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    ABC News Anna Sorokin speaks to ABC News. Anna Sorokin, who was convicted on fraud charges for posing as heiress Anna Delvey, was released from prison in February 2021 but taken into U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) custody on a detainer in March 2021. Sorokin is now 31. Sorokin was born in Russia but lived in Germany before moving to the United States in 2013, according to ABC News. Prosecutors said at her trial that she used her fake identity “to swindle Manhattan’s elite, gaining access to exclusive parties, nightclubs and hotels,” ABC reported. She was accused of defrauding businesses of about $275,000 over 10 months, including hotels, restaurants, banks and a private jet company, the news outlet reported. ABC 20/20 is digging into the case in a new episode, “The Sinfluencer of Soho,” which airs tonight, Friday, October 1, 2021, at 9 p.m. Eastern time. Here’s what you need to know:Prosecutors Argued Sorokin’s Instagram Page Shows She Has Not Changed Her Behavior & Said She Should Remain in ICE Custody View this post on Instagram ...
    ABC News Anna Sorokin speaks to ABC News. Anna Sorokin, who was convicted on fraud charges for posing as heiress Anna Delvey, was released from prison in February 2021 but taken into U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) custody on a detainer in March 2021. Sorokin is now 30. Sorokin was born in Russia but lived in Germany before moving to the United States in 2013, according to ABC News. Prosecutors said at her trial that she used her fake identity “to swindle Manhattan’s elite, gaining access to exclusive parties, nightclubs and hotels,” ABC reported. She was accused of defrauding businesses of about $275,000 over 10 months, including hotels, restaurants, banks and a private jet company, the news outlet reported. ABC 20/20 is digging into the case in a new episode, “The Sinfluencer of Soho,” which airs tonight, Friday, October 1, 2021, at 9 p.m. Eastern time. Here’s what you need to know:Prosecutors Argued Sorokin’s Instagram Page Shows She Has Not Changed Her Behavior & Said She Should Remain in ICE Custody View this post on Instagram ...
    Tony Award-nominated Broadway star Laura Osnes. Paul Morigi/Getty Images for Capital Concerts Laura Osnes said she "withdrew" from a theater production after a vaccine mandate was introduced. Page Six previously reported that Osnes had been fired after refusing the vaccine.  Osnes said she is still deciding whether or not to get the vaccine yet. Business Insider: A daily selection of curated stories Loading Something is loading. Email address By clicking ‘Sign up’, you agree to receive marketing emails from Insider as well as other partner offers and accept our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Broadway star Laura Osnes has denied reports that she was fired from an upcoming theater production after refusing to be vaccinated against COVID-19, saying she instead "withdrew" after a vaccine mandate was introduced by the theater. Late last week, Page Six reported that Osnes had been removed from a one-night production of the musical "Crazy For You" at the Guild Hall in East Hampton, New York, on August 29 after she revealed that she had not been vaccinated — which the Guild...
    A security expert is weighing in with his concerns about the U.S. Justice Department revelation reported last week. On Tuesday, August 10, Ryan Goodman, the co-editor-in-chief of Just Security appeared on the Law & Crime podcast where he weighed in on former DOJ official Jeff Clark's pushback against a colleague's efforts to overturn the election results for former President Donald Trump. Goodman, who recently co-authored a piece titled, "Mark Meadows Timeline: The Chief of Staff and Schemes to Overturn 2020 Election," noted his concerns about Clark's election conspiracy theories. "Jeff Clark has these bizarre conspiracy theories that he's cooking up about, you know, Chinese thermometers, changing ballots," Goodman noted as he attempted to describe the effort. "It's even hard to say those words." At the time, Clark circulated a draft letter that included his concerns regarding the outcome of the election possibly being ripe with fraud. Per ABC News: "The Department of Justice is investigating various irregularities in the 2020 election for President of the United States," the draft letter said. "The Department will update you as we...
    Fans have posted TikTok edits featuring Cameron Herrin, the 21-year-old who was sentenced to 24 years in prison for vehicular manslaughter. @b1noc/TikTok Cameron Herrin, 21, was sentenced to 24 years in prison for vehicular homicide in April. A cult fandom has developed around Herrin online. Herrin's mother said that some fans' actions have verged on "unhealthy obsession." Business Insider: A daily selection of curated stories Loading Something is loading. Email address By clicking ‘Sign up’, you agree to receive marketing emails from Insider as well as other partner offers and accept our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. The mother of Cameron Herrin, the 21-year-old who was sentenced to 24 years in prison after pleading guilty to vehicular homicide, said that she's received letters, emails, phone calls, and social media attention from supporters of her son, The Tampa Bay Times reported. Some of them, she says, verge on an "unhealthy obsession." In April 2018, Herrin crashed into Jessica Reisinger-Raubenolt and her 21-month-old daughter Lillia while speeding, leading to their deaths. As The Times reported at the time,...
    Skyline in New Delhi, where Bharatpe is based. Shihan Shan/Getty Images New Delhi-based fintech firm Bharatpe offers motorcycles to new tech employees in a bid to hire more staff. New hires can also choose a gadget package that includes a smart watch, an iPad Pro, and streaming subscriptions. The firm is trying to get an edge in its hiring push as India suffers a severe shortage in skilled IT professionals. Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. With IT manpower running low in India, one fintech firm looks to stand out by offering something different from the usual perks and benefits — a motorcycle for each new hire in its tech team. New Delhi-based fintech company Bharatpe lets its new employees choose from five motorcycles, such as a BMW model worth around $3,400 or about 3 months' salary for the average IT professional there. If a bike isn't your fancy, Bharatpe also offers a gadget package that includes an iPad Pro with a pencil, Marshall speakers, Bose headphones, a Samsung Galaxy watch, a $330 bicycle, and subscriptions to...
    People help with the fight against forest fires broke out in Antalya, Turkey. Suleyman Elcin/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images Turkey has been battling more than 100 wildfires that have now killed at least eight people. Videos show people fleeing the flames. People had to be evacuated from their homes and tourists were rescued from beaches by boats. Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. Dramatic videos show people fleeing devastating wildfires in Turkey. At least eight people have died in the more than 100 fires in the country over the past week, Reuters reported. These videos show people escaping the flames by foot, car, and boat: —ABC News (@ABC) August 2, 2021—Sky News (@SkyNews) August 2, 2021Thousands of people have had to be evacuated from their homes, and tourists were evacuated from beaches by boat, including private boats and yachts that pitched in to help. Most of the fires had been extinguished as of Sunday but many were left burning, Reuters reported. The EU, of which Turkey is not a member, said it helped to send three firefighting planes...
    NurPhoto/Getty Images Police attributed a child's death to a TikTok challenge after a preliminary investigation. Other deaths have been linked to the challenge, though users are unable to search for it on TikTok. But similar asphyxiation challenges predate TikTok and modern social media altogether.  Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. Following a preliminary investigation, detectives said they believed the death of a child Tuesday morning in Bethany, Oklahoma, followed his participation in a "blackout challenge." In a press release provided to Insider, the Bethany Police Department (BPD) attributed the deadly challenge to TikTok. But the "blackout challenge, which encourages people to choke themselves until they pass out for several seconds, actually predates TikTok. There's evidence that children died from games involving choking as early as 1995, according to one Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) study.  The BPD said in the press release that police and emergency services responded to a report of an unresponsive juvenile at an apartment complex just before midnight on Monday. An officer noticed ligature mark's on the child's neck....
    Protestors at the County USC Medical Center circa 1974 in Los Angeles, California. Los Angeles Times via Getty Images California is awaiting approval to give reparations to victims of forced sterilization, the Associated Press reported. The victims would receive compensation of about $25,000, including those who were sterilized in state prisons. Eugenics is a practice to sterilize those who were deemed "undesirable." Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. The state of California is set to pay compensation to the victims of  the "horrific history" of eugenics — a practice that determined that certain people, most in marginalized groups including those with mental illness or disabilities, should not reproduce due to "undesirable traits." The Associated Press first reported that once approved, the state will give about $25,000 to the survivors who experienced sterilization.  As Insider's Sarah Al-Arshani previously reported, the first eugenics sterilization law stems back to Indiana in 1907 and expanded to 30 states including California. The AP reported the state initiated its program in 1909. According to the report, the payments will also be given to women...
    Dr. Anthony Fauci said antibody tests are a waste of time and that he planned to get a COVID-19 booster shot to be safe, Business Insider reported Wednesday. Fauci said he believed protection from the COVID-19 vaccine would diminish with time, and booster shots will be needed, according to Business Insider. “You don’t want to assume that you’re going to have indefinite durability of protection,” Fauci said, according to Business Insider. (RELATED: Fauci Presses China To Release Medical Records Of Wuhan Lab Workers) Fauci said he won’t trust antibody tests to tell him whether he would need a booster shot, and he recommended the public to follow in his footsteps, according to Business Insider. Fauci says he’s not going to waste his time with an antibody test, and neither should you https://t.co/CBVdC5jZtQ pic.twitter.com/9wpRkswLW4 — Business Insider SA???????? (@BISouthAfrica) June 30, 2021 “If I went to LabCorp or one of those places and said, ‘I would like to get the level of anti-spike antibodies,’ I could tell what my level is, if I wanted to,” he said, according to Business Insider....
    An iPhone user looks at the TikTok app on the Apple App Store in January 2021. Lorenzo Di Cola/NurPhoto via Getty Images TikTok said that it had removed a graphic video from its platform, as well as re-uploads of it.  Users have been warning each other on the platform about a video of a beheading. The graphic video began with footage of a person dancing, according to Newsweek. Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. TikTok said that it has removed a violent, graphic video from the platform that depicted a beheading and prompted users to post videos warning each other of its presence on the app's For You Page. According to TikTok, the video is no longer circulating on the platform. Newsweek reported that the since-removed video began with footage of a girl dancing before cutting to the graphic clip, which reportedly showed a person being beheaded by a group of men in a bathroom. The graphic video was previously uploaded on another website before it was posted on TikTok, a TikTok representative said.  Insider was unable...
    A Minneapolis Police officers unrolls caution tape at a crime scene on June 16, 2020 in Minneapolis, Minnesota. Stephen Maturen/Getty Images Deputies in Minneapolis shot and killed a man on Thursday, according to The Star Tribune.  Hennepin County Sheriff's deputies were reportedly chasing the man who was a murder suspect. A small crowd began to gather near the scene of the crime. Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. Hennepin County Sheriff's deputies shot and killed a man in Minneapolis's Uptown neighborhood on Thursday afternoon, according to the Star Tribune. Deputies were pursuing the man, who was a murder suspect, the outlet reported.  Minneapolis police were reportedly not involved in the shooting, though police were providing support to deputies after the fact. The newspaper reported that officers requested two ambulances.  A representative for Hennepin County Sheriff's Office did not immediately respond to Insider's request for comment.  As residents and pedestrians awaited more information on the shooting, a small crowd began to gather and protest near the scene, according to Minnesota Public Radio reporter Matt Sepic.—Matt Sepic (@msepic) June...
    A cashier working behind the counter at McDonalds in Fort Pierce. Jeffrey Greenberg/Universal Images Group via Getty Images Around 256,000 teens gained employment last month. Companies are offering higher wages as they work to staff up, The New York Times reported.  However, it's mostly white teens that gaining employment.  Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. Teenagers may have the most to gain as companies look to hire more staff as many companies are reopening ahead of the summer, The New York Times reported.  Statistics from the Federal Reserve Economic Data show that around 256,000 16 to 19-year-olds gained employment last month, a large percentage of those who got employed last month.  The number of teens gaining employment is the highest it's been since before the 2008 financial crisis. It comes at a time when employers are offering higher starting wages, the Times reported.  For example, Kennywood amusement park in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, is offering $13 an hour, a $4 increase compared to last year, to those who have a high school diploma.  Educators told the Times that this trend...
    People run on Falaserna (Phalasarna) beach on the western coast of Crete island in Greece on May 15, 2021. LOUISA GOULIAMAKI/AFP via Getty Images As more Americans become fully vaccinated against COVID-19, people are ready for summer vacations. The soaring demand for travel has also caused an increased flight and hotel prices.  Booking weekday trips, packing light, and hiring a travel agent can help you save money. Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. After more than a year of canceled plans and limited travel, people are eager to book summer getaways. As of Tuesday, more than half of US adults have been fully vaccinated against COVID-19, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.  But as many hopeful travelers are finding as they book trips, flight prices are on the rise. According to a CNBC report published Sunday, costs for both international flights and domestic flights have soared in recent weeks. On average, international flight fares are up 17% since April 1, and domestic flight fares have risen 9%, according to findings by the research firm...
    A shinkansen bullet train conductor in Japan. Getty/Buddhika Weerasinghe A Japanese bullet train driver is facing punishment for leaving the cockpit due to a stomach ache. The driver went to the toilet and left an unlicensed conductor in charge for three minutes. The train was traveling at 93mph with 160 passengers on board at the time. Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. A Japanese bullet train driver is facing punishment after leaving the cockpit to go to the toilet while traveling at 150km/hr (93mph). The shinkansen train was carrying 160 passengers between Tokyo and Osaka on Sunday, May 16 when the driver left the helm due to a stomach ache, the BBC reported. The unnamed 36-year-old left a conductor — who was not licensed to drive — in charge of the Hikari 633 train for three minutes, but they did not touch the controls.  It was around 8.15 A.M. at the time, and the train was between Atami station and Mishima station in Shizuoka Prefecture, a spokesperson for Central Japan Railway Co. (JR Central) told CNN Travel....
    A drone photo shows a mass cremation of victims who died due to the coronavirus at a crematorium ground in New Delhi, India, on April 22, 2021. REUTERS/Danish Siddiqui A fire was reported at a hospital in Gujarat, India, as the country struggles with a second wave of COVID-19 infections. Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. A fire was reported inside the Bharuch Welfare Hospital in Gujarat, India, on Friday, with early reports suggesting that there were casualties, according to local reports. Videos on social media showed a part of the hospital engulfed in flames with fire crews attempting to stop the fire. Facebook Icon The letter F. Follow Insider on Facebook The horrific news comes as India is dealing with a surge in COVID-19 cases as well as a shortage of oxygen at hospitals. This story is developing. Check back for updates. Sign up for notifications from Insider! Stay up to date with what you want to know. Subscribe to push notifications
    Manhattan District Attorney Cyrus Vance announced Friday that he will not run for re-election—but it sure sounds like he’s trying his hardest to ensure his last months in office come to a dramatic climax as he weighs up whether to charge a case against former President Donald Trump. In a piece for The New Yorker, investigative journalist Jane Mayer reports that Vance’s office has dramatically accelerated the investigation into Trump’s business dealings in recent weeks—particularly since it got its hands on Trump’s tax records at the end of a long legal battle last month. As one person said to be closely involved in the investigation told The New Yorker: “They mean business now... It hit me—they’re closer.” One interesting new detail from the probe comes from Jennifer Weisselberg—the former daughter-in-law of Allen Weisselberg, chief financial officer of the Trump Organization. Allen Weisselberg has reportedly been identified by prosecutors as the most likely candidate to flip against Trump and spill all the gory details of his business dealings. And, by the sounds of it, his former daughter-in-law has already picked her...
    The royal family shooting their documentary at Balmoral Castle. Hulton Archive/Getty Images The controversial 1969 "Royal Family" documentary, which first aired on the BBC has resurfaced on YouTube. The film, which followed the royals' daily lives, was last shown on TV in 1972. The Queen reportedly banned the film after criticism that it would increase tabloid interest. Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. The controversial "Royal Family" documentary has resurfaced on YouTube after it's reported ban by the Queen in 1972. Queen Elizabeth, Prince Philip, and their family allowed cameras to follow their daily lives over 18 months in 1968 and 1969— the result was a documentary film which aired on BBC One in June 1969. Read more: That disastrously awkward documentary about the royal family featured on 'The Crown' is real. Here's everything you need to know. The documentary was shown on TV for the final time just three years after it originally aired — and now royal fans have the rare chance to watch it. "Royal Family" gave a behind the scenes look at the...
    The hit Netflix drama The Crown is facing backlash from the royal family for allegedly exploiting its pain for financial benefit. Amid the controversy, The Daily Mail reported that Prince Harry and Meghan Markle and under scrutiny for their deal with the streaming giant. ‘There are raised eyebrows about Harry taking millions from the company that’s behind all this.” an insider said. “After all where do much of Netflix’s profits come from? The Crown.” The insider accused the show of “dragging up” events of the past from difficult times in the royal family’s life. “That isn’t right or fair,” they said, adding that many of the depictions of the events “don’t represent the truth.” According to The Sun, the royal family is “furious” with both Harry and Meghan for their deal with the company. “The pair quit as senior royals earlier this year and ‘shopped themselves around’ for a big money TV deal before settling on Netflix, the firm’s boss Reed Hastings revealed.” The criticism against the pair comes as the royal family has engaged in what The Daily Mail...
    El Paso County detention inmates on work release climb into a transport van after working at the Medical Examiner's office in El Paso, Texas on November 13, 2020. JUSTIN HAMEL/AFP via Getty Images Inmates in El Paso, Texas, were seen assisting the county medical examiner as the city deals with an overflow of bodies related to the COVID-19 pandemic, KTSM reported.  As Insider previously reported, the medical examiner's office doubled the number of refrigerated trucks in parking lots its using as mobile morgues to hold bodies of COVID-19 patients. There are currently more than 31,000 active COVID-19 cases in El Paso County, according to county data. Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. Inmates in El Paso, Texas, were seen assisting the county medical examiner's office handle an overflow of bodies at the morgue from the growing number of COVID-19 deaths in the county, according to a report from KTSM. A spokesperson for the El Paso County Sheriff confirmed to the outlet that inmates were being used to help deal with the bodies, although did not tell the outlet...
    The Dock Street Theatre in Charleston, South Carolina, is reportedly haunted by the ghost of a woman who was struck by lightning on its balcony. traveler1116/Getty Images From cemeteries and hotels to prisons and abandoned buildings, there is no shortage of haunted places throughout the South. At The Marshall House in Savannah, Georgia, guests have reported seeing ghosts in the hallways and hearing children running through its halls at night.  The abandoned Tennessee State Prison in Nashville is a popular spot for ghost hunting — visitors have reported hearing screams believed to be from inmates who died in the electric chair.  Visit Insider's homepage for more stories.   Halloween is only a few weeks away, which means it's prime time for ghost hunters and paranormal enthusiasts to travel to nearby haunted spots.  Insider has previously identified the most haunted spot in every state, but in the South specifically, there is an abundance of spooky locations to check out, each with their own tale of apparitions, hauntings, and unfortunate events. From the eerie to the unnatural, here are...
    Crystal Cox/Business Insider Multiple studies have examined how the coronavirus shows up in dreams. Women reported the most pandemic-related stress and were more likely to see an effect on their dreams and sleep patterns. Increased dream frequency and recall, as well as patterns in dream content, reflect a shared anxiety about the pandemic. Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. The coronavirus has infected every aspect of our lives — even our dreams, several studies have found. Imagery of accidental handshakes, getting stuck at borders during lockdown, and losing loved ones to the virus make up a shared dreamscape observed in a Finnish study published today in Frontiers of Psychology. Some themes of bad dreams were unrelated to COVID-19, lead author Anu-Katriina Pesonen, head of the Sleep & Mind Research Group at the University of Helsinki, told Insider. But others were unmistakably influenced by the pandemic and associated countermeasures. "Losing your passport is a very common dream also outside of COVID-19," Pesonen said. "But in this case, many people were really stuck in the border, and they were...
    Jets-Bills Preview 17 Bible Verses to Remind You of Gods Constant Protection JPMorgan is requiring that its traders return to the office by September 21 after 6 months of working from home © Reuters JP Morgan Chase & Co sign outside headquarters in New York Reuters   JPMorgan will require its traders to return to their offices by September 21, The Wall Street Journal reported Thursday. CEO Jamie Dimon is already working out of the office. Executives said on a conference call that offices needed to reopen for the sake of team spirit and employee training. Bank reopening plans vary widely, with some pledging to wait until 2021 before requiring that employees head back into the office. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.  JPMorgan traders will be required to return to their offices by September 21 after six months of working from home, The Wall Street Journal reported Thursday. Load Error In Wednesday morning conference calls, JPMorgan's head of global markets Troy Rohrbaugh and head of sales and research Marc Badrichani told senior managers to bring their...
    NeNe Leakes’ role on the “Real Housewives of Atlanta” appears to be up-in-the-air. Rumors are swirling that the Bravo vet was fired from the show, but an insider told us conversations “are still ongoing.” Meanwhile, entertainment blog Love B. Scott reported that Leakes will not return for Season 13, and that execs want the show to “trend younger.” An insider confirmed to Page Six that actress Drew Sidora, 35, and influencer LaToya Ali, 33, are expected to join the cast. Leakes, on the other hand, has been hinting that there’s trouble in paradise with cryptic social media posts. On Friday, she tweeted: “Have you ever worked with a sociopath who used you for their personal gain to achieve what they want for themselves.” Earlier, Leakes alluded to being in a similar situation as pal Tamar Braxton, who we reported sent letters to her reality bosses at WeTV, alleging they made her suicidal. “I have dealt with so much lately… If I told you the way I was being treated, in a certain way, you would not probably believe it....
    The US Army Esports team playing Call of Duty at an event in Minneapolis, Minnesota, in January 2020. US Army Esports/Facebook The US Army representative confirmed to Insider that their esports team has "paused" video game streaming. The pause comes in the wake of recent controversy over Army recruitment policies, giveaways on the US Army esports team's Twitch account, and user bans on the team's Twitch account. "The team is reviewing ways to customize its submission forms and provide more clarity for each of its giveaways, and they have paused streaming to evaluate internal policies and procedures, as well as all platform-specific policies," a spokesperson for the US Army told Insider. Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. The US Army esports team, which maintains a social media presence and streams on Twitch, has confirmed to Insider that it has "paused" streaming after recent controversy.  The news, which was first reported by esports consultant and insider Rod "Slasher" Breslau, comes in the wake of controversies surrounding the team's recruitment policies, giveaways on its Twitch channel, and bans of...
    A general view of the Washington Redskins logo at center field before a game between the Detroit Lions and Redskins at FedExField on November 24, 2019 in Landover, Maryland. Patrick McDermott/Getty Images The Washington Redskins announced on Friday the team would be conducting a "thorough review" of its name after mounting pressure for a change.  The team has been criticized for keeping the name "Redskins," a racial slur. Sponsors and affiliated companies like FedEx, Nike, and PepsiCo have moved to cut ties with the franchise as long as it resists a name change. Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. The Washington Redskins announced on Friday that there would be a "thorough review" of the team's name after recent calls for it to be changed.  "In light of recent events around our country and feedback from our community, the Washington Redskins are announcing the team will undergo a thorough review of the team's name," the team said in a statement. "This review formalizes the initial discussions the team has been having with the league in recent weeks." Team...
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