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    A rare gene variant that typically appears in Amish communities may hold the key to preventing heart disease, according to researchers from the University of Maryland School of Medicine. The study found that those that have this particular gene, known as B4GALT1, appear to have lower levels of heart-damaging cholesterol, as well as a blood-clotting protein called fibrinogen.  Less than one in 10,000 people have this gene, yet amazingly 12 percent of the Pennsylvania Amish community in Lancaster County carry the gene variant.   Past studies on the gene revealed that certain mutations can change one's cholesterol levels, too much of which can cause clogged arteries and cardiovascular diseases, which remains the leading cause of death worldwide.  Researchers involved in the study claim this is the first time scientists have isolated a gene that lowers two different yet equally important heart disease risk factors.   Amazingly, 12 percent of the Pennsylvania Amish community in Lancaster County, pictured, carry the gene variant Those that have this particular gene, known as B4GALT1, pictured, appear to have lower levels of heart-damaging cholesterol, as well as a blood-clotting...
    IF you're diabetic, you'll know how important it is to keep on top of your blood sugar levels. Common signs of high blood sugar include an increased thirst and needing to go the loo more, but experts say there could also be indicators in your mouth. 1The most common signs of diabetes are an increased thirst and needing the loo more - but there could also be signs in your mouthCredit: Getty - Contributor Researchers say that people with severe gum disease (periodontitis) have a harder time keeping their blood sugar levels under control. For those whose blood sugar is not well controlled, they may find they have trouble with gum disease, the American Dental Association (ADA) states. A previous study published by experts at the ADA stated that people with diabetes may be at higher risk of developing gum disease than people without diabetes. Gum disease is a serious infection which in most cases can be treated. If it's left untreated is can lead to tooth loss which is irreversible, this is because it can destroy the bone...
    Fight disinformation. Get a daily recap of the facts that matter. Sign up for the free Mother Jones newsletter.This story is a collaboration between Public Health Watch and the Investigative Reporting Workshop. In April 2008, Jonathan Agin’s 27-month-old daughter, Alexis, was diagnosed with DIPG, a rare brain tumor. Agin, then a civil defense lawyer in Washington, DC, was dislodged from his comfortable life and dragged into the surreal world of a young cancer victim’s parent: The sleepless nights in the din of a hospital, the grueling clinical trials. “I always had hope,” Agin said in a recent interview, though he knew most DIPG patients survive no more than two years after diagnosis. Alexis lived for 33 months after her tumor was found. Toward the end of her life, she was unable to walk or speak. She died at 3:03 p.m. on Jan. 14, 2011. “My knowledge back then of children with cancer was watching St. Jude and Ronald McDonald House commercials,” Agin said. The image of a “smiling, bald-headed kid living happily ever after” was cruelly misleading, he learned, when it...
    In Maine, there has been considerable tension between Democratic Gov. Janet Mills and Rep. Chris Johansen, a Republican, during the COVID-19 pandemic — and Johansen bitterly fought against the social distancing measures that Mills ordered. But Johansen, according to Maine Public Radio’s website, has resigned from the Maine House of Representatives. Johansen became the face of coronavirus denial in the Maine House of Representatives, organizing a protest against Mills’ social distancing measures. In August, his wife, Cindy Johansen — an anti-vaxxer — died from COVID-19. Maine Public Radio’s Steve Mistler reports, “Rep. Chris Johansen's resignation was effective November 19, according to a letter he sent to Democratic House Speaker Ryan Fecteau that same day. Johansen kept a relatively low profile during his three terms until the onset of the pandemic, when he made several headlines for leading the first demonstrations against the governor's pandemic restrictions in 2020 and for his involvement in fights against mask-wearing requirements for lawmakers enacted by Democratic leaders earlier this year.” Mistler reports that Johansen “said his wife's dedication to the family farm allowed him...
    CROHN'S Disease is an ongoing and life-long condition once diagnosed and there is no cure for the disease. It was name after a New York doctor, Burrill Crohn, who reported a number of cases back in 1932. 1 A woman with bowel pain (orange), which could be caused by IBS (irritable bowel syndrome) or Crohn's diseaseCredit: Getty Images What is Crohn's Disease? It is a condition that causes inflammation of the digestive system. The inflammation is the body's reaction to injury or irritation, and can cause redness, swelling and pain. It is often described as a chronic condition and although sufferers will have periods of good health, there are flare-ups where symptoms are more active. It is one of the two main forms of Inflammatory Bowel Disease - the other is a condition known as Ulcerative Colitis. It can be caused by the genes a person has inherited, an abnormal reaction of the immune system and is probably triggered by something in the environment. MOST READ IN HEALTHHEADY HEIGHTS I’m a doctor and this is why all men should grow...
    As far as holy grails in medicine are concerned, you don’t get one much more significant than a cure for dementia. It’s the condition many of us fear most, as the disease slowly but inexorably obliterates the mind. We’ve been waiting for a breakthrough treatment for decades, yet despite billions spent on drug development and research by governments and companies worldwide, the majority of candidates have fallen by the wayside. Some experimental medicines have even had the opposite of the intended effect, actually worsening brain function. And the only drugs currently available simply tackle specific symptoms of mild to moderate dementia — there is nothing that can slow down the disease or prevent it. So, understandably, there was huge excitement and hopeful headlines recently after the first new medicine for Alzheimer’s (the most common type of dementia) in two decades was approved by the U.S. regulator, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). As far as holy grails in medicine are concerned, you don’t get one much more significant than a cure for dementia The drug, aducanumab (brand name, Aduhelm), works...
    SAN FRANCISCO (CBS SF) — Tony Bennett sang about leaving his heart in San Francisco, and Sunday night the city’s heart was aching as CBS aired his final televised performance. But, as Alzheimer’s disease has slowly silenced the iconic singer, it’s happening at a time when medical researchers are more optimistic than ever. READ MORE: Jack Dorsey Stepping Down As Twitter CEO“She gets too hungry for dinner at eight,” crooned Bennett as he took the stage with Lady Gaga in their “One Last Time” duet concert. In it, he sang a lot of the old standards from his past, and it was Alzheimer’s that was dictating his playlist. “The early phase, probably the phase that Tony Bennett is in now, is that he can’t really remember anything new, said Dr. Michael Weiner, a Professor of Radiology at UCSF. “So he probably could not learn a new song, but he can remember all the old songs.” Dr. Weiner said Alzheimer’s occurs when the brain develops plaques and tangles in the nerve cells, leading to a degeneration of the memory and...
    MICK HARFORD is at the front line of the prostate cancer fight — but vows: “This is not about me.” Now 62, he has fought for a few causes, first as a 6ft 3in dreadnought of a striker with top clubs and England, then as a manager who restored Luton to the Championship. 2Mick Harford, middle, is at the front line of the prostate cancer fight 2Luton's Harry Cornick, manager Nathan Jones and Cameron Jerome Yet this is his biggest fight — against a disease that killed 12,000 men in 2020, with more than 52,000 new cases every year. Harford is one of those cases. His world came crashing down in August and he stepped away from being assistant manager of the Hatters to undergo two months of radiotherapy. He says the backing from the club and fans has been 'overwhelming' — and tomorrow Luton switch their shirt logo to Prostate Cancer UK for the home match with Cardiff. A total of 61 staff at the club are also running or cycling every day this month to raise funds...
    THERE are hundreds of different types of cancers and it remains one of the biggest killers. The most deadly form is lung cancer, followed by bowel, prostate and then breast. 2 It's important to know the signs of skin cancer and get any worries checkedCredit: Getty Images These four cancers account for nearly half, 45 per cent, of overall deaths from cancer. In the UK, around 16,200 people a year are diagnosed with skin cancer , according to Cancer Research. From those patients, around 2,333 deaths tragically happen. And spotting the early signs of the disease could make all the difference when it comes to survival. Experts recommend people perform regular checks of their skin to spot potential signs of the disease returning, or new melanomas appearing. MOST READ IN HEALTHSUPER STRAIN New Covid variant with 32 mutations found amid fears it could escape vaccinesDRUG ALERT Common painkiller increases risk of heart failure in certain people, docs warn'MY LOVE' My husband’s back pain was actually cancer - it’s not too late to know the signsFATAL MISTAKE I nearly died after...
    Lady Gaga has shed light on her friend and collaborator Tony Bennett's 'heartbreaking' Alzheimer’s battle. Speaking to Zoe Ball on her Radio 1 show on Tuesday morning, The House Of Gucci star, 35, reflected on the pain of watching his battle and spoke of how they recorded their duets album after her was diagnosed with the condition.  It was revealed in February that Tony, 95, has the progressive neurologic disorder and had been secretly living with the disease since 2016, yet the news did not stop the release of his new music and performances with Gaga.  Her love: Lady Gaga has shed light on her friend and collaborator Tony Bennett's 'heartbreaking' Alzheimer’s battle While blazing the promo trail for Ridley Scott's House Of Gucci, Gaga appeared on the radio show on Tuesday where Zoe played her duet I’ve Got You Under My Skin.  Radio legend Zoe then asked the star: 'How is Tony? You said you always wanted to work with him and he’s a magic man isn’t he?’ RELATED ARTICLES Previous 1 2 Next Lady...
    Even in the prime of our lives, while still healthy and clever, our brains may be secretly developing the deadly plaques and tangles of Alzheimer’s disease. The first sign of trouble is memory loss — and, by then, damage is done. But innovative new blood tests can now detect these hidden signs of disease, years before the onset of heartbreaking symptoms. The tests are not yet recommended for widespread screening of the general public, because improvements are needed. But newly released data about the first FDA-approved version by C2N Diagnostics, shows that it’s 81% accurate in identifying levels of a brain protein that is a hallmark sign of Alzheimer’s disease. For the first time, the test is being used in a major National Institutes of Health-funded drug study at 75 medical centers. “When is the best time to put out a fire? When it starts,” said Dr. Julio Rojas-Martinez of UC San Francisco’s Memory and Aging Center, which is using the test to identify people as young as 55 to participate in NIH’s AHEAD study, aimed at finding drugs to...
    A new laboratory-stage mRNA vaccine that teaches the immune system to recognize the saliva from tick bites could prevent these bugs from feeding on and transmitting tick-borne diseases to people, according to a recent study my colleagues and I conducted in the Fikrig Lab at the Yale School of Medicine. Some animals repeatedly exposed to tick bites are eventually able to develop resistance to tick feeding, where the ticks either detach soon after biting or cause skin redness that alerts the host to remove them. Scientists have observed this tick immunity in several animals that don’t typically serve as hosts to ticks, including guinea pigs, rabbits and cows. In laboratory settings, guinea pigs bitten 2-3 times by ticks are able to develop robust immunity against them. While there have not been any formal studies on tick immunity in humans, people who have been repeatedly exposed to ticks can get itchy skin after getting bitten, a symptom that may be associated with tick immunity. Our lab was curious if we could induce tick immunity without tick bites. So we developed an...
    A Maryland resident has tested positive for the rare virus monkeypox after a recent trip to Nigeria. The Maryland Department of Health (MDH) says the patient has not been hospitalized and is currently recovering in isolation with mild symptoms.  No details are available regarding the resident's name, age, sex, where he or she lives, and where he or she traveled to in Nigeria. Currently, health officials say that the general public does not need to take any special precautions.  A Maryland resident traveling back to the United States from Nigeria has been confirmed to be infected with monkeypox. Pictured: Skin lesions, which are are a common symptom of monkeypox The unnamed resident is currently recovering in isolation with mild symptoms and has not been hospitalized. The virus can cause skin spots, which then turn to blisters and can take weeks to clear up (above) 'Public health authorities have identified and continue to follow up with those who may have been in contact with the diagnosed individual,' Dr Jinlene Chan, deputy secretary for public health at MDH, said in a statement.  'Our...
    The Alzheimer’s Association Imagine Benefit, built on the legacy of the Rita Hayworth Gala, was held on Monday, November 15 at New York’s iconic Jazz at Lincoln Center.  This year's gala raised more than $600,000 for the cause, while bringing awareness to the disease that affects more than 6 million Americans and more than 11 million caregivers. Princess Yasmin Aga Khan, daughter of Rita Hayworth and the gala’s founder and general chair, hosted the charitable and stylish event.  The Alzheimer’s Association Imagine Benefit, built on the legacy of the Rita Hayworth Gala, was held on Monday, November 15 at New York’s iconic Jazz at Lincoln Center Rita Hayworth was diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease in 1981 at the age of 62 Rita Hayworth was diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease in 1981 at the age of 62. Building on her legacy as a Hollywood performer, the two-part evening began with a cocktail hour, which was followed by a seated dinner. The evening of song and storytelling was held in an intimate theatre space with stunning views of Columbus Circle, Central Park and New...
    So far, close to a million kids aged 5 to 11 have gotten the Covid vaccine.  While some parents clamor for appointments, others still have questions.  Today, Dr. Oz and Director of The Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Dr. Rochelle Walensky, break down everything you need to know about the pediatric Covid vaccine roll-out.  She weighs in on dose availability, whether or not schools will mandate vaccines for kids and what the data says about natural versus vaccine-induced immunity.  She also shares with Dr. Oz her message to parents who are still hesitant about vaccinating their children. Dr. Oz asks the Director of The Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Dr. Rochelle Walensky, how the pediatric Covid vaccine roll-out is going. Watch THE DR. OZ SHOW, weekdays at 9 a.m. on CBS 62. Related
    Archaeologists have discovered a human skull on an uninhabited Caribbean island which dates back more than 200 years and shows signs of leprosy, one of just a few examples seen on a skeleton in the western world. The ancient skull, which dates to either the late 18th or early 19th century, was discovered on Petite Mustique. According to historical records, this 100-acre island that is part of St. Vincent and the Grenadines, may have been used for a leprosarium, or a hospital for people with leprosy, in the early 19th century. The leprosarium may have been established around 1806, the authors wrote in the study. Archaeologists discovered a human skull on an uninhabited Caribbean island that shows signs of leprosy The skull, which dates to either the late 18th or early 19th century, was found on Petite Mustique RELATED ARTICLES Previous 1 Next Wormholes might be more stable than previously thought, and... Mysterious small and cold object glimpsed 20 BILLION miles... Share this article Share Archaeologists, including University of Oregon archaeologist Scott...
    Robert F. Kennedy Jr., who was known for crazy anti-vaccine views even before the pandemic, downplayed covid-19 in an interview Monday with Tucker Carlson. For years Kennedy has pushed the flat-out false assertion that vaccines can cause autism, and he has fear-mongered about vaccines on many occasions. In 2019 several of his family members penned an op-ed calling out his dangerous misinformation. On Monday night Carlson queued up a clip of his interview with Kennedy by describing him to viewers as “one of the smartest and most articulate chroniclers of the erosion of our civil liberties.” They spoke for Carlson’s Fox Nation series Tucker Carlson Today, where Kennedy spread nonsense about the covid-19 vaccines. In comments appearing to reference Dr. Anthony Fauci, Kennedy said, “It was just a doctor who has never treated a covid patient saying one week masks don’t work and a month later, everybody putting them on, and not citing one study to justify that change.” He claimed that last year the U.S. “literally got rid of every amendment of the Constitution except the Second Amendment.” And...
    Sugar is bad news for health — on this most would agree. But when it comes to fat, there has been real and sometimes acrimonious debate. For decades we have been warned that eating too much dairy such as milk, butter and cheese could raise our risk of serious conditions such as heart disease and strokes — only for more recent studies to suggest they might actually protect us from these by lowering our risk of developing high blood pressure or type 2 diabetes. So where does the truth lie — and why can’t the scientists agree? The key reason dairy products are considered bad for us is their high saturated fat content. Although our bodies need fats for energy, growth and to absorb fat-soluble nutrients such as vitamins A, D and E, eating too much saturated fat, in particular, can raise levels of so-called ‘bad’ cholesterol in our blood.  This can clog arteries, which in turn leads to health problems such as high blood pressure, heart disease and strokes. For decades we have been warned that eating too much dairy...
    SICKLE cell disease is one of the most common genetic conditions, with between 12,500 and 15,000 people in England living with it. It's a group of inherited conditions that sees red blood cells die early, leaving a shortage in supply of healthy red cells. 2 Sickle cell disease is a group of inherited conditions that sees red blood cells die early Sickle cell disease is a serious and lifelong condition. But it varies between individuals and, although it can lead to fatal complications, most people with it lead normal lives. Although sickle cell can affect anyone, it occurs predominantly in people of African and African-Caribbean origin. But cases also occur in families originating from the Middle East, parts of India, the eastern Mediterranean, and South and Central America.What is sickle cell disease? Sickle cell disease refers to a number of conditions that effect the red blood cells in the body. The most serious form of sickle cell disease is called sickle cell anaemia. People with the disease produce unusually shaped red blood cells. MEMORY BOOST Fresh hope for Alzheimer's patients...
    Decryption – In ten countries the situation is considered “very worrying”. Those in the west and south, including France, are still preserved at this time. Many factors come into play. The Covid 19 epidemic continues to grow in the EU, and it is considered “Very annoying” Ten of its member countries, according to the European Disease Agency. “The epidemiological situation in the EU is currently characterized by an increase in rapid and significant cases and a low but slow increasing mortality rate.”On Friday, November 12, the European Center for Disease Control (ECDC) summarizes its final risk assessment. “The number of cases, hospitalizations and deaths are all expected to increase in the next two weeks.”, The company in Stockholm also warns. Read moreCovit-19: Should we be afraid of the fifth wave in France? Of the 27 countries, Belgium, Poland, the Netherlands, Bulgaria, Croatia, the Czech Republic, Estonia, Greece, Hungary and Slovenia are of concern – “Very annoying”. Other countries are classified in the classification “Trouble”: Germany, Austria, Denmark, Finland, Ireland, This article is for subscribers only. You have...
    IT’S easy to brush off niggling health problems as something that will go away with time. But doctors are frequently telling us, some symptoms should never be ignored because they could mean cancer. 1Cancer needs to be caught as early as possibleCredit: Alamy Cancer is more treatable the earlier it is discovered. Sadly 450 people die of cancer every day in the UK, and thousands more worldwide.  The most commonly diagnosed forms of the disease are breast, cancer and lung.  Often the signs of the killer disease are so vague that people diagnosed only recognise them in hindsight. They may also have been misdiagnosed by their doctor or by searching the internet. Experts urge people to be familiar with their own bodies - such as checking their testicles or breasts often - so that any new symptom is more obvious. The NHS says: “It's important to be aware of any new or worrying symptoms. “Although it's unlikely to be cancer, it's important to speak to a GP so they can investigate.” Most read in WellbeingFEELING PEACHY I’m a doctor and...
    AT just three-years-old, little Isaac Tilley had his first of many seizures. He was soon diagnosed with epilepsy and was also as also suffering from speech delay, and his mum Aimee Tilley thought he might also have autism. 5Isaac Tilley first started to have seizures when he was just three years oldCredit: Caters 5His mum Aimee (pictured together above) asked for him to be referred to a specialistCredit: Caters 5Isaac was diagnosed with Batten Disease which can be inherited. Isaac's sister Eva, does not have the conditionCredit: Caters The 34-year-old asked for Isaac, now five-years-old, to be referred to a neurologist in Oxford after his private speech therapist noticed that 'something wasn't right'. She said: "It wasn't until January this year that I noticed his hands and legs would shake and he was unsteady on his feet, this got worse over the next few months and his speech still wasn't coming along either. "He had an MRI, heart tests, blood tests, and a lumbar puncture in February but it wasn’t until August, after receiving results from an Epilepsy Panel test,...
    By Maggie Fox | CNN The global threat of measles has become worse after 22 million babies missed their vaccinations because of the Covid-19 pandemic, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention warned Wednesday. Measles is one of the most contagious viruses known and still kills more than 60,000 people a year, mostly young children. But it killed more than a million a year as recently as 2000. The CDC said Wednesday that reported measles cases fell in 2020 after a global resurgence from 2017-2019, but millions of kids missed out on their vaccines because of the pandemic and the reduced numbers of reports may not necessarily be good news, either. “Large and disruptive measles outbreaks in 2020, however, suggest that measles transmission was underreported,” the CDC team wrote in the agency’s weekly report on death and disease, the MMWR. “Over 22 million infants missed their first dose of measles vaccine — 3 million more than in 2019 and the largest annual increase in over 20 years,” the CDC said. “While reported measles cases dropped in 2020, evidence suggests...
    A GLASS of red wine at the end of the day can really help you unwind. But it can actually do more than destress - it can help prevent diseases later in life. 1A glass of red wine is beneficial for your health, but in moderation, research has foundCredit: Getty - Contributor While it is always best to drink in moderation and seek help if you start to rely on alcohol, a glass every now and then can help your health. Numerous studies have shown various benefits from supping on wine. And recent research went further to explain why the booze could fight off type 2 diabetes, heart disease, blood clots, cancer and dementia. Dr Rudolph Schutte of Anglia Ruskin University found it's all to do with the grapes. Or more specifically, micronutrients in the grapes, that are passed into the wine. They are called polyphenols, and they give red wine a touch of the superfood sparkle. Alcohol actually has nothing to do with it, and while you will still get the benefit of the nutrients if you drink the...
    AGE-related changes can happen to all of us but it's important to know when these are a little more serious. Dementia affects one in six people over the age of 80 in the UK, with 850,000 Brits believed to be suffering with the condition. 1While memory loss is one of the most common signs of dementia - there are other subtle signs that shouldn't be ignoredCredit: Getty Memory-loss and confusion are key signs of dementia but can sometimes be confused with general ageing. There are many different types of dementia and it can’t be guaranteed that you can prevent the most common type, Alzheimer’s. But a healthy lifestyle helps, the NHS says.  Experts say there are more subtle signs that need to be addressed when it comes to Dementia. Here are the four less-common signs you should be looking out for. 1. Eye conditions and hearing loss Most read in WellbeingCRUEL TWIST My mum thought it was menopause but died weeks later - 4 signs to never ignoreHEALTH CHECK The 4 cancer symptoms a third of people are IGNORING - are...
    In this article FIXXThe Merck logo is seen at a gate to the Merck & Co campus in Rahway, New Jersey, U.S., July 12, 2018.Brendan McDermid | ReutersLONDON — An antiviral pill found to be effective at treating Covid-19 has been approved by Britain's medicines regulator Thursday in a potentially game-changing way of treating the virus. Britain's medicines regulator said it had approved the world's first antiviral oral pill, known as molnupiravir, having found it to be "safe and effective at reducing the risk of hospitalisation and death in people with mild to moderate Covid-19 who are at increased risk of developing severe disease." The U.K.'s Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency said the decision "follows a rigorous review of its safety, quality and effectiveness" and made it the "first oral antiviral for the treatment of Covid-19 to be approved." Developed jointly by Ridgeback Biotherapeutics and Merck Sharp & Dohme, the pill works by interfering with the virus’ replication. This prevents it from multiplying, keeping virus levels low in the body and therefore reducing the severity of the disease,...
    A new study published in the journal Nature on Wednesday shows that gene therapy on mice could be used to boost the effects of existing drugs used to treat Parkinson’s disease, especially in late stages. And to boot, another arm of the study confirmed suspicions of how Parkinson’s starts, which could one day help scientists identify people who could be vulnerable to developing Parkinson’s five to 10 years before the onset of symptoms. Parkinson’s disease is thought to arise due to the loss of neurons in the brain that produce dopamine, a neurochemical that plays many different roles as a signal to other nerve cells. Dopamine is probably best known as the “feel-good” chemical that’s associated with pleasure and reward. But it’s also critical in motor control. As these neurons fail and die, dopamine levels tank, and Parkinson’s symptoms can worsen. One way doctors treat Parkinson’s is through prescribing a drug called levodopa, which the body’s neurons can convert into dopamine to restore levels to some degree of normalcy. But as the disease progresses, more and more neurons die before...
    Tracey Emin has said that 'love' rather than art saved her following her bladder cancer battle after revealing she 6'fell' for someone shortly before her diagnosis.  The artist, 58, who was given the all-clear from bladder cancer eight months ago, appeared on BBC Radio 4's Cultural Life and told host Wilson that she was diagnosed last year when she was at her happiest. Speaking of last year when she had fallen in love, Emin said: 'Every time in my life I say "I'm so happy" something awful has happened. I was sitting on my roof, with my feet cocked up on the slates, and I thought, "God, I'm so happy". Then a few weeks later I'm diagnosed with almost terminal cancer.'  'Love saved me this time, not art. I fell in love just before I found out I had cancer. I made a neon once which said "everything is different when you fall in love." It is, the rain is different, the wind is different....everything is much more heightened. You see colours more intense, you feel everything.'  The 58-year-old was diagnosed early last year...
    CNN’s Van Jones referred to Republican Virginia gubernatorial candidate Glenn Youngkin as a disease during Tuesday night’s election coverage. Jones said that Youngkin was essentially the “Delta variant of Trumpism” who posed a danger because he could potentially spread faster and farther. (RELATED: ‘People In The Black Community Don’t Trust You’: Sunny Hostin Challenges Van Jones Over Support For Trump Policies) WATCH: “When this election is over in Virginia, we will know have we seen the emergence of the Delta variant of Trumpism,” Jones began. “The Delta variant of Trumpism. In other words, Youngkin, same disease, but spreads a lot faster and can get a lot more places. The suburbs, if they fall to him –” “That is implying that Youngkin is more dangerous than the former president,” Anderson Cooper pushed back. “Well, more easy to spread, more easy to spread, because if you are looking at what he is doing. He is playing footsie with the worst of Trumpism,” Jones continued, arguing that Youngkin was positioning himself as a champion for parents while he pushed a message...
    CNN political commentator and former Obama administration official Van Jones said Tuesday on his network’s election coverage that Virginia gubernatorial candidate Glenn Youngkin (R) was the “Delta variant of Trumpism.” Jones said, “You do have the grassroots folks out there fighting for this on the Democratic Party side. The stakes are high. When this election is over in Virginia, we will know have we seen the emergence of the Delta variant of Trumpism. The Delta variant of Trumpism. In other words, Youngkin, same disease, but spreads a lot faster and can get a lot more places. The suburbs, if they fall to him —” Host Andersen Copper said, “That’s implying that Youngkin is more dangerous than the president — former president.” Jones said, “No, no. Easier to spread.” Cooper said, “Okay.” Jones said, “Easier to spread. More easy to spread because if you are looking at what he is doing. He is playing footsie with the worst of Trumpism. He is putting himself forward as a champion of parents. This is a referendum on parents’ rights, and not talking about...
    A ‘worrying’ number of people put off seeking help for one of the most deadly cancers, a charity has warned. Pancreatic Cancer UK said that anyone with common symptoms of the disease – including back pain, indigestion, stomach pain and weight loss – should see a GP if issues persist for more than four weeks. Anyone with jaundice – yellowing of the skin or eyes – should go to A&E immediately, it added. More than 10,000 people are diagnosed with the disease in the UK each year but early detection gives people better odds of survival RELATED ARTICLES Previous 1 Next The drugs that can make 'terminal' cancer patients' tumours... Cancer patients who recently received treatment are 75% more... Share this article Share A poll has revealed that 28 per cent of people wait three months before seeking help, while 22 per cent said that they would not feel confident recognising jaundice. The survey of 2,000 adults, by Savanta ComRes on behalf of the charity, also found that 31 per cent...
    New research has tracked the replication and spread of the protein tau for the first time. Aggregates of tau and the protein beta-amyloid are involved in the development of Alzheimer's disease. The international study, published at the end of last month in the journal Science Advances, was led by scientists at the University of Cambridge.  ALZHEIMER'S DISEASE AND SLEEP: COULD 7 TO 8 HOURS LOWER THE RISK? In it, the authors wrote that by bringing together chemical kinetics with measurements of the tau aggregates, or "seeds," across brain regions, they could quantify the rate of their replication in human brains. After developing a mathematical model to simulate the progression of the disease and using five different methods of tau quantification – ranging from postmortem seed amplification assays to tau PET (positron emission tomography) scans of the brains of living individuals – the researchers said that they had obtained comparable rates in several different datasets. "Our results suggest that from Braak stage III onward, local replication, rather than spreading between brain regions, is the main process controlling the overall rate of...
    OVER 42,000 people in the UK are diagnosed with bowel cancer every year so it's important you know the signs. It can strike anyone at any age, but it is treatable and curable if caught early. 1Bowel cancer is treatable if caught early so it's important that you know the signs to look out for when you're on the loo Bowel cancer, also known as colon cancer, is the second deadliest form of the disease in the UK. Early diagnosis saves lives and is why The Sun launched the No Time 2 Lose campaign in April 2018, calling on the Government to lower the screening age for the disease from 60 to 50. Bowel Cancer UK also previously launched its 'Never Too Young' campaign after it was revealed that millions of people were unaware that you could get bowel cancer under the age of 50. Here are the three changes in toilet habits that you should look out for. 1. Blood One of the most obvious red flags when it comes to bowel cancer is finding blood in your stool. Most read in WellbeingFATAL...
    Getty A member of the English Heritage team takes a picture of a light display as it illuminates the historic Whitby Abbey during a press evening on October 22, 2021 in Whitby, England. English Heritage’s Illuminated Abbey shows the iconic ruins of Whitby Abbey in North Yorkshire in a new light from the 23 October for 9 nights. After taking a break in 2020 due to the Covid 19 pandemic, the abbey is once again illuminated over the Halloween half-term in homage to Bram Stoker’s novel Dracula which was inspired by the abbey. The vampire is a common image in today’s pop culture, and one that takes many forms: from Alucard, the dashing spawn of Dracula in the PlayStation game “Castlevania: Symphony of the Night”; to Edward, the romantic, idealistic lover in the “Twilight” series. In many respects, the vampire of today is far removed from its roots in Eastern European folklore. As a professor of Slavic studies who has taught a course on vampires called “Dracula” for more than a decade, I’m always fascinated by the vampire’s...
    A Michigan woman is outraged after her mother died of the coronavirus, saying that a local urgent care center did not test her mother for virus the because she was already fully vaccinated.  "They screened her but she was vaccinated and so they didn’t feel the need," Teresa Lisowski, the daughter of the deceased woman, told Fox 2. "When I asked her, she said 'They didn’t test me because I am vaccinated.'" Lisowski said her mother Marilyn Pfeifer followed coronavirus precautions and was fully vaccinated. But the 74-year-old began feeling ill in August with symptoms such as congestion, ear pain, and a headache.  UCHEALTH DENIES KIDNEY TRANSPLANT TO UNVACCINATED WOMAN IN STAGE 5 RENAL FAILURE She was examined at Lakes Urgent Care in Livonia, but not tested for the virus, according to documents obtained by Lisowski. Her mother was instead diagnosed with a sinus infection.  Woman wasn't tested by urgent care because she was vaccinated - but later dies of COVID-19 (FOX 2) Her symptoms progressed, according to her daughter, and she was rushed to a hospital just more...
    Catching the 'kissing disease' could cause some people to develop multiple sclerosis (MS) later in their life, a new study finds. Researchers from University College London (UCL) in England found that people who were infected with mononucleosis at a young age were more likely to develop MS in the future. Previously, it was believed that people who were genetically at a higher risk of MS were more likely to suffer a serious case of mono if exposed, though researchers have now flipped the correlation. Researchers found that being infected with the condition in childhood or adolescence put someone most at risk of developing MS around a decade later. Contracting mono in early adulthood did not correlate much with an increased risk of MS.  A young person contracting mono, often dubbed 'kissing disease', can severely increase their likelihood of developing MS later in life (file photo) Mono is a disease often transferred via saliva, earning it the 'kissing disease' moniker. It is especially common in teenagers Mononucleosis is a contagious disease often spread by saliva. Many people, particularly teenagers, contract the...
    MILLIONS of people are at risk of type 2 diabetes - a serious condition that needs lifelong management. While some risk factors can’t be changed, such as age and ethnicity, the condition is largely preventable. 1Fruit juice has been linked to higher odds of type 2 diabetesCredit: Alamy Often people need to make large adjustments to their daily habits to lower their risk, such as stopping smoking, drinking alcohol or losing weight. But it could come down to simple tweaks in your diet - such as cutting back on your morning fruit juice. Research has shown that while an orange or apple may help ward off type 2 diabetes, juices made from the fruits can have the complete opposite effect.  A study looked at fruit consumption among more than 187,000 men and women in the US over an almost 25-year period. Some 6.5 per cent of participants developed type 2 diabetes - a condition driven by obesity - during the study period. Those who consumed one or more servings of fruit juice each day increased their risk of developing type...
    A young cancer survivor was left weeping tears of joy after Tom Brady handed him a Tampa Bay Buccaneers cap on Sunday night. The 44-year-old quarterback spotted the young football fan in the crowd during his Sunday night game against the Chicago Bears. The fan was spotted in the crowd holding up a sign which read: 'Tom Brady helped me beat brain cancer.'   Tom Brady said hello to a young fan.His reaction is priceless ❤️ pic.twitter.com/auS7MTvQVy— NFL on CBS ???? (@NFLonCBS) October 24, 2021 Tom Brady ran over to a young cancer survivor in the crowds to hand him a Tampa Bay Buccaneers cap, after his team's win over the Chicago Bears on Sunday night The young boy had been spotted towards the front of the crowd holding up a sign which read: 'Tom brady helped me beat brain cancer' Video footage showed Brady walking over to the stands and reaching up to place the Tampa Bay cap on the boy's head. Overwhelmed by emotions, the boy then bursts into tears and holds both of is hands over his face. ...
    BRUSHING your teeth twice a day is part of all of our routines, but one expert has revealed there is one big mistake you could be making. Good oral hygiene is key to a happy healthy smile and keeps bacteria from building up in your mouth. 1Oral hygiene can play a huge part in our overall health and one expert has revealed the one part of your routine that could do with a little bit more attentionCredit: Getty Dental professional Dr Sameet Hindocha from oral hygiene company MyMouth, says in order to prevent nasty bacteria - you should also be scraping your tongue. This he says, is so you can prevent gum disease developing. Gum disease is an incredibly common oral disease and around 45-50 per cent of all adults in the UK suffer with the condition. The biggest cause of gum disease is poor oral hygiene and not brushing your teeth properly, but bacteria can also live on your tongue, Dr Hindocha says. He explained: "If you are susceptible to it, you need to brush better than the average person to ensure...
    BOWEL cancer can strike at any age, but knowing the signs can help catch it early. I'm A Celeb's Adele Roberts revealed this weekend she had the disease to spread awareness of what to look out for. 2Knowing the signs of bowel cancer can help it be caught earlyCredit: Alamy 2Adele Roberts revealed she had been diagnosed with the disease to help others know the symptomsCredit: instagram Alongside a picture of her in a hospital gown giving a thumbs up, she wrote: "Ok, there’s no easy way to do this and it feels weird, especially posting on social media (I’m going full Black Mirror) but I’m hoping it’ll reach anyone who might benefit from seeing it or reading it. The Radio presenter said it had "all happened so quickly" before adding: "PLEASE make sure you get checked out if you have ANY concerns. The sooner you’re able to see your GP or talk to someone the sooner you can get help. If I hadn’t I might not be so lucky. "As I’ve learned over the last few weeks, there’s no...
    BOWEL cancer is the fourth most common form of the disease in the UK - after breast, prostate and lung. It's also UK's second deadliest cancer - claiming 16,000 lives a year. 1 The Sun's No Time 2 Lose campaign is calling on everyone to learn the red-flag signs of bowel cancer Celebrities diagnosed with the disease include radio DJ and TV presenter Adele Roberts, actress and comedian Dame Julie Walters,  BBC news reader George Alagiah and Lord Andrew Lansley. The Sun's columnist Deborah James shares her journey living with bowel cancer, having been diagnosed at just 35 years old. The Sun previously launched the No Time 2 Lose campaign to urge people to talk about their insides and their numbers twos - as often the first signs are in your poo - and has successfully got the NHS to lower its screening age from 60 to 50. What is bowel cancer? Bowel cancer is where the disease starts in the large intestines. It's also referred to as colon or colorectal cancer, because it can also affect the colon and rectum....
    ALZHEIMER'S is a devastating condition for both the person suffering with it and their loved ones. It can be hard to live with, but one expert has revealed there are some things you can do to reduce your risk of getting the illness. 1Living with Alzheimer's can be extremely difficult for both the sufferer and their loved ones, but one expert says there are things you can do to reduce your risk The disease affects the brain and Alzheimer's UK says that in the UK there are more than 42,000 people under the age of 65 living with the condition. While there is currently no cure for the disease, some treatments can help boost these chemical messages, and ward of some of the symptoms. But it is ultimately a progressive disease which means more symptoms appear and worsen over time. Speaking to The Sun Dr Marilyn Glenville PhD, expert at Natural Health Practice said there are a myriad of lifestyle changes a person can make to reduce their chances of developing Alzheimer’s or Dementia. 1. Diet Dr Glenville says that what...
    New York City has reported an increase in human cases of leptospirosis, a bacterial disease that the city reports has been spread by rats. In a late September advisory, the city's Department of Health and Mental Hygiene reported that 14 cases of human leptospirosis had been identified this year, a number it said was more than the total number reported to the city's health department in any previous year. Cases had been identified in all boroughs except Staten Island with "no obvious clustering."  BAT BITES AND RABIES: WHAT TO KNOW Thirteen out of the 14 people were hospitalized with acute renal and hepatic failure and two of the patients reportedly also had severe pulmonary involvement.  One person died as a result of infection and all others were treated and discharged. Three of those infected were reported to be experiencing homelessness and one person was traveling when infected.  Most of the cases had a "clear history or risk factor" that exposed them to an environment with a severe rat infestation, the advisory noted. A rat runs along the High Line...
    (CNN)Former US Secretary of State Colin Powell died on Monday of Covid-19 complications. His family announced that he was fully vaccinated. He was 84 years old, and had multiple myeloma, a blood cancer.Health officials worry that anti-vaccine activists will seize upon Powell's death to make the claim that vaccines don't work. If you can still die after being vaccinated for Covid-19, what's the point of getting the vaccine?What's the answer to that question? I discussed it with CNN Medical Analyst Dr. Leana Wen, an emergency physician and professor of health policy and management at the George Washington University Milken Institute School of Public Health. She is also author of a new book, "Lifelines: A Doctor's Journey in the Fight for Public Health." Masks and vaccines are a must this holiday season, CDC saysCNN: When we see vaccinated people dying from Covid-19, how do you explain that vaccines are still worth taking? Dr. Leana Wen: We need to start with the science and what the research shows. The Covid-19 vaccines are extraordinarily effective in preventing illness and especially severe disease....
    As koalas face a chlamydia epidemic, an Australian university research program intends to help find a cure for the furry creatures' infections down under. The Australia Zoo Wildlife Hospital began a yearlong experiment on Oct. 15, where it will use 400 koala bears to test a new vaccine against chlamydia, a sexually transmitted disease that can cause painful infections and infertility. Professor Peter Timms, the leader of the trial, is conducting the trial in an effort to rescue the increasingly endangered species, according to Reuters. BIG TECH CREATES 'MISINFORMATION' PANEL IN AUSTRALIA TO FORESTALL REGULATION "While this vaccination will directly benefit each of the animals, the trial will also have a focus on the protection provided by vaccination," Timms told the outlet. The research will take half of the 400 koalas and inject them with a single dose of the newly developed vaccine. Over the next 12 months, the 200 vaccinated koalas will be compared to the 200 unvaccinated koalas to see how many in each group are hospitalized with chlamydia symptoms, according to New...
    An Ohio woman who refuses to get the COVID-19 vaccine for religious and medical reasons was denied a life-saving transplant because she refuses to get the shot, but the hospital says she needs it as the transplant would weaken her immune system. Michelle Vitullo, 65, has been going to the Cleveland Clinic for treatment for her stage 4 liver disease since 2019. At that stage, the liver is permanently damaged and many of its cells turn into scar tissue.  But she has refused to get the vaccine for religious reasons, and also over fears it could damage her health, with that stance now derailing an urgently-needed transplant. Despite the drama, Vitullo is still refusing to have the vaccine, and is now hoping another hospital might perform the procedure instead.   Michelle Vitullo, 65, has stage 4 liver disease and was denied a lifesaving transplant this month Vitullo was initially excited on learning that her daughter Angela Green was an exact match.  Doctors were set to remove part of her liver and use it to save her mother when the entire procedure...
    by Stanley Stepanic, University of Virginia The vampire is a common image in today's pop culture, and one that takes many forms: from Alucard, the dashing spawn of Dracula in the PlayStation game “Castlevania: Symphony of the Night"; to Edward, the romantic, idealistic lover in the “Twilight" series. In many respects, the vampire of today is far removed from its roots in Eastern European folklore. As a professor of Slavic studies who has taught a course on vampires called “Dracula" for more than a decade, I'm always fascinated by the vampire's popularity, considering its origins – as a demonic creature strongly associated with disease.Explaining the unknownThe first known reference to vampires appeared in written form in Old Russian in A.D. 1047, soon after Orthodox Christianity moved into Eastern Europe. The term for vampire was “upir," which has uncertain origins, but its possible literal meaning was “the thing at the feast or sacrifice," referring to a potentially dangerous spiritual entity that people believed could appear at rituals for the dead. It was a euphemism used to avoid speaking the creature's name...