Wednesday, Dec 01, 2021 - 15:54:43
10 results - (0.023 seconds)

what indigenous people:

latest news at page 1:
1
    Amelia Bates/Grist Fight disinformation. Get a daily recap of the facts that matter. Sign up for the free Mother Jones newsletter.This story was originally published by Grist and is reproduced here as part of the Climate Desk collaboration. As a child, Preston J. Arrow-weed lived near a stretch of the Colorado River that traced a wide, sweeping curve through the Fort Yuma-Quechan Reservation, which straddles the border of California and Arizona. The tribal elder recalls the way the river would swell during certain seasons, as rain or runoff upriver would send sediment-laden water coursing through the channel.  “The water was so swift, and when it first came it would be sandy and brown, then after it settled it became blue,” said Arrow-weed, 81, a singer, actor, and playwright who is a member of the Quechan Indian Tribe. “We used to get a bucket of water from the river and take it home. Then, when it settled, we’d drink it.” Nowadays, the once-wild river flows mechanically into a concrete canal that diverts most of the streamflow toward distant lettuce fields in...
    Violence against Indigenous people on tribal land by outsiders has proved difficult to prosecute. David Goldman/AP Let our journalists help you make sense of the noise: Subscribe to the Mother Jones Daily newsletter and get a recap of news that matters.This story was originally published by High Country News and is reproduced here as part of the Climate Desk collaboration. Two years ago, on a February evening, Ellie Bundy attended a tribal working group in Arlee, Montana, on the Flathead Indian Reservation. Surrounded by local and tribal law enforcement, tribal members and families, Bundy listened as people told stories about loved ones or community members who had gone missing. “What if that were my daughter?” Bundy said. “We say that a lot, but really, what if it were my daughter? What if it were my sister? What if it were my cousins? It is a visual you just can’t get out of your head.” The meeting was one of four hosted by the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes to encourage discussion and come up with local community responses to the epidemic of...
    (CNN)As the US grapples with history and becomes increasingly racially and culturally aware -- with ethnic studies curriculums in schools, recognition of the dangers of White supremacy, and growing social justice movements -- more people are acknowledging the keepers of the land now known as North America: Native Americans.Land acknowledgments are a way for non-Indigenous people to honor and pay respect to the Indigenous people who lived and took care of the land before the arrival of White Europeans, who often used violence to take control of the lands while forcing survivors onto reservations. The acknowledgments are becoming increasingly common, with even the Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade taking part.And now, there are apps that will easily tell you whose land you're on.One of the most popular ones is run by Native Land Digital, a Canadian non-profit. The organization has a website and app where users can enter an address and see which Indigenous nations lived on that land. Though the map doesn't represent the official or legal boundaries of the nations, it's an interesting look into the history of the...
    On Monday evening, Debra Haaland, a 35th-generation New Mexican from the Pueblo of Laguna, became the first Native American ever to be confirmed as a Cabinet secretary.  When she testified in February at her confirmation hearing, Haaland began her opening remarks by introducing herself to senators in her tribal language of Keresan. "This historic nature of my confirmation is not lost on me, but I will say it's not about me. Rather, I hope this nomination would be an inspiration for Americans moving forward together as one nation and creating opportunities for all of us," Haaland said.  She grew up in a military family and later became a single mother who struggled to stay above the poverty line. Haaland eventually earned a bachelor's degree in English from the University of New Mexico when she was 34. Twelve years later she earned her J.D. in Indian law from University of New Mexico School of Law. Deb Haaland seen in Albuquerque, New Mexico, on October 1, 2018. MARK RALSTON/AFP via Getty Images Before she was elected to Congress in 2018, Haaland...
    The language used to describe racial minorities has fueled controversy in the United States for centuries. POC is widely used as an umbrella term for all people of color, but now a different acronym is suddenly gaining traction on the internet — BIPOC, which stands for Black, Indigenous, People of Color. People are using the term to acknowledge that not all people of color face equal levels of injustice. They say BIPOC is significant in recognizing that Black and Indigenous people are severely impacted by systemic racial injustices. According to Google Trends, the use of the acronym began to spike in May 2020, coinciding with the growing Black Lives Matter movement in the wake of the deaths of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor and Ahmaud Arbery. Founders of "The BIPOC Project" use the term to "highlight the unique relationship to Whiteness that Indigenous and Black (African Americans) people have, which shapes the experiences of and relationship to white supremacy for all people of color within a U.S. context."  Get Breaking News Delivered to Your Inbox But where does it come...
    The main memory that Moises Kampe keeps from September 9 is a sound. A brief noise that he heard seconds before he realized something terrible had happened. A friend of Kampe, the renowned Brazilian expert on indigenous affairs Rieli Franciscato lay motionless on the ground, wounded in the chest by an arrow. Shortly after he would be pronounced dead in a hospital. The arrow was launched by a group of natives sighted near a farm in Seringueiras, a town of less than 13,000 inhabitants in Rondonia (west), one of the nine Brazilian states that the Amazon rainforest extends through. Seringueiras is one of several settlements that surround an indigenous reserve known as Uru-eu-wau-wau. It is a place known to be inhabited by nine different tribes, including five groups classified as isolated. Franciscato followed the group seen near the farm as part of his work for the government agency Fundación Nacional del Indio de Brasil (Funai). “These indigenous people may never know that Rieli was one of the greatest defenders of indigenous rights in Brazil,” Kampe told...
    The acronym BIPOC is popping up all over social media, and it’s especially in use among young activists and academics. BIPOC stands for “Black, Indigenous and people of color.” But why is that term used, and is it the best descriptor for groups of Black, Indigenous, and people of color? Hide What does BIPOC mean? BIPOC is meant to be more inclusive than the popular term “people of color,” or POC. The additional two letters highlight the specific experiences and struggles of Black and Indigenous people, which can go unacknowledged in conversations about race. Hide “A term like BIPOC is meant to … recognize that not all people of color have the same relationship to American white supremacy as each other and that even within our collective struggle, there’s specific distinctions between us,” Cate Young, a freelance writer from Trinidad and Tobago whose work focuses on the intersection of race, gender, and sexuality in media representation, told the Daily Dot. (To clarify, no, BIPOC does not mean bisexual people of color—though it’s easy to see how one would assume that...
1