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the Build Back Better Act:

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    Democrats thought it prudent to pass a $1.7 trillion Build Back Better Act while Americans grapple with rising food costs ahead of Thanksgiving. President Joe Biden tasked his legislative majority with passing three major bills: the $1.9 trillion coronavirus bill, the American Rescue Plan, the $1.2 trillion so-called bipartisan infrastructure bill, or the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act, and the $1.7 trillion reconciliation bill, or the Build Back Better Act. Together these three bills represent trillions of dollars in social welfare programs. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) and Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-NY) passed the American Rescue Plan in March, and the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act in November, leaving the Congress to pass the Build Back Better Act. Pelosi and Schumer plan to use budgetary reconciliation to pass the legislation. Reconciliation amends budget spending and allows for Congress to pass the bill using only a simple majority in the Senate, although the bill must solely focus on spending and taxation. President Donald Trump used reconciliation to pass the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act in 2017; however, his GOP-led...
    President Joe Biden promised to get women back to work through the Build Back Better Act, which he says makes caregiving more accessible and more affordable. Nearly 2 million women in our country have been locked out of the workforce because they have to care for a child or an elderly relative at home. My Build Back Better Act will make caregiving accessible and affordable and help them get back to work. — Joe Biden (@JoeBiden) November 23, 2021 “Nearly 2 million women in our country have been locked out of the workforce because they have to care for a child or an elderly relative at home,” Biden commented on Twitter. “My Build Back Better Act will make caregiving accessible and affordable and help them get back to work.” As the COVID-19 pandemic hit the U.S. in early 2020, nearly 3.5 million mothers with young children wither lost their jobs, took leaves of absence or left the labor market, the Associated Press reported. (RELATED: House Begins Debate Over Biden’s $2.4 Trillion Spending Package Without Knowing How It’s Going...
    Michael Duva The roughly $2 trillion climate and social policy measure House Democrats passed Friday would create a fluid tax scenario for households over the next few years, as tax provisions affecting low and high earners phase in and out. The Build Back Better Act has tax components related to children, health care, education, state and local taxes, corporate profits and retirement plans, among others. But their start dates and duration differ — a dynamic that may have a big impact on taxpayer levies from year to year, according to projections. More from Personal Finance:How to maximize year-end tax planning after a layoff or early retirementHere's how Medicare could change if Build Back Better becomes lawYear-end tips to lower your tax bill or boost your refund "It's sort of a roller-coaster ride when it comes to a net tax change for folks, both at the bottom and at the top," said Garrett Watson, a senior policy analyst at the Tax Foundation. That legislative roller coaster is similar to a 2017 tax law passed by the Republican-controlled Congress, Watson said. That...
    Sen. Steve Daines (R-MT) slammed Democrats’ nearly $2 trillion social spending bill as “massive and reckless” on Sunday, and added that he is hopeful at least one Democrat will vote against it in the Senate. “This is a massive and reckless tax and spending bill. It’s as if the Democrats are launching cash cannons of borrowed money across our country,” Daines said in a Fox News interview. “It is going to raise the debt by $800 billion dollars in the first five years…This is a hyperinflation bomb that they’re dropping on the economy.” The bill passed the House on Friday with a 220-213 vote, with every Democrat except Rep. Jared Golden (D-ME) voting in favor. Daines then expressed concerns about inflation, saying that “those who can afford it the least get impacted the most.” Asked by anchor Jon Scott whether he sees the bill failing in the Senate, Daines said he thinks “there is a chance.” “I can tell you every single Republican is opposed to it,” he later added. “We just need one Democrat — just one — to oppose...
    U.S. House of Representatives passed the Build Back Better Act by a 220-213 vote. Now, it goes to the U.S. Senate. We are ready! On November 19, the U.S. House passed the Build Back Better Act. It is no exaggeration to say that for these members, this may be the most impactful vote of their careers. It is undoubtedly a victory for the American people. And now, it is incumbent on the U.S. Senate to pass it. The Build Back Better Act, as Rep. Jim McGovern said, could also be called 1) the Universal Pre-K for All Children Act, 2) the Tax Cut for Working Families With Kids Act, 3) the Affordable Day Care Act, 4) the Insulin Price Reduction Act, or 5) the Green Energy Jobs Creation Act. That's because the bill does all of these things—and more.  But now, the bill faces an uncertain future in the U.S. Senate. Sign and send the petition to your Democratic U.S. senator(s): Do all you can to pass the Build Back Better Act.  The Build Back Better Act would fight climate...
    Bush said that they should resign: "Developing fossil fuels now given the escalation of the climate crisis and its harm on black and brown communities is unconscionable. Given each of your roles in these attacks on our humanity, you all should resign."
    Progressive U.S. lawmakers and advocates for working families were outraged Wednesday by reporting that congressional leaders are planning to fully cut paid leave from Democrats' Build Back Better package due to opposition from Sen. Joe Manchin. Sources on Capitol Hill told reporters at several news outlets—including CNN, Politico, The Hill, The New York Times, and The Wall Street Journal—that Democrats are, as the Times put it, "likely to abandon their plans to create a new federal paid family and medical leave program" because of Manchin (D-W.Va.). The newspaper noted that Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand (D-N.Y.), who "personally reached out" to the right-wing West Virginian in an attempt to sell him on a compromise, promised to keep pushing for it. "Until the bill is printed, I will continue working to include paid leave in the Build Back Better plan," Gillibrand said in a statement Wednesday afternoon—a vow echoed by Rep. Ayanna Pressley (D-Mass.) on Twitter. Co-sign @gillibrandny. I will keep fighting for #PaidLeaveForAll until the ink is dry. https://t.co/hzYnYCbsWn — Ayanna Pressley (@Ayanna Pressley) 1635371603.0 Politico's Eleanor Mueller also reported that Democrats...
    Only 10% of Americans claim to know many specifics about the $3.5 trillion Democratic spending package, while nearly 60% said they didn’t know any specifics at all, according to a CBS News/YouGov poll. “The average American only has so much time to devote to politics,” David Ditch, a policy analyst at the Heritage Foundation, told the Daily Caller News Foundation. “My belief is that the longer the debate and discussion goes on, the more people find out about it, the more people are going to be opposed, especially among undecided and independent voters,” Ditch added. The $3.5 trillion Build Back Better Act that President Joe Biden is attempting to make law will change how the U.S. handles several social services, but few Americans seem to know its contents. According to a CBS News/YouGov poll released Oct. 10, 10% of Americans said they know “a lot of the specifics” of the bill, while nearly 60% said they didn’t know any specifics at all. “The average American only has so much time to devote to politics,” David Ditch, a policy...
    The $3.5 trillion dollar Build Back Better Act of 2021, in its current form, faces opposition in Congress not only from Republicans, but also, from centrist Democrats like Sen. Kyrsten Sinema of Arizona and Sen. Joe Manchin of West Virginia. However, that doesn't mean that it is unpopular with U.S. voters. And according to a newly released Vox/Data for Progress poll, many voters are willing to tax the rich in order to pay for it. Vox's Tim Ryan Williams reports that the poll, "conducted October 8-12, found that 71% of voters support raising taxes on the wealthiest 2% of Americans to pay for the bill. Eighty-six percent of Democrats and 50% of Republicans backed the idea. Other tax provisions focused on the wealthy that could be included in the bill — such as tax increases on corporations and capital gains — found 65% or more support overall." The Vox/Data for Progress poll got into specific things in the Build Back Better Act that U.S. voters like. Williams notes that "63% of voters in the poll said they supported the $3.5...
    Amid one of Congress’ busiest months in living memory, Democratic infighting has burst into the open. Disputes over the size and scope of the $3.5 trillion Build Back Better Act, which the party hopes to pass through the reconciliation process, have turned personal, with Democratic Minnesota Rep. Ilhan Omar calling Democratic West Virginia Sen. Joe Manchin and Democratic Arizona Sen. Kyrsten Sinema Republicans. In response, Manchin accused left-wing members of the party of “fiscal insanity.” Although the 95 member Congressional Progressive Caucus (CPC) is willing and able to tank legislation like the bipartisan Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act (IIJA), it does not exercise complete control over the Democratic Party. CPC members temporarily delayed funding for Israel’s Iron Dome missile defense system, dislodging it from a continuing resolution to fund the federal government. The $1 billion in military aid later passed the House 420-9 as a standalone bill, but not before Democratic Michigan Rep. Rashida Tlaib received bipartisan condemnation for remarks perceived as anti-Semitic. (RELATED: Ocasio-Cortez Explains Her Tears, Vote On Iron Dome Funding) Instead of negotiating directly with moderates like...
    Democratic West Virginia Sen. Joe Manchin threw more cold water on the $3.5 trillion Build Back Better Act on Wednesday night, criticizing the price tag and threatening to kill it unless it included the Hyde amendment, which prohibits the federal funding of abortion. “Spending trillions more on new and expanded government programs, when we can’t even pay for the essential social programs, like Social Security and Medicare, is the definition of fiscal insanity,” he said in a statement. Manchin later told National Review that the Build Back Better Act will be “dead on arrival” in the Senate if its Medicaid expansion does not include a ban on federal funding of abortion. He is one of the last pro-life Democrats still in Congress. My statement on infrastructure and reconciliation negotiations: https://t.co/ivdAUn9Mdh pic.twitter.com/6Y6ATeH8DR — Senator Joe Manchin (@Sen_JoeManchin) September 29, 2021 Manchin has called for a “strategic pause” on new federal spending, and privately suggested that Democrats wait until 2022 to pass the Build Back Better Act. The pause would give Congress “time to develop the right policies and to continue...
    (CNN)When President Joe Biden announced in the spring his plans for "once-in-a-generation investments in our nation's future," he said that "it is not enough to restore where we were prior to the pandemic. We need to build a stronger economy that does not leave anyone behind -- we need to build back better."That is our shared vision -- the vision the American people voted for -- and it is what we as Congressional leaders must deliver with urgency. (From left) Rep. Jayapal, Rep. Omar and Rep. Porter are members of the Congressional Progressive Caucus.Speaker Nancy Pelosi has announced her intention that the House vote this week on a transformative economic package and a major investment in infrastructure. Congress now faces a choice: advance the entirety of an agenda that gets American families the help they need, or deliver only a fraction of it. That's why we, as leaders of the Congressional Progressive Caucus, remain committed to voting for the infrastructure bill only after the Build Back Better Act is passed. We lead one of the largest ideological caucuses in the...
    Minnesota child care providers are struggling to keep their electricity on and their doors open. Families are struggling to pay for their services. It’s a chicken-and-the-egg scenario for many providers: If they pay their workers more, the cost for families will go up and they’ll lose business. If they pay their already low-wage workers less, they’ll lose workers and the ability to take care of all of their enrolled kids. Democrats are looking to solve — or at least help solve — this child care dilemma as part of the Build Back Better Act, their $3.5 trillion federal spending bill. Among a host of new policies and programs in the bill are several new federal funding streams aimed at providing what advocates are calling “universal child care.” The plans are ambitious. “This is the biggest thing to happen to the early childhood field ever in our country’s history, that [universal child care] is even being debated right now at this scale,” said Clare Sanford, government relations chair for the Minnesota Child Care Association. But the child care industry is complicated....
    Pushing back against conservative Democrats' attempts to shrink the Build Back Better Act's price tag, Sen. Bernie Sanders reiterated Tuesday night that anything less than $3.5 trillion is unacceptable. Asked by CNN's Anderson Cooper how the size of the reconciliation package will be decided, Sanders (I-Vt.) said, "It's gonna be $3.5 trillion." "That's the compromise that's already been made," said Sanders, referring to the fact that progressive lawmakers would prefer to invest at least $6 trillion to mitigate inequality and carbon pollution. Last month, House and Senate Democrats passed a budget resolution greenlighting $3.5 trillion in spending to improve social welfare, strengthen labor rights, provide a pathway to citizenship for millions of undocumented immigrants, and bolster climate action. "The truth is $3.5 trillion is not enough," Sanders argued Tuesday, listing several items—including child care, pre-K, and affordable housing—that many congressional Democrats want to spend more on but can't due to self-imposed constraints. With Democrats hoping to vote on the package by the end of the month, details of the Build Back Better Act are starting to emerge. So far, however,...
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