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    A bowl of medicinal marijuana.Justin Sullivan | Getty Images Cannabis investors in the last two weeks have seen a whipsaw that would be in high demand at Six Flags or Hershey Park, but has been painful when investing in an already volatile asset class.  The excitement around legislative catalysts to re-rate the sector higher has hung over the market for the last fifteen months and provided periods of exhilaration. However, it has also left investors nauseous as follow-through has been hard to come by. As a result, an industry that offers extraordinary growth, while supporting multiple social, lifestyle and ESG trends has felt a bit like a roller coaster.  At the root of the recent volatility was the excitement created by a Republican-led legislation package that aims to federally legalize cannabis while leaving the states to govern social equity and criminal justice issues. On Nov. 5, media sources reported that Rep. Nancy Mace, R-S.C. was leading a competing cannabis reform bill called the States Reform Act that would attempt to fast-forward legislation and steal the issue from Chuck Schumer and...
    On the verge of another historic success in a year full of them, Democrats across Washington are already worrying about how they may squander it. The president, the speaker of the House, the Senate majority leader and their teams may be days away from passing transformative legislation that will invest trillions in the U.S. economy. They may well, after months of ugly legislative sausage-making, overcome GOP obstructionism, internal divisions, and media narratives that always seem to emphasize the cloud around every silver lining produced by the White House. The Build Back Better and infrastructure packages would be capstones to a year of extraordinary accomplishments. And yet, in private, many Democrats are fretting they still may snatch defeat from the jaws of landmark victories. White House and Capitol Hill hands fear that, even with the passage of the Build Back Better bill and the bipartisan infrastructure bill, Dems will either fail to frame their achievements in a way that resonates with average Americans or let their frustrations about what has yet to be achieved undercut the benefits that should accrue to...
    LANSING, Mich. (AP) — State lawmakers are poised to consider bipartisan bills aimed at helping potentially thousands of sex abuse victims sue for damages, including those molested by a University of Michigan sports physician. It is the second time since 2018 that the Legislature may overhaul laws in the wake of a major abuse scandal. Similar legislation was enacted following the conviction of Larry Nassar, who sexually abused hundreds of female athletes under the guise of medical treatment, including at Michigan State University. Under the new measures, victims of the late Dr. Robert Anderson at the University of Michigan and others would get additional time to bring lawsuits that might be barred by a statute of limitations. Government entities could not use the immunity defense if they knew or should have known of an accused’s prior sexual misconduct and failed to intervene. Similar government immunity legislation stalled three years ago — after Michigan State agreed to a $500 million settlement for Nassar’s victims — amid pushback from universities, schools, municipalities, businesses and the Catholic Church over the financial implications...
    SACRAMENTO, Calif. -- California public schools and colleges would have to stock their restrooms with free menstrual products under legislation sent to Gov. Gavin Newsom on Thursday.The bill by Democratic Assemblywoman Cristina Garcia builds on her 2017 law requiring low-income schools in disadvantaged areas to provide students with free menstrual products. She also prompted the state to repeal a tax on menstrual products that she said cost women a collective $20 million a year.The new legislation expands the 2017 law to grades 6 to 12, community colleges and the California State University and University of California systems, starting in the 2022-23 school year. It encourages private schools and colleges to follow suit.There were no registered opponents and few opposition votes.RELATED: Diapers, menstrual hygiene products exempt from CA sales tax through 2021"Often periods arrive at inconvenient times. They can surprise us during an important midterm, while playing with our children at a park, sitting in a lobby waiting to interview for a job, shopping at the grocery store, or even standing on the Assembly floor presenting an important piece of legislation,"...
    SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP/CBS13) — California lawmakers approved legislation that would require public schools and colleges to stock their restrooms with free menstrual products. The bill by Democratic Assemblywoman Cristina Garcia builds on her 2017 law requiring low-income schools in disadvantaged areas to provide students with free menstrual products. She also prompted the state to repeal a tax on menstrual products that she said cost women a collective $20 million a year. READ MORE: Carjacking Suspect Injured In Sacramento County Officer-Involved Shooting Allegedly Assaults Deputy, Grandmother The new legislation, which was sent to Gov. Gavin Newsom on Thursday, expands the 2017 law to grades 6 to 12, community colleges and the California State University and University of California systems, starting in the 2022-23 school year. It encourages private schools and colleges to follow suit. There were no registered opponents and few opposition votes. “Often periods arrive at inconvenient times. They can surprise us during an important midterm, while playing with our children at a park, sitting in a lobby waiting to interview for a job, shopping at the grocery store, or...
    PHOTO VIA ADOBE STOCKFlorida Democrats are sounding the alarm Thursday, warning voters Florida Republicans may pursue legislation akin to Texas’ controversial heartbeat abortion ban in the upcoming Legislative Session. The new law ushers the most restrictive abortion laws in the country. It bans abortions after six weeks and provides no exception for rape or incest. While Gov. Ron DeSantis and House Speaker Chris Sprowls said they’d like to review the legislation before making any endorsements, Sen. President Wilton Simpson appeared more than eager Thursday about the possibility. Simpson told WFLA “there is no question” the Legislature will consider similar proposals. And when asked later about the statement by Democratic Rep. Michelle Rayner, Simpson replied only with an emoji sporting a smile and wearing dark sunglasses. “????,” Simpson responded. You would think discussing such a dangerous and oppressive law on abortion would be treated more seriously by Florida State leadership. President Simpson is teasing the public with threats of oppression. But then again, did we expect anything different? #AbortionBan pic.twitter.com/ekDaBYstR3— Michele Rayner-Goolsby (She/They) (@micheleforfl) September 2, 2021 “You would think discussing such a dangerous and oppressive law on abortion would be...
    CHICAGO (WLS) -- If you were overpaid on unemployment benefits from the Illinois Department of Employment Security (IDES), you may not have to pay that money back. There is new legislation that can help those who were on the hook.Around $123 million of regular state benefits were overpaid to 76,000 residents. But if you're one of those residents, you may be able to now keep the cash.The I-Team has reported for nearly a year about unemployed Illinoisans panicked because the Illinois Department of Employment Security informed them that they must reimburse the state for unemployment overpayments.Governor JB Pritzker signed a law last week waiving reimbursement for overpayments of regular state unemployment funds.Unemployment overpayment relief: Proposed legislation may allow claimants to keep money Those who received letters from IDES stating they were overpaid state unemployment, must first find out if they are eligible for the waiver. The state agency is working on the system that would decide eligibility on a case by case basis.If you qualify, you will not have to reimburse the state for that overpayment of state unemployment money.Broke:...
    U.S. Speaker of the House Rep. Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) speaks during a weekly news conference at the U.S. Capitol June 24, 2021 in Washington, DC.Alex Wong | Getty Images The House approved legislation Tuesday that will speed up the visa process for Afghans who worked for the American military or NATO to come to the U.S.  The measure passed in a 366-46 vote and will now go to the Senate.  Under the legislation, Afghans who worked with U.S. troops as interpreters, drivers and other positions will no longer have to undergo a medical examination in Afghanistan to qualify for a special immigrant visa, or SIV. Instead, they will be allowed to get an examination in the U.S. within 30 days of their arrival. Many Afghans have been forced to travel long distances to get the medical examination at a single clinic in Kabul, which is costly, dangerous and a "serious delay" in the visa process, according to a statement introducing the legislation in May. Waiving the requirement in Afghanistan is expected to expedite the SIV process and ensure that Afghans...
    Clemson football star Justyn Ross eagerly awaits his opportunity to cash in big on NIL. After missing all of the 2020 college season due to a spinal injury, Clemson football star wide receiver Justyn Ross is all about getting that money when it comes to the new NIL legislation going into effect. Ross was one of the handful of players to tweet out that they are open for business on Twitter on Saturday. Given that the former five-star recruit from Phenix City, Alabama may not be a first-round pick in 2022 because of his spinal condition, it absolutely serves him to take advantage of this new NIL legislation going into effect in South Carolina while he can so he won’t miss out. Without debate, Ross is one of the most notable players who NIL legislation benefits the most. pic.twitter.com/PtzYbqVu2j — Justyn Ross (@_jross8) June 26, 2021 Clemson football: Justyn Ross will take advantage of new NIL opportunitiesShould every college athlete be able to take advantage of NIL legislation? Absolutely, but few will be able to capitalize on it quite like someone in...
    By MARCY GORDON | Associated Press WASHINGTON — A House panel pushed ahead Wednesday with ambitious legislation that could curb the market power of tech giants Facebook, Google, Amazon and Apple and force them to sever their dominant platforms from their other lines of business. Conservative Republican lawmakers haggled over legislative language and pushed concerns of perceived anti-conservative bias in online platforms but couldn’t halt the bipartisan momentum behind the package. The drafting session by the House Judiciary Committee is an initial step in what promises to be a strenuous slog through Congress. Many Republican lawmakers denounce the market dominance of Big Tech but don’t support a wholesale revamp of the antitrust laws. Republicans have relentlessly hurled accusations of anti-conservative bias against the social media platforms and may demand targeted legislative sanctions in return for their support. The advance of the massive, bipartisan legislation comes as the tech giants already are smarting under federal investigations, epic antitrust lawsuits, near-constant condemnation from politicians of both parties, and a newly installed head of the powerful Federal Trade Commission who is a fierce...
    The establishment media is worried Vice President Kamala Harris’ presidential chances are slipping after faltering in Latin America last week. Axios explained their concern Monday, saying Harris’s stumbles “during her first foreign trip have rekindled the debate from her presidential campaign about whether she — and not her staff — is to blame.” “Harris also is in a tough spot managing two issues — immigration and voting rights, the latter of which she’s reported to have chosen herself — that have little upside and huge downside,” Axios continued. Moreover, Slate warned on Thursday that President Joe Biden may be setting her up to fail by putting her in charge of the border crisis and election takeover legislation, which are quickly becoming losing issues for the administration. Slate cautioned, “If you look at the assignments Kamala Harris has been given during her tenure as vice president, it’s pretty easy to think that she’s getting the short end of the political stick.” “First, she was tasked with taking on immigration: After mostly staying in D.C. during the pandemic, Harris is on her first...
    The Endless Frontiers Act, a comprehensive bill sponsored by Sen. Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., passed the Senate on Friday, leading some critics to point to a little-noticed move that could open a "Pandora's box" of unknown bioengineering with the help of federal funds. On "Fox News Primetime," host Tammy Bruce and investigative journalist Lara Logan noted that Democrats blocked the addition of an amendment from GOP Sens. James Lankford of Oklahoma, Steve Daines of Montana and Mike Braun of Indiana that would have outlawed so-called "Chimera research" – the bioengineering and experimentation of human-animal hybrid species. The larger bill has 6 Republican and 7 Democratic Senate co-sponsors, according to congressional records. Bruce reported that $250 billion in the Endless Frontiers Act will be allocated to promote emerging technologies to help the U.S. better compete with Chinese innovation. But she also noted that some of that Chinese experimentation has included a successful endeavor in April to create human-monkey embryos that lasted 20 days in a laboratory. That news comes as the National Institutes of Allergy & Infectious Disease and its leader, Dr....
    The Justice Department crafted red flag legislation for states to consider and issued a host of proposed changes to the classification of certain guns through the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives. On Monday, the DOJ published "model legislation and detailed commentary" on "extreme risk protection orders," also known as red flag laws, which allow local law enforcement to seize guns from those deemed a threat to themselves or others prior to an appearance before a judge. It also drew attention to a possible ATF rule change that would alter the definition of a rifle-style pistol "when individuals use accessories to convert pistols into short-barreled rifles." The change from pistol to short-barreled rifle likely will require gun owners to register their weapons under the National Firearms Act. The NFA tightly regulates short-barreled rifles, which are long guns with a barrel length shorter than 16 inches. FEDERAL JUDGE OVERTURNS 'ASSAULT WEAPONS' BAN IN 'HISTORIC VICTORY FOR INDIVIDUAL LIBERTY' In order to buy one, a person must register that firearm with the ATF and pay a $200 tax....
    Bradley Cortright May 27, 2021 0 Comments Sen. Joe Manchin (D-W. Va.) is blasting Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) and Senate Republicans for their opposition to creating a commission to investigate the Jan. 6 riot at the U.S. Capitol. In a statement on Thursday, Manchin said, “There is no excuse for any Republican to vote against this commission since Democrats have agreed to everything they asked for.” “Mitch McConnell has made this his political position, thinking it will help his 2022 elections. They do not believe the truth will set you free, so they continue to live in fear,” he added. Read the statement below: My statement on the January 6th Commission: pic.twitter.com/ZfNhQfKzmh— Senator Joe Manchin (@Sen_JoeManchin) May 27, 2021 Last week, the House passed legislation that would create a commission to investigate the Jan. 6 insurrection when supporters of former President Donald Trump stormed the U.S. Capitol. The bill now heads to the Senate where its fate is uncertain. Democrats would need at least 10 Republicans to join them in voting for the legisation for it...
    A Texas Republican-backed voting reform bill could be reworked in a series of private deliberations after the legislation cleared the state House on Friday. Senate Bill 7 prohibits the "solicitation of ballot by mail applications," requires disabled voters to affirm they are "physically unable to enter a polling a place" if they seek alternative means of casting their ballot, and disallows those in political subdivisions from using public funds to distribute early voting forms to people who did not request them. The House voted 81-64 to pass the legislation, though it has seen resistance from Democrats who have proposed about 130 amendments to the bill as of Thursday, according to the Texas Tribune. The proposal might be destined to be amended behind closed doors after left-leaning politicians threatened to stall the legislation. RON DESANTIS SIGNS GOP-BACKED ELECTION BILL The bill will need to once again be approved by the House before it can be sent to the Senate, where the most recent vote Saturday was 18-13. Republicans, including Gov. Greg Abbott, say the bill bolsters election integrity while...
    Washington — The House will take up a bill aimed at addressing hate crimes against Asian Americans later this month, Majority Leader Steny Hoyer announced on Thursday. The Senate passed the legislation by an overwhelming and bipartisan majority last month. The legislation would supplement the federal government's efforts to address the recent rise in anti-Asian hate crimes during the coronavirus pandemic, establish a point person at the Justice Department who would quickly review hate crime incidents and provide more guidance to state and local entities to make it easier to report hate crimes. The bill would also expand public education campaigns designed to increase awareness and outreach to victims. The proposal comes amid a dramatic rise in hate crimes against Asian Americans. The organization Stop AAPI Hate said Thursday that it had received a total of 6,603 reports of hate incidents against Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders between March 19, 2020, and March 31, 2021. The data showed that 64.8% of all hate incidents reported came from Asian American women. The House vote, set for the week of...
    (CNN)The US Senate is expected to pass a $1.9 trillion Covid-19 relief bill in the coming days before it heads to President Joe Biden's desk to be signed into law. This may seem like a major win for the new administration and congressional Democrats, but it's actually a Pyrrhic victory -- one that they may come to regret in the weeks and months ahead. Lanhee ChenThe expectation was that Biden would work to find common ground with Republicans on economic recovery, particularly after the two sides came together in late December 2020 to enact the last round of Covid-19 relief. Despite President Biden's many calls for unity and bipartisanship, however, Democrats have acted unilaterally this time around.Because this is the first major legislative initiative of Biden's presidency, the Democrats' unwillingness to compromise may have poisoned the well when it comes to future bipartisan action. This go-it-alone approach will only make it more politically challenging for Republicans to step out and work with Democrats in the future on issues such as prescription drug pricing, tougher action against China or infrastructure...
    Oklahoma’s governor signed three bills restricting access to abortion into law Monday — including one that would open up doctors to murder charges for performing the procedure. Doctors could now face criminal charges for performing an abortion on a fetus with a heartbeat — which can be detected as early as six weeks, before many women even know they’re pregnant. Under the new law, providers may also be stripped of their medical licenses for “unprofessional conduct’ if they’re caught performing an abortion that’s not deemed medically necessary — to either save the life of the mother or prevent her from becoming permanently disabled. Abortions in the state may only be done by board-certified obstetricians and gynecologists, according to the new law. Republican Governor Kevin Stitt tweeted, “I’m keeping my promise to sign all pro-life legislation. We now have three more laws protecting the lives of the unborn! HB 2441, HB 1904, and HB 1102.” Republicans cheered the controversial legislation. “I am optimistic that this legislation will help lower the abortion rate in Oklahoma,” said Republican state Representative Cynthia Roe,...
    (CNN)Key lawmakers in both parties plan to engage in substantive talks in the coming weeks to see if there can be a policing overhaul deal reached by the time of Democrats' self-imposed deadline: George Floyd's death anniversary.Democratic Rep. Karen Bass of California told CNN the conviction of former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin "gives us hope" for a policing overhaul bill. "I am hoping that we will get it over the finish line and this will be positive."Bass along with GOP Sen. Tim Scott of South Carolina and Democratic Sen. Cory Booker are trying to sketch out parameters of what a Senate version of this bill will look like. The next step will be formal negotiations in the Senate. By all accounts from all sides, there is a sincere desire to make something work on this.Bass says the goal is to have some language for the bill decided "by the time we hit the anniversary of George Floyd's death," on May 25. Her House bill, the George Floyd Justice in Policing Act, passed the House without any Republican support in...
    Uber CEO Dara Khosrowshahi said on CNBC Monday that the ride-hailing company would consider getting into cannabis delivery “when the road is clear.” “When federal laws come into play, we’re absolutely going to take a look at it,” Khosrowshahi said. Khosrowshahi made the remarks as part of a conversation about Uber’s February acquisition of Boston-based alcohol delivery service Drizly. Not part of that $1.1 billion acquisition was Lantern, a cannabis delivery service Drizly launched in May 2020. Lantern continues to operate independently. Cannabis remains illegal at the federal level, but about three dozen US states have decriminalized the drug, either for medical or recreational purposes — some for both uses. Last month, New York passed the Marijuana Regulation and Taxation Act, legalizing the recreational use and expunging the records of people who were convicted on marijuana-related charges that are no longer criminalized. And although legislation to legalize marijuana at the federal level has not been successful the past several years, Sens. Cory Booker (D-NJ), Ron Wyden (D-OR), and Chuck Schumer (D-NY) said in February that they would...
    By Phil Willon | Los Angeles Times When Gov. Gavin Newsom voiced his support last year for a ban on hydraulic fracturing by oil and gas companies, an effort long fought by the industry and trade unions alike, he gave Democrats a green light to send him legislation to achieve that goal as they saw fit. But the crackdown on oil and gas production under consideration by the California Legislature is much wider in scope than the plan requested by the governor, who may get more than he bargained for as he shoulders the pressures of carrying out the state’s COVID-19 pandemic response while battling a looming recall election. The ambitious proposal would outlaw hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, and a series of other oil extraction methods reviled by environmental activists. It would also prohibit wells from operating within 2,500 feet of homes, schools, healthcare facilities and other populated areas. Newsom’s proposal was limited to a ban only on fracking and the consideration of a buffer zone. Proponents of the bill have said from the outset that Newsom must take an...
    It’s all about how creatively you can bend the rules. Take the late Cincinnati Bengals head coach Sam Wyche in the late 1980s. As innovative a head coach as there ever was. Wyche unveiled the vaunted "no huddle offense." The Bengals would make a play, then race to the new line of scrimmage for the next down. The defense had no idea what was coming. They couldn’t sprint off the field in time for the next snap. The defense couldn’t sub personnel. It was a brilliant tactic by the Bengals and got them to the Super Bowl. Legendary New York Yankees manager Billy Martin knew baseball’s "pine tar" rule – even if no one else did. Rule 3.02 states that a bat handle "for not more than 18 inches from its end, may be covered or treated with any material or substance to improve the grip. Any such material or substance extends past the 18-inch limitation shall cause the bat to be removed from the game." SCHUMER PLOTS NEW WAY TO BYPASS REPUBLICANS ON BIDEN'S THIRD ECONOMIC SPENDING BILL Martin...
    PORTSMOUTH — In its last session of winter, Portsmouth City Council will convene on Monday to review five items on its agenda at the Shawnee State University ballroom. Beginning with second reading, the council will examine an ordinance that would limit commissions charged by third-party food delivery services on to local restaurants. 1st Ward Councilman Sean Dunne and 6th Ward Councilman Dennis Packard have said previously that this action would help both restaurants in terms of profit and customers in terms of safety. “We’re hearing this phrase, “we’re all in this together,” and I think this would help demonstrate that,” Dunne told the Portsmouth Daily Times in a February article. “We’re thankful for those services that can provide that delivery, but also we want to ensure that restaurants can survive through this.” This ordinance is requested to be passed as an emergency and would set the maximum charge at 15%, where charges have been as high as 30% throughout the pandemic. Businesses have either raised their prices to offset the commission fee or taken a financial blow by maintaining prices...
    The Senate is gearing up for a marathon voting session on Thursday for President Joe Biden's $1.9 trillion COVID relief bill as the Capitol remains on high alert for potential unrest from Trump supporters. And Vice President Kamala Harris may need to be on hand to break any ties in the evenly-divided 50-50 chamber. Senators may have a late night ahead of them as a series of amendments are expected to be offered to the legislation and it remains unclear when there will be a final vote on the thirteen figure package.   Meanwhile, the House of Representatives canceled its votes scheduled for Thursday after U.S. Capitol Police revealed it has received intelligence reports that indicated 'a possible plot to breach the Capitol by an identified militia group.' 'The decision was made that it was possible to finish all of the House's legislative work for the week tonight,' said the office of House Democratic Leader Steny Hoyer, on Wednesday. He sets the voting schedule.   Thursday is predicted by followers of the QAnon conspiracy theory to be the day that Donald Trump will take...
    An illegal Honduran immigrant spent three years inside a Missouri church to avoid deportation — and may now get to stay in the country thanks to a freshman Democrat congresswoman. Alex Garcia, a married father of five who crossed the border illegally in 2004, sought refuge in the United Church of Christ in Maplewood after being denied a one-year reprieve from deportation in 2017. “I miss spending time with my family outside of the church walls,” Garcia told Fox 5 News. “It has been hard for me watching my babies grown and learn without me.” Garcia, who is married to a US citizen, had been given two temporary reprieves from immigration officials dating to 2015 — but his most recent bid was denied. On Monday, US Rep. Cori Bush introduced legislation that would allow Garcia to avoid getting deported back to Central America. The bill, a type of legislation known as a “private bill” designed to provide assistance to individuals who have exhausted other legal remedies — often in immigration cases — would allow Garcia to...
    More On: immigration Biden administration cuts citizenship test questions in half Joe Biden brings America back to bad Obama days: Goodwin US begins admitting migrants as Biden phases out Trump’s ‘Remain in Mexico’ policy ‘Impending catastrophe’: House Republicans slam Biden immigration bill An illegal Honduran immigrant spent three years inside a Missouri church to avoid deportation — and may now get to stay in the country thanks to a freshman Democrat congresswoman. Alex Garcia, a married father of five who crossed the border illegally in 2004, sought refuge in the United Church of Christ in Maplewood after being denied a one-year reprieve from deportation in 2017. “I miss spending time with my family outside of the church walls,” Garcia told Fox 5 News. “It has been hard for me watching my babies grown and learn without me.” Garcia, who is married to a US citizen, had been given two temporary reprieves from immigration officials dating to 2015 — but his most recent bid was denied. On Monday, US Rep. Cori Bush introduced legislation that would allow Garcia...
    MONTGOMERY, Ala. (AP) — Alabama lawmakers will return to Montgomery on Tuesday for the 2021 regular session, which will be conducted differently because of the COVID-19 pandemic. Lawmakers convene at noon. Republican lawmakers have said a top priority for the first weeks of the session will be legislation to shield companies and others from civil lawsuit liability during the COVID-19 pandemic. Other key issues include gambling legislation, a state prison crisis and medical marijuana legislation. Lawmakers this year will have to draw new congressional districts but that may occur in a special session later in the year. Gov. Kay Ivey will give her annual State of the State address to lawmakers Tuesday night, but legislators will watch by remote feed. The governor on Monday signed agreements to lease two new state prisons, an action that has raised the objections of some lawmakers. Legislators plan to meet for two weeks and then take a break to review COVID-19 precautions. Copyright 2021 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed. Tags: Alabama, Associated Press
    CHICAGO (CBS) — There is a new push to get renters to stay in their apartments longer, but landlords may not be on board. Evictions except in cases of emergency are still halted in Illinois, and this proposed legislation could extend that even longer. The catch is that landlords get a check, but many are questioning if the amount is worth it. There is no denying people are facing hard times, and rent for many is hard to pay during the pandemic. The CBS 2 Investigators showed how landlords are affected, too. One woman was forced to live in her car with her daughter when her tenant did not pay and would not move out and she could not get him evicted. Now there is an attempt in Springfield to keep tenants from getting evicted for up to two years. “The problem with this statute is really it doesn’t allow the parties involved to sit down on equal bargaining grounds, and let’s think about what’s best for our building,” said property owner and attorney Ebony Lucas. Lucas knows firsthand what no...
    Bloomberg | Bloomberg | Getty Images With Democrats in control of the White House and Congress, student debt forgiveness stands a better shot of becoming a reality for millions of Americans.  Still, there are obstacles. Will cancelling the debt be a priority for the young Biden administration, which comes in amid dueling and unprecedented health and economic crises? "They have probably created a hierarchy of legislation they consider important," said Richard Semiatin, an assistant professor at American University. "It's unlikely this is on the first tier." On the campaign trail, President-elect Joe Biden promised to forgive $10,000 in student debt for all borrowers in response to the economic pain wrought by the pandemic, and the rest of the loans for those who attended public colleges or historically Black colleges and universities and earn less than $125,000 a year. "We expect to hold him to that promise," said Persis Yu, director of the Student Loan Borrower Assistance Project at the National Consumer Law Center, a nonprofit advocacy group. One recent survey found that 58% of registered voters are in support of cancelling student...
    TRENTON, N.J. (CBSNewYork) — New Jersey residents voted through a constitutional amendment to legalize marijuana, but finalizing legislation has been hit with delays. The promise of officially legalizing marijuana in 2021 may not happen. Gov. Phil Murphy is not satisfied with the decriminalization bill the Legislature sent him earlier this month. “There is some important, I want to say, technical, but important things we’re trying to wrinkle out,” Murphy said Tuesday. MORE: New Jersey Lawmakers Hammering Out Details Of Marijuana Legalization State Sen. Nicholas Scutari is the bill’s primary sponsor. He has been trying to get marijuana legalized in the Garden State for more than a decade. “It has to do with the underage possession of marijuana and what the appropriate penalties for that should be,” Scutari told CBS2’s Meg Baker. He said it’s looking like the law will make marijuana possession a civil penalty instead of criminal. Also included in the decriminalization bill is giving those already convicted a new start. “So those would be wiped clean, and there would be no longer a requirement of an arrest for possession...
    WASHINGTON -- President Donald Trump has threatened to torpedo Congress' massive COVID-19 relief and year-end package, upending a hard-fought compromise in the midst of a raging pandemic and deep economic uncertainty by demanding changes fellow Republicans have opposed.Trump assailed the bipartisan $900 billion bill and broader government funding package in a video he tweeted out Tuesday night and suggested he may not sign the legislation. That revives threats of a federal government shutdown. He called on lawmakers to increase direct payments for most Americans from $600 to $2,000 for individuals and $4,000 for couples.House Speaker Nancy Pelosi urged Trump in a Wednesday tweet to "sign the bill to keep government open!"Pelosi wrote in a letter to colleagues "the entire country knows that it is urgent for the President to sign this bill."WATCH: In Twitter video, Trump suggests he won't sign COVID relief billEMBED More News Videos Trump tells lawmakers to amend COVID-19 relief bill, suggests he may not sign $900 billion legislation. The final text of the more than 5,000-page bill was still being prepared by Congress and was not...
    WASHINGTON -- President Donald Trump has threatened to torpedo Congress' massive COVID-19 relief package in the midst of a raging pandemic and deep economic uncertainty, suddenly demanding changes fellow Republicans have opposed.Trump assailed the bipartisan $900 billion package in a video he tweeted out Tuesday night and suggested he may not sign the legislation. He called on lawmakers to increase direct payments for most Americans from $600 to $2,000 for individuals and $4,000 for couples.Railing against a range of provisions in the bill, including for foreign aid, he told lawmakers to "get rid of the wasteful and unnecessary items from this legislation and to send me a suitable bill."WATCH: In Twitter video, Trump suggests he won't sign COVID relief billEMBED More News Videos Trump tells lawmakers to amend COVID-19 relief bill, suggests he may not sign $900 billion legislation. Trump did not specifically vow to veto the bill, and there may be enough support for the legislation in Congress to override him if he does. But if Trump were to upend the sprawling legislation, the consequences would be severe, including...
    By KEVIN FREKING, Associated Press WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump is blasting the bipartisan $900 billion pandemic relief package that Congress just passed and is suggesting that he may not sign it. Trump complained in a video that he tweeted out Tuesday night that the bill delivered too much money to foreign countries, but not enough to Americans. The bill provides for a $600 payment to most Americans, but Trump said he is asking Congress to amend the bill and “increase the ridiculously low $600 to $2,000, or $4,000 for a couple. I am also asking Congress to get rid of the wasteful and unnecessary items from this legislation and to send me a suitable bill.” Copyright 2020 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed. Tags: Associated Press, legislation, infectious diseases, public health, health, coronavirus, lung disease
    WASHINGTON (AP) — Trump tells lawmakers to amend COVID-19 relief bill, suggests he may not sign $900 billion legislation. Copyright © 2020 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, written or redistributed.
    CHICAGO (WLS) -- Relief may be in sight for thousands of unemployed people across the country who were told they were "overpaid" by the state.Now there may be legislation that could allow claimants to keep the money they were told to give back."I'm on unemployment for a reason. Like, I don't have work and so I don't have a way of paying that back," said Jeff Kmiec, who reached out to the ABC 7 I-Team.RELATED: Some Illinois PUA unemployment recipients told to pay back thousands of dollars to IDES in alleged over-paymentThe ABC 7 I-Team has heard from dozens of unemployed Illinois residents, like Kmiec, who filed for Pandemic Unemployment Assistance through IDES. They've been told to come up with thousands of dollars to pay back to the state after being "overpaid."The Illinois Department of Employment Security said the "overpayment" problem can occur because PUA applicants are approved quickly, and their income may initially be overestimated and later corrected.However, applicants said they correctly filed PUA claims.On Thursday, U.S. Senators, Tammy Duckworth and Dick Durbin, introduced bipartisan legislation to "help fix...
    BALTIMORE (AP) — Officials in Baltimore may limit the amount of fees that third-party food delivery services can collect. The Baltimore Sun reported Wednesday that the Baltimore City Council would bar popular apps such as DoorDash and Grubhub from collecting more than 15% in fees under new legislation that is to be introduced. The popular apps, which also include Postmates and Uber Eats, typically take commissions from restaurants that are around 30% of the total costs of orders. The proposed bill was written by Democratic Councilman Eric Costello. He said a limit on such fees is critical because of the city's ban on indoor and outdoor dining that went into effect Friday in an effort to stop the coronavirus's spread. Restaurants across the nation have urged customers to order directly to support local businesses amid the pandemic. If the legislation passes, Baltimore would join cities such as San Francisco. It imposed a temporary 15% cap on third-party delivery fees via an emergency order from the mayor. The cap has been extended several times. Copyright 2020 The Associated Press. All rights reserved....
    AMERICANS in desperate need of stimulus checks may have to wait until February next year, a senior analyst has said. Garrett Watson, a senior policy analyst at the Tax Foundation, predicts the date for the next round of relief payments will be early in 2021. 2Americans may have to wait until February 2021 for a second £1,200 stimulus pay outCredit: Getty Images - Getty It comes as calls for a second round of stimulus checks grows louder amid reports that more and more US citizens are struggling financially due to the Covid-19 crisis. Lawmakers this week made progress on a proposed $908billion bill proposed by President-elect Joe Biden. But the proposal does not include a second round of $1,200 stimulus checks, as congressional aides still thrash the details of the package out. As reported by NBC, Watson said Congress' current goal is to keep the final relief measures of 2020 under the $1 trillion mark. Another round of $1,200 payments would cost more than $300 billion. But this would use up a chunk of other funds urgently needed across the country. Watson added that...
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