millennium Park, all because of a disability. As CBS 2’s Steven Graves reported Thursday night, we found out it should never have happened. READ MORE: Fired Ex-Chicago Heights Park District Police Chief Accused Misusing Old Badge, And Not For First Time Jordan Block, 10, and his family love an escape to Chicago from west suburban Warrenville. They especially love dipping into the shallow water at the Crown Fountain. “There’s not much else I can do, and that is something I can do – so it’s fun for me,” Jordan said. Jordan went this week after a doctor’s appointment for his spinal muscular atrophy, which has left him confined to a wheelchair. It was poised to be quite the treat for him on a hot day – until he was told to leave. “Surprised,” Jordan said. “Yeah, I said, like, I’ve been here before and have been able to do it.” But a security guard explained to Jordan’s mom that he was a liability, on the grounds...
    A man who survived the Pulse Nightclub shooting in 2016, having been shot four times in his lower back and once in his arm, was told he must repay disability payments to the tune of $21,000. The Social Security Administration claimed Tony Marrero was never eligible to receive the disability benefits despite being left in pain and having to undergo several surgeries to repair the damage left by gunman Omar Mateen in the June 2016 Orlando shooting. The agency sent him letters telling him to repay $20,792 since August 2018 but has only recently dropped their case against him following an investigation by a local Florida TV station. Tony Marrero was shot four times in the back in the deadly Orlando terror attack at Pulse nightclub in June 2016 Marrero was also shot in the arm and left unable to work at his job at a local theme park  'I'm really overwhelmed. I got shot four times in my lower back. The muscle was completely shattered and I had a hole in my back,' he told ClickOrlando. 'My left arm...
    The Department of Veterans Affairs plans to expand disability claims for military service members whose conditions are presumptively related to toxic exposures, officials announced Thursday. The VA will begin the process to consider adding respiratory conditions such as asthma, sinusitis, and rhinitis to the department’s list of chronic disabilities to cover veterans who served in Southwest Asia, Afghanistan, and Uzbekistan during or after the Persian Gulf War, the department said. There was an internal review process within the VA that examined scientific evidence on the relationship between exposure to particulate matter and the incidence of such respiratory illnesses that led to this decision, according to a VA news release. VETERANS AFFAIRS TO RECONSIDER AGENT ORANGE CLAIMS FOR CERTAIN VIETNAM VETERANS That review yielded the recommendation that the VA consider creating presumptions of service connection between exposure to toxic materials and respiratory conditions. “VA is establishing a holistic approach to determining toxic exposure presumption going forward,” said VA Secretary Denis McDonough in a statement. “We are moving out smartly in initiating action to consider these and...
    Let our journalists help you make sense of the noise: Subscribe to the Mother Jones Daily newsletter and get a recap of news that matters. Today is the third Thursday in May, making it Accessibility Awareness Day, launched 10 years ago to expand digital access and cement the political power and gains of people with disabilities. Disabled adults make up the largest minority group in the country, at 26 percent, and the largest in the world, at 17 percent. Yet the day could use an update; it’s a day of “action,” or can be, as much as of “awareness,” and it’s also a day of demarcation, mirroring how far disability rights have and haven’t come. Younger folks are driving it, notably 17- to 24-year-olds. The latest opportunity is a new ambassadorship program for folks who want to create material justice, greater participation, and wider conversation among changemakers digitally on any topic. Share this Recharge if you know activists or advocates or community leaders. I worked years ago for the team that’s now conceived of and launched it and support its...
    An unusual alliance of Democratic and Republican House lawmakers introduced a bill Wednesday that would provide disability benefits to victims of Havana Syndrome, a strange set of medical symptoms that date back to late 2016 and that officials believe may be caused by high-tech weapons wielded in various instances by the governments of Cuba, Russia, and China. The HAVANA Act, introduced by Rep. Adam Schiff, D-Calif., Chairman of the House Intelligence Committee, Rep. Devin Nunes, R-Calif., Ranking Member of the Intelligence Committee and Rep. Gregory Meeks, R-N.Y., Chairman of the House Foreign Affairs Committee, would grant authority to the director of the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) and the Secretary of State to provide disability benefits to those afflicted by the health anomaly in Havana, Cuba and other spots around the world. The bill is companion legislation to one introduced by Sen. Susan Collins, R-Maine, and Sen. Jeanne Shaheen, D-N.H. US OFFICIALS TARGETED ON AMERICAN SOIL, ACROSS THE WORLD BY PURPORTED SONIC ATTACKS  It technically mends a perceived gap in the Federal Employees Compensation Act, which aids federal employees who suffer...
    CHICAGO (CBS) — The city of Chicago is expanding its in-home COVID-19 vaccination program to all seniors age 65 and older. You can book an appointment by calling (312) 746-4835. READ MORE: Chicago Weather: Scattered Showers Wednesday, Summer-Like Temperatures Ahead The effort is an expansion of the city’s “Protect Chicago At Home” program, which offered vaccines to people who are homebound and have trouble leaving home to get vaccinated due to a medical condition or disability. READ MORE: Water Taxi Start Date Postponed Until Further Notice Since that program began in March, Chicago Fire Department paramedics have visited more than 1,500 homes, and administered more than 2,600 shots. To be eligible, you must be 65 or older, or have a disability or medical condition. Family members and caretakers in your home also can get vaccinated at the same time. MORE NEWS: Lollapalooza 2021 Lineup Announced The program uses the single-dose Johnson & Johnson vaccine.
    CHICAGO (WLS) -- In-home COVID vaccination is now available to everyone 65 and older in Chicago.The effort is another expansion of a homebound program for individuals who have significant difficulty leaving home due to a medical condition or disability.Since the homebound program launched in March, Chicago Fire Department Community Paramedics have visited more than 1,500 homes and vaccinated more than 2,600 individuals, the city said Tuesday. In total, CFD was responsible for providing over 25,000 doses of COVID-19 vaccine through all its programs.RELATED: As Chicago mask mandate lifted for vaccinated, nurses union disagrees with CDC guidanceTo be eligible for in-home vaccination, Chicago residents must be 65 or older, or have a disability or medical condition.Residents who meet these criteria can call (312) 746-4835 to book an appointment for in-home vaccination.Family members and caretakers are also eligible to be vaccinated during the same time as a qualifying at-home patient.All in-home vaccination appointments use Johnson & Johnson vaccine.
    MINNEAPOLIS (WCCO) — Here’s a story that will lift you up. It’s about a weightlifter with a background that’s hard to believe. Sometimes to understand where someone is at, you have to see where they’ve been. Matt Schafly is a buff 23 year old, but physically, he used to have some major barriers. READ MORE: Debate At Capitol: Electronic Pull Tab Games In Play Look Too Much Like Slot Machines “First grade or kindergarten, I realized the kids around me are able to walk, or run, or you know, chase other kids on the playground, and I could not participate,” Schafly said. He has cerebral palsy, a condition that effects 1 in 345 kids in the United States, and can weaken and cause problems using muscles. So the Missouri kid came to Minnesota to Gillette Children’s Specialty Healthcare, a place known for working with kids with CP. Schafly had brain procedures performed by pediatric surgeon Dr. Den Quanbeck. “He had three orthopedic surgeries after that, with probably literally hundreds of episodes of therapy following those, and he just has such...
    A baby girl has been spared a lifetime of disability after receiving pioneering spinal surgery — while still in the womb. Emily Malkie, from Pennsylvania in the US, was diagnosed with spina bifida following an ultrasound when her mother was just 16 weeks pregnant. A follow-up MRI showed the youngster was at risk of developing brain damage due to a build-up of spinal fluid in her skull. Her mother Rebecca, 37, was transferred to the specialist foetal John Hopkins hospital in Maryland weeks later to have the intricate operation, which has only been carried out a few dozens times worldwide The mother was told that the procedure had to be done within a four-week window between 23 and 26 weeks pregnant. Too early and the baby is still too small to operate on; too late and the damage cannot be reversed. Spina bifida, which affects around 1,500 babies in the US every year and roughly 700 in the UK, occurs when the spine does not form properly in the womb, leaving a gap in the vertebrae. It often leads to...
    Boris Johnson’s government is insisting that people harmed by vaccine side-effects must prove they are at least 60 per cent disabled in order to receive compensation, capped at £120,000, according to reports. 168 people were believed to have suffered blood clots following vaccination as of last week, according to a report by Britain’s Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA), with 32 of those afflicted dying. So far, 43 applications for compensation have been made under an official damages scheme for people harmed by government-approved vaccinations — which also covers more established vaccines for diseases such as tuberculosis — according to figures disclosed to the Telegraph, but as of the time of publication no payments have been issued, and the government is insisting that applicants “will need to prove, on the balance of probabilities, that the vaccination caused [a] disability and be assessed as being 60 per cent disabled” before they are compensated. The harsh stance has caused disquiet among backbenchers from Boris Johnson’s own party, with Sir Christopher Chope MP, for example, stating his belief that “The Government has a moral...
    A PARAPLEGIC army vet has joked that women who turn him down because of his disability are missing out Blue Badge parking - and he’s won legions of fans. TikTok user @stefpav76 has over 260,000 views for a video he made joking about the benefits of dating him. 3TikTok user @stefpav76 has over 260,000 views for his video about datingCredit: @stefpav76/TikTok Stef flashed his badge and wrote: “When people say they won’t date a disabled person”. The caption read: “Look at what you're missing----free parking near the shops hahaha #fyp #veteran #foryoupage #wheelchairlife.” Stef added in the comments that the video was just intended as a light-hearted joke, and people have left comments saying they are smitten. One person said: “Think I’ve found my TikTok crush.” 3Stef keeps fans up-to-date with his rehabilitation journeyCredit: @stefpav76/TikTok 3Stef added in the comments that the video was just intended as a light-hearted jokeCredit: @stefpav76/TikTok Another added: “People should take you as you are or not at all.” A third wrote: “I was distracted by how cute you are.” Explaining how he ended up...
    Indiana is proposing to increase spending on special education by $196 million over the next two years, with a 10% increase for the 2021-2022 school year. The additional spending would bring the total spent on special education in Indiana to about $1.4 billion a year, according to Sen. Eric Bassler, R-Washington, the chairman of the state Senate’s school funding subcommittee. “As we were talking with educators, teachers, parents, principals, superintendents, the more concerned we became about the fact that we were not funding special education sufficiently,” he said when asked about the reason for the increase. He said over the last year or so, he and other legislators asked schools to calculate the numbers, and determine how much they were getting from the state for special education and compare it to how much they were spending. “There were school corporations that had a pretty significant deficit there,” said Bassler. Out of 1.1 million students in Indiana, about 15% are classified as “special education” – a total of 181,262. The biggest percentage of K-12 special...
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