Tuesday, Dec 07, 2021 - 17:31:22
20 results - (0.004 seconds)

Congress can’t be:

latest news at page 1:
1
    Fox News' Kayleigh McEnany broke down the implications of a new report on the origins of COVID-19. On "Outnumbered," McEnany explained that if the virus did leak from a lab in Wuhan, then U.S. taxpayer money was used to fund the research that led to a pandemic. She also said that if Dr. Fauci was aware of the risk involved with the Wuhan research and approved the funding, then he likely lied to Congress. RAND PAUL SAYS NEW WUHAN DOCUMENTS SHOW FAUCI LIED KAYLEIGH MCENANY: He can't be truthful because the truth would mean that very likely, if this did originate in the lab, U.S. taxpayer dollars helped to fund a pandemic that was unleashed upon the world out of a lab in Wuhan, China. What is so galling to me is when you read these 900 pages of documents that were obtained by The Intercept, the grant request actually acknowledges the dangers of this research.  So Dr. Fauci, I presume he read the application for the grant which said this: 'The grant proposal acknowledges some of these dangers. Field...
    The Department of Justice on Friday said former President Trump’s tax returns must be released by the IRS to the House Ways and Means Committee. The DOJ's Office of Legal Counsel said the committee – which first requested the returns over two years ago – showed "sufficient reasons" to validate its bid to review the former president’s taxes. FORMER TRUMP ADVISER TOM BARRACK RELEASED ON $250M BAIL "The Chairman of the House Ways and Means Committee has invoked sufficient reasons for requesting the former President’s tax information," Dawn Johnsen, acting assistant attorney general wrote in an opinion Friday. "Under section 6103(f)(1), Treasury must furnish the information to the Committee." The Office of Legal Counsel argued that when a congressional committee requests access to a president’s tax returns, "the executive branch should conclude that the request lacks a legitimate legislative purpose only in exceptional circumstances." The opinion by the DOJ is a reversal of stance from the Trump administration’s 2019 judgment, which alleged the congressional committee lacked legitimate justification for reviewing the tax returns. Ways and Means Committee Chairman Richard Neal, D-Mass., applauded...
    Former U.S. President Donald Trump leaves Trump Tower in Manhattan on July 19, 2021 in New York City.James Devaney | GC Images | Getty Images The income tax returns of former President Donald Trump can be released by the IRS to Congress, the Department of Justice said Friday. The DOJ's Office of Legal Counsel said that Congess had made a legitimate request to see Trump's tax returns. This is breaking news. Please check back for updates.
    Five retired Navy SEALS are running for Republican seats in the House of Representatives in a collective effort to get more veterans in Congress.  Retired SEALs Brady Duke (R-Fla.), Derrick Van Orden (R-Wis.), Eli Crane (R-Ariz.), Morgan Luttrell (R-Texas) and Ryan Zinke (R-Mt.) joined Fox News’ Steve Doocy on "Fox & Friends" to discuss why they are running and what they plan to accomplish. Ryan Zinke, the former interior secretary, plans to address the division in America. SEN. KENNEDY: IF PARTISANSHIP WERE AN OLYMPIC SPORT, PELOSI WOULD TAKE HOME THE GOLD "A lot of my friends say, ‘look, the U.S. is falling apart. It can't be fixed.’ It certainly can be fixed," he said. "There’s no one better in crisis than SEALs Special Forces. We're going to win, and we're going to save America." When asked why he wants to run for Congress, 14-year military veteran Morgan Luttrell said, "I don’t." "It's just most certainly out of necessity," Luttrell said. "We have to bring our country back to center. That's why we're all running, because we believe so much in...
    Third-term North Carolina Rep. Ted Budd is no 'outsider.' Rep. Ted Budd (R-NC) is running for his party's nomination for an open Senate seat as a self-proclaimed "outsider." But already his campaign is heavily fueled by the insiders he claims cannot buy him. The three-term representative announced last Wednesday that he will run for the seat of retiring Republican Sen. Richard Burr in 2022. "I am a political outsider who can't be bought by the swamp and I don't give a rip about their Washington game," he said in his kickoff video. "I've shoveled a lot of manure on my family's farm, and it's not the dirtiest job I've had now that I've been in Congress." He vowed to be a "liberal agenda crusher." But a review of his campaign's first-quarter financial filings with the Federal Election Commission conducted American Bridge 21st Century, a Democratic opposition research organization based in Washington, D.C., casts doubt on that claim of independence from powerful monied interests. The review finds that this year alone...
    Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP/Getty Images Republican QAnon Congresswoman Marjorie Taylor Greene is facing growing calls for her ouster, but how exactly can that be accomplished? Faced with a growing library of past racist, violent, and seditious views, demands for Greene’s removal have been growing to a fever pitch. It began with outrage over her inclusion on the House Education Committee, but as the revelations grew more extreme and frightening, her removal from Congress altogether became the issue. The process of expelling a member of Congress is provided for in the U.S. Constitution, and requires a two-thirds majority vote in the chamber from which the member is being expelled. From  Article I, Section 5, clause 2: Each House may determine the Rules of its Proceedings, punish its Members for disorderly Behaviour, and, with the Concurrence of two thirds, expel a Member. But as the Congressional Research Service notes, this provision has rarely been used, and only under some pretty extraordinary circumstances: In the United States Senate, 15 Senators have been expelled, 14 during the Civil War period for disloyalty to the Union (one...
    Republican Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene, a vocal advocate of the far right QAnon conspiracy theory, has seen her fair share of public backlash in recent weeks. The congresswoman, representing Georgia’s 14th District has been shrouded in controversy over comments on her social media accounts prior to running for office. According to a CNN investigation, Greene “liked” comments on Facebook that threatened violence against House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, and claimed the “stage is being set” for the executions of Hillary Clinton and former President Barack Obama over the Iran Nuclear Deal. On Wednesday, Greene faced another round of backlash after a video went viral on Twitter of her harassing David Hogg, a gun safety activist who survived the Parkland, Florida school shooting in 2018. As a result, advocacy groups are calling for her resignation, while lawmakers seek to have Greene removed from office just three weeks after she was sworn in. The calls for her removal first came from gun safety groups, including March for Our Lives-Parkland, Moms Demand Action, and Everytown for Gun Safety; as well as from the NAACP,...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden arrived at the White House ready to wield his pen to dismantle Donald Trump’s legacy and begin pushing his own priorities. Presidents Trump and Barack Obama both relied on executive orders and other presidential directives to get some of their most controversial policies around a deadlocked Congress. But no president has come out of the gate as eager to use the authority as Biden. A primer on how the presidential power works and its often fleeting impact: EXECUTIVE ORDERS: THE BASICS An executive order is a signed, written and published directive from the president that manages operations of the federal government. Congress can’t just pass legislation to overturn an order, but it can use legislative action — such as cutting off funding — to gum up the president’s intentions. A new president may overturn a predecessor’s order by issuing another executive order effectively canceling it. Biden has done that repeatedly during his first days in office as he looks to chip away at Trump policies over a gamut of issues, including environmental regulations, immigration...
    Amid talk that the FBI is looking into whether members of Congress helped the Capitol rioters, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) is warning that anyone in her chamber found to have aided the insurrectionists could face dire consequences. At a news conference Friday on Capitol Hill, the speaker was asked about a request from her Democratic colleagues asking authorities to look into Republican members who may have given tours of the building to the rioters ahead of the Jan. 6 attack. Pelosi put anyone in Congress who may have been involved on notice. “When we’re talking about security, we have to talk about truth and trust,” Pelosi said. “In order to serve here with each other, we must trust that people have respect for their oath of office, respect for this institution. We must trust each other, respecting the people who sent us here. We must also have the truth. And that will be looked into. If, in fact, it is found that members of Congress were accomplices to this insurrection, if they aided and abetted the crime, there...
    House Democrats are meeting in the Capitol Friday to discuss a plan to rush through articles of impeachment against President Donald Trump in the final 13 days of his presidency – with leaders saying the votes are likely there for it. Leaders of both chambers, Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Senate Leader Charles Schumer – said they would support impeachment if Vice President Mike Pence fails to act with the Trump cabinet under the 25th amendment to strip him of authority following the Capitol riot on Wednesday. Pence appears not to be interested in that route – rebuffing a call from the two leaders Thursday morning. Yesterday, two Trump cabinet members who would vote in a 25th Amendment scenario, Transportation Sec. Elaine Chao and Education Secretary Betsy DeVos, announced their resignations – taking them out of the mix of cabinet members who could vote to strip away power.  Speaker of the United States House of Representatives Nancy Pelosi has said if Mike Pence and the cabinet do not invoke the 25th Amendment the House will likely go forward with impeachment....
    President-elect Joe Biden's victory is set to be reaffirmed early next month, when the new Congress convenes in a joint session to count each state's Electoral College votes.  Required by the Constitution, the event typically occurs with little fanfare. But the joint session slated for January 6 is already expected to bring heightened drama, as some of President Trump's Republican congressional allies have indicated they plan to challenge the electoral votes in certain states, though these efforts are almost certain to be unsuccessful.  Mr. Trump has refused to concede the election and has lost a slew of legal battles seeking to reverse its outcome, but the march towards Mr. Biden's inauguration continues, with the congressional counting of electoral votes the final step in formally acknowledging his victory. Here is the rundown of how Congress will count and certify electoral votes next month: When does Congress meet to count electoral votes?On January 3, the first meeting of the 117th Congress, the archivist of the United States will transmit the certification of election results from each state governor to both houses...
    Top Democrats and Republicans on Sunday said they were optimistic that a nearly $1 trillion coronavirus relief package could be passed by Congress after agreeing on a compromise over the Federal Reserve’s emergency lending powers. Arriving at the Capitol for a rare Sunday session, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) told reporters that both sides are “really, really close.” “We are winnowing down the remaining differences. I think I can speak for all sides when I say I expect and hope to have a final agreement nailed down in a matter of hours,” McConnell said later from the Senate floor. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi echoed McConnell’s sentiments, saying “we’re close. We’re very close.” Rep. Kevin McCarthy, the Republican leader in the House, said it is optimistic that the bill will pass. “The optimism is let’s get it done,” McCarthy said on “Sunday Morning Futures,” adding later that “I am very hopeful that we get this done today.” Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, who was instrumental in reaching the Federal Reserve compromise with GOP Sen. Pat Toomey, said “barring a major...
    More On: Coronavirus Cuomo rips UK-to-JFK air travel as London shuts down over new strain of COVID-19 Surgeon general pick discusses UK’s new COVID-19 strain Surgeon general pick outlines COVID-19 vaccine timeline Prominent Russian scientist working on COVID-19 vaccine found dead Top Democrats and Republicans on Sunday said they were optimistic that a nearly $1 trillion coronavirus relief package could be passed by Congress after agreeing on a compromise over the Federal Reserve’s emergency lending powers. Arriving at the Capitol for a rare Sunday session, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) told reporters that both sides are “really, really close.” “We are winnowing down the remaining differences. I think I can speak for all sides when I say I expect and hope to have a final agreement nailed down in a matter of hours,” McConnell said later from the Senate floor. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi echoed McConnell’s sentiments, saying “we’re close. We’re very close.” Rep. Kevin McCarthy, the Republican leader in the House, said it is optimistic that the bill will pass. “The optimism is let’s get it done,”...
    Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez said Wednesday that the Democratic Party needs 'new leadership' in a snub to House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer – but insisted she can't be the one to take on that role. The New York representative also admitted that even if Pelosi and Schumer were to go, the progressive wing of the party has no plan on who would fill those vacancies. And she said the replacement could end up being worse and 'even more conservative' than the current Democratic leaders. 'How do we fill that vacuum? Because if you create that vacuum, there are so many nefarious forces at play to fill that vacuum with something even worse,' Ocasio-Cortez told The Intercept podcast 'Intercepted' in an interview that aired Wednesday.  'And so, the actual sad state of affairs is that there are folks more conservative than even they are willing to kind of fill that void,' she said. Ocasio-Cortez, 31, admitted that she couldn't be the one to fill that void in party leadership should they kick Pelosi, 80, and Schumer, 70, to the...
    It’s hard to argue that any citizens have been more targeted under the Trump administration than those living in Democratic-led states, which was by Donald Trump’s own vindictive design. Whether it was singling them out for punishment with tax legislation, stealing their medical supplies, holding out disaster relief, or even attacking their citizens with his gestapo forces, Trump and his Republican allies did whatever they could to make blue state citizens suffer. Just recently, Trump even threatened to deny the COVID-19 vaccine to deep-blue New York. There are a lot of things Joe Biden needs to tackle that have been neglected by the current administration, including health care, the pandemic, climate change, and growing unemployment. If Republicans hold onto the Senate, they will try to roadblock each of these items. With that possibility in mind, I propose that one of the first bills the Biden administration request from Congress is one that Republicans should all jump on: an anti-socialism bill. Here’s a quick summary: Barring a national disaster, no state gets more than 1.5 times what they pay into the federal pot. ...
    By Jonathan Weber, Elizabeth Culliford and Nandita Bose (Reuters) - The chief executives of Twitter Inc, Facebook Inc and Alphabet Inc's Google defended a law protecting internet companies before a Senate panel on Wednesday as lawmakers seek ways to hold Big Tech accountable for how they moderate content on their platforms. The hearing was about Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, which offers big tech platforms protections from liability over content posted by users. WHAT IS SECTION 230? The core purpose of Section 230 is to protect the owners of any "interactive computer service" from liability for anything posted by third parties. The idea was that such protection was necessary to encourage the emergence of new types of communications and services at the dawn of the internet era. Section 230 was enacted in 1996 as part of a law called the Communications Decency Act, which was primarily aimed at curbing online pornography. Most of that law was struck down by the courts as an unconstitutional infringement on free speech but Section 230 remains. In practice, the law shields any...
    President Donald Trump's positive test for the coronavirus set off cascading effects through the chain of government – and raises a raft of constitutional issues should he endure a difficult illness or lose his battle with the disease. The Constitution and laws enacted by Congress provide for a line of succession, as well as provisions for how to proceed if the president becomes incapacitated. A web of party and state election laws make provisions for how to proceed if a candidate must be replaced on the ballot.  The Election Day itself is fixed by law, and can be moved only by an act of Congress.  But there are ambiguities in all areas – from national party rules to state election law and even the line of succession – providing multiple avenues for chaos just 32 days before the Nov. 3 election.    Who is in charge of the country now? President Trump continues to be in charge, both in title and effect. The White House reports that he has mild symptoms, and there were media reports that he was lethargic...
    VIDEO1:2701:27Cramer: You want to be in the market if we get another stimulus packageSquawk on the Street CNBC's Jim Cramer said Thursday that investors will want to have money in the stock market if Congress approves another coronavirus relief bill.  "If we get a stimulus package and you're out of the market, you will feel awful," Cramer said on "Squawk on the Street." "I do feel the stimulus package is very hard to get. But if we do get it, you can't be out of this market."  Democrats and Republicans in Washington have been locked in a stalemate since late July after key provisions of the March $2.2 trillion CARES Act expired. The two sides are largely at odds over the scale and scope of an additional relief package, with Democrats favoring more expansive legislation while GOP negotiators have been pushing for a more limited bill.  President Donald Trump, who took some executive actions last month designed to extend aid to unemployed Americans, indicated at a news conference Wednesday evening that he would be willing to support legislation around $1.5 trillion. House Speaker...
    AMERICANS could see a second $1,200 stimulus check soon - but only if Congress can restart talks it left on the table in August. “I’m optimistic,” House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said Friday when asked about Congress’ ability to either pass a larger stimulus bill or carry out executive action to release pandemic assistance funds for eligible adults. 2Families could get up to $6,000 if Congress manages to restart failed stimulus package talksCredit: Getty Images - Getty “I do think that we should have an agreement. That’s what we all want,” Pelosi continued. The speaker’s remarks come in direct contrast to Republican Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, who said he doesn't see an agreement between parties before the November 3 election. Pelosi also went on to slam Republicans for a $500 billion proposal Thursday rejected in the Senate. Trump said Democrats rejected the bill to hurt him at the polls in November. The CARES Act had no limit on the number of children that could be counted as dependents, so as long as they were under 17, families could receive $500...
    Sign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York City BY SUSAN HEAVEY U.S. President Donald Trump on Thursday raised the possibility of delaying the nation’s Nov. 3 presidential election, though the Constitution bestows that power on Congress, not the president. The move drew immediate objections from Democrats and it was not clear whether Trump was serious. Trump also said he would not trust the results of an election that included widespread mail voting – a measure that many election observers see as critical given the coronavirus pandemic. Trump, without evidence, repeated his claims of mail-in voter fraud and raised the question of a delay, tweeting: “delay the election until people can properly, securely and safely vote???” Trump’s tweet came shortly after the United States reported its worst economic downturn since the Great Depression: a second-quarter crash in gross domestic product due to widespread shutdowns prompted by the coronavirus pandemic. Trump, who is trailing challenger and former Vice President Joe Biden in opinion polls, had previously intended to focus his re-election...
1