Sunday, Jul 03, 2022 - 07:27:45
114 results - (0.000 seconds)

crabs:

latest news at page 1:
123
    BALTIMORE (WJZ) — Jimmy’s Famous Seafood is holding a fundraiser next week to benefit the people of Buffalo, N.Y. after a mass shooting at a grocery store in May rocked the community and the nation. Ten people were killed and three more were wounded when a man opened fire at Tops Friendly Market in Buffalo on May 14, in what authorities called a case of racially motivated violent extremism. Eleven of the 13 victims were African American. READ MORE: Teen, 14, Shot In Northeast BaltimoreJimmy’s partnered with Charm City Bills Backers, a local Buffalo Bills fan club, Genesee Brewing Company, and Labatt to throw a crab feast, dubbed “Crabs For a Cause.” Funds from the event will go to the Buffalo 5/14 Survivors Fund, a fund started by the National Compassion Fund in partnership with Tops Friendly Market. READ MORE: June Deadliest Month In Baltimore In 7 Years; Federal-Local Partnership Aims To Solve More HomicidesThe feast will feature an unlimited supply of Maryland steamed crabs and corn on the cob, but also some buffalo favorites, like beef on weck, chicken finger...
    A CAMPER has said he is "lucky to be alive" after revealing the terrifying moment he woke up to a giant crab holding a steak knife. The adventurous TikToker revealed the shock moment in a video that has nearly 2million views. 3A camper said that he is 'lucky to be alive' after a massive creature stole a steak knifeCredit: Tiktok/kylesthenix 3TikToker kylesthenix said that the scratching sound of the crab woke him up in the middle of the nightCredit: Tiktok/kylesthenix 3He identified the thief as a massive coconut crabCredit: Tiktok/kylesthenix Kylesthenix filmed himself getting out of a tent at night and wrote, "I got woken up at 2am by a scratching sound outside my tent," over the viral video. After walking a couple of steps outside the tent, the self-titled "fake lawyer, dad, and assassin," captured a horrifying creature that brandished a dangerous weapon. "Hey bro, hey bro I need that knife," kylesthenix humorously told the black creature. He then bravely snapped the steak knife away and said "thank you." read more sun storiesSTUCK IN THE SKY Urgent rescue underway...
    SCIENTISTS have discovered a creepy new type of crab that disguises itself in hair scraped from other sea creatures. Despite their menacing appearance, the "fluffy" beasts actually use it as a protective hat from predators. 3Hairy businessCredit: Colin L Mclay/Scientific Figure on ResearchGate 3New species trims living sponges for its coatCredit: Colin L Mclay/Scientific Figure on ResearchGate They're much like the common hermit crab but instead of shells they trim living sponges and create a coat out of it. The fuzzy new species is part of the sponge crab family and has been named Lamarckdromia beagle. It was discovered after washing up on a beach close to the city of Denmark, Western Australia. "The extreme fluffiness was the give away for us," Andrew Hosie, from the Western Australian Museum told Live Science. Read more about animalsFURY FRIENDS Brits reveal the cheekiest things their cats and dogs get up to in pet pics "The sponge crabs are often hairy, but it is more like felt or velvet, rather than this complete shaggy coat." The crabs have special back legs that allow them...
    For the first time ever, Maryland watermen will soon be limited on how many bushels of male blue crabs they can haul daily from the Chesapeake Bay. With populations of blue crabs at the lowest level since recordkeeping began more than three decades ago, the Maryland Department of Natural Resources announced that starting in July, commercial watermen will be limited to at most 15 bushels a day of male crabs in August and September. Until now, restrictions on Chesapeake Bay blue crab harvests have been limited to females to ensure there are enough in the bay to spawn. “For the first time ever, Maryland is placing bushel limits on male crabs in a change that underscores the need to boost overall reproduction,” Chesapeake Bay Foundation’s Maryland senior fisheries scientist Allison Colden said. In addition, the blue crab harvest will end on Nov. 30, two weeks earlier than normal, in an attempt to bolster the crab population. More Maryland News More Virginia News More Local News Scientists for the Chesapeake Bay Foundation do not believe overfishing alone is responsible...
    CONCORD, N.H. (AP) — Care for a hint of crab in your whiskey? A New Hampshire distillery has come up with its newest concoction called “Crab Trapper” — whiskey flavored with invasive green crabs. READ MORE: Maryland Weather: Enjoy This Gorgeous TuesdayTamworth Distilling, a maker of craft spirits, is not afraid of pushing boundaries with unexpected flavors. In the past, the distillery produced a whiskey with the secretion from beavers’ castor sacs. Last year, it was turkey over the holidays and before that the notoriously pungent smell of durian. The company said the body of this peculiar brew has hints of maple, vanilla oak, clove, cinnamon and allspice. And no, you won’t get any crab legs in the drink. WHY DID THE COMPANY CHOOSE GREEN CRABS? Searching for a fresh flavor, Tamworth Distilling cast its eye to the sea. Distiller Matt Power said the company heard about the problems caused by the invasive green crabs from the University of New Hampshire Extension’s Gabriela Bradt. The crabs, which came over on ships from Europe in the mid-1800s and landed on Cape Cod,...
    CONCORD, N.H. (AP) — Care for a hint of crab in your whiskey? A New Hampshire distillery has come up with its newest concoction called “Crab Trapper” — whiskey flavored with invasive green crabs. Tamworth Distilling, a maker of craft spirits, is not afraid of pushing boundaries with unexpected flavors. In the past, the distillery produced a whiskey with the secretion from beavers’ castor sacs. Last year, it was turkey over the holidays and before that the notoriously pungent smell of durian. The company said the body of this peculiar brew has hints of maple, vanilla oak, clove, cinnamon and allspice. And no, you won’t get any crab legs in the drink. WHY DID THE COMPANY CHOOSE GREEN CRABS? Searching for a fresh flavor, Tamworth Distilling cast its eye to the sea. Distiller Matt Power said the company heard about the problems caused by the invasive green crabs from the University of New Hampshire Extension’s Gabriela Bradt. The crabs, which came over on ships from Europe in the mid-1800s and landed on Cape Cod, have taken the...
    Cam Chadronet, also known as crustaceous_cam on TikTok, shared a horseshoe crab rescue. This unlucky horseshoe crab attempted to eat a clam, but instead, the clam closed down tightly on the claw. Chadronet explains that when clams are this big, they can break off the tip of the horseshoe crab’s claw. He gently removed the claw with caution, making sure not to injure his delicate legs. @crustaceous_cam #animals #ocean #fyp #fish #animalrescue #nature #science ♬ Addicted to a Certain Lifestyle – David Arnold & Michael Price Horseshoe crabs eat smaller sea organisms such as worms, clams, crustaceans, algae, and other animals. Because they don’t have teeth, they must crush up their food before eating by using their front legs. They also have a gizzard which allows them to grind up their food even more before eating. @crustaceous_cam A species older than dinosaurs #science #cool #fyp #nature #crab #animals #beach #ocean #fish #rescue ♬ Sail – AWOLNATION Horseshoe crabs have been on the planet for 445 million years, making them the oldest land animals. They have survived over...
    A mother of five from Harford County in Maryland is being mourned by her friends, family, loved ones, and the state’s sizable hermit crab community following her death. Bel Air resident Ginnie Lewinsky Soriano died in Maryland, leaving behind a lasting legacy in the hermit crab community, where she was an active and beloved member. Soriano, who had 21 hermit crabs at the time of her death, was popular for creating goods for hermit crab owners at her Etsy shop, Hobo Hermie, and “dedicated her life to make sure our crabs are living their best lives.” “I am creating this (GoFundMe) specifically for the hermit crab family Ginnie has touched with her passion and love for these dear creatures,” Angela Gackstetter, the organizer of a campaign on Soriano’s behalf said. “I know she has touched all of us and will be severely missed.” According to her friends and family, Soriano “believed that caring for hermit crabs helped her through her own personal loss.” “She advocated for hermit crabs as being considered mental health companions,” they added....
    ANNAPOLIS, Md. (AP/WJZ) — The number of blue crabs in the Chesapeake Bay is estimated to be at the lowest level observed since an annual survey tracking the population began in 1990, officials announced Thursday.  The Maryland Department of Natural Resources’ annual winter dredge survey, a cooperative effort with the Virginia Institute of Marine Science, estimated that 227 million crabs are living in the nation’s largest estuary, down from 282 million in 2021. The survey’s highest estimate for crabs in the bay was 852 million in 1993.  READ MORE: ‘We Don’t Have To Accept This’ Calls For Action After Texas School Massacre As Shootings Rise In Baltimore, NationwideWhile the survey’s juvenile crab estimate rose to 101 million from 86 million last year, officials noted that the number is below average for the third year.  The abundance of adult crabs has steadily declined despite meeting management objectives, officials said. The department said it will work with Virginia and the Potomac River Fisheries Commission on management measures for the 2022 crabbing season that address conservation needs.  The results “continue a worrying trend,”...
    (CNN)For these tiny robotic crabs, being small is a virtue.Engineers at Northwestern University in Evanston, Illinois, invented the world's smallest remote-controlled walking robot, according to research published in the journal Science Robotics. Each one is about half a millimeter wide, which is smaller than the thickness of a United States penny. A robotic crab can balance on the side of a penny. It took a year and a half to create the miniscule metal creatures, said coauthor John A. Rogers, the Louis Simpson and Kimberly Querrey Professor of Materials Science and Engineering at Northwestern University. His team was comprised of students across varying academic levels who combined critical- and creative-thinking skills to design robots that looked like crabs as well as other animals like inchworms and crickets, he said.Read MoreSome students found the sideways motion of crabs to be amusing, which was the inspiration behind the crab robot, Rogers said. The tiny robot can also twist, turn and jump, he added. Bringing the robots to lifeThe robots, which are made of a malleable shape-memory alloy, start out as flat...
    ANNAPOLIS, Md. (AP) — The number of blue crabs in the Chesapeake Bay is estimated to be at the lowest level observed since an annual survey tracking the population began in 1990, officials announced Thursday. The Maryland Department of Natural Resources’ annual winter dredge survey, a cooperative effort with the Virginia Institute of Marine Science, estimated that 227 million crabs are living in the nation’s largest estuary, down from 282 million in 2021. The survey’s highest estimate for crabs in the bay was 852 million in 1993. READ MORE: Park Heights “Renaissance Row” Apartment Building Opens With New Affordable Housing UnitsWhile the survey’s juvenile crab estimate rose to 101 million from 86 million last year, officials noted that the number is below average for the third year. The abundance of adult crabs has steadily declined despite meeting management objectives, officials said. The department said it will work with Virginia and the Potomac River Fisheries Commission on management measures for the 2022 crabbing season that address conservation needs. READ MORE: Baltimore Homeowner Blasts City, Courts As Investment Property Turns Into 'Nightmare'...
    The number of blue crabs in the Chesapeake Bay and its tributaries is on a downturn, according to the results of the 2022 Blue Crab Winter Dredge Survey. This year’s survey estimated total crab abundance at 227 million, which is the lowest in the survey’s 33-year history, according to a news release. The survey is compiled annually by the Virginia Marine Resources Commission and the Maryland Department of Natural Resources. More Local News Adult female and male crab populations both decreased, with males at record lows and the number of juvenile crabs continuing a troubling three-year below average trend. “The results of this year’s survey continue a worrying trend for blue crabs in the Chesapeake Bay region,” said Chesapeake Bay Foundation Senior Regional Ecosystem Scientist Chris Moore. “The continued low abundance of juveniles and adult males indicates the urgent need for action to protect these segments of the population.” He said the survey underscored a need to protect adult females in order help ensure better numbers in the future. “It is likely that the loss of grasses is...
    Finally! Scientific experiments on crabs and lobsters could finally end when the animal sentience bill became a law in the United Kingdom. Welfare rules would finally be applied to crustaceans and decapods. Source: PETA (People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals)/Youtube Many people still wrongly believe that fish and other marine animals are not sentient beings, which is far from the truth. As opposed to mammals and mice, there are few laws to protect crustaceans and decapods in scientific experiments. For example, The Guardian reported that scientists do not have to register how many crustaceans and decapods that they experiment on, so we have no idea how what extent these sentient creatures are being tested on. They are also not in the Animals (Scientific Procedures) Act 1986, which means that no licenses or training are required to use them in procedures or experiments. Crustaceans and decapods are often used in experiments because they are sensitive to pollutants, and they breed quickly so that scientists can quickly exploit numerous generations. They are often used to see how different types of...
    NEW YORK (WABC) -- If you've ever gotten a vaccine, including the COVID vaccine, you have a very unlikely creature to thank. The horseshoe crab.For the last 40 years, the blue blood from the horseshoe crab, a creature which predates the dinosaurs and has survived all of Earth's five mass extinctions, has been used to safely manufacture vaccines, medicines and vitamins.The blood is used to detect bacteria or toxins during the manufacturing process.But, the horseshoe crab population is declining in our area and around the world due, in part, to fishermen using them for bait, according to Dr. John Tanacredi, who operates the only horseshoe crab breeding facility in the Western Hemisphere, which is located in West Sayville.Tanacredi, who has been studying horseshoe crabs for years at the Center for Environmental Research and Coastal Oceans Monitoring at Molloy College, said New York State has one of the worst records in the country for the maintenance of its horseshoe crab population.He said it's in part because of the state's harvesting rules, which allow fishermen to harvest horseshoe crabs for bait. The...
    PLAYA GIRON, Cuba (AP) — Every year in Cuba, millions of crabs emerge from the forest at the beginning of the spring rains and head for the waters of the Bay of Pigs, crossing streets and highways on a perilous journey to mate and reproduce. Now underway, the migration causes concern to drivers who try to swerve in an often futile attempt not to kill the crustaceans. The crabs are a nuisance to residents but the sight of their road-crossing is a wonder for tourists and other first-time onlookers. “They got here before us,” said Amaury Urra, a 50-year-old hiking guide who spent his entire life in this part of the Ciénega de Zapata, the largest wetland in the Caribbean, particularly picturesque for the backdrop of turquoise sea waters and the coastal cliffs. ″We’re used to this.″ “Where I live, which is in the center of the town of Girón, the crabs don’t get there as much,″ though there are plenty on the outskirts, he said. Located about 180 kilometers (110 miles) southeast of Havana, the area...
    Armor-plated pill-bugs the size of dinner plates. Pulsating red jellyfish that look like beating hearts. Bone-eating worms that consume whale carcasses. Loopy coral seemingly drawn by Dr. Seuss. The menagerie seems more fitting for a science fiction movie in outer space than something that lives nearby. Yet the bizarre creatures swim in Monterey Bay and other parts of the world’s oceans — often thousands of feet below the surface, in pitch-black, cold waters under immense pressure. After spending years trying to figure out how to collect them with unmanned robots and keep them alive in captivity, the Monterey Bay Aquarium is preparing to open a new exhibition revealing what lives below the mysterious depths of the world’s oceans down to 10,000 feet below the surface. The new $15 million attraction, called “Into the Deep,” opens April 9 at the aquarium on Cannery Row, which was funded by Silicon Valley tech pioneer David Packard 40 years ago. As much an ode to the technology of marine exploration as to the poetic magnificence of some of the planet’s most unusual life, the...
    MILLIONS of zombie crabs are currently migrating in massive swarms after a population boom. The crabs have emerged early and in unprecedented swarms according to local residents around the Bay of Pigs, Cuba. 4The crabs march across the road towards the bay where they will release their eggsCredit: Reuters 4The crabs numbers are believed to have increased hugely due to the pandemicCredit: Reuters Following two years of Covid, the crabs size and numbers have grown massively because they were allowed to cross normally trafficked roadways in peace. After the island's spring rains begin, millions of red, yellow and black crustaceans emerge at dawn and dusk and march from the forest across the road and down to Cuba's southern coast to spawn in the sea. Mass migration occurs after mating because females return to the sea to release their eggs to be hatched where the larvae live as plankton. "There was very little traffic, and very little tourism," said Angel Iraola, 46, who guards a parking lot off the winding, crab-infested road that tracks the bay. "There are more crabs now...
    We’re on the downhill slide. The miserable month of February is about to run its course. Tuesday marks the first day of March. A reader wanted to know when is the best time to begin fishing for crappie. He had in mind Grayson Lake. The last week of March is best for finding them schooling up around underwater brush piles. Kentucky bass (spotted) can also often be found feeding right in among the crappie. Today I want to talk about catching a species of the underwater world that most readers – if any – have never fished for. My first experience with crab fishing came quite a few years ago when I, as a naval reservist, was undergoing two weeks training with the regular U.S. Navy at a ship repair station in New Port, Rhode Island. The regular navy guy who took me crab fishing first drove two stakes into the bottom about 10 feet apart. He tied a line between the stakes, with a swag in the middle. He tied five or six lines, each about three feet long,...
    GIANT red king crabs from Russia are invading Britain — spreading fear and joy among fishermen. The species, which can grow close to 6ft across and weigh up to 28lb, have been showing up off the Yorkshire coast. 3The giant red king crabs can grow up to 6ft in size and have been caught in YorkshireCredit: Alamy Fishermen are thrilled as the sweet-fleshed goliaths are popular with chefs — but fear the monsters may munch all the scallops and see off brown crabs. One said: “I’m really excited, but worried about our native seafood.” The species, whose hard upper shell can measure 11in across, are native to North America. Scientists introduced them to Russia in the 1960s and they thrived in the Arctic Ocean. Their population exploded and fishermen got rich. Soon, the titans travelled to ­Norway where they sparked another fishing boom. Most read in The US SunMEET WILLOW Jill Biden announces new White House cat Willow named after her hometownFAMILY HORROR Mom-of-three dies from Covid 'after begging for vaccine for six months'STICK TOGETHER Khloe Kardashian's 'embarrassing' DMs...
    (CNN)Washington state is taking action to tackle an infestation of European green crabs after an exponential increase in the invasive species.Governor Jay Inslee issued an emergency order on Wednesday that will allow the state's department of fish and wildlife to eradicate the crustacean or prevent it from permanently establishing itself.The increase in the number of European green crabs had been seen within the Lummi Nation's Sea Pond and outer coast areas.The state said in a statement that if the crab becomes permanently established, "it will particularly harm endangered species, impact resources that are part of the cultural identity of the tribes and native peoples, and affect small businesses."Thought it's native to the northeastern Atlantic Ocean, the European green crab is considered a "globally-damaging invasive species" that is able to survive in a wide range of water temperatures and has become established in many temperate coastal zones around the world, according to the emergency proclamation.Read MoreA new species of tarantula discovered by Thai YouTube starIn these places, European green crabs have disturbed habitats, displaced and outcompeted native species, and altered natural...
    A group of Australian golfers had their game interrupted by a grabby coconut crab, and it cost one man a golf club. The moment was caught on video in October 2020, but the 1-minute and 39-second clip has gone viral after a Reddit user by the name of Lessons_Learnt shared it to the site’s r/Australia and r/WellThatSucks subreddits. "Golf in [Far North Queensland]. Crab takes a liking to some golf clubs," Lessons_Learnt captioned one of their posts. SNAKE CATCHER REMOVED A GIANT PYTHON AFTER A COUPLE REPORTED THEIR CLOGGED DRAIN: 'NOT WHAT I WAS EXPECTING' In the video, it's shown that the coconut crab – also known as a robber crab in Australia – has somehow managed to climb up a wheeled caddie bag, and it grabbed ahold of a set of golf clubs with its strong legs and pincers. The owner of the golf clubs, a man named Alan, tried to dislodge the crab by pushing the caddie bag down a hill. When that didn't work, he tried to carefully free his clubs from the crab's grip by hand....
    The Bay Area’s Dungeness crab lovers can now put local crustaceans on the menu. After a weeks-long delay, crab fleets on Wednesday were allowed to pull up their first haul from the waters off the San Francisco, San Mateo, Marin and Sonoma coasts. By early afternoon, crews that faced gnarly weather in the Pacific were arriving at Fisherman’s Wharf, Half Moon Bay’s Pillar Point and Bodega Bay. “I would have been out there longer, but the weather picked up fast,” said fisherman Mike Vorak, who still managed to haul four big pails of crabs into Pillar Point, where he sold them at $10 a pound off his boat, the Tonita. With eager buyers lined up in anticipation, he ran out quickly. Other fishermen sold their crabs for $11.50 a pound at a nearby seafood market. The traditional Nov. 15 start to the commercial season was delayed this year, as it has been other years, by the risk of whale entanglement in fishing lines. California’s Department of Fish and Wildlife gave the go-ahead after ocean surveys showed whales moving out of...
    Horseshoe crabs have been around for 450 million years, surviving mass extinctions and several ice ages, but conservationists say the creatures could soon go extinct because their bright blue blood is vital to pharmaceutical companies. The blue blood has immune cells, known as Limulus polyphemus (LAL), which are sensitive to toxic bacteria and can be used to test vaccines and drugs for dangerous bacterial toxins before products hit the market. The coveted blood has been used for nearly 20 years and is being used to test the coronavirus vaccines that are currently on the market. Scientists drain the horseshoe crabs of their blood and return them to the ocean, after which most of the creatures die - one South Carolina lab says crabs can be drained for up to eight minutes. While the horseshoe crab is not currently endangered, data shows up to 30 percent of the crabs harvested for their blood in the US die when returned to the ocean. Scroll down for video  The blue blood has immune cells, known as Limulus polyphemus (LAL), which are sensitive to toxic...
    Australia – Annual migration of Christmas Island crabs begins. Thousands Red crabs Located in the northwestern part of Australia, in the direction of the water, it emerges from the center of the Indian Ocean region. Christmas Island This ecological event is the only place on earth that takes so much. Brendan Tyrnon, head of natural resources at Christmas Island National Park, said: “This year’s migration is absolutely epic. Reuters. “The roads are full of red crabs Traffic jams On this small island, people have to get out of their cars and throw themselves off the road. In the presence of Crabs Roads or gardens last only three weeks. Enough time for the males to dig a hole on the beach so the females can lay their eggs. An incubation period begins later. The females stay in the nest for two weeks and lay their eggs, while the males return to the wild. Each female can produce up to 100,000 eggs. Valuable to the island’s ecosystem About 2,500 people living on the island know that these arthropods are important...
    One of the world's great wildlife migrations will reach a hectic climax in coming days when millions of red crabs make a dash for the water on Christmas Island. When the tide is right, columns of determined females that have already endured a week-long march from their forest homes will plunge into the shallows. With their claws raised about their heads, they'll vigorously 'shake their booties' like they're in a mosh pit at a dance party, releasing sacks of eggs from beneath their abdomens. When the tide is right, female red crabs plunge into the shallows on Christmas Island In footage of the natural phenomenon the crustaceans are seen swarming across roads, bridges, rocks and streams to reach their destination and breed Those eggs will hatch almost immediately and the larvae will vanish into the sea only to return three to four weeks later as baby crabs. In a good year, entire rocky outcrops and stretches of sand can be blanketed in the tiny, scurrying creatures. It's a reproductive marvel that never gets old for scientist Tanya Detto, who is...
    And you thought holiday traffic was bad. Roads are closed on Christmas Island to accommodate the migration. (Reuters/Parks Australia) An annual crab migration on Australia's Christmas Island has been closing roads for the past week as 120 million of the crustaceans make their way from forest to the Indian Ocean beach to reproduce. (Reuters/Parks Australia) "This year's migration has just been absolutely epic," said Christmas Island National Park natural resource manager Brendan Tiernan told Reuters. Over 120 million crabs are part of the migration. (Reuters/Parks Australia) "The roads have been a seething mass of red crabs. It's caused traffic jams on this small island and people having to get out of their cars and rake them out the way. The Australian territory is located near the Indonesian Island of Java and has a permanent population of around 2,000, with most of its land comprised of a protected national park. Bridges have been built to help the crabs cross a main road. (Reuters/Parks Australia) To make life easier for motorists several bridges have been constructed over a...
    By Stefica Nicol Bikes | Reuters Millions of red crabs crawled across Christmas Island on Tuesday, part of their annual migration journey to the ocean on the island off the coast of Western Australia. “This year’s migration has just been absolutely epic,” said Christmas Island National Park natural resource manager Brendan Tiernan. “The roads have been a seething mass of red crabs. It’s caused traffic jams on this small island and people having to get out of their cars and rake them out the way.” Tiernan said the ecological phenomenon of crabs migrating to the sea to spawn occurs nowhere else in the world on such a scale. “Sometimes we call it red crab island; the island’s community acknowledge just how important red crabs are to our ecosystem and to our economy, to tourism,” he said. After mating, male crabs will journey back to the jungle as the females stay behind in burrows for about two weeks to lay eggs. Each female can produce up to 100,000 eggs, which she will deposit into the ocean. “Some people were quite freaked...
    The UK has officially declared that decapod crustaceans and cephalopod mollusks, which include shrimp, lobsters, hermit crabs, squid, octopus, and cuttlefish, will be recognized as sentient beings. This decision was made after a study revealed that these creatures have the ability to feel pain. As a result of this new evidence, the animals will be added to the Animal Welfare Bill. Animal Welfare Minister Lord Zac Goldsmith said, “The UK has always led the way on animal welfare and our Action Plan for Animal Welfare goes even further by setting out our plans to bring in some of the strongest protections in the world for pets, livestock, and wild animals.” Adding these creatures to the bill will not necessarily protect them from fishermen or being sold in restaurants, but it will affect future welfare decisions around these species. Many have argued that these creatures need to be treated better and recognized as sentient beings, as they are often ruthlessly fished and trapped with no thought to their pain or fear. This bill is a giant leap for animal...
    (CNN)Octopuses, crabs and lobsters are capable of experiencing pain or suffering, according to a review commissioned by the UK government, which has added the creatures to a list of sentient beings to be given protection under new animal welfare laws.The report by experts at the London School of Economics looked at 300 scientific studies to evaluate evidence of sentience, and they concluded that cephalopods (such as octopuses, squid and cuttlefish) and decapods (such as crabs, lobsters and crayfish) should be treated as sentient beings. Vertebrates, animals with a backbone, are already classified as sentient in new animal welfare legislation currently under debate in the United Kingdom. A common octopus (Octopus vulgaris) moves along the seabe on August 2, 2017, in Marseille, France. "The Animal Welfare Sentience Bill provides a crucial assurance that animal wellbeing is rightly considered when developing new laws. The science is now clear that decapods and cephalopods can feel pain and therefore it is only right they are covered by this vital piece of legislation," said Animal Welfare Minister Lord Zac Goldsmith in a statement.The Bill,...
    xainte – 2021-11-20T17: 08: 00.000 + 01: 00 1813 people inhabit Christmas Island, this area north of the west coast of Australia and about 43 million red crabs. Coming from a native species that is scientifically known as Gecarcoidea natalis, the latter are generally sensible, as they spend most of their time near their holes. But when the rainy season starts in October-November, they become somewhat heavier. It is during this period that they begin their migration from the upper reaches of the island to the shores of the Indian Ocean, where they breed. They cover about 8 kilometers in ten days. Men are waiting for scouts and women to set up new holes. Once this is done, they return home, while the females lay 100,000 eggs each, which ensures the continuity of the species. The residents of Christmas Island have adapted to this migration so that the species is protected and not disturbed. So they are allowed to cross roads, schools and golf courses. Closing the roads on the way to them makes their journey...
    THIS is the jaw-dropping moment a "biblical plague" of 50 million crabs head to the ocean to breed. The swarm of cannibalistic critters shut down roads from the jungle to the coast on Christmas Island off Western Australia. 8Millions of red crabs scurry across the road on Australia's Christmas IslandCredit: Parks Australia 8The cannibalistic critters swarm townships in the winter monthsCredit: Parks Australia / Animal News Agency Unbelievable footage shows the bright red creatures descending on townships in what is considered one of the greatest animal migrations on the planet. Every year, an estimated 50 million crabs make their way from the forest after rainfall in October or November and head to the ocean to mate. Their journey takes them through residential areas and tourist hotspots through the winter months. Photos and video shared by Parks Australia show thousands upon thousands of crabs scurrying across roads and specially-constructed bridges. The animals also turned up at the door of an office block, the organisation reported. Residents of the Drumsite settlement in the north east were trapped in...
    Tourists have been left stunned as millions of red crabs are seen making their yearly migration to the ocean to breed on the picturesque Christmas Island.  Over 50 million of the blazing red crabs will make the journey from the jungle to the coast of the National Park, in Western Australia's far northwest. Locals and travellers alike have raced to capture what is considered one of the greatest animal migrations on the planet as the creatures turn the island red.  In footage of the natural phenomenon the crustaceans are seen swarming across roads, bridges, rocks and streams to reach their destination in time to breed.   Tourists have been left stunned as millions of Red Crabs are seen making their yearly migration to the ocean to breed on the picturesque Christmas Island (pictured) The crabs have been known to turn up in some pretty bizarre locations as they move over the cliffs and through the township.  Staff on the island spend several months preparing for the migration by building specially constructed crab bridges and temporary barriers.  Dr Tanya Detto, an invasive species...
    (CNN)In the depths of ancient seas more than 500 million years ago, phallic-shaped creatures known as penis worms commandeered empty shells to protect themselves from predators -- the earliest evidence of behavior best known today in hermit crabs. That penis worms lived like hermit crabs was revealed by analysis of fossils found in Yunnan province in southern China that date back to the Cambrian Period. The fossils preserved the soft tissue of four penis worms called Eximipriapulus, as well as material from conical-shaped shells that once belong to animals called hyoliths."The worms are always sitting snugly within these same types of shells, in the same position and orientation," said Martin Smith, associate professor in palaeontology at the University of Durham in the UK, in a statement. He was a coauthor of a study on the fossils that published in the journal Current Biology on Monday."The only explanation that made sense was that these shells were their homes -- something that came as a real surprise," Smith said. This ancient sloth ate meat, unlike its plant-eating relativesHermiting behavior had been...
    Hermit crabs were far from the first to call other creatures' discarded shells their own — fearsome 'penis worms' did the same thing 500 million years ago, a study found. Researchers led from Yunnan University presented new specimens recovered from the 'Guanshan biota', rock deposits that outcrop around Kunming city in China. The Guanshan deposits are famous because they preserve not only shell material, but also the soft tissues that would commonly be lost from the fossil record.  Four of the phallic creatures — properly known as priapulid worms — were found preserved residing within the conical shells of hyoliths, a long-extinct fossil group.  Having eliminated other explanations, the team concluded that the ancient worms were forced to take shelter to avoid predators, a conclusion they called 'surprising'. The worms from the Guanshan biota lived not long after the 'Cambrian Explosion', a time which saw the rapid diversification and complication of animal life. According to the researchers, the findings highlight how key predation was in shaping the ecology and behaviour of animals at this key point in their history. Hermiting behaviour has never been...
    Abandoned tires dumped into the ocean are turning into deadly traps for hermit crabs, who may be resorting to eating each other in a desperate but futile gambit to survive. According to a study out of Japan's Hirosaki University, the bottom-feeding arthropods can crawl into a tire's concave interior but can't get out. Biologists Atsushi Sogabe and Kiichi Takatsuji found hundreds of hermit crab shells inside a discarded tire in Aomori Prefecture's Mutsu Bay.  Some still had occupants but many more were damaged and discarded—a sign, Sogabe and Takatsuji believed, that the crab inside had fallen victim to cannibalism or violent competition for food or shelter. Scroll down for video Tires discarded in the ocean are becoming deadly traps for hermit crabs, who can climb into the concave structures but can't get out. Over a period of a year, researchers counted nearly 1,300 crabs stuck inside six tires in Mutsu Bay To test their theory, they submerged six car tires about 25 feet deep in various locations in the bay and came back once a month to see if they...
    (CNN)Hermit crabs are finding their way into discarded tires in the ocean -- and they can't get out, a new study from Hirosaki University found.The concave interior of a car tire can trap hermit crabs that go there in search of food and shelter. The study refers to this phenomenon -- when marine animals get caught in human litter, such as fishing nets -- as "ghost fishing." Atsushi Sogabe, first researcher on the study and associate professor at Hirosaki University, initially noticed this during a 2012 survey of Mutsu Bay in Japan. While monitoring pipefish along Mutsu Bay, he saw several shells in a discarded tire, some belonging to hermit crabs."I thought that the hermit crab that had invaded the inside of the tire could not escape due to the recurved inner structure of the tire and consequently die," Sogabe said in an email to CNN. "I wanted to prove this to myself." The tire found in Mutsu Bay contained several gastropod shells.The hermit crab shells found in this survey were heavily damaged, and researchers suggested this was a sign...
    Under new rules, California’s fish and wildlife department may prohibit use of crab traps during part of the upcoming Dungeness recreational season. Agency director Charlton Bonham on Wednesday announced the protocol for determining gear restrictions. On Monday, Nov. 1, a hearing will assess data on populations of humpback whales and Pacific leatherback sea turtles  off California’s coast. If that data suggests there’s a substantial risk of those animals getting entangled in crab traps’ lines and buoys, then the traps may be prohibited when the recreational Dungeness season opens on Nov. 6. Any mid-season restrictions will also be announced five days in advance. Additionally, the new regulations adopted by the state’s fish and game commission stipulate each crab trap may have only one  main buoy and one small marker buoy, of specific sizes; a crabber can run only 10 traps at a time; and the traps must be checked every nine days. Anyone using a crab trap must have a validation stamp, which can be bought for $2.42, in addition to a fishing license. Crab traps, or crab pots, are constructed...
    (CNN)British environmental watchdogs have launched an investigation after thousands of dead sea creatures washed up on beaches in North East England.Sharon Bell, a Marske-by-the-Sea resident, told CNN she walked the beach near her home every day and had seen a "steady build-up of soft crustaceans," in the past few weeks. Bell said she went to the beach on Monday morning and was shocked to see "the seaweed was piled high to waist level, but it was absolutely full, and I mean thousands of dead crabs and alive crabs, all varieties, lobsters as well." Photo courtesy of Sharon Bell.She told CNN she visited the beach again Wednesday, only to find the smell was "absolutely terrible," as the piles of dead crabs began to "decompose down."The UK's Environment Agency told CNN it was working with the Centre for Environment, Fisheries and Aquaculture and North Eastern Inshore Fisheries Conservation Authority to investigate why hundreds of dead crabs have washed up along the shore in the Tees Estuary and neighboring beaches.Read MoreWhat is COP26? How the pivotal UN conference could avert global climate catastrophe"Samples...
    THE skeletal human remains found during the search for Brian Laundrie on Wednesday were likely snacked on by alligators and other creatures as a body wouldn't decompose that quickly naturally, a former detective has said. A backpack and notebook belonging to Laundrie were found by police near human remains at Myakkahatchee Creek Environmental Park, near the Calton Reserve, yesterday that were today confirmed to be the 23-year-old. 4A former detective believes that Brian may have been eaten by animals due to the possible state of his remainsCredit: WFLA 4Many people took to observing Brian's body language in the bodycam footageCredit: Observe/YouTube While law enforcement shared very few details, two sources told local media on Thursday that the remains found were skeletal, consisting of a series of bones and a portion of a human skull. The remains, and the articles belonging to Brian, were found in a stretch of land inside the 24-000 acre park that until recently had been submerged in floodwaters. But Tom Joyce, a retired NYPD commander, exclusively told The Sun that the remains have likely suffered "a lot...
    (CNN)Fossils trapped in amber have been among paleontology's most fascinating finds in recent years -- globs of hardened ancient tree resin have captured tantalizing details about spiders, lizards, microscopic animals, insects, birds and even a tiny dinosaur that are often missing from fossils found in rock. However, all these creatures were land lubbers that you might expect to encounter on a tree trunk or branch. Now, scientists have found the oldest aquatic animal preserved in amber -- and it's the most complete crab fossil ever discovered. Blood amber may be a portal into dinosaur times, but the fossils are an ethical minefield for palaeontologists "The specimen is spectacular, it is one of a kind. It's absolutely complete and is not missing a single hair on the body, which is remarkable," said Javier Luque, a postdoctoral researcher in the Department of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology at Harvard University, in a news release. He was the lead author of the study that published Thursday in the journal Science Advances. The Chinese, US and Canadian scientists working on the amber specimen, which originated...
    Remains of an ancient crab frozen in amber for 100 million years have been discovered, making it the oldest modern-looking crab ever to be uncovered. Previous fossil records, which mainly consist of bits and pieces of claws, suggested nonmarine crabs came onto land and freshwater about 75 to 50 million years ago. The 55-millimeter crab was discovered in the jungles of Southeast Asia and is the first-ever to be found that lived among the dinosaurs. 'The discovery provides new insights into the evolution of these crustaceans and when they spread around the world,' researchers at Harvard University, who analyzed the amber, shared in a press release. Remains of an ancient crab frozen in amber for 100 million years have been discovered, making it the oldest modern-looking crab ever to be uncovered. Previous fossil records, which mainly consist of bits and pieces of claws, suggested nonmarine crabs came onto land and freshwater about 75 to 50 million years ago Javier Luque, a post-doctoral researcher in the Harvard Department of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology, said in a statement: 'If we were to...
    Former Clinton administration official Jon Baron chats with visitors at the J. Millard Tawes Clam Bake and Crab Feast. Maryland Matters/Danielle E. Gaines (1/26) Share This Gallery: Share on Facebook. Share on Twitter. Share via email. Print. This content was republished with permission from WTOP’s news partners at Maryland Matters. Sign up for Maryland Matters’ free email subscription today. The J. Millard Tawes Clam Bake and Crab Feast, a beloved ritual of summer temporarily transferred to autumn due to the COVID-19 pandemic, returned to Crisfield on Wednesday, attracting dozens of flesh-pressing candidates, scores of political insiders schmoozing with one another, and thousands of everyday citizens who came to enjoy the unlimited seafood and beer. For a struggling and neglected town at the bottom of Eastern Shore, far from Maryland’s population centers, it was a welcome moment in the spotlight, and an opportunity for candidates to pitch their policy prescriptions to local voters. “This event is really important for Crisfield and for Somerset County,” said state Sen. Mary Beth Carozza (R-Lower Shore), who represents the area. And the mid-October date...
    BALTIMORE (WJZ) — If you live in this state, chances are you know and adore these little guys. “All Marylanders love to eat big juicy fat blue crabs,” said Dr. J. Sook Chung, a doctor at the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science. READ MORE: Annapolis Town Center To Hold A Community Event To Help Those Affected By Hurricane IdaSince 2015 scientists have been studying blue crabs-what diseases impact them, how warmer water temperatures affect them, which females have the best reproductive ability, etc. In preparation for the future as climate change is seen as inevitable. “Some of the traits make them stronger animals to disease resistance or growing really fast,” said Chung. A female crab was taken from our waters in the fall of 2018, one of her babies became ‘the chosen one’ or who the genetic code was cracked from. It was a team effort that took years to complete. Billions of ‘genetic bases’ were sequenced together ‘just so’ in order to create the perfect DNA of the Maryland blue crab. READ MORE: Nuclear Engineer And Spouse...
    COLLEGE PARK, Md. (WJZ) — A University of Maryland team just published the entire genome sequence of the state’s favorite crustacean — the blue crab. The researchers explained the best way to understand any organism is to understand its genetic blueprint. They say that they’ve learned the crabs’ functions including which genetic traits make the crabs particularly successful and reproducing or adapting to their environment, particularly in waters warmed by climate change. READ MORE: One Of 'Maryland's Most Wanted' Captured In Georgia After 3 Years On The RunThe genome sequencing project was done by a team of four scientists over the course of four years at the Institute of Marine and Environmental Technology, (IMET) located in Baltimore’s Inner Harbor The project was lead by University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science Professor Sook Chung at the IMET. She said understanding the crabs will help us keep them safe in a changing environment. “Marylanders love crabs, and everybody wants to have big, fat crabs in the fall. Understanding what makes them successful is located in the chromosomes,” said Chung, an expert...
    Sook Chung during her research project on finding the genetic blueprint for the blue crab. (Courtesy University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science) Courtesy University of Maryland Center for Environmental Scienc Part of Sun Chook’s research is finding a blue crab’s genetic blueprint. (Courtesy Cheryl Nemazie) Cheryl Nemazie Part of Sun Chook’s research is finding a blue crab’s genetic blueprint. (Courtesy Cheryl Nemazie) Cheryl Nemazie (1/3) Share This Gallery: Share on Facebook. Share on Twitter. Share via email. Print. Those blue crabs eaten at a picnic table in the summer from the Chesapeake Bay had a long mystery behind them. Now, local scientists have cracked the code and know the makeup of their DNA. It was unknown until now that the blue crab has between 40 and 50 chromosomes, nearly double the number found in humans. “We did it first in the blue crab,” said Sook Chung, a professor at the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science who led the project at the Institute of Marine and Environmental Technology in Baltimore. “So that part, I...
    (CNN)The oil spill off Huntington Beach and spreading to the surrounding area is not a lone actor or a unique monster. We have been here before and will be again -- probably quite soon. This oil spill may well prove to be something of a replay of the 2015 Refugio spill that erupted over beaches about 150 miles north of Huntington Beach. Sean AndersonThat Refugio Spill had significant impacts on the critters you'd expect, but also on some of our most hidden and cryptic coastal dwellers. While oiled seabirds and marine mammals understandably garner the most attention and public sympathy, the research of students and faculty at California State University Channel Islands showed a high mortality rate among adults and developing young at the very base of our sandy beach ecosystems: sand crabs.Read More These thumb-sized crustaceans dwell in the sand where the tides crash into the coast. They are directly in the path of this floating oil. The spilled oil kills adult crabs when it is thick and developing eggs when it is diluted. This should cause great...
    ANNAPOLIS, Md. (WJZ) — The two-day 53rd Maryland Seafood Festival concludes Sunday at Annapolis’ Sandy Point State Park. The tradition features the 30th annual Crab Soup Cook-off, music, exhibits, crafts and of course, seafood. READ MORE: Ocean City Promises "Zero Tolerance" For Lawbreakers At Unsanctioned H20i Car Event That said, only a limited number of steamed crabs will be available onsite from Jimmy’s Famous Seafood for those who did not preorder. Prices for crabs will be higher this year than previously due to the limited availability of crabs and crab meat, festival organizers said. READ MORE: Delta Airlines Wants National No Fly List Of Unruly Passengers Festival organizers this year have partnered with the Annapolis Social League to bring sporting tournaments, including beach volleyball, beach soccer, KamJam, spikeball, corn hole and kickball, to the event. A portion of the proceeds goes to local nonprofit organizations. Tickets are available online and at the event. MORE NEWS: Kent Devereaux Inaugurated As Goucher Colleges 12th President Friday  
    ABC Bachelor in Paradise resort in Mexico. The stars of “Bachelor in Paradise” are speaking out about the undesirable — and sometimes downright frightening — living conditions they endured while filming the ABC dating show. With the exception of the first season, which took place at a resort in Tulum, Mexico, and aired in 2014, the reality series is filmed at the Playa Escondida Resort in Sayulita, Mexico. But while it looks like “Paradise,” the filming location leaves a lot to be desired, according to several of the franchise stars. In an interview with Us Weekly, “BiP” couple Dean Unglert and Caelynn Miller-Keyes revealed there were some scary goings-on when they filmed their season in 2019. Unglert spoke of an unidentified “creature” that was sighted by some past franchise stars, which they compared to a monkey. “It could fly, I think. And it was big and hairy,” Unglert dished. “I never personally saw it, but there [were] a lot of whispers throughout the cast and the crew about this mythical creature that would sometimes come around and strike...
    BALTIMORE (WJZ) — The Guinness Open Gate Brewery in Baltimore is hosting its third annual Baltimore Blonde and Blue Crabs Feast next weekend, September 11 and 12. Tickets went on sale Friday for $95 and include an “all-you-care to eat” crab feast with a Guinness Baltimore Blonde Keepsake glass and limited edition Baltimore Blonde Crab Mallet, the brewery said. READ MORE: Baltimore Man Lloyd Simon Pleads Guilty To Robbing Same Bank Twice In A Week The ticket also includes a pint of Baltimore Blonde and El Dorado amber ale. After that, pints are $4 for the rest of the event. All other beverages are included in the price. READ MORE: Two Men Killed In Suitland Shooting Thursday Night To purchase tickets and learn more about the event visit their website.  MORE NEWS: Baltimore Fan Proposes With A Mini Salt Box  
    That’s one delicious-looking crab. A fisherman caught a rare crab off the coast of England that has a unique look to it. From some angles, the animal’s shell coating makes it look less like a sea creature and more like a pastry dish. sponge coated crab caught Ian Jepson caught a rare type of crab that locals have nicknamed the "sponge-coated" crab during a trip off the coast of Cornwall, Southwest News Service (SWNS) reports. He was about six miles off the coast when the creature was first spotted. FISHERMAN CATCHES DEER HALF-MILE OFF COAST "We do get a few weird things now and again and it is great to see. It certainly makes the day more enjoyable out here," Jepson explained to SWNS. "We caught it six miles off Perranporth and were delighted. You don't see them often, so it was lovely to see. Afterwards we carefully and slowly returned it so the sponge remained on its back" CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP sponge coated crab (SWNS) According to Jepson, the...
123