Sunday, Jul 03, 2022 - 07:08:07
10 results - (0.008 seconds)

that he would vote:

latest news at page 1:
1
    Sen. Mitch McConnell (R-KY) suggested on Thursday that there is no crime that would cancel out his "obligation" to vote for former President Donald Trump in the next general election. During an interview with Axios, host Jonathan Swan asked McConnell about his "moral red lines." "Help me understand this," Swan said. "I watched your speech last year in February on the Senate floor after the second impeachment vote for Donald Trump." The host reminded McConnell that he said Trump was "morally" responsible for the Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol. "How do you go from saying that to two weeks later saying you'd absolutely support Donald Trump if he's the Republican nominee in 2024?" Swan asked. "Well, as the Republican leader of the Senate, it should not be a front-page headline that I will support the Republican nominee for president," McConnell insisted. "After you said that about him, I think it's astonishing!" Swan remarked. "I think I have an obligation to support the nominee of my party," McConnell explained. "Is there anything they could do?" Swan wondered. "Well, that...
    Chris Christie says Donald Trump's repeated claims that he actually won the 2020 election 'incited' the January 6 Capitol riot, but that he doesn't regret voting for the former president twice. 'I think everything that he was saying from election night forward incited people to that level of anger,' the former New Jersey governor told CNN's Dana Bash Monday night. 'I don’t think they wouldn’t gone there if they thought the election had been fair,' he said, after admitting that he wouldn't have voted for someone else in retrospect simply because Democrats' policies are 'so long term bad for the country.' Christie's comments come as he promotes his new book, Republican Rescue: Saving the Party From Truth Deniers, Conspiracy Theorists, and the Dangerous Policies of Joe Biden.  On Monday, he told ABC's The View that First Lady Melania Trump called him every day after he contracted COVID at a White House reception, while the president himself was only worried about whether Christie would blame him for catching it. Former New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie admitted that Trump's rhetoric from Election...
    Mo Brooks—armed and wearing body armor—demands that Trump supports 'fight for America' on Jan. 6 On Sunday, an article in Rolling Stone reported that both Republicans members of Congress and their staff met repeatedly with the organizers of the Jan. 6 rally to plan protests around blocking the official tallying of the Electoral College vote. On Monday, the Montgomery Advisor reported that Brooks denied helping to plan the rally, saying that he had not had any  involvement in fundraising for the rally, and only showed up to speak “because the White House asked him to do so.” In a phone interview, Brooks seemed quite sure that his hands were clean when it came to the rally and the violent and deadly assault on the Capitol that followed. "If you’re talking about someone participating in meetings, setting the agenda, raising the money,” said Brooks, “I don’t know of anything that suggests my staff as doing that stuff.” But speaking to reporters on Monday afternoon, Brooks walked that statement back a critical distance. Speaking to CNN’s Melanie Zanona, Brooks continued to claim that...
    Moderate Democrat Joe Manchin has declared that he will not to eliminate the filibuster - a move which could potentially dash President Biden's chances of passing progressive legislation in the Senate.  Manchin, who serves as a senator for West Virginia, made the declaration in an op-ed published in The Washington Post Thursday, claiming that killing the filibuster would lead to more political partisanship and government dysfunction.  Currently, Republicans can filibuster (ie. obstruct or delay) legislation they are vehemently against and force reconciliation, which requires 60 senate votes.  Considering the senate is currently split 50-50 (with Vice President Kamala Harris holding the tie-breaking vote) most Democrats are eager to kill the filibuster, which would mean they could then pass legislation with a simple majority of 51.  However, Manchin says the decision to do so would only divide the country deeper, asserting that the filibuster makes it possible for Democrats and Republicans to eventually find compromise.  Moderate Democrat Joe Manchin has declared that he will not to eliminate the filibuster - a move which could potentially weaken President Biden's legislative agenda...
    There have been rumblings that former President Donald Trump would start a new third party because of his anger at Republicans, but at CPAC Sunday, Trump told the audience he’s sticking with the GOP. Trump made his big public appearance at CPAC Sunday weeks after leaving office and after the violent riots at the Capitol by his supporters following all his false claims about the 2020 election results. When the former president spoke Sunday, he said at one point, “They kept saying, ‘He’s going to start a brand-new party.’ We have the Republican party. It’s going to unite and be stronger than ever before.” “I am not starting a new party. That was fake news,” Trump said, telling the crowd it would “divide our vote so that you can never win.” You can watch above, via Fox News. Have a tip we should know? [email protected]
    Dwayne "The Rock" Johnson is still open to diving into politics. During a 2017 appearance on "The Ellen DeGeneres Show," the star said that he was "seriously considering" a run for president. Nowadays, he's further alluding to a possible run with his new sitcom "Young Rock," which chronicles his younger years. According to USA Today, each episode of the show features the star in mock interviews during a 2032 run for office. DWAYNE JOHNSON REFLECTS ON DISCRIMINATION HE FACED AS A CHILD: 'RACIAL PREJUDICE WAS PRETTY PREVALENT' Dwayne 'The Rock' Johnson said he's still considering a presidential run. (Photo by Axelle/Bauer-Griffin/FilmMagic) Despite having years' worth of projects lined up in Hollywood, the star still hasn't ruled out one day vying for the Oval Office. "I would consider a presidential run in the future if that's what the people wanted," he told the outlet. "Truly I mean that, and I'm not flippant in any way with my answer. That would be up to the people... So I would wait, and I would listen." DWAYNE 'THE ROCK' JOHNSON RECALLS 'INCREDIBLY COMPLICATED' RELATIONSHIP WITH...
    He helped block Merrick Garland and dozens of other judicial nominees. Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-SC) complained on Thursday that partisanship has taken over the judicial confirmation process — just four years after helping to block former President Barack Obama's Supreme Court nominee Merrick Garland from even getting a vote. "Now we find ourselves in a situation where qualifications no longer matter. It is about holding open seats to have them filled after the next election," Graham charged as the Senate Judiciary Committee he chairs rammed through a Supreme Court nominee without a single Democratic vote. "We have lost sight that the individuals nominated matter. I think they do matter."
    As President Donald Trump quickly moves ahead to nominate a replacement for the late Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Democrats had hoped to halt that process in its tracks by convincing at least four Republicans that Trump's nominee should not even receive a vote before the election. Those hopes likely took a mortal blow on Tuesday when Utah Sen. Mitt Romney (R) announced that he is not opposed to confirming a nominee in an election year and that he would vote on Trump's replacement "based upon their qualifications." Thus far, Democrats have only been able to secure "no vote" commitments from Alaska Senator Lisa Murkowski and Maine Senator Susan Collins among all the Republicans in the Senate. Democrats had hoped to secure similar commitments from Senators Lindsey Graham (S.C.), Cory Gardner (Colo.), or Chuck Grassley (Iowa), but one by one those hopes have been dashed. Democrats had remained hopeful that Romney might defect, given his contentious relationship with Trump (and his willingness to cast a "yes" vote on Trump's removal from office after the post-impeachment trial in the Senate earlier...
    Embattled Sen. Susan Collins, R-Maine, said in a statement Monday that she agreed with the Supreme Court decision striking down Louisiana’s draconian abortion law, adding that while conservative Justice Brett Kavanaugh sided with the minority, his opinion “gave no indication” that he would overturn Roe v. Wade, the 1973 decision that legalized abortion nationwide. “Some have tried to suggest that this opinion is an indication of now certain justices would vote on the question of whether abortion remains legal. That is reading too much into this specific decision,” said Collins, almost the last nominally pro-choice Republican in national politics. “As Justice Gorsuch noted, ‘In truth Roe v. Wade is not even at issue here,'” Collins continued. “And while Justice Kavanaugh called for additional fact finding in the case, he gave no indication in his dissenting opinion that he supports overturning Roe.” Collins, who has won four consecutive Senate races in Maine, finds herself trailing Democratic challenger Sara Gideon in a campaign haunted by her 2018 vote to confirm Kavanaugh, despite credible allegations of sexual assault and a common understanding that he would vote to overturn Roe v. Wade...
    MOSCOW, June 21 (Reuters) – Vladimir Putin is considering running for a new term as Russia’s president if voters approve constitutional changes that would enable him to do so, Russian news agencies quoted him as saying in an interview on Sunday. Russia will hold a nationwide vote from June 25 to July 1 on proposed changes to the constitution, including an amendment that would allow Putin to seek two more six-year terms as president when his current mandate ends in 2024. Opponents say the reforms are designed to allow Putin to keep power until 2036 and amount to a constitutional coup. The Kremlin says they are needed to strengthen the role of parliament and improve social policy and public administration. “I do not rule out the possibility of running for office, if this (option) comes up in the constitution. We’ll see,” Putin was quoted as saying in an interview with state TV that was shown in Russia’s far east before airing in western Russia. “I have not decided anything for myself yet.” The changes that Russians will vote on, already...
1