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    SANTA ROSA (CBS SF) — The personal data of 2,347 clients of three Sonoma County agencies may have been exposed during a breach of a county contractor’s network, county officials said Wednesday. An August ransomware attack on the network of Seneca Family of Agencies may have exposed vital personal data including names, social security numbers, addresses, phone numbers, diagnosis and treatment information, the county said. Seneca provides mental health, counseling and family engagement services for the county Human Services Department, Health Services Department and Probation Department. The county said there is no evidence that clients’ personal data has been misused as a result of the breach but, as a precaution, Seneca is notifying county clients whose data was stored on its network. The county’s computer systems were not attacked or compromised during the incident. The county took immediate action to secure clients’ data when it was notified of the breach. Seneca is providing potentially impacted individuals with 12 months of free credit monitoring and identity protection services. To enroll, clients can call (855) 675-2841 Monday through Friday (except U.S. holidays),...
    Climate change's impact feels all but inevitable given the federal government's recent reports The Biden administration released reports from more than two dozen federal agencies on Thursday detailing the ways each department plans to adapt to climate change. The language within these reports from such agencies as the Department of Commerce, Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and even the Smithsonian Institute paint bleak portraits of the crises to come, suggesting a depressing inevitability of rising inequality. In the case of the Smithsonian, its major priorities—educating guests about climate change’s impact on marginalized communities, as well as what a more sustainable planet might look like—may never get off the ground if severe weather threatens the very facilities meant to house these exhibits. The Smithsonian Institute admits that forced closures from storms would most heavily impact marginalized workers who otherwise would not be able to work remotely. The agency has what’s known as a “telework” policy, though it doesn’t extend to every employee. Work is a key issue across myriad departments, most notably within the Department of Defense (DOD), which, in its climate change adaptability report, stresses the...
    Former Hawaii Rep. Tulsi Gabbard sounded the alarm on Democratic elite using their power to "silence us into compliance," telling "Fox News Primetime" the oath she took as a soldier and congresswoman to protect the right of the First Amendment.  PARENTS CONTINUE BLASTING DOJ, SCHOOL BOARDS AMID PROBE INTO VIOLENT THREATS TULSI GABBARD: Every American should be concerned about what's happening right now, Ben. This is something that's bigger than Democrats versus Republicans. What we're seeing here is about the powerful elite in this country, using their power to try to silence and control us. What is so dangerous about this situation is we have the attorney general essentially weaponizing our federal law enforcement agencies to intimidate and silence the American people, to try to silence us into compliance, essentially.  And the reality is that, as you know, very well, whether we disagree or agree with each other, whether our speech is quiet or obnoxious, our speech is protected by the First Amendment. It's something that I, as a soldier and as a member of Congress, took an oath to...
    New York Gov. Kathy Hochul has cautioned residents as thunderstorms are expected to bring heavy rain to parts of the state, including areas that experienced flooding recently.  Hochul said the storms are expected to mainly impact the Hudson Valley, New York City, parts of western Long Island, and the Capital Region from the late afternoon through the evening hours of Wednesday, Sept 8. (See the image above.) Flash flood watches were issued for Orange, Rockland and Sullivan counties from Wednesday afternoon through late Wednesday night. Isolated tornadoes could also form as the storm moves across the state, she said. State agencies were also directed to prepare for the coastal impacts of Hurricane Larry, which is expected to cause swells along the East Coast and may impact New York's shorelines later this week. "We witnessed the painful devastation left by the remnants of Hurricane Ida and, out of an abundance of caution, we are now keeping a close eye on this week's storms and any potential impacts they may cause across New York," Hochul said. "I am urging New Yorkers to...
    A very rare “window of opportunity” for the Alameda County Water District to purchase more than 50,000 acres of privately held land in the hills east of the Bay Area to preserve water quality for millions of people appears to have closed, officials said this week. Leaders of the district — which provides water to about 350,000 people in Fremont, Newark, and Union City — have for nearly two years been weighing making an offer to buy the N3 Cattle Co. ranch, much of which lies in watersheds that feed into critical creeks, reservoirs and lakes depended on for water supplies. Officials have said if the district purchased the huge swath of land, it would help ensure water quality for generations to come in the Bay Area by preventing potential development on the land, which lies upstream of Lake Del Valle, Calaveras Reservoir, and parts of the greater Alameda Creek watershed. But while the district’s board of directors discussed many times in closed session meetings since fall 2019 how or whether to buy the property — in what has been...
    A report issued by the Kentucky Legislative Research Commission last week called on the state’s Finance and Administration Cabinet to improve several policies in regards to vehicle fleet management. That includes tracking underutilized vehicles and determining if independent fleets managed by five state agencies are effectively using public funds. The 34-page report was the focus of a Legislative Oversight and Investigations Committee meeting in Frankfort on Thursday. Among the findings was 24.4% of the 3,793 cars, trucks and sports-utility vehicles leased in fiscal year 2019 were driven 5,000 miles or less. In addition, 110 of the 459 vehicles state agencies bought also were driven less than 5,000 miles. It’s not just a one-year issue either as the cabinet averaged more than 917 leased vehicles per year that were driven less than 5,000 miles over a five-year period. In agency fleets, the average was more than 113 purchased cars per year. “These vehicles may be underutilized, and the commonwealth may be buying more vehicles than necessary,” the report stated. The report stated that the cabinet did not seek reports from five...
    US security agencies are keep a close eye on two Iranian warships that may be headed toward Venezuela.  An Iranian frigate and a former oil tanker known as the Makran are currently sailing south along the east coast of Africa, anonymous sources told Politico on Saturday.  Intelligence officials remain mystified by Iran's motivations with the two vessels and they are unsure what kind of cargo they may be holding. However, if the ships do end up in Venezuela it could be a sign Iranian President Hassan Rouhani is trying to intimidate Washington.  The 755-foot long Makrtan was commissioned this year. Iranian officials have boasted of the its missile and weapons capabilities, and it can allegedly carry up to six helicopters.  Both Iran and Venezuela are under heavy sanctions from the United States, and they have become closer allies in recent years.  US security agencies are keep a close eye on two Iranian naval vessels that may be headed toward Venezuela. The former oil tanker, Makran, is one of two ships currently sailing south along the east coast of Africa Iran...
    US Navy nuke submarines have reportedly detected a "mystery" craft traveling at "unprecedented speeds" from an underwater base. The Pentagon is said to have confirmed footage showing a mysterious pyramid as genine ahead of a potential explosive official report on numerous UFO sightings. 7US Navy submarines have detected "unknown" craft travelling at unprecedented speedsCredit: Fox 7The craft reportedly had the ability to travel at incredible speeds above and in the waterCredit: Fox The submarine sightings were revealed by Tom Rogan from the Washington Examiner. Rogan told Fox News' Tucker Carlson it is not thought the craft could be technology from a foreign power. He said: "I have heard from very good sources and that the US Navy has the data. "I think what we may well be looking at a true unknown. "Relevant to this video, an area we will learn more about is the interaction between US Navy submarines, nuclear ballistic submarines and attack submarines, picking up sonar contact of things moving at hundreds of knots under the water. "Which is to say, intelligently controlled machinery that is not...
    The US government has released updated figures on the number of companies and federal agencies it believes were impacted by the recent SolarWinds hack. “As of today, 9 federal agencies and about 100 private sector companies were compromised,” Deputy National Security Advisor Anne Neuberger said in a briefing, though she declined to name specific organizations. Although the hack was “likely of Russian origin,” Neuberger said the hackers launched their attack from inside the US. The latest figures revealed are lower than the 250 federal agencies and businesses that were previously reported to have been infected, though Neuberger cautioned that the investigation is still in its “beginning stages” and that “additional compromises” may be found. In particular, the technology companies compromised gives hackers potential footholds for future attacks. Up to 18,000 SolarWinds customers are thought to have originally received the malicious code, though hackers did not attempt to gain additional access to all of them. “As of today, 9 federal agencies and about 100 private sector companies were compromised” The hack originally came to light late last year, when it emerged...
    Six red-state attorneys general are warning the Biden administration they will take legal action if he oversteps his authority to implement radical and wide-ranging agendas, including the rollback of immigration rules. The six attorneys general, Patrick Morrisey (WV), Ken Paxton (TX), Austin Knudsen (MT), Lynn Fitch (MS), Todd Rokita (IN), and Leslie Rutledge (AR) signed the letter addressed to President Joe Biden, highlighting concerns over the tone he has set in his early days in office by signing a flurry of executive actions, besting the pace of all his predecessors. The officials noted that Biden’s first week “appears to indicate” that his administration “may be following the unfortunate path of executive unilateralism” and warned that they will take action in the event of “cabinet officials, executive officers, and agencies” moving beyond their authority. The Republicans listed specific issues that may arise — from the administration attempting to implement the “extreme ‘Green New Deal'” agenda to “tearing down immigration statutes” via “executive fiat.” “Overreaching and defying Congress will not be rewarded or succeed. Our States have led the charge in successfully challenging...
    Sudhakar Ramakrishna, who took over as SolarWinds CEO this week, wrote in a blog post that the company has brought in several cybersecurity experts to help the team immediately improve “critical business and product development systems, with the goal of making SolarWinds an enterprise software industry security leader.” On its website, Krebs Stamos Group states that it works with clients to “help them understand the threats they face, the weaknesses in their posture, and the role they play in the security of our wider society.” Hackers reportedly used a vulnerability in IT management software sold by SolarWinds to access systems belonging to many public and private sector organizations, including federal agencies. US intelligence agencies have suggested Russia was behind the attack and officials believe more than 18,000 SolarWinds clients may have been affected. Meanwhile, it emerged that sealed US court records may have been compromised in the breach. 
    WASHINGTON (AP) — The Justice Department said Wednesday that about 3% of its email accounts could be compromised as part of a massive breach of federal government agencies that U.S. officials have linked to Russia. No classified systems are believed to have been affected, according to a statement from Justice Department spokesman Marc Raimondi. It did not identify to whom who the potentially compromised email accounts may belong. It was not immediately clear whether the intrusion at the Justice Department and other agencies included access to data other than email because Microsoft’s Office 365 includes multiple document-sharing and collaborative components. Copyright © 2021 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, written or redistributed.
    The Russia-linked SolarWinds hack which targeted US government agencies and private corporations may be even worse than officials first realized, with some 250 federal agencies and business now believed affected, the New York Times reported. Microsoft has said the hackers compromised SolarWinds’ Orion monitoring and management software, allowing them to “impersonate any of the organization’s existing users and accounts, including highly privileged accounts.” The Times reports that Russia exploited layers of the supply chain to access the agencies’ systems. The Times reports that early warning sensors that Cyber Command and the NSA placed inside foreign networks to detect potential attacks appear to have failed in this instance. In addition, it seems likely that the US government’s attention on protecting the November elections from foreign hackers may have taken resources and focus away from the software supply chain, according to the Times. And conducting the attack from within the US apparently allowed the hackers to evade detection by the Department of Homeland Security. Microsoft said earlier this week it had discovered its systems were infiltrated “beyond just the presence...
    JOE Biden said that his incoming administration has faced "obstruction" from certain government agencies that are making it "harder" to protect the American people. The president-elect made the remarks during a Monday afternoon speech given after he was briefed by members of his national security and foreign policy agency review teams. 1Biden said his administration is facing 'obstruction' from certain government agenciesCredit: Reuters Biden said his administration is facing resistance from certain agencies, particularly the Department of Defense, and other security departments. He said many of the agencies "that are critical to our security have incurred enormous damage." "Many of them have been hollowed out in personnel, capacity and in morale," Biden added. Most read in NewsNIGHT OF TERRORXXXTentacion pal part of 'rapper trio that raped wife in $20k kidnap plot'REVENGE SHOOTINGTragic toddler, 3, murdered by gang in ‘revenge’ drive-by shootingHOUSE HUNTERSTrump & Melania 'hunting for new home as small Mar-a-Lago may spark conflict'TAKING ON TROLLSClaudia Conway hits back at haters after blasting 'confused' mom KellyanneTRAGIC LOSSGirl, 7, 'fatally shot in back of the head while going to buy Xmas...
    (CNN)US officials and private sector experts investigating the massive data breach that has rocked Washington increasingly believe the attackers were ultimately discovered because they took a more aggressive "calculated risk" that led to a possible "unforced error" as they tried to expand their access within the network they had penetrated months earlier without detection, according to a US official and two sources familiar with the situation. Investigators still haven't confirmed the motives of the attackers as they work both to uncover the full scope of the attack and assign blame for the campaign that impacted at least half a dozen government agencies and potentially hundreds of private companies. The incursion was first uncovered by the cybersecurity firm FireEye after its own network was breached. FireEye was tipped off to the hackers' presence when they attempt to move laterally within the firm's network, according to the sources, a move that suggested the hackers were targeting sensitive data beyond emails addresses or business records. Whether that exposure was the result of a mistake by the attackers or because they took a calculated...
    More On: russia Suspect in death of Russian COVID-19 scientist released Kremlin critic reportedly tricked Russian spy into admitting poisoning Ex-cybersecurity chief takes blames for massive government hack Prominent Russian scientist working on COVID-19 vaccine found dead President-elect Joe Biden’s first big test is already clear, a month before he takes office: what to do about to a vast cyberattack almost surely waged by Russia. This was no run-of-the-mill hack. A key starting point seems to be “backdoor” malware that infected a flawed product from software firm SolarWinds used by thousands of customers, including US government agencies, most Fortune 500 companies and the widely used cybersecurity firm FireEye. The penetration was global and months-long, with the extent of damage yet unknown; it may not even be over. They hit the Pentagon, US intelligence agencies, nuclear labs, the Commerce, Justice, Treasury and Homeland Security departments and several utilities. FireEye cybersecurity tools were likely stolen, giving the hackers a future leg up. Experts say the level of sophistication points to Russia; both Secretary of State Mike Pompeo and...
    More On: russia Trump says government cyberattack may have been China, not Russia US to close two consulates in Russia, State Department says Massive SolarWinds hack a ‘grave risk’ to global computer systems It’s ‘pretty clear’ Russia did it, Pompeo says of massive US government hack attack Sen. Mitt Romney said Russia acted with “impunity” when it hacked a number of federal agencies and scores of private companies worldwide – a cyber attack that must be met with a response from the US. “This invasion underscores that Russia acted with impunity. They didn’t fear what we would be able to do from a cyber capacity. They didn’t think that our defense systems were particularly adequate. And they apparently didn’t think that we would respond in a very aggressive way,” the Utah Republican said Sunday on NBC News’ “Meet the Press.” Romney said Russia’s apparent lack of concern about the US’ ability to retaliate must be address and the government has to become “more serious” about “our cyber capabilities – offensive and defensive.” “I think we have to have a...
    President Donald Trump downplayed the widespread hack of U.S. government agencies in his first comment on the subject Saturday, tweeting that the media was blowing the incident out of proportion. Hackers allegedly breached numerous government agencies and major corporations after compromising software from SolarWinds, a Texas-based company used by the organizations. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said Friday that the culprit was most likely Russia, a sentiment Trump downplayed Saturday. “The Cyber Hack is far greater in the Fake News Media than in actuality. I have been fully briefed and everything is well under control. Russia, Russia, Russia is the priority chant when anything happens because Lamestream is, for mostly financial reasons, petrified of discussing the possibility that it may be China (it may!),” Trump tweeted. “There could also have been a hit on our ridiculous voting machines during the election, which is now obvious that I won big, making it an even more corrupted embarrassment for the USA.” The companies and agencies affected by the hack have not presented evidence suggesting China was behind the attack. (RELATED: REPORT: US...
    By Frank Bajak | Associated Press It’s going to take months to kick elite hackers widely believed to be Russian out of the U.S. government networks they have been quietly rifling through since as far back as March in Washington’s worst cyberespionage failure on record. Experts say there simply are not enough skilled threat-hunting teams to identify all the government and private-sector systems that may have been hacked. FireEye, the cybersecurity company that discovered the worst-ever intrusion into U.S. agencies and was among the victims, has already tallied dozens of casualties. It’s racing to identify more. “We have a serious problem. We don’t know what networks they are in, how deep they are, what access they have, what tools they left,” said Bruce Schneier, a prominent security expert and Harvard fellow. It’s not known exactly what the hackers were seeking, but experts say it could include nuclear secrets, blueprints for advanced weaponry and information for dossiers on key government and industry leaders. That means many federal workers — and others in the private sector — will have to presume that...
    RUSSIAN hackers are a "grave" threat to the United States as more breaches of federal agencies have been exposed. Federal officials issued an urgent warning on Thursday that the suspected hackers posed as "a grave risk to the federal government." 5Federal officers issued a new warning on ThursdayCredit: Getty Images - Getty Alongside potentially stealing data from agencies within the Treasury Department and the US Department of Commerce, it has since emerged that other software in the "supply chain" used by government agencies may have been hacked, the New York Times reported. "This adversary has demonstrated an ability to exploit software supply chains and shown significant knowledge of Windows networks," the alert read. "It is likely that the adversary has additional initial access vectors and tactics, techniques and procedures," which, it said, "have not yet been discovered." "Taken together, these observed techniques indicate an adversary who is skilled, stealthy with operational security, and is willing to expend significant resources to maintain covert presence," the warning said. Due to this, investigators said it could take months to figure out...
    Washington (CNN Business)The US government is reeling from multiple data breaches at top federal agencies, the result of a worldwide hacking campaign with possible ties to Russia. Investigators are still trying to figure out how much of the government may have been affected and how badly it may have been compromised. But what little we know has cybersecurity experts extremely worried — with some describing the attack as a literal wakeup call. "I woke up in the middle of the night last night just sick to my stomach," said Theresa Payton, who served as White House Chief Information Officer under President George W. Bush. "On a scale of 1 to 10, I'm at a 9 — and it's not because of what I know; it's because of what we still don't know." On Sunday evening, the Commerce Department acknowledged it had been hit by a data breach after Reuters first reported that sophisticated hackers compromised the agency through a third-party software vendor known as SolarWinds. While SolarWinds is not a household name, it works with many businesses and organizations that...
    BOSTON (AP) — Some of America’s most deeply held secrets may have been stolen in a disciplined, monthslong operation being blamed on elite Russian government hackers. The possibilities of what might have been purloined are mind-boggling. Could hackers have obtained nuclear secrets? COVID-19 vaccine data? Blueprints for next-generation weapons systems? It will take weeks, maybe years in some cases, for digital sleuths combing through U.S. government and private industry networks to get the answers. These hackers are consummate pros at covering their tracks, experts say. Some theft may never be detected. What’s seems clear is that this campaign — which cybersecurity experts says exhibits the tactics and techniques of Russia’s SVR foreign intelligence agency — will rank among the most prolific in the annals of cyberespionage. U.S. government agencies, including the Treasury and Commerce departments, were among dozens of high-value public- and private-sector targets known to have been infiltrated as far back as March through a commercial software update distributed to thousands of companies and government agencies worldwide. A Pentagon statement Monday indicated it used the software. It said it...
    By FRANK BAJAK, AP Technology Writer BOSTON (AP) — Some of America’s most deeply held secrets may have been stolen in a disciplined, monthslong operation being blamed on elite Russian government hackers. The possibilities of what might have been purloined are mind-boggling. Could hackers have obtained nuclear secrets? COVID-19 vaccine data? Blueprints for next-generation weapons systems? It will take weeks, maybe years in some cases, for digital sleuths combing through U.S. government and private industry networks to get the answers. These hackers are consummate pros at covering their tracks, experts say. Some theft may never be detected. What’s seems clear is that this campaign — which cybersecurity experts says exhibits the tactics and techniques of Russia’s SVR foreign intelligence agency — will rank among the most prolific in the annals of cyberespionage. U.S. government agencies, including the Treasury and Commerce departments, were among dozens of high-value public- and private-sector targets known to have been infiltrated as far back as March through a commercial software update distributed to thousands of companies and government agencies worldwide. A Pentagon statement Monday indicated it...
    ​Federal agencies were ordered to disconnect servers that may have been compromised during the months-long suspected Russian-hack of the Treasury and Commerce departments and scan their networks for “malicious actors,” the Department of Homeland Security said. “Tonight’s directive is intended to mitigate potential compromises within federal civilian networks, and we urge all our partners — in the public and private sectors — to assess their exposure to this compromise and to secure their networks against any exploitation,” the DHS’ Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency said in a statement late Sunday.   It’s only the fifth emergency directive issued by CISA since 2015. WHITE HOUSE CONFIRMS CYBERATTACK REPORT ON U.S. TREASURY BY FOREIGN GOVERNMENT The intrusion into the Treasury and Commerce department systems, first reported by Reuters, is believed to be connected to a breach at US cybersecurity firm FireEye. The hackers may have infiltrated the systems by piggybacking on SolarWinds, a server software used by scores of government agencies and a majority of Fortune 500 companies. The directive warned that the “compromise of SolarWinds’ Orion Network Management Products poses unacceptable risks to...
    The same Russian government hacking group responsible for a security breach at FireEye compromised the Treasury and Commerce departments and other US government agencies, The Washington Post reported. The group, known as APT29, or Cozy Bear, was responsible for hacking the US State Department and the White House during the Obama administration, according to the Post, and is the group that officials believe targeted COVID-19 vaccine research over the summer. Reuters reported that in addition to hacking Treasury and the Commerce Department’s National Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA), the hackers may have breached other US government entities. Government officials considered the hack dire enough that the National Security Council held an emergency meeting at the White House on Saturday. An NSC spokesman told Reuters that the government was “aware” of the reports, adding “we are taking all necessary steps” to remedy the situation. It’s not yet clear exactly what information may have been stolen or which foreign government was involved. But the “highly sophisticated” hackers were able to break into NTIA’s Microsoft Office software, tricking authentication controls in...
    BURLINGTON, Vt. (AP) — The University of Vermont Health Network has “experienced a significant and ongoing system-wide network issue” and is investigating all causes including a possible cyberattack, officials said Thursday, as federal agencies are warning about cyber-assaults against the U.S. health care system. Some changes have been made to patient appointments and the network was trying to reach impacted patients, said spokesman Neal Goswami in a text. The outage has affected its six hospitals in various ways. Federal agencies warned Wednesday that cybercriminals are unleashing a wave of data-scrambling extortion attempts against the U.S. health care system designed to lock up hospital information systems, which could hurt patient care just as nationwide cases of COVID-19 are spiking. The FBI and two federal agencies warned in an alert that they had “credible information of an increased and imminent cybercrime threat to U.S. hospitals and healthcare providers.” UVM Medical Center was rescheduling some elective procedures and hoped to resume those procedures on Friday, he said in a statement. Patients may experience delays at Central Vermont Medical Center in Berlin and Champlain...
    BOSTON – Federal agencies warned that cybercriminals are unleashing a major ransomware assault against the U.S. healthcare system. Independent security experts say it has already hobbled at least four U.S. hospitals this month, and could potentially impact hundreds more. In a joint alert Wednesday, the FBI and two federal agencies warned that they had “credible information of an increased and imminent cybercrime threat to U.S. hospitals and healthcare providers.” They said “malicious cyber actors” are targeting the sector with ransomware that could lead to “data theft and disruption of healthcare services.” The attacks coincide with the U.S. presidential election, but do not appear to have any connection to it. “We are experiencing the most significant cyber security threat we’ve ever seen in the United States,” Charles Carmakal, chief technical officer of the cybersecurity firm Mandiant, said in a statement. He’s concerned that the group may deploy malware to hundreds of hospitals over the next few weeks. Alex Holden, CEO of Hold Security, which has been closely tracking the ransomware in question for more than a year, agreed that the unfolding...
    A woman accused of sending a letter containing ricin to President Trump is also suspected of mailing the highly-potent poison to law enforcement agencies in Texas, sources close to the matter said Monday. The woman, who was not identified prior to her initial court appearance, was taken into custody Sunday by US Customs and Border Protection agents at the Peace Bridge border crossing near Buffalo, New York. She was expected to appear in federal court Tuesday in Buffalo to face charges, three law enforcement officials told The Associated Press. The letter, which appeared to have been sent from Canada, was intercepted last week at a government facility that screens mail addressed to the White House and President Trump. Two tests later confirmed it tested positive for ricin, a highly toxic substance that can kill adults in doses as small as 500 micrograms, CNN reports. Now, it has emerged that envelopes containing the deadly poison were also sent to law enforcement agencies in the Rio Grande Valley in south Texas, a law enforcement official told the Associated Press, adding that they...
    Washington, DC (CNN)New York City bus driver Cynthia Wells has battled Covid-19, missing weeks of work this spring. She's watched colleagues die from the virus. Today, she still feels unsafe, shielded from the passengers by a thin plastic sheet resembling a shower curtain. And the virus isn't her only concern. Transit workers like Wells, who have risked their lives during the pandemic, find themselves wondering if they'll even have jobs soon. Some have already lost their positions. And massive budget shortfalls may force transportation agencies to make drastic cuts. Transit's woes are typical of the struggling US economy, which gained a lower-than-expected 1.4 million jobs in August and has an unemployment rate of 8.4%, according to data the US Bureau of Labor Statistics released Friday."I"m not hearing that help is coming," Wells said in an interview with CNN Business. "There's so much unknown. I think that creates even more fear." She said she's never seen employees worry so much about their futures in her 30 years as a driver. And Wells said she doesn't have anything reassuring to tell colleagues...
    JUNEAU, Alaska (AP) — Critics and proponents are debating the merits of changes to federal environmental policy, including the effects on management of Alaska's Tongass National Forest. The largest U.S. national forest will probably be impacted by the Trump administration’s recent revisions to the National Environmental Policy Act, Alaska’s Energy Desk reported Wednesday. Supporters have said the changes streamline a regulatory process that hampers development on federal lands. Natalie Dawson, executive director of Audubon Alaska, said the updates engender less public engagement, which was a founding principle of the environmental act's framework. Only substantive comments about projects will be accepted under the new rules, meaning expressions of general concerns about issues such as logging near animal or fish habitat will not be considered. “You may not have the time to sit down with all the maps and documents and provide a site-specific analysis of the federal agency action, and yet you are an incredibly important stakeholder in this process,” she said. The Tongass forest is scheduled to be exempted from the federal Roadless Rule, which could open up more access...
    The The US Department of Homeland Security is reportedly worried that face coverings will stymie the police's use of facial recognition technology. According to a report from The Intercept, a bulletin drafted by the DHS discusses the effects of widespread use of face coverings in a correspondence with other federal agencies, including Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE). 'The potential impacts that widespread use of protective masks could have on security operations that incorporate face recognition systems — such as video cameras, image processing hardware and software, and image recognition algorithms — to monitor public spaces during the ongoing Covid-19 public health emergency and in the months after the pandemic subsides,' reads the bulletin according to The Intercept. Federal Agencies that face coverings used by people trying to help prevent COVID-19 may thwart the effectiveness of facial recognition systems (stock) The bulletin, which was obtained via a trove of police documents leaked in the 'BlueLeaks' hack on law enforcement agencies, mentions that the masks could be used by extremists to avoid facial recognition technology but says there is no current evidence that...
    By John Miller ZURICH (Reuters) - Swiss officials have opened investigations into importers and dealers of defective respiratory masks, they said on Friday, warning users of protective devices to be vigilant for flawed products rushed into the country during the COVID-19 pandemic. The Swiss Federal Office for Accident Prevention (BFA) and Swiss National Accident Insurance Fund (SUVA) said 60% of the protective masks they reviewed offered insufficient protection. The call by the agencies does not pertain to soft hygienic masks people commonly wear in public or while riding trains and buses, but to more robust respiratory protective devices to help protect medical workers from the deadly disease. Most of the masks were labelled KN95, the agencies said, a label that may indicate approval in China. In April, the Swiss government relaxed import restrictions on protective gear so its health system had enough amid a global scramble. "SUVA and BFU noticed...reports that numerous defective products were in circulation," the agencies said. Products, mostly purchased online, were tested in a SUVA laboratory. After scrutinising about 60 kinds of masks, the agencies determined...
    After a federal judge's late-night ruling on June 5 limiting how police can use force against Denver protesters, several law enforcement agencies that had been helping the Denver Police Department decided that they were done. “I pulled our team immediately upon the temporary restraining order and we haven’t returned,” says Gary Creager, the Broomfield police chief. “Chief Paul Pazen, he’s a very smart man. He’s got his use-of-force policy. I’m not in a position at 8:30 on a Friday night when the restraining order was issued to review Chief Pazen’s policy.” Like over a dozen other law enforcement agencies that had been assisting the DPD during the Denver protests, Creager's department operates under its own use-of-force policy, even when it's in another agency's jurisdiction — such as Denver.Related StoriesAll the "Less-Lethal" Munitions Used by Law Enforcement at ProtestsJudge's Limit on "Less-Lethal" Weapons Could Become State LawWhen the Smoke Clears: Denver Police Commit to Transparency, New PoliciesThe temporary restraining order issued by Judge R. Brooke Jackson of the U.S. District Court of Colorado put an end to this scattershot application of use-of-force...
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