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    CBS4 – Once a baby is born, all parents care about is the health of their little one. Every year, 4 million babies are tested for diseases, and around 3,000 are positive for something severe. That’s according to the National Library of Medicine. “It’s a part of what’s called a dried blood spot test.” Doctors can check for rare genetic, hormone-related and metabolic conditions that can cause serious health problems. (Credit: PHILIPPE HUGUEN/AFP via Getty Images) “I think in particular, there’s a couple of new disorders that are being added this year, and one in particular is called the X-ALD or X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy. It is an irreversible and progressive neurological disease that primarily affects males during childhood.” That’s Dr. Patrick Long. He’s a clinical geneticist at Presbyterian/St. Luke’s. “If diagnosed early, there are treatments that prevent the progression of disease.” Although most babies get tested, some do not. “There’s a rare chance that [people] could have an underlying genetic disorder that could have been screened for, and eventually they will start to present the symptoms that they’ll need to probably...
    Dr. Erica Anderson is a clinical psychologist with 30 years of experience and a former board member of the World Professional Association for Transgender Health (WPATH). Her private practice has specialized in treating transgender and gender-questioning youth. H.H.S. Assistant Secretary for Health, Admiral Rachel Levine raised eyebrows last month by declaring that 'no argument' exists among medical professionals who care for adolescents 'regarding the value and the importance of gender-affirming care.' That's just not true. Author, Dr. Erica Anderson is a clinical psychologist with 30 years of experience There is legitimate argument over these treatments, which are defined by the World Health Organization as a range of social, psychological, behavioral, and medical interventions 'designed to support and affirm an individual's gender identity' when it conflicts with the gender they were assigned at birth. For instance, despite what the staunchest defenders of gender-affirming care say some of these treatments, like puberty blockers and hormone treatments, are not fully reversible in some cases. But I must write that I also sympathize with Dr. Levine. She likely sees it as her responsibility as...
    by Mary Stroka   Minnesota’s share of long-term care facilities reporting staffing shortages is the largest in the country, Seniorly reports. Seniorly’s April 8 report indicated about two of every five long-term care facilities in the North Star State are experiencing staffing shortages this year, up 18.4% since 2020. Minnesota’s neighbors aren’t doing all that much better. Wisconsin ranks eighth, with 32.90% of facilities reporting staffing shortages and an 18.1% increase since 2020. Iowa ranks ninth, with 31.60% and a 14.5% increase over the past two years. About a quarter (25.9%) of Michigan (ranked 16th) long-term care facilities have staffing shortages, up 9.2% since 2020. In Minnesota, the shortages reported through Feb. 27 were 56.8% among nursing jobs, 8.40% in clinical jobs, 59.60% in aides jobs, and 40.60% in other jobs. Wisconsin’s shortages were highest among aides jobs (49.70%), followed by nursing (46.20%), others (29.50%) and clinical (6.10%). The same was true in Iowa (aides 49% nursing 45.40% others 28.9% clinical 3.10%) and Michigan (aides 39.50% nursing 36.00%, other 23.6% clinical 4.3%). Nurses and aides are the profession with bigger shortages...
    After Joni was diagnosed with stage IV breast cancer in 2017, she turned to our experts at the UC Davis Comprehensive Cancer Center, home to the most advanced clinical trials in the region. That’s where she connected with Helen Chew, oncologist and director of the cancer center’s Clinical Breast Cancer Program. Together, they built a personalized plan with less-toxic targeted therapies that has helped Joni overcome one of the biggest battles. World-class care and extensive clinical trials READ MORE: Californians Asked To Cut Back Further On Water UsageEvery day our oncologists break down barriers, uncover new treatments and improve lives in new ways — and we’re honored to offer their expertise right here at home for our region. As one of the nation’s top hospitals for cancer care, we’re home to the UC Davis Comprehensive Cancer Center — inland Northern California’s only center to earn “comprehensive” designation from the country’s top cancer agency, the National Cancer Institute. We provide the latest diagnosis and treatment options, early-stage clinical trials, and bring together research and innovation to treat a complete range of...
    BALTIMORE (WJZ) — The Johns Hopkins Health System on Wednesday night announced it has activated Crisis Standards of Care Protocols amid rapidly rising COVID-19 hospitalizations in the state. JHBMC said in December, it saw a 360% increase in patients hospitalized with COVID-19, which is the highest increase the hospital has experienced since the start of the pandemic. READ MORE: Hunt For COVID-19 Tests Push People To Wait Hours, Some Leaving Empty HandedOn Wednesday, Maryland surpassed 2,000 COVID-19 hospitalizations for the first time during the pandemic, up from its previous peak of 1,952 set in January 2020. The Maryland Hospital Association on Wednesday asked Gov. Larry Hogan to reinstate a limited public health emergency. Of those currently hospitalized, 1,657 are adults in adult care and 367 are adults in intensive care. There are 15 children in acute care and another seven in the ICU. READ MORE: Man Charged With Murder In Death Of 91-Year-Old Perry Hall Man“This decision was not taken lightly,” said Kevin Sowers, president of the Johns Hopkins Health System and executive vice president of Johns Hopkins Medicine. “Unfortunately,...
    Women who suffer a miscarriage will be offered help earlier under proposed new guidelines to stop them losing more babies. Currently they are eligible for tests and investigations on the NHS only if they have three miscarriages in a row. Charities say this 'rule of three' results in thousands of women and their partners experiencing devastating further losses that could be prevented. Updated guidelines issued last night by the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists will mean women can get support after a first miscarriage. The Royal College wants all NHS trusts to adopt the policy and revolutionise care for women who suffer the 'distressing, shocking and traumatic experience'. About 1 per cent of couples lose three or more babies to miscarriage, defined by the NHS as loss of pregnancy before 24 weeks. One in every four pregnancies ends in miscarriage, with an estimated cost to the economy of £471million year in healthcare and lost productivity. Many women struggle to find out if there is an underlying cause and are simply told to try again. The new guidelines say information...
    In May of this year, Donald Trump began telling associates that he plans to run for president in 2024 if he is healthy enough. In July, he told dinner pals that he is running. Just this month, he reiterated that he is likely to run again. The twice-impeached ex-president is increasing his media appearances and planning campaign-style rallies in Georgia and Iowa. Trump's humiliating defeat to Joe Biden — which he refuses to acknowledge even occurred — has fomented a yearning for redemption. Whether he actually runs again remains uncertain, but he wants his supporters to be ready, willing and primed. As Trump keeps his millions of supporters in suspense, they must answer one difficult question: Do they really want to continue to support a man who despises them and hurts them? Donald Trump has always abhorred his supporters. He does not feel an ounce of empathy or affection for those who profess their devotion to him. He sees his supporters as weak, stupid and inferior. They are losers to him. He hates his supporters as much as he...
    Clinical Director of the EGRMC Emergency Department Melissa Edrington, Employee of the Month Ginny Smith, Chief Nursing Officer Marie Burdett, and Assistant Clinical Director of the Emergency Department Cheri Wagner / EGRMC EGRMC has named Ginny Smith as Employee of the Month: Congratulations to Ginny Smith, R.N., in the EGRMC Emergency Department, for being named Employee of the Month! Ginny began her career at East Georgia Regional Medical Center in August 2017. “Ginny embodies the Community Cares culture in all aspects of her job,” said Cheri Wagner, RN, BSN, CEN, Assistant Clinical Director of East Georgia Regional Medical Center’s Emergency Department. “As an RN (registered nurse), she consistently provides excellent physical and psychosocial care for her patients. She appropriately advocates for her patients, assures that they are comfortable, and provides thorough and timely care. As a professional in her field of nursing, Ginny displays a thirst for knowledge and is always advancing her skills. She takes every opportunity to learn from peers, providers, and through her professional organization. Ginny recently...
    LOS ANGELES (KABC) -- Registered nurses at Keck Hospital of USC and USC Norris Cancer Hospital began a two-day strike on Tuesday morning, protesting what they claim are "unsafe staffing conditions" at the university-affiliated health facilities.Labor representatives from the California Nurses Association/National Nurses United -- representing more than 1,400 nurses at the two hospitals -- said nearly all nurses voted in June to authorize the strike."We don't want to strike, but our patients' safety is jeopardized by chronic short staffing and the hospital's excessive reliance on outside contractors without the appropriate skill mix to provide safe care," Keck Hospital nurse Joshua Duarte said in a statement released by the union. "USC needs to do better."Nationwide, health care systems are facing a shortage of nursing and other clinical staff.Keck Medicine of USC officials said they are disappointed the union called for a strike following more than 40 bargaining sessions and recently reaching a tentative agreement. USC nurses have been in negotiations since November 2020 for a new contract."Our top priority during the strike -- as always -- is the safety and...
    Texas, Mississippi see lowest Covid cases in almost a year Inmates in St. Louis jail stage another protest: Help us © Sami Drasin Nasim Pedrad was elated when her new TBS comedy, Chad, was green lit, but she also had a massive reality dawn on her: It was time to step up her skin-care routine.  That might seem like a somewhat obvious thing for an actor to think when embarking on a new TV series, but Pedrad's latest role—which she's also the writer and producer for—is far different from anything we've seen the 39-year-old actor in. For one, she'll be playing a 14-year-old. And, secondly, that teenager also happens to be a boy. “The show's very personal to my life growing up as an immigrant kid,” she tells Glamour. “I love writing about the awkwardness of adolescence, and I thought how to be cool would it be to tell a coming-of-age story where the teenager at the center of it was played by an adult who's in on the joke. Teenagers don't know what's so funny about being a...
    The Barcelona oncologist Josep Baselga died this sunday, have reported sources from the Vall d’Hebron Hospital in Barcelona. As it has progressed The vanguard, Baselga, which was currently Director of the Research and Development area (R&D) for Oncology from the AstraZeneca company, has passed away at the age of 61. His claim in this position was to develop cancer drugs. In the words of the oncologist, “of the different options that I had after closing the Memorial stage, this was the best to continue contributing to improve the care of people with cancer.” Pascal Soriot, CEO of AstraZeneca, declared in 2019 that Josep Baselga was “a Outstanding Scientific Leader in oncology. His research and clinical achievements have led to the development of several innovative medicines and he is an international leader in cancer care thinking and clinical research. “ Settled in the United States, it was medical director of the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York and director of the Vall d’Hebron Oncology Institute.
    Nearly a year after the World Health Organization (WHO) first declared the novel coronavirus a public health emergency, the agency has issued new clinical advice for both at-home and hospitalized treatment of COVID-19 patients. The agency also announced forthcoming plans to study so-called "long-COVID" or otherwise called "COVID long-haulers" who continue to suffer from symptoms well after the infection is gone. The agency also revealed plans to study long-COVID. (iStock) "Understanding this condition is one of WHO’s priority areas of work," the agency said, in a news release posted Tuesday. "In February 2021, WHO will organize a series of consultations to reach consensus on a description of this condition and its subtypes, and case definitions. The scientific understanding will inform the name of the condition. The consultations will include a broad range of stakeholders, including patient groups." US VOWS TO AID WHO IN CORONAVIRUS RESPONSE: FAUCI Meanwhile, for current patients who do not require hospitalization, WHO is recommending using pulse oximetry to measure oxygen levels in the blood. The over-the-counter products should be "coordinated with other aspects of home care,...
    SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — Dr. David Tom Cooke says his choice to participate in a clinical trial for a coronavirus vaccine is like his grandmother’s decision to leave the Jim Crow South to work in California’s naval shipyards during World War II. She was determined to contribute even though the country didn’t recognize her as worthy of full rights. Today, it’s Cooke’s sense of duty and experience as a Black man that led him to test out Pfizer’s vaccine in August and make it his mission to allay concerns about its safety among Black friends, family and community members. He’s also driven by an understanding of skepticism toward the medical profession among many Black Americans, rooted in a history of poor health outcomes and abusive research. “When you look at the scourge of the COVID-19 pandemic, communities of color are disproportionately affected in regards to death,” said Cooke, head of general thoracic surgery at UC Davis Health, the Sacramento area’s major trauma center. “Therefore, it’s imperative that we enroll people of color into these clinical trials enough to show they’re...
    By KATHLEEN RONAYNE, Associated Press SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — Dr. David Tom Cooke says his choice to participate in a clinical trial for a coronavirus vaccine is like his grandmother’s decision to leave the Jim Crow South to work in California’s naval shipyards during World War II. She was determined to contribute even though the country didn't recognize her as worthy of full rights. Today, it's Cooke's sense of duty and experience as a Black man that led him to test out Pfizer's vaccine in August and make it his mission to allay concerns about its safety among Black friends, family and community members. He's also driven by an understanding of skepticism toward the medical profession among many Black Americans, rooted in a history of poor health outcomes and abusive research. “When you look at the scourge of the COVID-19 pandemic, communities of color are disproportionately affected in regards to death," said Cooke, head of general thoracic surgery at UC Davis Health, the Sacramento area's major trauma center. “Therefore, it’s imperative that we enroll people of color into these clinical...
    A Philadelphia tech company which provides the software currently used in COVID-19 vaccine trials has suffered a ransomware attack, the CEO has confirmed. The global firm, eResearchTechnology, first came under attack two weeks ago, on September 20. Employees discovered that they were locked out of their data by ransomware, The New York Times reported - an attack that holds victims' data hostage until they pay to unlock it. ERT said clinical trial patients were never at risk, but customers said the attack forced trial researchers to track their patients with pen and paper. Several of ERT's clients were hit - among them IQVIA, the contract research organization helping manage AstraZeneca's COVID vaccine trial, and Bristol Myers Squibb, the drugmaker leading a consortium of companies to develop a quick test for the virus. ERT has its global headquarters in Philadelphia and has been under attack since Sept 20 ERT provides the software used by firms including AstraZeneca and Bristol Myers Squibb Research into a vaccine is feared to be delayed following the ransomware attack ERT has not said how many clinical...
    MINNEAPOLIS (WCCO) –- HealthPartners announced Wednesday that it is involved in clinical trials of the COVID-19 vaccine being developed by Oxford University. The trials, which are being led by AstraZeneca, are happening at about 100 different sites throughout the U.S., Peru and Chile, but the HealthPartners trial is the only one happening in Minnesota, the company said. “This research compliments our other efforts to advance COVID-19 testing, treatment and care and is an important part of our mission to improve health and well-being,” HealthPartners president and CEO Andrea Walsh said. Researchers said they are focusing on recruiting people who have health conditions that would make them “more likely to develop severe forms of COVID-19,” such as heart-related issues or diabetes. They’re focusing on people who are at least 18 and who have an increased risk of contracting the virus, such as first-responders, health care workers, and those in the food service or food production industries.
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