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    PRESIDENT Donald Trump was impeached for the second time in January of 2020. A Senate trial will follow after he leaves office. 4U.S. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi presides over the vote to impeach President Donald Trump for a second timeCredit: Reuters What is the timeline of Trump's second impeachment? January 6, 2021: A mob filled with Trump supporters, angry over his valid election loss, riot at the Capitol in Washington, DC, and trespass into the building. At least five people died as a result of the riot, and hundreds more were arrested. January 8, 2021: President Trump is banned from Twitter and would be banned from other social media platforms. January 11 - House Speaker Nancy Pelosi introduces a single article of impeachment charging Trump with "incitement to insurrection." January 12 - Rumors have begun spreading suggesting that Trump could declare martial law in an attempt to overturn the election. January...
    Chief Justice John Roberts is eager to avoid presiding over Donald Trump's second impeachment trial – after he became a lightning rod during the first one. Just as the Senate is seeking to ascertain how it might proceed with an impeachment trial without blowing up the start of Joe Biden's term, the Supreme Court could face its own business being rearranged. The Constitution states that 'When the President of the United States is tried the Chief Justice shall preside.' But with the Senate having been in recess since the House voted to impeach, the trial will occur when Trump is no longer in office – potentially giving Roberts an out.   Supreme Court Justice John Roberts is not keen to preside over the historic second impeachment of Donald Trump 'He wants no further part of this,' a Capitol Hill source told Politico.  Roberts has spent his tenure seeking to avoid...
    More On: impeachment Rep. Raskin: Article of impeachment will be delivered to Senate ‘soon’ Sen. Graham urges Chuck Schumer not to hold impeachment trial Rep. Raskin talks serving as impeachment manager after son’s suicide Giuliani claims he’s on impeachment defense team; Trump rep begs to differ Senate Democratic Whip Dick Durbin will not formally push his caucus to vote in favor of convicting President Trump in his second impeachment trial, describing it as a personal decision for lawmakers. Speaking to CNN’s “State of the Union” Sunday morning, Durbin (D-Ill.) made the remarks after being asked if he believed every Democrat would vote in favor of impeaching the outgoing president, to which he responded that he did not know the answer. Durbin, who is set to become the No. 2 Senate Democrat when the party takes control on Wednesday, explained that he agreed with Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.)...
    Democratic senators on Sunday outlined how the chamber plans to address President TrumpDonald TrumpFacebook temporarily bans ads for weapons accessories following Capitol riots Sasse, in fiery op-ed, says QAnon is destroying GOP Section 230 worked after the insurrection, but not before: How to regulate social media MORE’s second impeachment trial, while Republican House members criticized the president in the wake of the deadly Capitol riot. Senate Minority Whip Dick DurbinDick DurbinSunday shows preview: Washington prepares for an inauguration and impeachment; coronavirus surges across the US Democrats looking to speed through Senate impeachment trial Schumer says Democrats will probe extremist groups after Capitol attack MORE (D-Ill.) said on CNN’s “State of the Union” that he would not whip votes in his caucus during the trial, saying he thought it was too important of an act to apply pressure to members to convict. “When it comes to an issue of this gravity and constitutional...
    Senate Democratic Whip, Dick DurbinDick DurbinSunday shows preview: Washington prepares for an inauguration and impeachment; coronavirus surges across the US Democrats looking to speed through Senate impeachment trial Schumer says Democrats will probe extremist groups after Capitol attack MORE (Ill.) said Sunday that he is not going to whip votes in his caucus in favor convicting President TrumpDonald TrumpFacebook temporarily bans ads for weapons accessories following Capitol riots Sasse, in fiery op-ed, says QAnon is destroying GOP Section 230 worked after the insurrection, but not before: How to regulate social media MORE in his upcoming impeachment trial. In an interview with CNN's "State of the Union," Durbin explained that the gravity of an impeachment vote was too great for Senate leadership to pressure members one way or the other. “When it comes to an issue of this gravity and constitutional importance, members really have to follow their own conscience," Durbin told CNN's Jake TapperJacob (Jake)...
    Related news The Caution takes over Wall Street again in a session in which the US Congress will vote whether to open a new reprobation process against the acting president, Donald Trump. The indices once again mark narrow swings at both ends of their graph, while the macroeconomic data provides few surprises. Various Republican congressmen have already been in favor to endorse this impeachment understanding that the leader of his party instigated the recent assault by protesters on the Capitol. However, all possibilities are on the table, except for the intervention of the president-elect Joe biden, who has already ruled out using his powers to disable his rival. With this uncertain scenario, narrow movements in which the large indices struggle to safeguard your recent new all-time highs. He Dow Jones 0.03% is left but holds the 31,060 points. He S&P 500 it has added a quarter of a point...
    House Speaker Nancy Pelosi is holding her weekly press conference at the Capitol Visitor Center on Friday, two days after the House voted to impeach President Trump for a second time, and amid security concerns ahead of President-elect Joe Biden's inauguration. FBI Director Chris Wray said Thursday the agency is tracking an "extensive amount of concerning online chatter," including calls for armed protests ahead of President-elect Joe Biden's January 20 inauguration.  How to watch Pelosi's press conference today  What: House Speaker Nancy Pelosi holds her weekly press conference   Date: Friday, January 15, 2021 Time: 11:30 a.m. ET Location:  Capitol Visitor Center, Washington D.C.  Online stream: Live on CBSN in the player above and on your mobile or streaming device. Pelosi is expected to address to address security concerns, as well as Mr. Biden's roughly $1.9 trillion COVID-19 relief proposal that he unveiled on Thursday night. The massive stimulus bill is expected...
    Rose McGowan has ripped the House of Representatives' vote to continue the process of removing President Trump from office. The Hollywood actress-turned-activist took to Twitter late Thursday to share her opposition to Wednesday's House vote of 232-197 to impeach the president for "incitement of insurrection" after a mob of his supporters besieged the Capitol on Jan. 6 in a failed attempt to stop the certification of President-elect Joe Biden's Electoral College win. In a scathing tweet, McGowan called the actions against Trump cultlike which is something she's said numerous times in the past about Hollywood. "This impeachment is Cult propaganda. A theater of mass distraction. US cult members on the left will cheer, those on the right will be in a fury," McGowan wrote. CELEBRITIES REACT TO TRUMP'S 2ND IMPEACHMENT The tweet continues: "And the country’s starving, sick & poor will sink farther & farther. Good thing the Elites are leading us!" McGowan...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — For a second time, Republican senators face the choice of whether to convict President Donald Trump in an impeachment trial. While only one GOP senator, Utah’s Mitt Romney, voted to convict Trump last year, that number could increase as lawmakers consider whether to punish Trump for his role in inciting a deadly insurrection at the Capitol. Whatever they decide, Trump is likely to be gone from the White House when the verdict comes in. An impeachment trial is likely to start next week, as early as Inauguration Day, raising the specter of the Senate trying the previous president even as it moves to confirm the incoming president’s Cabinet. GOP leader Mitch McConnell, who says he’s undecided, is one of several key senators to watch, along with Democratic leader Chuck Schumer, who is set to take the Senate reins as his party reclaims the Senate majority. Others to...
    San Antonio Spurs Coach Gregg Popovich praised the effort of House Democrats to impeach Trump for a second time, calling it a “good move.” Popovich told USA Today that a second impeachment was the “the least we can do” to destroy Trump. “I don’t have a lot of faith that the 25th Amendment is going to be invoked. This impeachment will say a lot. If anything, it will bring people together rather than be divisive. It will bring people together who may have thought a different way and realize what Trump can really do and what he really is. So, I’m all for it. It’s a good move,” the coach said. “As a citizen, what we all watched was horrific, and we all saw the lack of concern and incompetence on the part of our president, which is really sad,” Popovich continued. “He is what he is, but what that...
    While reporting from the White House on Thursday, CNN’s Jim Acosta said that President Donald Trump has been more “Jefferson Davis than Thomas Jefferson” while referring to his legacy as President. Acosta was asked by host Anderson Cooper if he thought the President cared about his legacy or if he cared more about the Trump brand and the potential to make money. (RELATED: Joe Concha: Jim Acosta Should ‘Go Work For The Biden Admin’ If He Won’t Challenge The New President) “The President is basically clueless about what this is going to do to his legacy, that he doesn’t fully grasp the magnitude of the fact, I think the very real likelihood that he’s going to be placed at rock bottom of the list of presidents in terms of how they’re viewed by historians,” Acosta began. “I mean, this is a President who has been more Jefferson Davis than...
    Ivanka Trump was seen smiling and giving a thumbs up while leaving the White House on Thursday, the day after her father was impeached for a historic second time.   The White House senior adviser's days in the White House are coming to an end, but she appeared to be in good spirits while leaving the West Wing in a figure-hugging red dress with a back slit.  Ivanka, 39, paired the bright cherry-colored frock with shiny black patent leather stilettos and her square, cushion-cut diamond engagement ring, a bold look for the unseasonably warm winter day.   Feeling good? Ivanka was seen smiling and giving a thumbs up while leaving the West Wing of the White House on Thursday  Bold choice: The White House senior adviser had on a cherry-red dress and black black patent leather stilettos The former businesswoman has mostly steered clear of ostentatious jewelry since she started working...
    CNN continued its ratings winning streak Wednesday, getting the most total viewers and the most viewers in the key A25-54 demographic in both cable news and broadcast during coverage of the House vote to impeach President Donald Trump for the second time. MSNBC had the second-most viewers, and Fox continues to find itself in the unusual position of third place among cable news viewers. Since the start of the year, CNN has topped its cable news competition across the board. In total day viewers, CNN averaged 3.16 million total, and 951,000 in the demo – more total day demo viewers than MSNBC and Fox combined. MSNBC had 2.76 million total viewers and 533,000 in the demo. Fox was third, with 1.72 million total viewers and 337,000 in the demo. During special coverage of the House impeachment debate and vote, CNN drew more viewers than MSNBC, Fox, ABC and CBS...
    Sen. Lisa Murkowski says the second House impeachment of President Trump was an appropriate course of action. The Alaska Republican, known for her centrism and willingness to break from her party, released a statement on Thursday afternoon assuring her constituents that she will carefully consider the case for convicting Trump on a charge of incitement of insurrection following the deadly riots last week. “For months, the President has perpetrated false rhetoric that the election was stolen and rigged, even after dozens of courts ruled against these claims,” Murkowski said. “When he was not able to persuade the courts or elected officials, he launched a pressure campaign against his own Vice President, urging him to take actions that he had no authority to do." Although Trump claims he did nothing wrong in his bid to challenge the integrity of President-elect Joe Biden's victory, Murkowski stressed that the president's...
    To no surprise of anyone, Gregg Popovich expressed his support for the second impeachment of President Trump in the wake of the violent U.S. Capitol riot last week. The San Antonio Spurs head coach is a vocal critic of the president. He told reporters Tuesday, ahead of Wednesday’s impeachment, that a second impeachment was "the least we can do." CLICK HERE FOR MORE SPORTS COVERAGE ON FOXNEWS.COM "I don’t have a lot of faith that the 25th Amendment is going to be invoked. This impeachment will say a lot. If anything, it will bring people together rather than be divisive. It will bring people together who may have thought a different way and realize what Trump can really do and what he really is. So I’m all for it. It’s a good move," he said, via USA Today. He added: "As a citizen, what we all watched was horrific, and...
    Opinion: We should have seen the Capitol riot coming FBI warns racist extremists, militias emboldened by Capitol siege may target Biden inauguration These $19k SUVs Will Make You Trade in Your Car Ad Microsoft The Highest Paying Cash Back Card Has Hit The Market Ad Microsoft 17 Ways These $20 Lights Will Upgrade Your Home Ad Microsoft
    We read, correctly, that the country is being torn apart by hyperpartisan politics, by the invasion of the Capitol last week, by the summer’s urban riots, and by the second impeachment of President Trump. While these matters preoccupy citizens concerned about the future of their republic, as they should, bear in mind a less emotive truism about democracy: All political battles must end with voter turnout. For Nancy Pelosi, getting out the vote defines reality. From that vantage, the House speaker would have no trouble interpreting the key events in America’s recent political history. NANCY PELOSI WORE THE SAME DRESS FOR BOTH IMPEACHMENTS In 2016, Donald Trump defeated Hillary Clinton because the Democrats lost count of the votes in Pennsylvania, Michigan and Wisconsin. Then-Minority Leader Pelosi would have seen that Mr. Trump, however personally anathema, turned out nearly 63 million votes. Conclusion: Next time, produce more turnout than Mr. Trump. CLICK HERE TO...
    Republicans who complained that impeaching Donald Trump was divisive had nothing to say about Marjorie Taylor Greene's plans. Freshman Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene (R-GA), a fan of QAnon far-right conspiracy theories, announced Wednesday night that she planned to file articles of impeachment against President-elect Joe Biden the day after he took office. Her statement was met with silence from Republicans who had slammed the second round of impeachment proceedings against Donald Trump as divisive. "On Jan. 21, 2021, I'll be filing Articles of Impeachment against Joe Biden for abuse of power," Greene tweeted after the House of Representatives voted 232-197 to impeach Trump for the second time. Greene took to far-right network Newsmax to confirm her intention later in the evening: "I would like to announce on behalf of the American people, we have to make sure that our leaders are...
    New York (CNN Business)Stephen Colbert, Jimmy Kimmel and other late-night TV hosts got a second chance to make fun of an impeachment of President Donald Trump. The pair opened their shows with jokes about the second impeachment, which has never before happened in US history: "It was a day of reckoning in Washington today as the House of Representatives voted to impeach Donald Trump... again," Kimmel said to kick off ABC's "Jimmy Kimmel Live!" on Wednesday.Kimmel mentioned that Wednesday's impeachment was bipartisan, with Republicans joining all Democrats voting to impeach."Your President gave a big — I mean little — thumbs up to an army of morons marching down the street, kicking in doors, killing a police officer and smearing their feces all over your office," Kimmel said. "And most of these Republicans are like, 'Well, you know, the office did need some freshening up. Some color on the walls is...
    VIDEO5:1305:13Pres. Donald Trump condemns the 'calamity at the Capitol'News Videos One week after his supporters stormed Capitol Hill in a deadly riot and hours after his second impeachment in the House, President Donald Trump on Wednesday delivered his clearest condemnation yet of the Jan. 6 violence. "I want to be very clear. I unequivocally condemn the violence that we saw last week. Violence and vandalism have absolutely no place in our country, and no place in our movement," Trump said in a video posted by the White House's official Twitter account. Trump took no responsibility for the attacks.VIDEO8:1308:13The Capitol siege: An hour-by-hour breakdown of how the day unfoldedPoliticsThe five-minute video, which appears to show Trump speaking from the Resolute Desk of the Oval Office, arrived as the president faces an upcoming trial in the Senate. Democrats have pushed for Trump's immediate removal from office, arguing that his presence in power...
    Celebrities Robert De Niro, Madonna and Kathy Griffin were name-checked by Rep. Ken Buck (R-Colo.) during Donald Trump’s historic second impeachment hearings Wednesday.  During his remarks at the hearing in the House, Buck highlighted the trio of stars as being particularly outspoken anti-Trump people, who he went as far to accuse of fomenting the violence that was seen last week at the U.S. Capitol. On Jan. 6, protesters of Joe Biden’s win in the 2020 election breached the security of the Capitol building in what became a riot that left five people dead. "Robert De Niro said he wanted to punch the president in the face. Madonna thought about blowing up the White House. Kathy Lee Griffin [sic] held up a likeness of the president's beheaded head and nothing was said by my colleagues at that point in time," Buck said during his remarks.  Griffin, who was incorrectly named as "Kathy...
    With his place in history being rewritten, President Donald Trump received the news of a second impeachment process against him virtually alone and in silence. MiamiMundo / ApNews For more than four years, Trump has dominated the national discourse like no other president before him. Yet when his legacy was set in stone on Wednesday, he was surprisingly on the sidelines. Trump’s situation is unmatched as he is the only president to be accused twice of a crime or serious misconduct, a new end to a presidential term defined by increasing division in the country, his failures during the worst pandemic in a century and his refusal to accept defeat at the polls. Trump stayed out of public view in a practically empty White House while impeachment proceedings took place in a heavily guarded Capitol. There, the damage from last week’s riots provided a visible reminder of the insurrection the...
    President TrumpDonald TrumpCotton: Senate lacks authority to hold impeachment trial once Trump leaves office Marjorie Taylor Greene says she will introduce impeachment articles against Biden ICE acting director resigns weeks after assuming post MORE is reportedly considering hiring an attorney who spoke at the "Stop the Steal" rally in Washington, D.C. last week before the president's supporters stormed the U.S. Capitol as part of Trump's defense in his second impeachment trial.  Two unidentified sources told Reuters that John Eastman, a conservative attorney who clerked for U.S. Supreme Court Justice Clarence ThomasClarence ThomasBiden's identity politics do a disservice to his nominees For conservative justices, faith in 'religious freedom' trumps public health Hillicon Valley: Lawmakers call for action after 'devastating' cyberattack on federal government | US cyber agency issues emergency directive following hacks | FTC opens privacy study into major internet platforms MORE and who was part of the legal team that represented Trump in cases...
    In this image from video, the final vote total of 232-197 to impeachment President Donald Trump over the violent siege of the Capitol, after voting on the House floor Wednesday, Jan. 13, 2021, on Capitol Hill in Washington. House Television via AP WASHINGTON, DC - JANUARY 13: Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) signs an article of impeachment against President Donald Trump at the U.S. Capitol on January 13, 2021 in Washington, DC. The House of Representatives voted to impeach Trump for incitement of insurrection, following Vice President Mike Pence's refusal to use the 25th amendment to remove him from office for his role in the breach of the U.S. Capitol last week. Photo by Stefani Reynolds/Getty Images A television monitor in the White House Press Briefing Room displays a recorded address by U.S. President Donald Trump after the U.S. House of Representatives voted to impeach...
    More On: impeachment The left’s bare-faced hypocrisy: Devine Impeachment the right answer to Trump’s wrongs — but won’t end his demagoguery Impeachment only feeds divisions, elevates Trump in his supporters’ eyes All the Republicans who voted to impeach Trump a second time Hours after President Trump was impeached for the second time, his successor Joe Biden said after the vote that he hoped the Senate will be able to juggle its role in the process along with its other pressing responsibilities. “Today, in a bipartisan vote, the House voted to impeach and hold President Trump accountable. Now, the process continues to the Senate—and I hope they’ll deal with their Constitutional responsibilities on impeachment while also working on the other urgent business of this nation,” the president-elect said in a tweet. Trump was impeached by the US House of Representatives, with a handful of Republicans joining Democrats to blame the...
    COVID vaccination is a challenge for rural hospitals; Texas is having a tough time Trump has told staff not to pay Rudy Giuliani over irritation at being impeached again Author bringing up her child without a gender © Provided by Daily Mail MailOnline logo A mother who decided with her husband to puruse 'gender creative parenting' and let their child choose their own gender, has revealed how people have accused them of 'child abuse'.  Dr Kyl Myers, who is originally from Salt Lake City but now lives in Australia with her husband Brent, told Mamamia that they've been flooded with social media comments, emails and even letters at her workplace from people who believe Zoomer should be taken away. She explained: 'We didn't assign a binary girl-or-boy gender to our child, Zoomer, at birth; we don't disclose Zoomer's genitals to people who don't need to know.  'We used the gender-neutral...
    A sufficient number of Republican elected officials voted in favor of the impeachment process initiated by the Democrats. The Republican Party finally snorts, as released from an old bad spell. correspondent in New York Un earthquake that gives birth to a small tsunami. A week after the attempted coup by Trump supporters on Capitol Hill, a sufficient number of Republican elected officials on Wednesday backed the parliamentary impeachment process initiated by the Democrats, paving the way for a historic second trial of the President of the States -United. With the support of at least 10 Republicans – only 7 were needed – the threshold of 217 votes in favor of indicting Mr. Trump was exceeded, with the Democratic-majority House then continuing to vote on it. adoption of the indictment targeting the Republican billionaire.
    WASHINGTON -- President Donald Trump was impeached by the U.S. House for a historic second time, charged with "incitement of insurrection" over the deadly mob siege of the U.S. Capitol in a swift and stunning collapse of his final days in office.With the Capitol secured by armed National Guard troops inside and out, the House voted 232-197 on Wednesday to impeach Trump. The proceedings moved at lightning speed, with lawmakers voting just one week after violent pro-Trump loyalists stormed the Capitol, egged on by the president's calls for them to "fight like hell" against the election results.Ten Republicans fled Trump, joining Democrats who said he needed to be held accountable and warned ominously of a "clear and present danger" if Congress should leave him unchecked before Democrat Joe Biden's inauguration Jan. 20.Trump is the only U.S. president to be twice impeached. It was the most bipartisan presidential impeachment in modern...
    Trump has called on Americans to be united and does not discuss his impeachment while Joe Biden has asked Congress to work on priorities despite the trial. LUS President Donald Trump on Wednesday evening called for unity, saying violence “has no place” in America. “None of my real supporters could be in favor of political violence,” he said in a video message in which he never mentions his indictment by Congress for encouraging the assault on his sympathizers against the Capitol. “If you do this, you are not supporting our movement, you are attacking it, you are attacking our country. We cannot tolerate it, ”he added. Biden: working on priorities For his part, President-elect Joe Biden on Wednesday asked Congress to work on the priorities of his program, despite the impeachment trial of Donald Trump, which will open after the Democrat comes...
    Donald Trump has become the first US president to face impeachment proceedings twice. What do the American dailies think of this? Newspaper. MOn Wednesday, a majority of elected House of Representatives voted to formally indict Donald Trump for inciting violence on Capitol Hill, paving the way for a historic second trial of the President of the United States. “Impeached again”, “again indicted” is what stands out most in the press “made in US”. Deserved The threshold of 217 votes in favor of indicting Donald Trump was exceeded, the Democratic-majority House therefore adopted the indictment against the Republican president, and this a second time, a year after being accused of ‘pressuring the Ukrainian president in exchange for information about Joe Biden. For the Washington Post “there is no doubt” that the outgoing president “deserved” it. But this trial could have serious consequences for Joe...
    Donald Trump has become the first US president to face impeachment proceedings twice. What do the American dailies think of this? Newspaper. MOn Wednesday, a majority of elected House of Representatives voted to formally indict Donald Trump for inciting violence on Capitol Hill, paving the way for a historic second trial of the President of the United States. “Impeached again”, “again indicted” is what stands out most in the press “made in US”. Deserved The threshold of 217 votes in favor of indicting Donald Trump was exceeded, the Democratic-majority House therefore adopted the indictment against the Republican president, and this a second time, a year after being accused of ‘pressuring the Ukrainian president in exchange for information about Joe Biden. For the Washington Post “there is no doubt” that the outgoing president “deserved” it. But this trial could have serious consequences for Joe...
    Donald Trump’s trial will take place after he leaves the White House, that is to say after Joe Biden takes office on January 20. A historical situation It is the first time in the history of the United States that an impeachment has been voted twice against the same president. Donald trump would soon be tried by the Senate following the indictment by the House on Wednesday for “incitement to insurgency”. The decision was passed by 232 votes to 197. In total, ten Republicans, including Liz Cheney, the daughter of former Vice President Dick Cheney, participated in the vote with them. “No one is above the law, not even the President of the United States”, said Nancy Pelosi, the leader of the House Democrats on the remarks echoed by 20 minutes. In his opinion, Donald Trump represents “a danger to democracy”. He is, in fact, accused by the...
    Trump has called on Americans to be united and does not discuss his impeachment while Joe Biden has asked Congress to work on priorities despite the trial. LUS President Donald Trump on Wednesday evening called for unity, saying violence “has no place” in America. “None of my real supporters could be in favor of political violence,” he said in a video message in which he never mentions his indictment by Congress for encouraging the assault on his sympathizers against the Capitol. “If you do this, you are not supporting our movement, you are attacking it, you are attacking our country. We cannot tolerate it, ”he added. Biden: working on priorities For his part, President-elect Joe Biden on Wednesday asked Congress to work on the priorities of his program, despite the impeachment trial of Donald Trump, which will open after the Democrat comes...
    Donald Trump has made history again this Wednesday. The republished has become the first president of the United States in be subjected to impeachment twice. The House of Representatives has given the green light to the impeachment against the still president of the United States thanks to the support of several Republican legislators. The vote of several Republicans has been key to moving the process forward. The second impeachment against Trump has had 232 supporters compared to 197 votes against. One of them has been Peter Meijer. “President Trump betrayed his oath by seeking to undermine our constitutional process, and you have the responsibility to incite the insurrection that we suffered last week. With heavy heart, I will vote to impeach President Donald J. Trump, “he said in his statement. The impeachment resolution states that “President Trump seriously endangered the security of the United States and its institutions. He...
    With his place in history being rewritten, President Donald Trump received the news of a second impeachment proceeding against him virtually alone and in silence. For more than four years, Trump has dominated the national discourse like no other president before him. Yet when his legacy was set in stone, he was surprisingly on the sidelines. Trump’s situation is unmatched as he is the only president to be accused twice of a crime or serious misconduct, a new end to a presidential term defined by increasing division in the country, his failures during the worst pandemic in a century and his refusal to accept defeat at the polls. Trump stayed out of public view in a practically empty White House while impeachment proceedings took place in a heavily guarded Capitol. There, the damage from last week’s riots provided a visible reminder of the insurrection the president is accused of inciting....
    EASTVALE (CBSLA) — Some support for President Donald Trump in the Inland Empire is waning as others are standing by the president following his historic second impeachment. Trump was charged with incitement of an insurrection by the Congress on Wednesday for his actions leading up to and during a riot at the U.S. Capitol last week. It was an emotional moment for many local Trump supporters, considering the president won in many communities there in 2016. Michael Timmons, an Eastvale resident who once supported the president, says since the election, Trump has gone too far. “It makes me kind of embarrassed. It reflects poorly on us as a nation to the rest of the world and… and it makes me sad,” Timmons said. “I think everything that he did accomplish is gonna be lost.” Daniel Wenzel, another Eastvale resident, says he does not support the violence that took place at...
              Live from Music Row Wednesday morning on The Tennessee Star Report with Michael Patrick Leahy – broadcast on Nashville’s Talk Radio 98.3 and 1510 WLAC weekdays from 5:00 a.m. to 8:00 a.m. –  host Leahy welcomed Tennessee Star National Correspondent Neil W. McCabe to the newsmakers line live from Washington, D.C. During the third hour, McCabe weighed in on the looming second impeachment of President Trump and whether or not it would lead to a trial in the Senate. He added that he believes the president would be impeached yet may still offer a range of pardons to warriors and possibly a pre-emtptive Stephen K. Bannon. Leahy: On our newsmaker line our Washington correspondent for the Star News Network Neil McCabe. Good morning, Neil. McCabe: Hey, Mike, Crom. Glad to be with you and good morning. Leahy: Well we’ve got seven days and 5 hours left in the...
    On Wednesday night, Jimmy Kimmel addressed the news that President Trump had been impeached in the House of Representatives—for a second time—with a vote of 232-197, owing to his incitement of a violent, seditious takeover of the U.S. Capitol. “Unlike the first one, this was a bipartisan impeachment,” said Kimmel during his late-night monologue. “Every Democratic [representative], and a handful of Republicans—ten of them in the House—voted to throw Trump out in protest for his role organizing, mobilizing, and exciting the violent attack on them last week. These people attacked them, they tried to get the vice president, they tried to stop our election, and these jackholes today were like, ‘This is another political attack on our president!’” Kimmel was of course referring to the many Republicans who failed to vote for impeachment, choosing fealty to a crooked former reality TV host and accused serial rapist over love of country....
    House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., has "destroyed the separation of powers" by overseeing a second impeachment of President Trump, Mark Levin told "Hannity" Wednesday night.  The "Life, Liberty & Levin" host delivered a broadside against House Democratic leadership, making note of the "sick irony" of watching House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerrold Nadler, D-N.Y., lead impeachment proceedings against Trump for alleged "incitement of insurrection" last week at the U.S. Capitol. "I want to remind people of Jerrold Nadler, and the Democrats' former president by the name of Clinton," Levin recalled. "On his last day in office, President Clinton ceded to Jerrold Nadler's request to commute the sentences of Linda Evans and Susan Rosenberg," both members of the far-left May 19th Communist Organization, which sought the violent overthrow of the U.S. government.  Returning to the present, Levin argued that instead of uniting the country against the rioters, Democrats and the media have used the unrest as a proxy to...
    The US Congress gives the green light to the second impeachment against Trump
    LOS ANGELES (CBSLA) — There was mixed reaction on Wednesday throughout Los Angeles County from lawmakers and locals following the historic second impeachment of President Donald Trump. Democratic Burbank Congressman Adam Schiff was one of those who voted to impeach. “It’s a solemn moment when you take a step like this in Congress, one that we have taken very seldom in history,” Schiff said. “I do feel like this is a pivot point when we begin the restoration of our democracy and put the country back on the path it was mean to take and the is to perfect our union and make us a stronger democratic republic.” Several local Republican lawmakers were speaking out online. Newly elected Republican Rep. Mike Garcia tweeted this message saying, “With only a few days left in the Trump administration, the vote to impeach the President is no more than political theater that runs...
    More from: John Podhoretz America and the GOP reap the bitter fruits of Trumps obscene sore-loserism One last disaster in 2020: Wonder Woman 1984 A top Biden aides gaffe exposes the truth about any real chance for future bipartisan deals SCOTUS proves that all the lefts Trump pawns noise was utter bull Joe Biden still doesnt realize what the voters that Democrats have lost actually want President Trump likes to talk about things “nobody’s ever seen before” in relation to his own supposed achievements. This is a phrase he uses constantly. He spoke often of an economy the likes of which nobody had ever seen before and employment numbers like nobody had ever seen before. Hey, you know what else we’ve never seen before? A riot encouraged by a president — certainly, something nobody has ever seen before. Also, an attempt to overturn the free and fair results of...
    President-Elect Joe Biden commented on President Donald Trump’s second impeachment Wednesday, saying he hopes the Senate trial doesn’t get in the way of his administration’s priorities. House Democrats and many Republicans voted to impeach Trump for “incitement of insurrection” on Wednesday, and Biden echoed the language of that charge in his statement. He has been hesitant to fully endorse an impeachment process, however, and said on Jan 8 that impeachment was “a decision for Congress.” “Last week, we saw an unprecedented assault on our democracy,” Biden said in a Wednesday statement. “It was carried out by political extremists and domestic terrorists, who were incited to this violence by President Trump. It was an armed insurrection against the United States of America. And those responsible must be held accountable.” (RELATED: Trump Says He Was ‘Outraged’ By Supporters Storming Capitol, Is Now Focused On ‘Smooth’ Transition Of Power | The Daily Caller)...
    More On: impeachment All the Republicans who voted to impeach Trump a second time Pelosi signs second impeachment documents over Capitol siege Trump calls for unity, disavows violence in video message after impeachment Rep. Scalise calls for House to hail Capitol Police officers Let’s stipulate that President Trump’s conduct during the mob assault on Capitol Hill was appalling. If his fiery rhetoric didn’t amount to illegal incitement, his inflaming mob passions was deeply irresponsible. Even so, impeaching him a second time was a grave mistake. Perhaps Trump’s conduct is impeachable in the abstract. In Federalist No. 65, Alexander ­Hamilton defined the Constitution’s “high crimes and misdemeanors” impeachment criterion as an “abuse or violation of some public trust.” The phrase “high crimes and misdemeanors,” which goes back to 14th-century English common law, doesn’t require criminal action.  Impeachment, in other words, is ultimately a political judgment, and it’s hard to blame legislators who...
    Mississippi runs out of coronavirus vaccine as state expands eligibility FBI urges local police to share threat intelligence in run-up to Biden inauguration These $19k SUVs Will Make You Trade in Your Car Ad Microsoft The Highest Paying Cash Back Card Has Hit The Market Ad Microsoft 17 Ways These $20 Lights Will Upgrade Your Home Ad Microsoft Full screen 1/31 SLIDES © Broadimage/Shutterstock For the first time in the history of the United States, a President has been impeached...
    Reps. Matt Gaetz and Jim JordanTom Williams/Congressional Quarterly/ZUMA Let our journalists help you make sense of the noise: Subscribe to the Mother Jones Daily newsletter and get a recap of news that matters.On Wednesday, Donald Trump—an egotist who loves to boast he’s the best of this or has the most of that—set a new record in American history: most impeached president. Democrats leading the charge only had to ask: Were you paying attention? In a bipartisan vote, the House indicted Trump for inciting the murderous attack on the US Capitol a week earlier. The case was pretty straightforward. For weeks following the election, Trump hyped the bogus claim that the election was fraudulent, tried to steal a victory by leaning on local election officials to alter or throw out certified results, pushed his vice president to overturn the electoral vote count, and encouraged his riled-up followers to descend upon Congress...
    Hollywood celebrities erupted in joy late Wednesday after the Democrat-controlled House of Representatives voted for the second time to impeach President Donald Trump. Ten Republican lawmakers broke ranks and sided with Democrats in the left’s unceasing effort to remove the commander in chief from office. As Breitbart News reported, the House voted 232 to 197, with 10 Republicans supporting the measure. It remains unclear what effect the vote will have on the president’s final seven days in office. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) has stated that he believes the president committed an impeachable offense, but added that he won’t reconvene the Senate before January 19, the president’s final full day in office. The Democrat-controlled House previously voted to impeach the president in late 2019. But their efforts to remove him  ultimately failed when the Republican-controlled Senate voted against impeachment. The latest effort comes a week after a crowd of Trump...
    Wednesday's House vote to impeach President Trump has teed up a Senate trial where President Donald Trump will once again decide on a team to represent him – this time on a charge of 'incitement of insurrection.' Sources have already said Trump may turn to lawyer Rudy Giuliani as he battles impeachment a second time, this time before a Senate 'jury' that may be considerably more skeptical than last time. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said Wednesday he does not know how he will vote. Giuliani has been a key legal advisor to Trump while also leading a personal crusade to unearth potential dirt on Joe Biden in Ukraine as well as on his son's business dealings. Donald Trump lawyer Rudy Giuliani, who has led Trump's legal effort to overturn the election results in court, is expected to head his legal effort as the impeachment trial approaches in the...
    More On: impeachment Pelosi signs second impeachment documents over Capitol siege Trump calls for unity, disavows violence in video message after impeachment Rep. Scalise calls for House to hail Capitol Police officers Nancy Pelosi wore the same dress for both impeachments Ten House Republicans crossed party lines on Wednesday and voted to impeach President Trump — which is 10 more than the amount to go against him the first time around. The GOP lawmakers aligned with Democrats to formally charge the outgoing commander-in-chief with “inciting violence against the government of the United States” in last week’s storming of the Capitol by supporters he had addressed during a rally near the White House. No Republicans voted in 2019 to impeach Trump the first time. Here are the 10 GOP members who voted to impeach on Wednesday: Rep. John Katko (R-N.Y.) Katko, a former federal prosecutor, was the first House Republican to say he’d...
    More On: impeachment Trump calls for unity, disavows violence in video message after impeachment Rep. Scalise calls for House to hail Capitol Police officers Nancy Pelosi wore the same dress for both impeachments Trump plans video response to House voting on his second impeachment House Speaker Nancy Pelosi on Wednesday evening signed the article of impeachment against President Trump for allegedly inciting last week’s Capitol riot. Pelosi (D-Calif.) gave only a brief statement to reporters and took no questions at the engrossment ceremony following a 232-197 House vote. Ten Republicans voted to impeach. “Today in a bipartisan way the House demonstrated that no one is above the law, not even the President of the United States, that Donald Trump is a clear and present danger to our country, and that once again, we honored our oath of office to protect and defend the Constitution of the United States so help...
    The majority of the House of Representatives voted to impeach President Donald Trump for the second time, just a week after the president encouraged his supporters to “fight hard” against the election results and a mob of supporters stormed the federal Capitol. Trump, who will leave the White House on January 20, will go down in history as the only US president to face two political trials. The lower house vote for the charge of inciting an insurrection still continued Wednesday, but the Democratic majority precinct has already secured enough votes to start the process against Trump. Some Republicans voted in favor of the measure. During the debate prior to the vote, the Speaker of the House of Representatives Nancy Pelosi asked Republicans and Democrats to do “soul-searching.” Trump is the first president to face impeachment on two occasions. The proceedings take place a week after a violent mob of...
    More On: nancy pelosi House Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s looted lectern returned to US Capitol Ex-mayoral candidate who bragged about breaking into Pelosi’s office busted Rep. Jordan says House Dems want to ‘cancel’ Trump at impeachment hearings Nancy Pelosi names nine Trump impeachment managers Nancy Pelosi has an impeachment dress.  When lawmakers gathered to impeach President Trump for a second time Wednesday, the House Speaker donned the same black dress she wore the first time it happened.  The sleek black business frock, which some likened to funeral garb, immediately caught the eye of Twitter denizens who realized the look matched Pelosi’s Dec. 2019 impeachment outfit.  “I KNOW this shouldn’t be the focus but Nancy Pelosi in the same dress for both impeachments is the exact kind of trolling our grandmothers taught us and the exact kind of business I am here for,” Jen Curran quipped.  “the fact that nancy pelosi...
    More On: impeachment The new impeachment question and other commentary GOP rep’s Capitol siege question stumps House during Trump impeachment vote McConnell hasn’t decided how he will vote on Trump impeachment Movers seen at White House week ahead of Biden arrival President Trump plans to respond to his second impeachment in a video message Wednesday night. The tone and length of the planned response to the 232-197 vote was not immediately clear. House Democrats joined by 10 Republicans impeached Trump for allegedly inciting last week’s Capitol riot, which disrupted certification of President-elect Joe Biden’s victory. The Senate won’t begin his trial until after Trump leaves office on Jan. 20. The impeachment briskly passed the House after over two hours of afternoon debate. Those voting to impeach said Trump organized a mob when he spoke to thousands of supporters and urged them to march on the Capitol to overturn Biden’s...
    MIAMI (CBSMiami) – Florida lawmakers followed along party lines when it came to impeaching President Donald Trump for a second time on Wednesday for inciting a violent insurrection when he charged up a violent mob to storm the U.S. Capitol in order to stop Congress from counting presidential electoral ballots. Those who voted in favor of impeachment were Democrats Alcee Hastings, Ted Deutch, Debbie Wasserman Schultz and Frederica Wilson. Those who voted against impeachment were Republicans Mario Diaz-Balart, Carlos Gimenez and Maria Elvira Salazar. Congressman Alcee Hastings, who voted remotely, released the following statement: “Today’s vote to impeach Donald John Trump is a necessary step in protecting our democracy. Leading up to the January 6, 2021 insurrection, false allegations of voter fraud and unfair elections were widely spread by Trump and his administration to his base of supporters, conspiracy theorists, and extremists. Speaking at a rally a week ago as...
    ABC News senior White House correspondent Cecilia Vega said that, after a second, historically bipartisan impeachment the Donald Trump’s presidential legacy could now be considered even worse that of Richard Nixon, who resigned under a cloud of scandal and threat of impeachment and conviction because of the Watergate investigation. Speaking with ABC News anchor George Stephanopoulos, Vega offered her analysis as the House voted 232 – 197 — with 10 Republicans joining the majority — to impeach Trump for incitement of insurrection over the MAGA mob assault on the Capitol one week before. She noted that just the day before, Trump had been visiting part of the unfinished border wall in Texas, and even signed the wall, as part of his narrative that he is a “law and order president.” “It’s a bit of revisionist history right now,” Vega said, pushing back on Trump’s self-portrayal. “We are looking, minutes away now, from this president, from...
    **Want FOX News Halftime Report in your inbox every day? Sign up here.** On the roster: Second Trump impeachment draws bipartisan support - I’ll Tell You What: We knew it was going to be difficult - Guard bivouacs in Capitol, 20,000 expected next week - Biden wants Senate to move on nominations asap - The case of the beagle and the Balkan bratwurstsSECOND TRUMP IMPEACHMENT DRAWS BIPARTISAN SUPPORTFox News: "The House of Representatives Wednesday made history by voting to impeach President Trump for a second time for ‘incitement of insurrection’ after a mob of his supporters besieged the Capitol on Jan. 6 in a failed attempt to stop the certification of President-elect Joe Biden's electoral college win. The House voted 232-197 to impeach the president. Ten Republicans joined with Democrats. Trump has just one week left in office, but the supporters of the impeachment push say Trump is too dangerous to...
    For the House of Representatives' vote on impeachment today, Nancy Pelosi pulled an old favorite out of her closet: the exact same dress she wore for President Trump's first impeachment vote in 2019. The 80-year-old Speaker of the House was photographed on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C. on Wednesday wearing a knee-length black sheath dress with three-quarter sleeves and a mandarin college, which she paired with a gold beaded necklace and a floral mask. The dress and necklace were both immediately familiar to Americans who had closely watched Trump's impeachment proceedings in December 2019, as Pelosi had dressed nearly identically for the historical occasion.   Impeachment dress: Nancy Pelosi was pictured at the Capitol today wearing a black dress with a beaded necklace  Flashback: She wore the same dress and necklace combo for Trump's first impeachment in December 2019 (pictured) Twitter users were quick to notice that she wore...
    The House of Representatives on Wednesday voted to impeach President Donald Trump for a second time over last week’s riots at the U.S. Capitol in which five people died, including a Capitol Police Officer. The vote to impeach President Trump was approved by the House by a vote of 232 to 197, with 10 Republicans supporting the measure. The following House GOP members voted in favor of the move: Rep. Anthony Gonzalez (OH), Rep. Peter Meijer (MI), Rep. Fred Upton (MI), Rep. Liz Cheney (WY), Rep. John Katko (NY), Rep. Adam Kinzinger (IL), Rep. Tom Rice (SC), Rep. Jamie Herrera Beutler (WA), Rep. Dan Newhouse (WA), and Rep. David Valadao (CA). The vote makes President Trump the first U.S. president to be impeached twice. “On January 6, 2021 a violent mob attacked the United States Capitol to obstruct the process of our democracy and stop the counting of presidential electoral...
    So now, after four-plus years of praising Donald Trump’s “exquisite” leadership; four-plus years of waving away lines like the one about finding the Second Amendment solution for Hillary Clinton by saying he was just joking; and lately, after nine weeks of mostly being accomplices to Trump’s insane claims about election fraud; after Trump has torn the country in two and bullied local Republicans trying to do their jobs and instigated a riot that sought to kill his own vice president and did kill a police officer, exactly 10 members of the Republican Party out of 207 voting in the House of Representatives went on record as being willing to impeach Trump. For most of America, the week since the riots has if anything intensified the horror. With each new day, we see shocking videos showing that some of the intruders knew the Capitol floor plan. We learn new details about...
    President Trump was impeached a second time by the US House of Representatives on Wednesday in a largely party-line vote that saw a handful of Republicans join Democrats to blame the outgoing commander-in-chief for sparking last week’s Capitol siege. The historic vote passed 217 yea votes to make Trump the only president to be impeached twice. The move set the stage for a Senate trial that a spokesman for Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) said won’t begin before the Jan. 20 inauguration of President-elect Joe Biden. At least seven Republicans publicly pledged to side to vote against Trump: Liz Cheney of Wyoming, Adam Kinzinger of Illinois, John Katko of New York, Fred Upton of Michigan, Dan Newhouse and Jaime Herrera Beutler of Washington, and Peter Meijer of Michigan. No Republicans voted yes for Trump’s first impeachment just over a year ago. n a tweet posted minutes before nearly 3...
    Washington — The House of Representatives voted Wednesday to impeach President Trump on one count of incitement of insurrection, making him the first president in U.S. history to be impeached twice. The vote came exactly one week after a mob of the president's supporters stormed the U.S. Capitol building in an effort to block Congress from counting the Electoral College votes and confirming President-elect Joe Biden's victory. The vote was 232 in favor, 197 opposed. Ten Republicans joined 222 Democrats in voting to impeach. The article of impeachment, introduced Monday by House Democrats, accuses Mr. Trump of "willfully inciting violence against the government of the United States" in violation of his constitutional oath and duty.  "President Trump gravely endangered the security of the United State and its institutions of government," the article states. "He threatened the integrity of the democratic system, interfered with the peaceful transition of power, and...
    By LISA MASCARO, MARY CLARE JALONICK, JONATHAN LEMIRE and ALAN FRAM WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump was impeached by the U.S. House for a historic second time Wednesday, charged with “incitement of insurrection” over the deadly mob siege of the Capitol in a swift and stunning collapse of his final days in office. With the Capitol secured by armed National Guard troops inside and out, the House voted 232-197 to impeach Trump. The proceedings moved at lightning speed, with lawmakers voting just one week after violent pro-Trump loyalists stormed the U.S. Capitol, egged on by the president’s calls for them to “fight like hell” against the election results. Ten Republicans fled Trump, joining Democrats who said he needed to be held accountable and warned ominously of a “clear and present danger” if Congress should leave him unchecked before Democrat Joe Biden’s inauguration Jan. 20. Trump is the only U.S....
    WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on the fallout from the attack of the U.S. Capitol by pro-Trump loyalists (all times local): 4:30 p.m. President Donald Trump has become the first American president to be impeached twice, facing a strong bipartisan rebuke from the House exactly one week after a violent mob of his supporters invaded the U.S. Capitol. The House voted 232-197 to impeach Trump, with 10 Republicans joining with Democrats to charge him with incitement of insurrection. The extraordinary second impeachment, just days before Trump is to leave office, comes after the president encouraged his supporters to “fight like hell” against the election results in a speech near the White House. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi will now send the article of impeachment to the Senate, though that timing is unclear. Actual removal seems unlikely before the Jan. 20 inauguration of President-elect Joe Biden, as Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell...
    WASHINGTON (CBS/CNN) — For the first time in U.S. history, a president of the United States has been impeached for the second time. The House of Representatives voted Wednesday to impeach President Donald Trump in a bipartisan vote to condemn his role inciting the riot at the U.S. Capitol last week. Pennsylvania Congresswoman Madeleine Dean is one of the nine impeachment managers. “I am honored to serve as an impeachment manager among my esteemed colleagues,” Dean said in a statement. “It is for the sake of our country, not the hate of one man or anyone, but for the love of our country and Constitution. The case is clear: it is our solemn duty to impeach Donald J. Trump. This tragedy must have consequences.” House Democrats and ten Republicans — including the House’s No. 3 Republican — voted in favor of the impeachment of Trump exactly one week after a...
    By Lisa Mascaro, Mary Clare Jalonick, Jonathan Lemire and Alan Fram | Associated Press WASHINGTON — A majority of the U.S. House has voted to impeach President Donald Trump for a second time, just a week after he encouraged loyalists to “fight like hell” against election results — a speech that was followed by a mob of his supporters storming the U.S. Capitol. The House vote on an article of impeachment for “incitement of insurrection” was still underway Wednesday afternoon. During debate before the vote, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi asked Republicans and Democrats to “search their souls.” Trump would be the first American president to be impeached twice. Trump “must go,” Pelosi said. “He is a clear and present danger to the nation we all love.” Actual removal seems unlikely before the Jan. 20 inauguration of President-elect Joe Biden. A spokesman for Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said...
    Bradley Cortright January 13, 2021 0 Comments The House is making history by voting to impeach a U.S. president for the second time. On Wednesday, lawmakers voted to impeach Trump on the charge of “incitement of insurrection” just one week after a mob of violent Trump supporters stormed the U.S. Capitol.  In a stunning break from Trump, at least 10 Republicans voted to impeach him.  IMPEACHMENT LATEST• Vote happening now• 215+ House Democrats and at least 8 House Republicans support impeachment• 218 votes needed to impeachLive blog: https://t.co/uYvM2lSkm1Live coverage: https://t.co/ukmX3rVsZl pic.twitter.com/kSZ4hAWrWq— NBC News (@NBCNews) January 13, 2021 Lawmakers moved with an unusual sense of urgency after the violence in the Capitol. On Monday, House Democrats unveiled their impeachment resolution, which read, “President Trump gravely endangered the security of the United States and its institutions of Government.” “He threatened the integrity of the democratic system, interfered with the peaceful...
    The House impeached President Trump for the second time Wednesday, charging him for behavior they believe caused the violent Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol that left five dead, dozens injured and the historic building defaced and damaged. A small group of Republicans joined all House Democrats to pass a single impeachment article accusing Trump of inciting an insurrection. Speaker Nancy Pelosi, a California Democrat, must now decide when to send the article to the Senate, which is not in session and isn’t scheduled to return until Jan. 19 and is unlikely to consider it until after Trump leaves office. Trump’s term ends on Jan. 20 at 12 p.m.. But Democrats made the case during the one-day proceeding that Trump is too dangerous to remain in office a moment longer: Democrats came to the floor to suggest Trump may incite additional violence, move to pardon the protesters charged...
    The House voted Wednesday to mpeach President Donald Trump for a second time for 'incitement of insurrection,' exactly a week after the MAGA mob stormed Capitol Hill.  The Democratic majority was joined by some Republicans, making the House's move bipartisan unlike Trump's first impeachment less than 13 months ago.   Earlier, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell's spokesman confirmed that McConnell informed Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer that he wouldn't bring the Senate back before January 19, the day before President-elect Joe Biden's inauguration.  The revelation came after the House cleared procedural hurdles and debate had started on the article. IMPEACHMENT TIMETABLE Wednesday afternoon: House vote on single Article What happens next? Nancy Pelosi decides when to transmit Article to Senate. When she does, it must begin trial on the next sitting day and sit six days a week until it concludes  Tuesday January 19:  Earliest date Mitch McConnell has said trial can...
    House lawmakers on Wednesday impeached President TrumpDonald TrumpGrowing number of GOP lawmakers say they support impeachment YouTube temporarily bars uploading of new content on Trump's channel House passes measure calling on Pence to remove Trump MORE for his role in last week’s deadly attack on the U.S. Capitol, capping an extraordinary week of violence, apprehension and partisan brawling in Congress just as Washington cranks up security in preparation for Joe BidenJoe BidenGrowing number of GOP lawmakers say they support impeachment House passes measure calling on Pence to remove Trump Disney, Walmart say they will block donations to lawmakers who objected to Electoral College results MORE’s inauguration, just a week away. The vote was historic: It made Trump the first president in the country’s history to be impeached twice. And unlike the first debate, this time the president’s Democratic critics had support across the aisle. At least 10 Republicans joined every voting...
    (CBS4) — Republican U.S. Rep. Lauren Boebert (CO-03) said she would vote against impeaching President Donald Trump on Wednesday. On the House floor, Rep. Boebert said, in part: “Glory to God. Madam Speaker, I rise today to oppose this impeachment and denounce the recent violence on the Capitol, just as I oppose the previous impeachment. “And the violence we’ve all witnessed all summer long across our great country. Make no mistake here, the hypocrisy of the left is on full display.” Boebert quoted unsourced members of the opposition as calling for people to “take Trump out tonight,” and criticized a Representative from New York for defending looters. (credit: CBS) “Where’s the accountability for the left after encouraging and normalizing violence?” Boebert asked. “Rather than actually helping American people in this time, we start impeachments that further divide our country.” “I call bullcrap when I hear the Democrats demanding unity,” Boebert...
    In his final week in office, President Donald Trump finally earned himself a superlative distinction for the history books: the first president in U.S. history to be impeached twice. On Wednesday, the House of Representatives impeached Trump on one charge of “incitement of insurrection,” seven days after the president egged on a violent mob that stormed the U.S. Capitol in an attempt to overturn the 2020 election results and then harm—or kill—top officials in the federal government. The impeachment vote took place on the very floor where, on Jan. 6, lawmakers, staff, and reporters huddled, fearing for their lives as armed extremists attempted to fight their way in. Unlike the first impeachment, the second included Republican support—including from Rep. Liz Cheney (R-WY). The third-ranking House Republican said in a Tuesday night statement that “there has never been a greater betrayal by a President of the United States of his office...
    The House impeached President Trump for the second time Wednesday, charging him for behavior they believe caused the violent Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol that left five dead, dozens injured and the historic building defaced and damaged. A small group of Republicans joined all House Democrats to pass a single impeachment article accusing Trump of inciting an insurrection. Speaker Nancy Pelosi, a California Democrat, must now decide when to send the article to the Senate, which is not in session and isn’t scheduled to return until Jan. 19 and is unlikely to consider it until after Trump leaves office. Trump’s term ends on Jan. 20 at 12 p.m.. But Democrats made the case during the one-day proceeding that Trump is too dangerous to remain in office a moment longer: Democrats came to the floor to suggest Trump may incite additional violence, move to pardon the protesters charged...
    The House of Representatives began its session on Wednesday in which it plans to vote the new impeachment against President Donald Trump after the violent assault on the Capitol last Wednesday by a mob of his followers, in which five people died. Democrats, with a majority in the Lower House, will seek this Wednesday to accuse the president of the charge of “inciting insurrection.” The vote is expected to go ahead with the backing of the Democratic caucus, and at least four Republican lawmakers have announced they will join the initiative: Adam Kizinger, a congressman from Illinois; Liz Cheney, congresswoman from Wyoming; John Katko, from New York; and Fred Upton, from Michigan. The process initiated in the Lower House promises to force the Senate to subject Trump to an impeachment trial that will take place when the president-elect, Democrat Joe Biden, is already in power, and which therefore will not...
    More On: impeachment House Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s looted lectern returned to US Capitol Rep. Boebert blames Dems, AOC for ‘normalizing violence,’ defends Trump on impeachment GOP leader McCarthy calls for unity during Trump impeachment debate Republicans in Congress warn against politicizing impeachment The US House of Representatives began voting Wednesday afternoon on a Democratic Party push to make President Trump the only commander-in-chief to be impeached twice. The move is expected to easily pass the Democrat-controlled House with support from a handful of Republicans, most notably US Rep. Liz Cheney (R-Wyo.), the chamber’s third-highest ranking member of the GOP. But a potential Senate trial won’t be held until after President-elect Joe Biden is sworn in on Jan. 20, a spokesman for Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) tweeted earlier Wednesday. The article of impeachment being voted on accuses Trump of “inciting violence against the government of the United States” ahead...
    DONALD Trump is facing a second impeachment, as members of the House of Representatives will vote on whether to proceed with trying to remove him. It would be the first time in history a US president is impeached twice during his presidency. Read our Donald Trump live blog for the very latest news on the President... 5Donald Trump is facing a second impeachmentCredit: AFP or licensors How many votes are needed to impeach Trump in the House? There are currently 435 members in the House of Representatives representing the population of the 50 states, with Democrats holding the majority. Democrats have accused President Trump of encouraging his supporters to attack the Capitol building, resulting in the death of five people. Five out of 211 Republicans in the House are expected to turn on Trump and vote on impeachment on January 13. 5The House of Representatives will vote on January...
    Former House Speaker Newt Gingrich decried efforts in Congress to impeach President Trump a second time as an "enormous danger." "What I object to is the idea that the U.S. Congress, whether Democrat or Republican, is going to dictate to the American people who they’re allowed to vote for. This idea that they're somehow going to make it illegal for Trump to run, that says they think he’s popular that he could win," Gingrich said on Fox Business's Mornings with Maria on Wednesday, noting that conviction in the Senate would bar Trump from holding elected office again. "Now, by what right does [House Speaker] Nancy Pelosi or any member of Congress dictate to the American people who is allowed to run?" Gingrich also said Trump has been subject to censorship on social media, and he argued that there is a campaign to silence the president that will "blow up" on...
    Capitol Police: What we know about the 2 officers suspended, more investigated in DC riots McConnell racing away from Trump as impeachment vote nears Spurs coach Gregg Popovich supports second Trump impeachment: Least that we can do San Antonio Spurs coach Gregg Popovich is rarely ambiguous. NBA players and coaches use platform once again in wake of Capitol riots USA TODAY SPORTS See more videos SHARE SHARE TWEET SHARE EMAIL What to watch next NBA players and coaches use platform once again in wake of Capitol riots USA TODAY SPORTS Lorenzos Locks: The 3 best bets for NFL wild-card Sunday USA TODAY SPORTS Jaylen Brown draws from MLK: “There is two split, different Americas” USA TODAY SPORTS Lorenzos Locks: The 3 best bets for NFL wild-card Saturday USA TODAY SPORTS Heres what it looks like inside the Capitol after...