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    A Swedish billionaire who is developing a controversial luxury hotel in Aspen is suing one of the city’s newspapers for defamation, claiming The Aspen Times wrongly portrayed him as a corrupt Russian oligarch amid that country’s war on Ukraine. Vladislav Doronin, who was born in the Soviet Union and built his fortune in Moscow’s real estate scene in the 1990s, says the newspaper’s coverage of him in both news stories and opinion pieces casts a pall on his $76.25 million Aspen land purchase and planned development, according to a complaint filed last month in U.S. District Court for the District of Colorado. It’s the latest escalation in a simmering fight between the newspaper and Doronin. The Aspen Times has been critical of Doronin’s purchase, while the billionaire’s public relations team has staunchly fought the “oligarch” label, denied allegations of corruption and emphasized Doronin’s disapproval of Russia’s invasion of Ukraine. The Soviet-born Doronin left that country and renounced his citizenship in the mid-1980s, before the Soviet Union collapsed. He now lives in Switzerland and is a citizen of Sweden. He divested...
    ASPEN, Colo. (CBS4) – We’re well past the season for Christmas lights, but some people in Aspen still have them hung up bright. The city says it’s time to take the lights down. The Aspen Times reports city officials are giving out violation notices to the holiday light fanatics. City code says all lights have to come down by March 1 or a resident faces a more than daily $2,500 fine. A total of 50 people have already been contacted. Holiday lights are allowed to go back up starting Nov. 15, according to the code. Amy Simon, the city’s planning director, told The Aspen Times “Yes, holiday lights bring some charm in the community but there should be a period of time when it’s appropriate and when it’s not.”
    A New York Times columnist has resigned from his position at the Aspen Institute after he failed to disclose his salary for the role to the paper.   David Brooks was on the payroll of the Aspen Institute's Weave project, which started in May 2018, it emerged Thursday. The Times said that while his work there was approved in 2018, the current Opinion Editors were unaware of his additional salary. Brooks' Weave salary was disclosed by Buzzfeed as it highlighted how the columnist also had several troubling conflicts of interest with the think tank's funders.  He had continued to write about Facebook for the Times, even when the social media giant was among the donors to Weave. It added that Brooks had failed to disclose his salary to the Times' readers as he wrote about Weave itself, describing it as a project focused on 'building community and weaving the social fabric' of the US in one of his columns.  New York Times columnist David Brooks has resigned from his position at the Aspen Institute after it emerged he had failed...
    New York Times columnist David Brooks has resigned from a think-tank job he has held since 2018 over issues involving conflicts of interest. In a statement on Saturday, a Times spokeswoman acknowledged Brooks had not informed his current management team at the newspaper about the salary he was drawing from the Aspen Institute for his work with a project called Weave: The Social Fabric Project. “The current Opinion editors were unaware of this arrangement and have concluded that holding a paid position at Weave presents a conflict of interest for David in writing about the work of the project, its donors or the broader issues it focuses on,” Times spokeswoman Eileen Murphy said. Brooks has resigned from Aspen but will still volunteer for the project, she added. “Going forward The Times will disclose this unpaid relationship,” she added. “We are also in the process of adding disclosures to any earlier columns in which David refers to the work of Weave or its donors.” BuzzFeed News first reported the move. On PBS Friday night, Brooks denied his work for Aspen had compromised his reporting for...
    New York Times columnist David Brooks maintained Friday evening that his second job for a high-profile think tank hasn’t influenced his reporting while pledging "changes" to address concerns raised by critics. “It hasn't affected my journalism, but we are going to make some changes,” Brooks told PBS NewsHour host Judy Woodruff when asked about the controversy. Brooks’s remarks come two days after it was revealed that, in addition to writing columns for the Times, he’s drawn a salary from the think tank the Aspen Institute for his work with a project called Weave: The Social Fabric Project since 2018. The project was partly funded by Facebook and Brooks has referenced both Weave and Facebook in his Times columns. “Media critics are saying that you have written favorably about Facebook and about the project in your New York Times column,” Woodruff said. “So given that this is making news, David, we want to give you the opportunity to explain it, to ask if you are rethinking the decision, not to disclose this funding relationship." “Yeah, first we did totally disclose it. It's, everything has been public,”...
    New York Times columnist David Brooks is drawing a salary work he is doing for the Aspen Institute, Buzzfeed News reported Thursday. “The Aspen Institute declined to say how much it pays Brooks, but confirmed that ‘as chair of the Weave project, he is a staff member at the Aspen Institute,’” the Buzzfeed report said. In 2018, Brooks created Weave: The Social Fabric Project, a nonprofit that supports “hyperlocal community builders.” It is affiliated with the Aspen Institute, a nonprofit think tank, which has confirmed to Buzzfeed that Weave had received funding from Facebook, as well as other donors. “The amount and timing of Facebook’s funding, which had not been previously reported, combined with Brooks’s promotion of Weave in the Times, has raised questions about the columnist’s conflicts of interest,” the Buzzfeed piece said. Buzzfeed first reported on Brooks’ possible conflict of interest on Feb. 26, when Brooks penned a blog post for Facebook’s corporate website, praising online communities, such as Facebook Groups. In the post, Brooks said that Facebook Groups have a “tendency to subvert social hierarchies” and...
    New York Times columnist David Brooks earned a second salary for a think-tank project partially funded by Facebook without fully disclosing the relationship to his readers, BuzzFeed News reported Wednesday. Brooks has been a Times columnist since 2003, according to a short biography on the newspaper's website. He joined the Aspen Institute as part of Weave: The Social Fabric Project in March of 2018.  The Aspen Institute confirmed to BuzzFeed that Brooks was a staff member. It did not immediately respond to The Hill’s request for comment.  Brooks could not be reached by The Hill for comment and also did not respond to BuzzFeed reporters' questions, the outlet said. The Times also did not immediately respond to requests by The Hill for comment.  Facebook donated $250,000 to the Aspen Institute in 2018 but has not, according to BuzzFeed, donated any money to Weave since then. A list of other donors to the Aspen Institute includes family foundations such as Bezos Family Foundation and the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation as well as companies such as Boeing, Best Buy, and Bank of America....
    New York Times columnist David Brooks failed to disclose his financial ties to social media giant Facebook, according to a report from BuzzFeed News. Brooke’s project at the Aspen Institute, titled “Weave,” is defined as a “cultural movement renewing America’s social fabric, which is badly frayed by distrust, division and exclusion,” according to its website. The Aspen Institute, a non-profit organization based out of Washington, D.C, received a $250,000 donation for the project from Facebook in 2018, according to the BuzzFeed News report. NEW: NYT columnist David Brooks draws a second salary for leading an Aspen Institute project funded by Facebook, Jeff Bezos’ dad, & others. He didn’t disclose this to readers. The Times refused to say if the paper was aware of Brooks’ second salary: https://t.co/7WN3zrtrKp — Craig Silverman (@CraigSilverman) March 3, 2021 Several of Brooks’ columns in the New York Times have mentioned his project by name, as well as Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg and the  social media company itself. Still, Brooks failed to disclose that he was earning a second salary from his Facebook-sponsored project, according...
    New York Times columnist David Brooks has written a favorable piece praising online communities, such as Facebook Groups, in connection with the release of a study of the Groups feature partially funded by the social media giant, Buzzfeed News reported Friday. In the piece, Brooks praises Facebook Groups as having a “tendency to subvert social hierarchies,” and says they seem to “create opportunities especially for non-dominant groups, people who might feel uncomfortable walking into an in-person meeting place.” Brooks also says that Facebook Groups have created a new type of “online community leader,” the administrators who monitor the groups. “There are 70 million admins in the world today,” Brooks writes. “That’s 70 million community leaders, practicing their leadership in new and novel ways. Surely we should be focusing a lot of attention on these people, on helping them perform their role well.” Brooks also mentioned that Facebook is creating certification processes to help the group admins, and connecting them with “potentially revenue generating brands.” In 2018, Brooks created Weave: The Social Fabric Project, a nonprofit that supports...
    A teenager who beat a rare form of cancer three times has died in her parents' arms after catching COVID.  Aspen Deke, 17, from Missouri, was diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia at the age of four. She has since endured both a bone marrow transplant and CAR-T cell immunotherapy to help fight the disease, as well as four years of gruelling chemotherapy.  On a fundraising page set up to help pay for the cost of her treatment, her family told how she tested positive for COVID-19 in late November and ended up being hospitalized.   Aspen Deke (pictured), who beat a rare form of cancer three times died in her parents' arms after catching COVID  She was rushed to Children's Mercy Hospital in Kansas City, Missouri two weeks before Christmas, and had been in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit since New Year's Eve.  RELATED ARTICLES Previous 1 Next Moment cancer patient is arrested for giving free soup to... Eat Out to Pig Out. Then weeks of exercise binges. Now... Share this article Share...
    A 17-YEAR-OLD girl who beat cancer three times after going through four years of chemotherapy has died from coronavirus complications. Aspen Deke died from complications of Covid-19 on Saturday, her family said, saying she passed away in her mother's and father's arms. 4Aspen Deke beat a rare cancer three times before dying from Covid-19 complicationsCredit: Facebook 4At four, Deke was diagnosed the rare Philadelphia chromosome positive form of acute lymphoblastic leukemiaCredit: Facebook The high school junior had been diagnosed with the rare Philadelphia chromosome positive form of acute lymphoblastic leukemia at age four. She was given a dire diagnosis then, but went on to beat three forms of the cancer in her lifetime. She was then diagnosed with Covid-19 in November 2020. After going through four years of chemo and a bone marrow transplant, Deke was experiencing even worse conditions with Covid-19. 4She went through four years of chemoCredit: Facebook 4Deke was remembered for baking for her friends and family and people she met while getting cancer treatments at the hospitalCredit: Facebook "At least with cancer, as bad as it...
    Around 700 people are still without heat after vandals disrupted gas service to residences in Colorado Saturday evening, the Aspen Daily News reported Wednesday. The Aspen, Colorado, city council declared an emergency Tuesday in response to the disruption in gas service where around 3,500 Black Hills Energy natural gas meters were affected, the Aspen Daily News reported. An estimated 2,000 customers were affected, though around 65% of services were restored as of Tuesday. The phrase “Earth First!” was written on a pipe at a natural gas pumping station, though it’s unclear whether the radical environmental advocacy group was involved in the incident, The Aspen Times reported. Linn said no group had claimed responsibility for the disruption. Earth First! is a worldwide advocacy group that participates in a “direct action approach to protecting wilderness,” according to their website. The group claimed success in instances where other organizations gave up and lamented on the public attention they garnered. The FBI has joined a criminal investigation of what police say appears to be an “intentional attack” on gas service lines in Aspen, Colorado,...
    ASPEN, Colo. (CBS4)– An Aspen man who intentionally coughed on a woman while walking along the Rio Grande Trail in March, will get mental health counseling in lieu of jail time, according to the Aspen Times. The police report states Tom Patierno, 35, admitted that he “got in her face, and then made a coughing gesture” while walking along the trail March 29. He told the officer that he was “so sick and tired of all these people and their paranoia” but added he was sorry for his actions. (credit: Roaring Fork Transportation Authority) The victim, a 68-year-old woman, reported that she was walking with her husband and asked Patierno to move over to give them more room, in accordance with the social distancing laws. Her husband told police that Patierno became upset and, approached his wife, “got in her face,” then coughed in his wife’s face. Patierno was initially charged with disorderly conduct and according to the Aspen Times, less than two weeks later, the Pitkin County Public Health Director Karen Koenemann — through the county...
    ASPEN, Colo. (CBS4) – The Aspen City Council passed a mandatory mask zone which goes into effect July 31. People must wear a face covering at all times indoors and outdoors while in the zone. The area includes downtown and Highlands Village. Exemptions include those in motor vehicles and those while seated for dining. The new ordinance will expire on Nov. 4, but can be amended. Those caught in their first offense can be charged with a $50 fine. A second offense yields a $250 fine, and a those who are caught three times could pay $3,000 and face possible jail time. The emergency ordinance was passed unanimously, the Aspen Times reports.
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