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    Steve Cone, 41, of Falls Church, enjoys spending time with his grandchildren Blair, 6, and Jackson, 9. Courtesy Steven Cone Steve Cone, 71, of Falls Church, said he’s declined to have reconstructive surgery after his two bouts with breast cancer. Courtesy Steve Cone (1/2) Share This Gallery: Share on Facebook. Share on Twitter. Share via email. Print....
    Women of color should get screened to know their breast cancer risk beginning at the age of 30, according to The American College of Radiology, which notes that they tend to get diagnosed with the disease earlier than white women. “There was a recent publication that came out in Cancer that demonstrated that women of color have a higher percentage...
    Breast cancer most typically is associated with women, but mammogram screenings also are recommended for transgender women. “They take hormones to help with the transition. Because of this hormone exposure, they are at increased risk of developing breast cancer and therefore need to be screened,” said Dr. Sarah Friedewald, Chief of Breast Imaging at Northwestern Memorial Hospital in Chicago and...
    MIAMI (CBSMiami) – New research is reassuring for breast cancer patients receiving chemotherapy during the pandemic. There have been concerns that treatments like chemo could make patients more vulnerable to the coronavirus. Now a NYU Langone Health study shows breast cancer patients treated with chemo do not have an increased risk for COVID-19 infection, compared to patients who had other...
    NEW YORK (CBSNewYork) — A new study is providing reassuring news for breast cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy during the pandemic. A new NYU Langone Health study found breast cancer patients treated with chemo did not have an increased risk for COVID infection compared to patients who had other therapies. READ MORE: New Jersey Offers Dinner With Governor, Free Wine &...
    This article was medically reviewed by Richard Reitherman, MD, medical director of breast imaging at MemorialCare Breast Center at Orange Coast Medical Center.  Medically Reviewed Reviewed By Check Mark Icon A check mark. It indicates that the relevant content has been reviewed and verified by an expert Our stories are reviewed by medical professionals to ensure you get the most...
    This article has been medically reviewed by Crystal Fancher, MD, surgical breast oncologist at the Margie Petersen Breast Center at Providence Saint John's Health Center and assistant professor at the John Wayne Cancer Institute.  Medically Reviewed Reviewed By Check Mark Icon A check mark. It indicates that the relevant content has been reviewed and verified by an expert Our...
    By Amy Norton HealthDay Reporter (HealthDay) FRIDAY, Oct. 30, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Another large study finds that menopausal hormone therapy is linked to an increased risk of breast cancer, though it varies with the formulation, timing and duration of use. British researchers found that among more than 500,000 women aged 50 to 79, those who'd used hormone replacement therapy...
    By MARY LANDERS, The Savannah Morning News RICHMOND HILL, Ga. (AP) — Ana Rosales wanted to know. An education major at Georgia Southern’s Armstrong campus, Rosales, 19, plans to become a high school math teacher. She has a good grasp of numbers, including risks. So after watching her 45-year-old mom struggle recently with a second round of breast cancer and...
    According to recent research, the number of people being diagnosed with breast cancer has declined by half during the COVID-19 pandemic. Oncologists said the reason behind it is because fewer people are visiting their health care providers. The good news is many things can still be done to help reduce the risks of breast cancer. First, know your family history:...
    Dear Doctor, My mom and grandmother both had breast cancer. I’m assuming it’s genetic, but I’ve never gotten the test to confirm. Should I get tested—and how can I reduce the risk of getting it myself? Sincerely, “Concerned and Curious” Dear Concerned: I understand why you’re worried. Anywhere from about 5% to 10% of all breast cancer cases are hereditary—meaning...
    Hormone replacement therapy (HRT) could lower the risk of breast cancer for some women, but raise it for others, a new study finds.  Researchers found that women who had had their uteruses removed and were taking HRT were about 25 percent less likely to develop cancer than those being given a placebo. What's more, this same group of women was...
    TESTING all women for the “Angelina Jolie Gene” could prevent cancer and save thousands of lives, a study suggests. Researchers say it would allow doctors to identify those at far higher risk of developing tumours before they occur. 2Testing women for the 'Angelina Jolie Gene' could save thousands of lives, Actress Jolie had her breasts and ovaries removed after she...
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