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    Another Russian cyber strike on the homeland has demonstrated the wishful thinking of the Biden Administration policy which aims to "reset" Russian President Vladimir Putin’s brain into a "friendly" one.  U.S. President Joe Biden and his coterie of "experts"––who just finished a summit in Geneva where they sought to "stabilize" relations with Russia and asked Putin to limit his cyberattacking habit––are merely projecting weakness to a Russian president who is not seeking stability and views cyberattacks as an invaluable tool. PUTIN CALLS ACCUSATION OF CYBERATTACKS AGAINST US 'FARCICAL' Late Friday evening, the Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency sent out an advisory that it was "taking action to understand and address" another on-going ransomware cyberattack. Cybersecurity experts involved in the investigation characterized the attack as "colossal."  The hack since has been attributed to the same "Russia-linked" criminals who struck our meat supply a month earlier, extorting 11 million dollars from the supplier. This time the target list is thousands of companies. The Russians achieved a "force multiplier effect" by striking what’s called a supply chain vendor, Kaseya VSA, and multiple managed...
    Americans are already contending with the consequences of two major Russian cyberattacks, including gas shortages and price hikes due the Colonial Pipeline hack and potentially rising prices on steak and burgers after the JBS meat processing company was hit.  But get ready, because more is on the way. Moscow will likely further escalate its aggression against U.S. interests. U.S. officials, in charge of keeping America safe have not taken the Russian threat seriously enough. Because Russian President Putin’s goal is much bigger than the infliction of a few inconveniences. It is, rather, the unraveling of our society and the weakening of our nation, which Russia views as the primary threat against it. The Kremlin recently declared — with typical intentional ambiguity — its intent to use "forceful measures," including "coercive use of force," "when necessary," against "unfriendly" countries. But this almost certainly refers to the United States.  The warning came on May 31st from the Head of Russia’s Security Council, Nikolai Patrushev, who in his interview with Russia’s Gazette announced the decision to update Russia’s National Security Strategy. This doctrinal...
    A former U.S. Army Special Forces officer pleaded guilty on Wednesday to charges of providing sensitive military information to Russian intelligence agents. Peter Rafael Dzibinski Debbins, 45, who was arrested in August, pleaded guilty to one count of delivering defense information to a foreign government. He’ll be sentenced in February and faces a maximum of life in prison, the Justice Department said in a statement. According to court documents, Debbins, who served in the elite Green Berets, periodically traveled to Russia between 1996 and 2011, sharing sensitive U.S. military information with Russian intelligence agents. In 1997 he was given a code name “Ikar Lesnikov” and signed a statement attesting that he wanted to “serve Russia,” U.S. prosecutors say. “Debbins today acknowledged that he violated this country’s highest trust by passing sensitive national security information to the Russians,” John C. Demers, assistant attorney general for national security, said in a statement. “Debbins betrayed his oath, his country, and his Special Forces team members with the intent to harm the United States and help Russia.” Mother was Soviet-born Debbins’ mother was born...
    FALLS CHURCH, Va. (AP) — A former Army Green Beret charged with espionage activity on behalf of Russia is scheduled to plead guilty to federal charges. A plea hearing has been scheduled Wednesday in federal court in Alexandria for Peter Rafael Dzibinski Debbins, 45, of Gainesville, Virginia. Court records do not spell out the specific charge to which he is expected to plead; when he was arrested in August, he was charged under the federal Espionage Act with divulging U.S. military secrets about his unit’s activities in former Soviet republics to Russian intelligence agents. Debbins’ attorney did not return an email Monday seeking comment. Debbins, a Minnesota native, had a 15-year relationship with Russian intelligence, according to the indictment issued earlier this year. It began in late 1996 when he was still an ROTC undergrad at the University of Minnesota and on a visit to Russia for an independent study program gave a Russian handler the names of four Catholic nuns he had visited. He joined the Army as an active duty officer in 1998 and served through 2005, the...
    A SENIOR French army official has been arrested on suspicion of spying on behalf of the Russian secret service. Florence Parly, France’s Armed Forces Minister confirmed the news and said the case had been handed over to prosecutors. 2The case is a huge scandal within the French military. According to the French media, sources have indicated the officer was working with NATO and based in Italy. She told radio station Europe 1: “What I can confirm is that a senior officer is facing legal proceedings for a security breach”. She added: “We have taken all the protective measures that were necessary. “Now, it is important that the judicial system carries out its work in accordance with the principle of secrecy of the investigation”. According to her, it was France that begun legal proceedings against the officer. Although she refused to give further details, Europe 1 reports that the officer, a lieutenant colonel, has roots in Russia and also speaks fluent Russian. The case is a huge scandal not only for the French army but for the alliance as well. French...
    In this episode of Intelligence Matters DECLASSIFIED: Spy Stories from the Officers Who Were There, host Michael Morell interviews former CIA Senior Clandestine Services Officer Daniel Hoffman about the FBI and CIA's decade-long pursuit of 10 Russian "illegals" living and operating in the U.S. A former Chief of Station, Hoffman tells Morell how a group of Russian intelligence officers came to pose as American citizens all over the country, and spent years stealing secrets to send back to Moscow. Hoffman explains how they were monitored and eventually caught, and details the negotiations that ultimately led to a spy swap with Russia. Intelligence Matters DECLASSIFIED is new series dedicated to featuring first-hand accounts from former intelligence officers.  Listen to this episode on ART19 HIGHLIGHTS What the FBI knew: "The FBI knew exactly where these 'illegals' were going to be at all times. They had penetrated their communications, and so they were reading their covert, not-so-covert communications. They knew beforehand when these illegals were going to go out and perform operational acts. And so they were able to track everything that the illegals were...
    A former U.S. Army captain has been charged for allegedly conspiring to deliver defense information to Russian agents working for the country’s military intelligence agency after they first established contact with him back in the mid-1990s.  According to the Department of Justice, Peter Rafael Dzibinski Debbins, 45, started traveling to Russia beginning in 1994, and, while on an independent study program in 1996, held meetings with at least one foreign intelligence agent. He allegedly told the agent he was a “son of Russian,” and the DOJ says he subsequently met with at least six other foreign intelligence agents up until about 2010.  In meetings over the years, Debbins allegedly received an official nickname from the Russian intelligence agency, signed a statement pledging to “serve Russia,” and forwarded U.S. military information to the Russian agents, according to an indictment.  “Debbins violated his oath as a U.S. Army office, betrayed the Special Forces and endangered our country’s national security by revealing classified information to Russian intelligence officers, providing details of his unit, and identifying Special Forces team members for Russian intelligence to try...
    A former Army special forces officer was arrested Friday on charges that he spied on behalf of Russia for nearly 15 years, allegedly providing Russian military intelligence officers with information about his fellow soldiers and secrets about U.S. military endeavors in central Asia. Peter Rafael Dzibinski Debbins, 45, of Gainesville, Va., was charged with conspiring to provide United States national defense information to agents of a foreign government. According an indictment filed on Thursday, Debbins provided information to Russia’s military intelligence unit, the GRU, from December 1996 through January 2011. Debbins served active duty in the Army from 1998 to 2005, and was in the Army Reserves through 2010. A Russian intelligence officer first approached Debbins during a trip he made there in December 1996, the indictment says. Debbins, who was in the ROTC at the University of Minnesota at the time, told the officer that he was a “son of Russia” and would be willing to collect information to his Russian handler. Debbins formalized the relationship in October 1997 by signing an agreement to work for Russia. He was...
    Photograph: Rick Wilking/Reuters A report by the Senate intelligence committee provides a treasure trove of new details about Donald Trump’s relationship with Moscow, and says that a Russian national who worked closely with Trump’s presidential campaign in 2016 was a career intelligence officer. The bipartisan report runs to nearly 1,000 pages and goes further than last year’s investigation into Russian election interference by special prosecutor Robert Mueller. It lays out a stunning web of contacts between Trump, his top election aides and Russian government officials, in the months leading up to the 2016 election. The Senate panel identifies Konstantin Kilimnik as a Russian intelligence officer employed by the GRU, the military intelligence agency behind the 2018 poisoning of the Russian double agent Sergei Skripal. It cites evidence – some of it redacted – linking Kilimnik to the GRU’s hacking and dumping of Democratic party emails. Kilimnik worked for over a decade in Ukraine with Paul Manafort, Trump’s campaign manager. In 2016 Manafort met with Kilimnik, discussed how Trump might beat Hillary Clinton, and gave the Russian spy internal polling...
    COPENHAGEN, Denmark (AP) — A Norwegian citizen suspected of spying for Russia has been remanded in custody for four weeks. The man was arrested arrested Saturday as he met with an alleged Russian intelligence officer in an Oslo restaurant. He has not been identified beyond that he is a Norwegian national in his 50s who was born abroad. The man has admitted receiving money, with Oslo District Court judge Helene Andenaes Sekulic saying it was a “not insignificant amount.” The court ruling came late Monday following a hearing held behind closed doors. The man was working for Norway-based DNV GL, a major global classification society for ships, that also deals with the Norwegian defense industry and scientists handling advance military technology. He has denied that the information he handed over to the alleged Russian intelligence officer was sensitive, the Norwegian news agency NTB said. The Norwegian Police Security Service said he is suspected of violating a Norwegian law that carries a maximum prison term of 15 years. The agency said it is up to the Norwegian Foreign Ministry to...
    White House national security adviser Robert O'Brien said he stands by the decision not to brief President Trump on an alleged Russian plot offering bounties to Taliban fighters to kill U.S. soldiers in Afghanistan, saying the decision was made by a career, senior spy. "The person who decided early on whether the president should be briefed on this in the Oval [Office] intelligence briefing was a career senior servant, a CIA officer, and she made that decision because she didn’t have the confidence in the intelligence that came up," O'Brien told reporters outside the White House on Wednesday. "She made that call, and you know what, she made the right call. And knowing the facts I know now, I stand behind that call." O'Brien said that the CIA had filed a "crimes report" with the Department of Justice over the leak, which he said made investigating the intelligence more challenging. "The story is we did everything right," O'Brien said. He listed measures he said targeted Russia, such as sending Ukraine anti-tank Javelin missiles, imposing sanctions on oil giant Rosneft,...
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