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    Tens of millions of Americans face power blackouts this summer as roasting weather, overstretched powerplants and unreliable green energy sources combine to create a perfect storm of problems.   States stretching from the Great Lakes to the Pacific Ocean which are home to tens of millions of Americans could have a hard time producing enough power for their residents this summer. The 'MISO' part of America's power grid - whose full name is the Midcontinent Independent System Operator is at greatest risk of a large-scale outage. That warning was given by the North American Electric Reliability Corporation (NERC), which released a map showing Michigan, most of Indiana, most of Illinois, and Wisconsin were in trouble. Also at the highest risk are Louisiana, Mississippi, Arkansas and a small part of East Texas. That high-risk classification means that the existing power grid is 'potentially insufficient to meet peak load during both normal and extreme conditions,' according to NERC.  Every state that sits further west of that area is at an elevated risk, according to NERC. That means power plants should have sufficient resources...
    Electricity customers across the country face a heightened risk of power outages this summer, something regulators say reflects a worsening outlook for a grid simultaneously struggling through extreme weather conditions and a shift away from traditional energy sources. The North American Electric Reliability Corporation, or NERC, a regulatory body overseeing grid operations across the United States and Canada, warned in its summer reliability assessment published on Wednesday that the entire West and most of the Midwest face at least an "elevated" risk of seeing insufficient electricity supply where slim reserve margins run up against high demand. For the sections of the grid stretching from Wisconsin down to the Gulf Coast, NERC deemed the risk for insufficient operating reserves to be "high" during peak demand conditions. DAILY ON ENERGY: THE POWER SHORTAGE THREAT The areas covered by the Midcontinent Independent System Operator, or MISO, including Minnesota and Iowa, all the way down to Louisiana, face especially “high risk of energy emergencies during peak summer conditions,” according to NERC. "Expected resources do not meet operating reserve requirements...
    A top European Union regulator warned billionaire Elon Musk on Tuesday that Twitter will have to comply with the EU's digital rules under his ownership, complicating Musk's ambitious free speech agenda. Musk, who acquired Twitter on Monday for $44 billion after weeks of negotiations, has vowed to overhaul the platform to orient it toward free speech, with significantly less content moderation and censorship, which he has said is the bedrock of a functioning democracy. However, Thierry Breton, the EU’s commissioner for the internal market, said he wanted to offer Musk a “reality check” on his free speech plans, warning that Twitter would incur hefty fines or even a ban if it doesn't follow the EU's rules. “We welcome everyone. We are open but on our conditions. At least we know what to tell him: ‘Elon, there are rules. You are welcome, but these are our rules. It’s not your rules which will apply here,'" Breton told the Financial Times. MUSK POLL ASKS IF TWITTER SAN FRANCISCO HQ SHOULD BECOME HOMELESS SHELTER “Anyone who wants to benefit from this market...
    Icons for the Monzo and Starling banking apps on a smartphone.Adrian Dennis | AFP via Getty Images Britain's online-only challenger banks need to do more to prevent the abuse of their platforms by criminals, regulators have warned. The Financial Conduct Authority on Friday published the findings of a review into financial crime controls at several U.K. challenger banks — younger banks set up with the aim of taking on incumbent lenders. The FCA didn't name any firms but said its review focused on six challenger banks, half of which were digital banks. Collectively, these companies covered more than 8 million customers, the watchdog said. The review excluded e-money issuers and payment services providers, like Revolut and Wise. The regulator said it found weaknesses in challenger banks' due diligence checks on customers, with some firms failing to adequately assess the risk of financial crime when onboarding new clients. In some cases, challenger banks did not have customer risk assessments in place to begin with, it added. "Challenger banks are an important part of the UK's retail banking offering," Sarah Pritchard, executive...
    DES MOINES, Iowa (AP) — A top workplace safety regulator warned the Republican leaders of the Iowa Legislature that conditions inside the state Capitol are hazardous and may be exposing workers to the coronavirus, according to documents released Monday. Russell Perry, administrator of the Iowa Occupational Safety and Health Administration, warned in a “hazard alert letter” dated April 13 that an inspection by his agency raised concerns for the potential of worker illnesses tied to COVID-19 exposure. Perry wrote that social distancing is not always practiced or enforced inside the building, temperature checks and health screens are not performed on everyone entering and employees are not required to report positive tests to legislative leaders under their policy. In addition, cases that are reported are not examined to determine whether they were work-related. Perry wrote that the conditions do not amount to a violation of Iowa law but “may expose workers to COVID-19 hazards.” He asked Senate Majority Leader Jack Whitver, Senate President Jake Chapman, House Majority Leader Matt Windschitl and House Speaker Pat Grassley to “please facilitate immediate corrective actions...
    The New York Times Throughout Trial Over George Floyd’s Death, Killings by Police Mount MINNEAPOLIS — Just seven hours before prosecutors opened their case against Derek Chauvin, a former Minneapolis police officer charged with killing George Floyd, a Chicago officer chased down a 13-year-old boy in a West Side alley and fatally shot him as he turned with his hands up. One day later, at a hotel in Jacksonville, Florida, officers fatally shot a 32-year-old man, who, police say, grabbed one of their Tasers. The day after that, as an eyewitness to Floyd’s death broke down in a Minneapolis courtroom while recounting what he saw, a 40-year-old mentally ill man who said he was being harassed by voices was killed in Claremont, New Hampshire, in a shootout with the state police. On every day that followed, all the way through the close of testimony, another person was killed by the police somewhere in the United States. Sign up for The Morning newsletter from the New York Times The trial has forced a traumatized country to relive the gruesome death of...
    An epic battle is unfolding on Wall Street, with a cast of characters clashing over the fate of GameStop, a struggling chain of video game retail stores. The conflict has sent GameStop on a stomach-churning ride with amateur investors taking on the financial establishment in the mindset of the Occupy Wall Street movement launched a decade ago.Olivier Douliery | AFP | Getty Images LONDON — European regulators have warned retail investors against participating in financial markets "purely" based on information they gather from social media. The GameStop phenomenon witnessed in the United States earlier this year brought to the fore the impact of coordinated retail investment, when many people used the social media platform Reddit to discuss their intentions to bet on the American games and consoles seller, leading its share price to move. Retail investors used commission free trading platforms such as Robinhood to get involved. The main issue for regulators is that some of these investors were not fully aware of the details of the transactions. "What we have done as a securities regulator is that we...
    What CNNs Chris Cuomo Has Said About the Andrew Cuomo Allegations Taylor Swift didnt appreciate that Ginny & Georgia joke © South China Morning Post/Getty Images Guo Shuqing is chairman of China's banking regulatory commission South China Morning Post/Getty Images China's banking regulator said he is worried about "the bubble problem in foreign financial markets." Guo Shuqing said monetary policy had pushed US and European markets well ahead of the real economy. The comments weighed on Asian stocks overnight, while US futures fell. Sign up here for our daily newsletter, 10 Things Before the Opening Bell. US and European markets are racing ahead of their real economies, potentially creating bubbles that could pop, China's banking regulator has warned. Load Error The comments weighed on Asian stocks after the US's S&P 500 had its best day since June, with China's CSI 300 falling 1.28% and Hong Kong's Hang Seng dropping 1.21%. "I'm worried the bubble problem in foreign financial markets will one day pop," Guo Shuqing, chair of the China Banking and Insurance Regulatory Commission, told media...
    Reuters February 23, 2021 0 Comments  U.S. Federal Aviation Administration chief Steve Dickson warned on Tuesday of a changed industry in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic that has shaken air travel over the past year and created new safety risks that must be addressed. “The industry that existed last March in many respects no longer exists today,” Dickson said at a town hall about commercial aviation safety shown on social media, citing the retirement of veteran pilots, new fleets with complex aircraft and less international flying. “All these changes are creating a whole new set of stressors that can inject new safety risks into the system,” he said. While the risk of a fatal U.S. commercial aviation accident has fallen by 94% since 1997 thanks to improvements in aviation safety, Dickson said the industry must proactively curb new safety risks by understanding the pandemic’s impact. He cited added training and enhanced industry oversight as possible measures. “COVID-19 has created a tremendous amount of disruption and change in our system with breathtaking speed,” he said. Airlines have parked jets...
    Deputy charge nurse Katie McIntosh administers the first of two Pfizer/BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine jabs, to Vivien McKay Clinical Nurse Manager at the Western General Hospital, on the first day of the largest immunisation programme in the British history, in Edinburgh, Scotland Britain December 8, 2020.Andrew Milligan | Reuters LONDON — People who have a history of "significant" allergic reactions should not currently receive the coronavirus vaccine developed by Pfizer and BioNTech, the U.K. drug regulator said on Wednesday. The U.K's Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency updated its guidance to British health service trusts on who should receive the vaccine, cautioning that "any person with a history of a significant allergic reaction to a vaccine, medicine or food (such as previous history of anaphylactoid reaction or those who have been advised to carry an adrenaline autoinjector) should not receive the Pfizer BioNtech vaccine."  The precautionary advice came after two members of Britain's National Health Service, who received the vaccine on Tuesday, experienced allergic reactions to the shot. Both are recovering well, according to the national medical director for the NHS....
    2020 Fantasy Football Mock Draft Simulator: Practice your draft strategy, find best picks, sleepers What you should never buy at the dollar store China’s Bank Regulator Warns Dollar Dominance Is Seed of Crisis (Bloomberg) -- China’s top banking watchdog cautioned that U.S. dollar dominance combined with the massive stimulus unleashed by the Federal Reserve could push the world to the edge of another financial crisis. © Bloomberg Pedestrians wearing protective masks ride an escalator in the Lujiazui Financial District of Shanghai, China, on Monday, March 2, 2020. The pressure to get China back to work after the coronavirus shutdown is resurrecting an old temptation: doctoring data so it shows senior officials what they want to see. In a rare act of public criticism, China Banking Regulatory Commission Chairman Guo Shuqing also lashed out at developed nations seeking to divert blame from their own failures to contain the virus outbreak and moves by the U.S. to blacklist Chinese companies and entities. Load Error “In an international monetary system dominated by the U.S. dollar, the unprecedented, unlimited quantitative easing policy...
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