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    A class-action lawsuit has accused Kellogg's of misleading customers about the fruit content of their frosted strawberry Pop-Tarts, claiming they contain few actual strawberries.  The suit filed by New York woman Elizabeth Russett accuses the convenience food giant of padding out strawberry Pop-Tart filling with cheaper pears and apples, according to TMZ. The class-action suit seeks $5 million in damages, and also seeks to force Kellogg's to change its allegedly misleading Pop-Tart labels. A spokesperson for the Kellogg Company declined to comment when reached by DailyMail.com on Tuesday, saying only: 'Kellogg does not comment on pending litigation.'   A class-action lawsuit has accused Kellogg's of misleading customers about the fruit content of their frosted strawberry Pop-Tarts Pop-Tarts are seen in a stock image. First introduced in 1964, the toaster pastries are wildly popular, but a new lawsuit alleges that  RELATED ARTICLES Previous 1 Next Tragedy of the outrageously opulent yet unloved Kellogg... How to make POP TARTS at home: Dad reveals how to create his... Share this article Share It is not the...
    Workers lift a solar panel onto a roof during a residential solar installation in Scripps Ranch, San Diego, California, U.S. October 14, 2016. Picture taken October 14, 2016.Mike Blake | Reuters Extreme weather events across the U.S. – from wildfires and drought in the West, to deep freezes and floods in the South and Southeast – have disrupted the electric grid this year. As a result, homeowners are buying home solar and energy storage systems as never before, according to data from solar web site SolarReviews.com. Data from SolarReviews.com clearly demonstrates the link between extreme weather events and interest in solar systems. As California faces devastating wildfires and record drought, the website saw a 358% year-over-year jump in solar estimate quotes requested by California residents between June 30 and August 6. The state has also faced numerous power outages over the last year. PG&E has cut the power on several occasions when dry conditions and high winds increase the risk of sparking a fire. The state has also had trouble on the power supply side, and the California ISO has...
    In this article VZ T A large advertisement on the LED screen outside the apple store is to warm up the iPhone 12 series, which is officially on sale on the 23rd. Shanghai, China, October 21, 2020.Barcroft Media | Getty ImagesU.S. wireless giants AT&T and Verizon had big plans last year to advertise why customers should upgrade their phones and start using 5G wireless. Then the pandemic hit, and with everyone stuck at home, showing off blazing speeds and consumer use cases in stadiums, airports and public places wasn't just irrelevant — it was gauche. Cloud gaming, checking instant odds on gambling apps from stadiums and downloading Netflix movies at the airport became far less important than the ability to work from home -- a better message for cable companies who already deliver high-speed home broadband. "We almost lost the year," said David Christopher, EVP of partnerships & 5G ecosystem development for AT&T. "But now, people are excited to get out of their homes and experience 5G in the wild. We will dramatize use cases that matter to customers."...
    Apple CEO Tim Cook called House Speaker Nancy Pelosi earlier this month to warn over 'rushed' antitrust bills that are circulating throughout the House, according to a new report.     Cook called Pelosi and other members of Congress to 'deliver a warning' that the antitrust bills were 'rushed,' would hurt innovation and hurt consumers by disrupting Apple's services, according to The New York Times, which first reported the news. Two sources familiar with the call told the Times that Cook asked Pelosi to delay the process of considering the bills. Pelosi reportedly pushed back against Cook's concerns, asking him to identify a specific policy objection. Apple CEO Tim Cook called House Speaker Nancy Pelosi earlier this month to warn over 'rushed' antitrust bills that are circulating throughout the House, according to a new report Pelosi reportedly pushed back against Cook's concerns, asking him to identify a specific policy objection In a letter obtained by DailyMail.com, Timothy Powderly, Apple's Senior Director of Government Affairs, Americas, told the House Judiciary Committee that a number of provisions would create a race to...
    Nike, American Airlines and Coca-Cola have been accused of putting 'woke politicians' ahead of their customers. The three companies were targeted in a $1million ad campaign by Consumers' Research, a nearly 100-year-old conservative-leaning watchdog.    The 30-second Nike advert, entitled with Cover, begins with a picture of former NFL quarterback Colin Kaepernick and describes Nike as 'constantly political.' Kaepernick led protests against police brutality, taking a knee for the National Anthem before games. He was then hired by Nike as a model. 'Nike is constantly political. Why? Cover,' the ad asks. Consumers' Research on Tuesday unveiled a new $1 million-plus advertising campaign The advert accused Nike of using forced labor in China, citing a March 2020 Congress report Nike was accused of failing their customers, having put 'woke politicians' first 'Congressional reports suspect Nike used forced labor in China. Religious minorities were ripped from their families, sterilized, sold to factories. Nike made shoes in those same areas. 'Congress tried to ban Nike's labor practices. Nike fought back with highly-paid lobbyists.' The advert then called out John Donahoe, the...
    LaTonya Story is every retailer’s worst fear. With the viral pandemic re-surging through the country and the economy under threat, Story has decided to slash her holiday shopping budget. She’ll spend less than $2,000 this season, down from several thousand dollars in 2019. Worried about entering stores, she’s buying gifts online and going out only for groceries. “I want to be conservative,” said Story, a 47-year-old Atlanta resident. “I’m not a scientist, but the best precaution is to stay in place.” The acceleration of coronavirus cases is causing an existential crisis for America’s retailers and spooking their customers just as the critically important holiday shopping season nears. It’s also raising the risk that the economy could slide into a “double-dip” recession this winter as states and cities re-impose restrictions on businesses and consumers stay at home to avoid contracting the disease. An anxious consumer is a frightening prospect for retailers as well as for the overall economy. Any sustained recovery from the pandemic recession hinges on consumers, whose spending fuels about 70% of economic growth. A pedestrian Wednesday, Nov. 18,...
    By CHRISTOPHER RUGABER and ANNE D'INNOCENZIO, AP Business Writers WASHINGTON (AP) — LaTonya Story is every retailer’s worst fear. With the viral pandemic re-surging through the country and the economy under threat, Story has decided to slash her holiday shopping budget. She'll spend less than $2,000 this season, down from several thousand dollars in 2019. Worried about entering stores, she's buying gifts online and going out only for groceries. “I want to be conservative,” said Story, a 47-year-old Atlanta resident. “I’m not a scientist, but the best precaution is to stay in place.” The acceleration of coronavirus cases is causing an existential crisis for America’s retailers and spooking their customers just as the critically important holiday shopping season nears. It's also raising the risk that the economy could slide into a “double-dip” recession this winter as states and cities re-impose restrictions on businesses and consumers stay at home to avoid contracting the disease. An anxious consumer is a frightening prospect for retailers as well as for the overall economy. Any sustained recovery from the pandemic recession hinges on consumers, whose...
    The past decade or so has been tough for Frontier Airlines. Once the pride of Denver, the carrier has suffered through years of terrible consumer reviews, public-relations disasters and labor strife. And now, compounding the devastating impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on travel, the firm is now being used as an example of why Congressional aid to the industry as a whole should be tied to customer protection — thanks partly to Colorado Attorney General Phil Weiser's call for a federal investigation into Frontier's practices. Weiser is among forty attorneys general from across the country to sign an October 1 letter to Congressional leaders urging them to "enact new consumer protection measures for airline industry customers whether as part of a financial relief package or in separate legislation as soon as possible," according to Weiser's office. That missive, released by the National Association of Attorneys General (NAAG), makes prominent mention of Weiser's call last month for U.S. Transportation Secretary Elaine Chao to "use your authority under federal law to protect consumers by ordering Frontier to stop any unfair and deceptive...
    The coronavirus pandemic has reshaped Americans’ home buying experience by making it more consumer friendly, and will have significant and lasting consequences on how consumers buy and sell homes. Last March, when the U.S. was first coming to grips with the public health crisis, I suggested how it could affect the housing industry — such as the increased digitization of the mortgage process to better serve consumers. Since it appears that the pandemic will not be fully behind us in the coming months, here are three ways in which the home buying experience may have changed forever: 1. Home buying has gone remote: Most of us by now are comfortable with video interactions. Last March, one online home listing website saw its traffic surge more than 190%, versus the prior month. There was also a dramatic rise in the requests that brokers received from consumers who wanted home video tours. Software companies are popping up to facilitate unaccompanied home tours by sending shoppers a code on their mobile phones that will open the door. In addition, there is a...
    Lovers of streetwear brands will soon have a place online to call their own, thanks to a new Richmond-based tech startup. DropAlly.io, co-founded in May by Willis Lam, Steven Valdez, Matt Thomas and Joe Sadaka, focuses on innovating how fashion is released to the market using product launches directly from brands. The platform is essentially a pre-launch waitlist for brands’ products that Valdez said will focus on meeting the online expectations of the customers in their primary market — Gen Z consumers looking for streetwear exclusives. “The platform takes consumers on a journey through the pre-drop, during the brand drop and post-drop to create an efficient that benefits the fans and the brands,” he said. Valdez said the team began working on validating the platform earlier this year, after seeing an emerging trend where brands began losing customers’ trust and failed to keep them engaged with the products. “These brands are challenged to remain connected to younger consumers…… Read the full story from the Washington Business Journal.
    The Better Business Bureau is warning consumers about the diet app Noom after receiving more than 1,200 complaints in the past 12 months from irate customers who alleged they had received unexpected charges.  Noom is supposed to help users lose weight by providing them with tools to track their weight, log what they eat, and connect with others for support, but many people have claimed that the company's free trials are misleading and difficult to cancel. According to the BBB's website, 'many consumers reportedly try to cancel the trial offer before it ends but still end up being billed for the subscription.' Watch out: The Better Business Bureau is warning consumers about the diet app Noom after receiving more than 1,200 complaints in the past 12 months Complaints: Many consumers claim they tried to cancel the app's trial offer before it ended but still ended up being billed for the subscription A number of people reported that they were led to believe the cost of a monthly membership was between $20 and $40 after the trial period...
    Pedestrians cross Herald Square in front of a Verizon Wireless store in New York.Richard Levine | Corbis | Getty Images It's one thing for Netflix or Apple — companies that benefit from consumers shifting from cable TV to streaming — to declare an end to traditional media consumption. It's quite another when it's Verizon doing the talking. Verizon, which owns Fios, a provider of internet, landline phone and bundled television, announced an offer this week for some of its premium wireless customers that includes Disney+, Hulu and ESPN+, at no additional cost, without a promotional roll-off deadline. Subscribers to the plans also get Apple Music included, either for six months or indefinitely, depending on the plan. That's quite a bit of content tied to an eligible wireless plan that starts at $45 per month. The idea of bundling content with wireless isn't new. T-Mobile unlimited data customers can already get free access to both Netflix and Quibi. The wireless carrier also has partnered with sports website The Athletic and MLB.TV to offer free one-year subscriptions. Both annual subscriptions typically cost $60...
    London (CNN Business)Hundreds of thousands of people and businesses have been locked out of accounts linked to Wirecard after Britain's financial watchdog ordered the collapsed digital payments company to suspend UK operations.The Financial Conduct Authority on Friday suspended the operations of Wirecard Card Solutions after its parent company filed for insolvency in Germany following the discovery of a $2 billion hole in its accounts. Wirecards collapse reveals cracks at the heart of Germany, IncThe FCA said it had taken the decision so that Wirecard "should not pay out or reduce" any money, except on the instructions of its customers. Wirecard Card Solutions provides technology and payments processing services to dozens of UK digital account and prepaid card providers, which have been forced to suspend services to customers."Our primary objective is to protect the interests and money of consumers who use Wirecard," the FCA said in a statement. On Monday, the regulator said that the company was making progress in addressing its concerns but that it won't lift restrictions until it is comfortable that "all clients' money is safe."Customers of startups...
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