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    ST. PAUL, Minn. (WCCO) — St. Paul Public Schools says it might close LEAP High School and four elementary schools because of low enrollment. From a refugee camp in Thailand to a student in St. Paul, 18-year-old Naing Aung has finally found his refuge in LEAP High School. READ MORE: Ivan Contreras-Sanchez Charged With Murder In Beating Death Of Man Found In Farm Ditch“We came from same refugee, so we understand each other,” Aung said. “We can’t speak English that well.” Students at the school have a special bond because LEAP specifically serves learners that are new to the country. “LEAP High School is the perfect place for immigrants to have a good environment while learning culture, language and assignments,” said Israel Toledo, a sophomore. Declining enrollment could cause the school to close. LEAP went from about 360 enrolled students in 2011 to a current enrollment of about 140 students. The St. Paul Board of Education recommends shutting down LEAP and four elementary schools including Highwood Hills, John A. Johnson, Jackson, and Wellstone. It’s part of a plan called Envision...
    VIDEO3:5503:55How families can use 529 plans to help save for collegeSquawk Box Amid the ongoing pandemic, many high schoolers are rethinking their future plans, and whether that will still include college. A recent survey of high school students found that the likelihood of attending a four-year school sank more than 20% in the last year and a half — down to 48%, from 71%, according to ECMC Group, a nonprofit aimed at helping students find success.  High schoolers are putting more emphasis on career training and post-college employment, the report found. ECMC Group polled more than 1,000 high school students four times since January 2020. Nearly half, or 46%, now say their ideal post-high school plans would require three years of college or less. More from Personal Finance:Here are the colleges with the best return on investmentFewer students are going to college because of the costHow to maximize your college financial aid Even before the pandemic, students were starting to consider more affordable, direct-to-career alternatives to a four-year degree, said Jeremy Wheaton, ECMC Group's president and CEO. Still, most said...
    PHILADELPHIA (CBS) — The potential SEPTA strike could force Philadelphia schools to return to remote learning. One week from tonight, as kids are trick or treating, many parents may be frightened by the thought of a strike when the clock strikes midnight. “It’s going to be really hard for me… I don’t have a car, I don’t know [how to get to school], I guess Uber,” student Ritika Malik said of the possible SEPTA strike. READ MORE: SEPTA Union Unanimously Approves Strike If Deal Isn't ReachedPhiladelphia’s students and their families are watching and wondering what they’ll do if SEPTA and more than 5,000 transport workers who operate our city’s buses, trolleys, subway, and trains fail to reach an agreement by 12:01 a.m. on November 1. “We’re not trying to be greedy, we’re not trying to break the bank, we’re not trying to be unreasonable,” Willie Brown, the president of the TWU Local 234, said. Union leaders said current terms aren’t going to get a deal done, but SEPTA is staying optimistic for a new contract that “provides stability for both...
    Fox News is very upset. Because, on Thursday, MSNBC’s Nicolle Wallace went there: "If kids aren’t in school, it’s because Republicans didn’t get vaccinated and Republican governors stood in the way of mask mandates that would make it possible," Wallace said. While calling Wallace a “flack” and "one of the most fanatically anti-GOP voices on MSNBC,” Fox conspicuously omitted any factual rebuttal to her statements. Of course, Fox News is always upset about something. Outrage is their primary modus operandi, and the network’s existence depends on continually ginning up outrage among its viewership. But sheer defensiveness runs a close second. Occasionally, there’s a story that prompts a swift reaction by Fox News, simply because they see it as a threat that must be quashed at all costs. The breakdown of the Texas power grid this past February was a good example, as millions of Texans froze in the dark due to a catastrophic failure of Texas’ Republican governor and the state’s Republican-dominated legislature (Fox immediately blamed renewable energy sources and even the Green New Deal, neither of which had anything to...
    MINNEAPOLIS (WCCO) — This week marks the end of the school year across much of Minnesota. For many, summer will be a welcomed break from the balancing act the pandemic caused at home. READ MORE: Wis. Pharmacist Who Ruined COVID Vaccine Doses Sentenced To 3 Years In Prison WCCO has been documenting the distance learning journey of two Twin Cities families since September. We found the setbacks and sacrifices will take some time to recover from. We caught a brief glimpse of life as kids again on a Bloomington playground as this brother and sister finish out an unprecedented school year. As a single mom, Chalisa Everson couldn’t risk a drawn out quarantine away from the salon with kids at separate schools. “I had to expect a lot out of them and I’m at work,” Everson said. “So if I don’t go to work I don’t make any money. So I just kept them home.” With the help of their grandparents and dedicated teachers, Averie and Taj did their best to keep up with distance learning. (credit: CBS) “There’s good...
    HOLLY Willoughby has revealed how her cheeky six-year-old son Chester refused to go to school during her break from This Morning. The 40-year-old TV presenter shared an adorable snap of the youngster wrapped up in his duvet and covered in teddies. 5Holly shared an adorable snap of her son ChesterCredit: instagram Holly laughed as she explained she "hoped he was pointing" at her, while Chester stuck out his index finger to direct his mum towards the door. "Someone didn’t want to go to school today... I hope Chester was pointing at me," she wrote beneath the sweet snap alongside an embarrassed emoji. Fans immediately flooded the comments section as they joked he got his "fingers mixed up" and may have been giving his mum a middle finger. "I thought that was a middle finger there," one shocked fan wrote alongside laughing faces, as another agreed: "You're not the only one." 5The star has been taking an extended break from This Morning A third chimed in: "I have a feeling he got his fingers mixed up and...
    OAKLAND, Calif. (KGO) -- After more than a year of being closed due to coronavirus, Oakland schools will begin reopening Tuesday. Only the younger kids will be allowed in the classroom and it will be a different experience for them and their families.RELATED: Oakland Unified announces agreement to bring students back to in-person learningOakland Unified says close to 58 percent of families with the youngest students said they were returning to in-person learning."Do we expect it to be quite that high? Probably not," anticipated John Sasaki, Spokesperson for the Oakland Unified School District.That's because tomorrow when some schools start reopening, not every teacher will be there. In fact, the school district told us because this week is optional for teachers, only 38 percent of them opted to return -- But all teachers must come back by April 19.VIDEO: Oakland Unified to begin in-person learning on Tuesday, but not all schools will reopenEMBED More News Videos After more than a year of distance learning, Oakland Unified School District will begin welcoming students back on campus on March 30. "We still had...
    SAN FRANCISCO (KGO) -- As schools prepare to reopen, Asian American, Black and Hispanic families are opting to keep their children in distance learning at disproportionately high rates. The reason? Many students live in multigenerational households and are concerned they may infect others in the home, like their grandparents or another elderly relative.New York City has reported that Asian American students make up the smallest portion of children that have returned to classrooms.RELATED: Building a Better Bay Area: Solutions for students struggling with distance learningThe same is true in Nashville public schools.In Chicago, one third of Asian, Black and Latino students have returned, while two-thirds of white kids have come back.As San Francisco schools prepare to reopen, we have found that many Asian Americans here are also following that trend."Going back to school is very dangerous, at home safe," expressed San Francisco Parent Lina Li.VIDEO: Falling behind while distance learning isn't just an academic issue for students, familiesEMBED More News Videos Falling behind while distance learning isn't just an academic issue. It can also be an emotional one, for both...
    A TEENAGE boy hacked his parents and his little sister to death with an axe because he didn't want to go to school. Vadim Gorbunov, 17, killed his mum and his 12-year-old sister before turning the axe on his father during a furious fight over school. 5The teenage boy hacked his family to death using an axe after an argument about school 5The 17-year-old boy was described as a high-flying final year student 5Cops said Vadim confessed to the gruesome killings Cops said the boy disfigured his dad's face and dressed his body in his own clothes to confuse the cops after the gruesome attack. The duped cops initially thought Alexey Gorbunov, the boy's 40 year-old dad, was the killer and issued an urgent appeal to find him. But forensic experts later discovered that the badly mutilated body actually belonged to the teenage boy's father and launched a manhunt for Vadim. The Russian Investigative Committee said Alexey's face was "strongly disfigured". The body’s of Gulya Gorbunova, the boy’s mother, and Yulia, 12, his sister, were found in the house in Oktyabrsky,...
    There are calls for members of a California school board to be recalled after they were caught on camera making disparaging comments about parents.  The Oakley Union Elementary School Board conducted an online meeting via Webex on Wednesday afternoon so parents could dial in to discuss plans for their children to return to school amid the COVID-19 pandemic.  Before the meeting began, several of the board members allegedly believed that no parents were on the call and proceeded to poke fun of them.   'Are we alone?' board member Kim Beede asked her colleagues, according to ABC7, who obtained vision of the meeting.  When the other members replied that they were, Beede jokingly imitated herself threatening parents who had written letters about school re-openings.  'B**ch, if you are going to call me out I am going to f**k you up! Sorry! That's just me,' Beede can be heard stating as the other board members laugh.   There are calls for members of The Oakley Union Elementary School Board to be recalled after they were caught on camera making disparaging comments about...
    During an interview aired on Monday’s “CBS Evening News,” President Joe Biden stated that teachers’ unions “want to go back to school.” But the unions “need some guidance.” Host Norah O’Donnell asked, “There are teachers’ unions across the country, though, that are resisting efforts to open classrooms. Mike Bloomberg…he has said, it’s time for Joe Biden to stand up to teachers’ unions because kids are the most important things. Is that going to happen?” Biden responded, “They are. And I have. I’ve met with the teachers’ unions. They want to go back to school. They need some guidance.” Follow Ian Hanchett on Twitter @IanHanchett
    Is a Modular Home a Good Investment? The Electric Polestar 2 Gets a Disappointing Range Rating Im Sad and Exhausted, and I Just Want My Kid to Be Able to Go to School © Michael Loccisano NEW YORK, NY - MARCH 19: A hallway is empty on what would otherwise be a school day at Yung Wing School P.S. 124 in the Manhattan borough of New York City. Public schools in New York City have been shut down until at least until April 20th amid the spread of coronavirus (COVID-19). (Photo by Michael Loccisano/Getty Images) Well that was nice while it lasted. After precisely three days of in-person learning, it seems that my kindergartener will be back home with me come Friday, his public school shuttered by Governor Cuomo’s order on Tuesday evening that schools in 20 zip codes shut due to the spike in cases. https://twitter.com/NYGovCuomo/status/1313588620264124416 In the hours following the announcement, I felt myself advancing through an accelerated version of Kubler-Ross’s stages of grief: denial (we can’t possibly be within that zone ...), anger (why don’t people...
    Dear Ms. MoneyPeace, My two boys graduated from high school this year. Though they are twins, they are as different as can be. One, I’ll call Tommy, was planning to go to college several states away until the school went online. The other, Timmy, was planning a gap year of traveling and working abroad. The coronavirus upended a lot of people’s plans, including theirs. Timmy decided to go to a trade school for plumbing. Tommy is going to stay home and work odd jobs and may even “take a class or two” (his words). They want to know what their allowance will be! The economy isn’t great, though for now we are holding our own and have college savings in a 529 plan. My wife and I went to college. She says, “Whatever they want, I’m OK.” They are only 18 — so young to make a life decision. I was the first generation of my family to attend college and want my boys to go. But how do I make them? Or what do I do to support...
    On August 12, more than 100 Parker high-school students gathered for "Senior Sunrise," taking a group photo under the banner "Class of 2021." It's a tradition that started back in 2013, but this year went on without the okay of Chaparral High School officials; during the gathering, few masks were in evidence and the teens skipped social-distancing protocols. Students had planned the event on their own, advertising it through social media. And that's where one parent posted a now-deleted photo of the event, with this note: "My daughter is a senior. I am so thankful that she was able to attend this and have some normalcy!" And is normal these days, our story about this "Senior Sunrise" inspired plenty of comments on Facebook, discussing everything from mask-wearing to Parker to journalism in general. Says Joseph:Related Stories Op-Ed: Teachers Are Essential to Your Children...but Also Our Own Families Op-Ed: Information Is Critical in the Drive for Equity at DPS Wow! High school kids being reckless and rebellious?! Who could have foreseen that? Suggests Matthew: “The gathering could be declared an...
    (CNN)Teachers and parents who are currently weighing their options when it comes to school reopenings in the middle of a deadly pandemic may have one additional challenge ahead: children who are fearful of returning to school. Pediatrician Edith Bracho-Sanchez says that some children in her practice are having a hard time during the pandemic.Like the rest of us, children in this country have been told to stay inside, to wash their hands and to wear a mask for months now. For some kids, the restrictions, what they've heard on the news and their own personal experience with Covid-19 have made the outside world feel like a dangerous place. "He is different now, I can see that," said Rose Israel, whose 6-year-old son Jeremiah Israel-James has refused to go outside in recent weeks. On the rare occasion Jeremiah agrees to leave their East Harlem home, he must first peep through the window, declaring it safe when "there's not that many people outside." Once out, Jeremiah wants to get back inside as quickly as possible. "Before when he was outside he...
    So exactly why do we want our kids to go back to school? Americans must answer this question honestly before we can figure out how, or if, to open K-12 schools this fall. And there are only two possible answers: the economic reason or the education reason. Chirag Asaravala  The economic reason argues that unless our children go back to school, parents cannot return to work, and thus our economy cannot return to “normal.” The education reason promotes our kids’ returning to school so that they may learn and develop into productive members of our future society. To claim that we want both is to be disingenuous. Certainly, both outcomes are desired, but our current predicament demands us to choose now what our true motive is — for each reason has its own unique set of compromises to accept. If we desire primarily to restore the economy to what it was before the coronavirus pandemic, to get back to full-time work and prior levels of consumerism, then we are advocating for schooling as it was — an 8 a.m.-to-3 p.m.,...
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