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    CHICAGO (CBS) — In Washington on Tuesday, U.S. House Democrats are expected to give final approval to the $1.9 trillion COVID relief bill, which the Senate passed on Saturday. U.S. Sen. Dick Durbin (D-Illinois) held a virtual news conference Sunday to discuss key elements of the American Rescue Plan. READ MORE: Police From City, Suburbs Hold Seminar To Help People Avoid Becoming Carjacking Victims “The people in Illinois, like people across this nation, have three priorities – stop this pandemic in its tracks; second, get the economy moving again and people back to work; and third, get the kids back in school, Durbin said. “Those are the three top priorities in every household across our state, and they are priorities that were served with this American Rescue Plan.” Under the new plan, Illinois will receive $275 million in vaccine distribution money, $1.5 billion for COVID testing, and $100 million for...
    Loading the player... Democratic Senator Joe Manchin of West Virginia has defended his vote which resulted in reduced unemployment benefits in President Joe Biden’s $1.9 trillion COVID-19 stimulus bill.  Manchin appeared on ABC’s This Week on Sunday, during which host Martha Raddatz noted that he “brought the Senate to a standstill for 10 hours on Friday, threatened to side with Republicans and did not budge until a call from the president and significant concessions were made.” An earlier report from theGrio noted that the Senate package was delayed repeatedly as Democrats made eleventh-hour changes aimed at balancing demands by their competing moderate and progressive factions. As reported by Newsweek, Biden’s original stimulus proposal offered $400 in additional weekly unemployment benefits through August. Manchin pushed to lower the amount to $300 and shorten the payout by one month. Read More: Biden, Dems prevail as Senate OKs $1.9 trillion virus relief...
    Fox News' Chris Wallace asked Joe Manchin if he is 'enjoying your position of power maybe a little too much' as the centrist Democrat has made himself the center of media spotlight by pushing for bipartisanship in the Senate on the COVID-19 relief package. 'Do you like being the most powerful member of Congress, the swing vote in a 50/50 senate? Do you like that, sir?' the 'Fox News Sunday' host asked the West Virginia Democratic senator. 'No, I do not and I did not lobby for this, did not seek it out,' Manchin insisted. Wallace pushed by pointing out that Manchin has killed several Democratic initiatives in the package and said: 'You are on four Sunday shows today.' He then asked the senator: 'Are you enjoying your position of power maybe a little too much?' 'I sure hope not,' Manchin insisted. 'Oh, my goodness. That would be horrible. That's...
    Sen. Joe ManchinJoseph (Joe) ManchinSunday shows preview: Manchin makes the rounds after pivotal role in coronavirus relief debate Biden takes victory lap after Senate passes coronavirus relief package Schumer insists Democrats unified after chaotic coronavirus debate MORE (D-W.V.) on Sunday shot down suggestions that Senate Democrats are now forced to cater to him as he has become one of the most prominent moderate lawmakers in a 50-50 Senate. While appearing on ABC’s “This Week” host Martha Raddatz asked Manchin if he believed Democrats must cater to a “Joe Manchin agenda” after he stalled on a vote on enhanced unemployment benefits included in the $1.9 trillion stimulus bill passed on Saturday. “Not at all, no. I didn’t lobby for this position. I’ve never changed, Martha. I’m the same person I have been all my life and since I’ve been in the public offices, I’m the same. I’ve been voting the same...
    CHICAGO (CBS Chicago/CBS News) — The U.S. Senate on Saturday approved President Joe Biden’s $1.9 trillion coronavirus relief package. As CBS 2’s Marissa Parra reported, this newest step comes as 11.4 million Americans are at risk of losing their unemployment benefits in the coming weeks. READ MORE: Man Found Dead With Gunshot To Back At Scene Of Englewood Fire The final vote was 50-49, with all Democrats voting in favor of the bill and all Republicans voting against it. The passage of the bill was met with cheers and applause from Democrats, celebrating the passage of one of Mr. Biden’s key priorities. Vice President Kamala Harris did not need to visit the Capitol to break any ties, as GOP Senator Dan Sullivan (R-Alaska) left due to a family emergency on Friday. Democrats took a victory lap after the passage of the bill, with Senate Majority Leader Charles Schumer (D-New York)...
    Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-NY) held open a vote on a minimum wage amendment Friday to buy time to save the $1.9 trillion coronavirus package after Sen. Joe Manchin (D-WV) raised an unforeseen objection. The objection caused the longest vote in history, 11 hours and 50 minutes. The vote was finally closed at 10:53 p.m. With the help of President Biden, it took Schumer nearly nine hours to negotiate a deal with Manchin. Under the deal, laid-off workers will receive $300-a-week federal unemployment benefits on top of their state benefits until September 6, 2021. And the first $10,200 in unemployment benefits received in 2020 will be tax-free for households with less than $150,000 in annual income. After the deal was struck, the Senate had to wait for the legislative text to be drafted and for a cost estimate from the Congressional Budget Office. The vote broke the record set on June 28, 2019, when senators kept...
    The Senate passed Democrats' $1.9 trillion coronavirus relief bill on Saturday afternoon, bringing the historic rescue package backed by President Joe Biden one step closer to becoming law about a week before federal unemployment benefits are set to run out. The strictly party-line vote came after senators pulled an all-nighter to work through multiple amendments, a session known as a vote-a-rama, after a 12-hour delay on Friday by Democrats to get Sen. Joe Manchin of West Virginia to support their deal on unemployment insurance. At the conclusion of the marathon session more than 24 hours later, the Senate moved to final passage in a 50-49 vote with no Republicans backing the legislation, which will be sent back to the House this week to vote on Senate changes before it can make its way to Biden's desk. Democrats are racing to get the rescue package, one of the largest in U.S....
    The Senate passed a massive coronavirus aid spending bill Saturday after hours of debate on GOP amendments and a protracted fight among Democrats over unemployment benefits. The $1.9 trillion legislation heads back to the House, where Speaker Nancy Pelosi must sell the measure to her liberal faction of Democrats who are likely to oppose changes made in the Senate. The bill passed 50 to 49, with one Senator, Republican Dan Sullivan of Alaska, absent. While the House passed the bill last week, Senate Democrats made significant changes to appease party moderates and adhere to Senate rules that allowed them to pass the bill without any Republican support. Democrats stripped out a provision that would have mandated a $15 minimum wage and agreed to reduce monthly enhanced jobless pay from $400 to $300. The changes have angered the party’s liberal base, including those in the House Democratic Caucus,...
    Bleary-eyed lawmakers have pulled an all-nighter to vote on President Biden's $1.9trillion stimulus bill - as Democrats were blasted by their own party for 'sending money to fewer people' than Trump, cutting direct payments, reducing unemployment benefits and failing on the $15 minimum wage.  The Senate commenced a dreaded 'vote-a-thon' - a continuous series of votes on amendments - shortly before midnight on Friday, and by midmorning Saturday had dispensed with over two dozen. Democrats were hoping for final passage by around midday so the Senate could send the modestly revamped bill back to the House, and then to Biden this coming week for his signature. Progressive Democrats are angry at the size of the package, with Ilhan Omar calling it 'very disappointing'. She added: 'We obviously are now ultimately sending money to less people than the Trump administration.'  It came as Democratic Senator for Arizona Kyrsten Sinema was slammed by...
    The Senate worked through the night from Friday to Saturday at dawn, until a deal on the $ 1.9 trillion rescue package between the leaders and moderate Senator Joe Manchin around emergency benefits for the unemployed allowed to overcome an impasse. The compromise, announced by the West Virginia legislator and a Democratic aide, appeared to pave the way for the Senate to launch a marathon of key voting and eventually pass the sweeping legislation. The bill, which is President Joe Biden’s top legislative priority, seeks to combat the deadly pandemic and help the ailing economy recover. It will offer direct payments of up to $ 1,400 to most Americans and money for coronavirus screenings and vaccines, as well as aid to state and local governments, schools and the airline industry, and subsidies for health insurance. Shortly before midnight, the Senate quickly began to tackle a series of amendments....
    Alex Wong | Getty Images News | Getty Images Democrats are rushing to pass a $1.9 trillion pandemic aid bill by next week and get it to President Joe Biden in time to prevent a gap in unemployment benefits. It's perhaps too late to stop that from happening, according to some experts. "The unfortunate reality is, we waited a little too long," said Elizabeth Pancotti, an unemployment expert and policy advisor at Employ America. "They needed a bill to [President Biden] by about Valentine's Day." Lawmakers are racing to pass relief legislation by March 14. The Continued Assistance Act, passed in December, extended benefits to that date. Absent another extension, millions of long-term unemployed would lose income support — falling off the so-called benefits cliff. More from Personal Finance:Some workers never got the last round of extended benefitsThere are new PPP rules for self-employed and gig workersWith 4 million Americans...
    March 6, 2021 8:39 AM | With information from EFE 15 minutes. The US Senate resumed this Friday shortly before midnight the approval of the rescue of 1.9 trillion dollars to face the economic devastation caused by the pandemic after more than 12 hours of blockage in the Upper House for last minute negotiations in the Democratic ranks. The protagonist of the negotiation was Senator Joe Manchin, the closest to the Republicans among the Democrats, who challenged the unemployment benefits proposal that the bailout project carried and seemed at times to align himself with the opposition. Ultimately, the Democrats managed to win back Manchin by lowering the unemployment benefit from $ 400 to $ 300 a week, which will run until Sept. 6, instead of Sept. 30. This is the latest downgrade to the bill promoted by the White House after direct payments of $ 1,400 to people with incomes...
    Kids still arent learning LGBTQ history. The Equality Act might change that. Taliban says met with US envoy in Doha © Provided by The Motley Fool Senate Finance Chair Plans to 'Fight Like Hell' to Extend Jobless Benefits an Extra Month © Getty Images A line of people standing in front of a building labeled Job Center. Lawmakers are trying to push a $1.9 trillion coronavirus relief proposal forward. So far, that relief bill has passed a House vote and now needs Senate approval to get signed into law. But one Democratic senator isn't happy about the way unemployment benefits will be dished out under the bill. In fact, Senate Finance Committee Chair Ron Wyden says it's a "prescription for trouble" to end jobless benefits for the long-term unemployed on Aug. 29, which is what the House bill calls for.Cutting off jobless benefits a month early could leave many...
    Senators worked throughout the night Friday into Saturday as the chamber considered various amendments to the $1.9 trillion coronavirus relief package, with a vote expected later in the day. The chamber is holding a marathon voting session known as a vote-a-rama, where any senator can force a vote on potential changes to the mammoth relief package. Democrats have rejected a series of proposed GOP changes to the bill. Debate was held up on Friday for nearly 12 hours as Democratic leaders scrambled to save the relief proposal, the first major piece of legislation pushed by President BidenJoe BidenSenate holds longest vote in history as Democrats scramble to save relief bill Ex-Trump appointee arrested in Capitol riot complains he won't be able to sleep in jail Biden helps broker Senate deal on unemployment benefits MORE since he took office. Presiding over the Senate as we work to pass President Biden's Rescue Plan. No matter how long...
    WASHINGTON -- Senate leaders and moderate Democratic Sen. Joe Manchin struck a deal over emergency jobless benefits, breaking a logjam that had stalled the party's showpiece $1.9 trillion COVID-19 relief bill.The compromise, announced by the West Virginia lawmaker and a Democratic aide late Friday, seemed to clear the way for the Senate to begin a climactic, marathon series of votes and, eventually, approval of the sweeping legislation.The overall bill, President Joe Biden's foremost legislative priority, is aimed at battling the killer pandemic and nursing the staggered economy back to health. It would provide direct payments of up to $1,400 to most Americans and money for COVID-19 vaccines and testing, aid to state and local governments, help for schools and the airline industry and subsidies for health insurance.Shortly before midnight, the Senate began to take up a variety of amendments in rapid-fire fashion. The votes were mostly on Republican proposals virtually...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — Senate leaders and moderate Democratic Sen. Joe Manchin struck a deal over emergency jobless benefits, breaking a logjam that had stalled the party’s showpiece $1.9 trillion COVID-19 relief bill. The compromise, announced by the West Virginia lawmaker and a Democratic aide late Friday, seemed to clear the way for the Senate to begin a climactic, marathon series of votes and, eventually, approval of the sweeping legislation. The overall bill, President Joe Biden’s foremost legislative priority, is aimed at battling the killer pandemic and nursing the staggered economy back to health. It would provide direct payments of up to $1,400 to most Americans and money for COVID-19 vaccines and testing, aid to state and local governments, help for schools and the airline industry and subsidies for health insurance. Shortly before midnight, the Senate began to take up a variety of amendments in rapid-fire fashion. The votes were mostly...
    By ALAN FRAM, Associated Press WASHINGTON (AP) — Senate leaders and moderate Democratic Sen. Joe Manchin struck a deal over emergency jobless benefits, breaking a logjam that had stalled the party's showpiece $1.9 trillion COVID-19 relief bill. The compromise, announced by the West Virginia lawmaker and a Democratic aide late Friday, seemed to clear the way for the Senate to begin a climactic, marathon series of votes and, eventually, approval of the sweeping legislation. The overall bill, President Joe Biden’s foremost legislative priority, is aimed at battling the killer pandemic and nursing the staggered economy back to health. It would provide direct payments of up to $1,400 to most Americans and money for COVID-19 vaccines and testing, aid to state and local governments, help for schools and the airline industry and subsidies for health insurance. The Senate next faced votes on a pile of amendments that were likely to last...
    Senate Republicans are getting what's expected to be a short-lived win in a fight over unemployment benefits in Democrats' nearly $1.9 trillion coronavirus bill. Sen. Joe ManchinJoseph (Joe) ManchinOvernight Defense: Capitol Police may ask National Guard to stay | Biden's Pentagon policy nominee faces criticism | Naval Academy midshipmen moved to hotels Progressives won't oppose bill over limits on stimulus checks Senate votes to take up COVID-19 relief bill MORE (D-W.Va.) voted with all 49 Republican senators — Sen. Dan SullivanDaniel Scott SullivanThe Hill's Morning Report - Presented by The AIDS Institute - Finger-pointing on Capitol riot; GOP balks at Biden relief plan Sanders votes against Biden USDA nominee Vilsack Senate confirms Vilsack as Agriculture secretary MORE (Alaska) is absent due to a family emergency — in support of a proposal from Sen. Rob PortmanRobert (Rob) Jones PortmanMandel gets Club for Growth nod in Ohio Senate primary Rick Scott caught in...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — Senate Democrats came out with their version of the $1.9 trillion coronavirus relief bill. A look at some of the major changes in the bill now being considered by the Senate versus what passed the House last week. WHO GETS A CHECK President Joe Biden and Senate Democrats have agreed to tighten eligibility for the $1,400 payments. Under the House bill, the cash payment would phase out for singles with incomes between $75,000 and $100,000. But under the Senate bill, the phaseout stops at $80,000. Under the House bill, the cash payment for married couples phased out between $150,000 and $200,000. But under the Senate bill, the phaseout stops at $160,000. Most Americans will still be getting the full amount under either bill. The median household income was $68,703 in 2019, according to the U.S. Census Bureau. Roughly 8 million fewer households will get a check...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — Senate leaders and moderate Democratic Sen. Joe Manchin struck a deal late Friday over emergency jobless benefits, breaking a nine-hour logjam that had stalled the party’s showpiece $1.9 trillion COVID-19 relief bill. The compromise, announced by the West Virginia lawmaker and a Democratic aide, seemed to clear the way for the Senate to begin a climactic, marathon series of votes expected to lead to approval of the sweeping legislation. The overall bill, President Joe Biden’s top legislative priority, is aimed at battling the killer pandemic and nursing the staggered economy back to health. It would provide direct payments of up to $1,400 to most Americans and money for COVID-19 vaccines and testing, aid to state and local governments, help for schools and the airline industry and subsidies for health insurance. While the Senate next faced votes on a pile of amendments that were likely to go overnight,...
    Senate Democrats reached a deal with key centrists, including Joe Manchin, on a $1.9 trillion spending package to extend enhanced federal unemployment benefits until Sept. 6 but lower them from $400 to $300 per week while making the first $10,600 nontaxable. The deal will help Democrats pass the spending package without the help of GOP senators, who are expected to oppose it. Manchin had been holding out, hoping to reduce a proposed $400-per-week enhanced federal jobless payment to $300. He succeeded, in part by agreeing to an extension of the unemployment pay from late August to Sept. 6. Manchin also agreed to a deal that would make the first $10,600 in jobless pay non-taxable for incomes less than $150,000. CRUZ PROPOSING AMENDMENT TO CORONAVIRUS RELIEF PACKAGE BARRING ILLEGAL IMMIGRANTS FROM RECEIVING STIMULUS CHECKS Democrats said the deal avoids an “August cliff,” when benefits were originally scheduled to expire, by adding...
    WASHINGTON -- Senate leaders and moderate Democratic Sen. Joe Manchin struck a deal late Friday over emergency jobless benefits, breaking a nine-hour logjam that had stalled the party's showpiece $1.9 trillion COVID-19 relief bill.The compromise, announced by the West Virginia lawmaker and a Democratic aide, seemed to clear the way for the Senate to begin a climactic, marathon series of votes expected to lead to approval of the sweeping legislation.In a statement made by White House Press Secretary Jen Psaki, she says "The President supports the compromise agreement, and is grateful to all the Senators who worked so hard to reach this outcome. It extends supplemental unemployment benefit into September, and helps the vast majority of unemployment insurance recipients avoid unanticipated tax bills. Most importantly, this agreement allows us to move forward on the urgently needed American Rescue Plan, with $1400 relief checks, funding we need to finish the vaccine...
    WASHINGTON -- Senate leaders and moderate Democratic Sen. Joe Manchin struck a deal late Friday over emergency jobless benefits, breaking a nine-hour logjam that had stalled the party's showpiece $1.9 trillion COVID-19 relief bill.The compromise, announced by the West Virginia lawmaker and a Democratic aide, seemed to clear the way for the Senate to begin a climactic, marathon series of votes expected to lead to approval of the sweeping legislation.In a statement made by White House Press Secretary Jen Psaki, she says "The President supports the compromise agreement, and is grateful to all the Senators who worked so hard to reach this outcome. It extends supplemental unemployment benefit into September, and helps the vast majority of unemployment insurance recipients avoid unanticipated tax bills. Most importantly, this agreement allows us to move forward on the urgently needed American Rescue Plan, with $1400 relief checks, funding we need to finish the vaccine...
    More On: joe manchin Senate vote on $1.9T stimulus stalled by swing Democrat Manchin on unemployment White House pressed on Tanden’s teetering nomination Manchin opposes Biden OMB pick Neera Tanden’s confirmation over nasty tweets Biden partisan ‘relief’ push puts Democrats’ desires ahead of the nation’s needs WASHINGTON (AP) — Senate leaders and moderate Democratic Sen. Joe Manchin struck a deal late Friday over emergency jobless benefits, breaking a nine-hour logjam that had stalled the party’s showpiece $1.9 trillion COVID-19 relief bill. The compromise, announced by the West Virginia lawmaker and a Democratic aide, seemed to clear the way for the Senate to begin a climactic, marathon series of votes expected to lead to approval of the sweeping legislation. The overall bill, President Joe Biden’s top legislative priority, is aimed at battling the killer pandemic and nursing the staggered economy back to health. It would provide direct payments of up...
    One of President BidenJoe BidenTrump State Department appointee arrested in connection with Capitol riot FireEye finds evidence Chinese hackers exploited Microsoft email app flaw since January Biden officials to travel to border amid influx of young migrants MORE’s biggest selling points on the 2020 campaign trail was that he knows how Washington, and more specifically the Senate, works and could get things done. On Friday evening he delivered when he helped break an eight-hour stalemate between centrist Sen. Joe ManchinJoseph (Joe) ManchinOvernight Defense: Capitol Police may ask National Guard to stay | Biden's Pentagon policy nominee faces criticism | Naval Academy midshipmen moved to hotels Progressives won't oppose bill over limits on stimulus checks Senate votes to take up COVID-19 relief bill MORE (D-W.Va.) and other Democrats on extending unemployment benefits beyond March 14, when they are currently due to expire. Under the deal, laid-off workers will receive $300-a-week federal unemployment...
    WASHINGTON -- Senate leaders and moderate Democratic Sen. Joe Manchin struck a deal late Friday over emergency jobless benefits, breaking a nine-hour logjam that had stalled the party's showpiece $1.9 trillion COVID-19 relief bill.The compromise, announced by the West Virginia lawmaker and a Democratic aide, seemed to clear the way for the Senate to begin a climactic, marathon series of votes expected to lead to approval of the sweeping legislation.The overall bill, President Joe Biden's top legislative priority, is aimed at battling the killer pandemic and nursing the staggered economy back to health. It would provide direct payments of up to $1,400 to most Americans and money for COVID-19 vaccines and testing, aid to state and local governments, help for schools and the airline industry and subsidies for health insurance.While the Senate next faced votes on a pile of amendments that were likely to go overnight, Democratic leaders' agreement with...
    WASHINGTON (CBS/AP) — Delaware Sens. Tom Carper and Chris Coons joined six other Democrats to vote against a $15 per hour minimum wage on Friday. The amendment was introduced by Independent Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders. Eight Democrats and all 50 Republicans voted no on the amendment. Sen. Joe Manchin of West Virginia, Sen. Kyrsten Sinema of Arizona, Sen. Jeanne Shaheen of New Hampshire, Sen. Maggie Hassan of New Hampshire, Sen. Jon Tester of Montana and Independent Sen. Angus King of Maine, who has caucused with Democrats since 2013, joined Carper and Coons in voting no. READ MORE: Jackson Kostolsky, Of Allentown, Charged For Alleged Role In US Capitol Riot Meanwhile, Senate leaders and Manchin struck a deal late Friday over emergency jobless benefits, breaking a nine-hour logjam that had stalled the party’s showpiece $1.9 trillion COVID-19 relief bill. The compromise, announced by the West Virginia lawmaker and a Democratic aide,...
    By Alan Fram | Associated Press WASHINGTON — Senate leaders and moderate Democratic Sen. Joe Manchin struck a deal late Friday over emergency jobless benefits, breaking a nine-hour logjam that had stalled the party’s showpiece $1.9 trillion COVID-19 relief bill. The compromise, announced by the West Virginia lawmaker and a Democratic aide, seemed to clear the way for the Senate to begin a climactic, marathon series of votes expected to lead to approval of the sweeping legislation. The overall bill, President Joe Biden’s top legislative priority, is aimed at battling the killer pandemic and nursing the staggered economy back to health. It would provide direct payments of up to $1,400 to most Americans and money for COVID-19 vaccines and testing, aid to state and local governments, help for schools and the airline industry and subsidies for health insurance. With 10 million fewer jobs since the pandemic struck a...
    WASHINGTON - Democrats laid aside one battle over boosting the minimum wage but promptly descended into another internal fight Friday as the party haltingly tried moving its $1.9 trillion COVID-19 relief bill through the Senate. Hours after asserting they'd reached a deal between party moderates and progressives over renewing emergency unemployment benefits, lawmakers said Sen. Joe Manchin, D-W.Va., now preferred a less generous Republican version of the payments. Manchin is probably the chamber's most conservative Democratic, and a kingmaker in a 50-50 Senate that leaves his party without a vote to spare. With Democrats' scanty majorities — they have a mere 10-vote House edge — the party can't tilt too far to the center without losing progressive support. The episode tossed fresh complications into the Democrats' drive to give quick approval to a relief bill that is President Joe Biden's top legislative goal. And while they still seemed likely...
    Senate Democrats have reached a deal on unemployment payments after an hours-long delay snagged the nearly $1.9 trillion coronavirus relief bill. Democrats will offer a proposal to provide a $300 per week unemployment payment through Sept. 6, according to a Democratic aide. The deal would also make the first $10,200 of benefits non-taxable for households with an income less than $150,000. The deal comes as the Senate has been stuck in limbo for hours as Democrats tried to craft an agreement that could get 50 votes within the caucus. Sen. Joe ManchinJoseph (Joe) ManchinOvernight Defense: Capitol Police may ask National Guard to stay | Biden's Pentagon policy nominee faces criticism | Naval Academy midshipmen moved to hotels Progressives won't oppose bill over limits on stimulus checks Senate votes to take up COVID-19 relief bill MORE (D-W.Va.), who was at the center of the hours-long hold up, threw his support behind the new deal. “We...
    Let our journalists help you make sense of the noise: Subscribe to the Mother Jones Daily newsletter and get a recap of news that matters.In their effort to pass a $1.9 trillion stimulus, senators are getting hung up on unemployment benefits. The stimulus bill passed in the House would increase weekly unemployment payments from $300 to $400 and extend their duration through August. (They’re currently set to lapse on March 14.) But Sen. Joe Manchin III (D-W.Va.), a crucial vote in a divided Senate, opposes higher unemployment payments. So Sen. Thomas Carper (D-Del.) came up with a compromise: Keep the payments at $300, extend them through September, and make the first $10,200 in benefits nontaxable. Sounds great, right? Not so fast. Sen. Rob Portman (R-Ohio) had another idea, which Manchin seems to be considering: Ditch the tax break, keep the payments at $300, and halt the payments at the end...
    Senate negotiations on President Joe Biden’s nearly $2 trillion coronavirus relief package ground to a halt Friday after Democrats failed to unanimously agree on a compromise on weekly unemployment benefits. At the heart of the stalemate is West Virginia Democratic Sen. Joe Manchin, who has yet to agree to Senate Democrats’ unemployment benefits proposal. Delaware Democratic Sen. Tom Carper readied an amendment lowering weekly unemployment benefits from $400 — as included in the House of Representatives’ version of the bill — to $300, and extended them through September instead of August. But Manchin has signaled that he is open to supporting another amendment offered by Ohio Republican Sen. Rob Portman, CNN reported, which mirrors Senate Democrats’ plan but would only offer $300 benefits through July 18. In the 50-50 Senate, Democrats would need the support of every member of their caucus to pass Carper’s amendment, assuming every Republican votes against...
    New York : The new proposal would allow to extend the extra unemployment benefits until September. Photo: OLIVIER DOULIERY / . / . Democrats in the Senate agreed this Friday reduce supplemental federal unemployment benefits for the next stimulus bill from $ 400 to $ 300 per week. The version approved last week by the House of Representatives would have authorized supplemental federal unemployment benefits of $ 400 a week that would be distributed until August. Despite the fact that the US economy recovered in February where more than 379,000 jobs were added, still exist near 9.5 million fewer jobs than a year ago, according to figures from the Labor Department released this Friday. Modifications The change that Democrats agreed to on Friday would lower the weekly supplement to $ 300, But it would extend unemployment benefits for one more month, this time until September....
    New York : Despite the economic recovery, there are still some 9.5 million fewer jobs than a year ago. Photo: SAUL LOEB / . / . This Friday the United States government reported that the US economy added 379,000 jobs last month. In February The economy appears to have recovered as states lifted some of the restrictions and vaccination efforts were intensified. However, despite the recovery, there are still some 9.5 million fewer jobs than a year ago. This weekend, Congress continues to discuss the $ 1.9 trillion stimulus package to help households and businesses struggling from the coronavirus pandemic. The unemployment rate in February was 6.2%, below the rate of the previous month, 6.3%. But, as the Federal Reserve and some administration officials have pointed out, that number understates the extent of the damage. Most of the gains in February were in the service...
    DeSantis denies involvement in vaccine drive following revelation of $250,000 PAC donation from former Illinois governor Ex-Dallas cop facing capital murder charges was kept on the job to not arouse suspicion of investigation For nearly two months Amy Taulbee has been waiting for her unemployment checks to resume. © Michael Clevenger/Courier Journal Hundreds wait in line to get their unemployment insurance claims resolved at the education center at the Kentucky State Capitol on Wednesday, June 17, 2020. She was receiving benefits last year through the federal Pandemic Unemployment Assistance program, but when it ended in late December, so did payments. Load Error After Congress extended the program, Kentucky required PUA recipients to refile their claims, which Taulbee did in mid-January. Start the day smarter. Get all the news you need in your inbox each morning. She uploaded financial records to her online unemployment account, as requested by the...
    DEMOCRATS have agreed to cut the weekly unemployment benefits for struggling Americans to $300. The last-minute change is to lower the benefits by $100 but extended them another month, till September. 2Democrats have decided to lower the benefits by $100Credit: Getty Images The first $10,200 of unemployment benefits would be exempt from federal income tax. The previous version of the bill included unemployment benefits of $400 per week through August. According to CNN, the amendment will be introduced by Sen. Tom Carper during the Senate’s voting session. White House press secretary Jen Psaki tweeted that Joe Biden supports the extension of benefits Her tweet reads: "The President believes it is critical to extend expanded unemployment benefits through the end of September to help Americans who are struggling, as the President proposed in the American Rescue Plan. "The compromise amendment achieves that while helping to address the surprise tax bills...
    Democrats have agreed to extend enhanced unemployment insurance through September with a smaller boost to benefits, according to multiple media reports. The legislation would put the enhancement at $300 per week, down from $400 in the version passed by the House, but would extend the enhancement through September from the earlier draft’s August end date. The deal also makes $10,200 of unemployment benefits exempt from taxes, providing relief to families who might have faced an unexpected tax bill. This compromise is a great result. https://t.co/jMdKYJyDUG — Ronald Klain (@WHCOS) March 5, 2021 White House chief of staff Ronald Klain applauded the changes on Friday. Some Democratic Senators have worried that providing too much enhancement could prompt out-of-work Americans to avoid returning to work because they receive more from unemployment insurance than they would in wages. There is still some chance that this deal will not hold. Republicans have proposed an...
    Volunteers load shopping bags with food assistance for laid off workers at a food distribution event on Dec. 12, 2020 in Orlando, Florida.Paul Hennessy/NurPhoto via Getty Images Democrats are poised to send more unemployment benefits to laid-off workers. Meanwhile, some workers are still waiting on the last tranche, authorized months ago. A $900 billion Covid relief bill signed Dec. 27 extended jobless benefits to March 14 and raised them by $300 a week. In Wisconsin, officials estimate self-employed and gig workers won't get that extra aid until at least April 21 — almost four months later. Zoom In IconArrows pointing outwards Other workers who had exhausted their state benefits just began receiving the extended aid on Thursday, according to Wisconsin's Department of Workforce Development. Other states, like California and Colorado, only began paying benefits to some groups recently. Workers who experience delays will get back pay for the missed weeks...
    (CNN)Jobless Americans will get a smaller weekly boost to unemployment benefits but will receive those payments for an additional month under a last-minute revision of the Senate's $1.9 trillion coronavirus relief package on Friday.More on Covid-19 relief A guide to what you can expect to get from the $1.9 trillion Senate stimulus Senate bill will narrow income eligibility for $1,400 stimulus checks Here's what 'vote-a-rama' is (and what it means for Biden's stimulus There's a race to pass the stimulus by March 14. Here's what's at stake The bill, which now differs from the House version passed last week, calls for providing a $300 a week federal enhancement and for extending two key pandemic jobless benefits programs through September.The agreement would also make the first $10,200 worth of benefits tax-free.This is a significant change from the House bill, which would provide an extra $400 a week through August 29...
    WASHINGTON -- Democrats agreed Friday to pare back emergency jobless benefits but extend them for an extra month, bidding to solidify support as the Senate approached a voting marathon on a $1.9 trillion COVID-19 relief bill.The deal came as the chamber worked toward approving a final version of the massive package, probably over the weekend, of President Joe Biden's top legislative priority. That would give the House time to approve the legislation and whisk it to Biden for his signature.First, the Senate was preparing to vote on a mountain of amendments, mostly by GOP opponents. Virtually all are destined to fail but are designed to force Democrats to take politically awkward votes.Among them, though, was a Democratic plan that was expected to pass that would trim the House bill's $400 weekly emergency unemployment benefits.Under the compromise, those payments - payable on top of regular state benefits - would be reduced...
    Food is loaded as drivers in their vehicles wait in line on arrival at a "Let's Feed LA County" food distribution hosted by the Los Angeles Food Bank on Dec. 4, 2020 in Hacienda Heights, California.FREDERIC J. BROWN | AFP | Getty Images Long-term joblessness is nearing a record, as Washington lawmakers rush to pass another pandemic aid package ahead of a benefits cliff for the long-term unemployed. Long-term unemployment is a period of at least six months without a job. It's an especially risky stretch of joblessness relative to household finances, say some economists. About 4.1 million unemployed Americans were long-term unemployed in February — up by about 3 million people over the past year, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Zoom In IconArrows pointing outwards Such workers accounted for 41.5% of all jobless workers last month, according to the agency, which issued its monthly jobs report on...
    New jobless claims in New Hampshire dropped again last week, as the state's pandemic-battered labor market continues to improve. At least 2,196 new applications for benefits were filed for the week that ended Feb. 27 – a decrease of 737 from the previous week, according to the U.S. Department of Labor's weekly report. There were 41 new claims last week for Pandemic Unemployment Assistance, a federally backed program that covers workers ineligible for traditional unemployment benefits. That's an increase of 16 from the previous week. Meanwhile, 24,977 continuing claims – which lag behind a week but are viewed as a barometer of the unemployment situation – were filed in the week ending Feb. 20, declining by 621 over the previous week. The state has paid out more than $1.8 billion in federal and state unemployment benefits since mid-March, when the COVID-19 outbreak began. New Hampshire's jobless rate crept up slightly...
    SAN ANSELMO, Calif. -- A Bay Area man tried to do the right thing when the Employment Development Department accidentally overpaid his benefits. His efforts to return the money set off a chain of unfortunate events that he's still trying to unwind months later.The construction worker now regrets even applying for unemployment. All Mathew Lombardi can do is laugh about his problem.Like so many others, he lost his job as a construction supervisor of a San Francisco project back in March.It was the first time he has ever been out of work. He wasn't sure if the trouble of filing for benefits would be worth it."But when the federal government chipped in that extra $600 per week, I felt it was beneficial," he said.RELATED: Third stimulus check updates: Senate nears votes on $1.9T COVID relief billEMBED More News Videos The Senate is steering toward a voting marathon on Democrats' $1.9...
    Senate Democrats are nearing an agreement within their caucus to reduce the plus-up in federal unemployment benefits in the COVID-19 relief bill to $300 from the $400 included in the House bill. Democratic centrists led by Sens. Joe ManchinJoseph (Joe) ManchinOvernight Defense: Capitol Police may ask National Guard to stay | Biden's Pentagon policy nominee faces criticism | Naval Academy midshipmen moved to hotels Progressives won't oppose bill over limits on stimulus checks Senate votes to take up COVID-19 relief bill MORE (D-W.Va.) and Tom CarperThomas (Tom) Richard CarperBiden to meet with bipartisan lawmakers on infrastructure Five takeaways from dramatic Capitol security hearing Democrats worry Senate will be graveyard for Biden agenda MORE (D-Del.) support keeping the weekly benefit at $300 given the cost of the $1.9 trillion relief measure.  The “contours” of the emerging deal call for keeping the weekly unemployment benefit at $300 but extending it to Oct....
    MINNEAPOLIS (WCCO) – A 58-year-old Lakeville man was charged via summons for one count of theft of unemployment insurance benefits on Wednesday. According to the criminal complaint, on July 7, the Minnesota Bureau of Criminal Apprehension received a report from a bank that Steven Schroeder was receiving funds from a Payroll Protection Program (PPP) loan and simultaneously receiving Minnesota unemployment benefits. READ MORE: 9 Months After Unrest, Local Leaders And Businesses Push For State Aid For Rebuilding Schroeder is listed as president, 100% owner, and only employee of an LLC in Lakeville, at his residence. He was working as an independent contractor for a large clothing company. He applied for a PPP loan in April of 2020, requesting a payroll loan of $8,333 a month for the program’s two and a half months, a total sum of $20,833. The loan, which he requested because of lost income due to the pandemic,...
    The Department of Justice has received reports that fraudsters are creating websites mimicking unemployment benefit websites, including state workforce agency (SWA) websites, for the purpose of unlawfully capturing consumers’ personal information. To lure consumers to these fake websites, fraudsters send spam text messages and emails purporting to be from an SWA and containing a link. The fake websites are designed to trick consumers into thinking they are applying for unemployment benefits and disclosing personally identifiable information and other sensitive data. That information can then be used by fraudsters to commit identity theft. Unless from a known and verified source, consumers should never click on links in text messages or emails claiming to be from an SWA offering the opportunity to apply for unemployment insurance benefits. Instead, anyone needing to apply for unemployment benefits should go to an official SWA website,...
    According to a Georgia Department of Labor (GDOL) report, in the past five months, almost 10,000 Georgians have returned to work, but continued to request unemployment insurance (UI) benefits without reporting new wages earned.  Per state and federal law, an individual must report gross wages (earnings before taxes and other deductions) for each week you work and claim unemployment benefits. The GDOL utilizes a quarterly wage cross-match system that alerts the agency to wages reported by employers, but not reported by claimants. Employers pay unemployment taxes that fund UI benefits when they file quarterly wage reports. “It’s good to see Georgians go back to work, but it is critical that employees report these wages to us to avoid overpayments and potential legal action,” said Georgia Labor Commissioner Mark Butler. “Reporting false information on your weekly certifications is against the law and we...
    Initial unemployment claims dropped below 100,000 last week in California for the second straight week, federal labor officials reported Thursday. Since the onset of the lockdowns in late winter 2020, the state has posted weekly jobless claims well above 100,000 for 45 out of 48 weeks. During the week that ended on Feb. 27, California workers filed about 88,130 initial claims for unemployment, down 2,340 from the 90,470 claims filed in the week ending Feb. 20, the U.S. Labor Department reported. Nationwide, initial jobless claims totaled 745,000 last week, up 9,000 from the 736,000 in claims filed the prior week. Though the pace of layoffs has eased since the year began, they remain high by historical standards. Before the virus flattened the U.S. economy a year ago, applications for unemployment aid had never topped 700,000 nationwide in any week, even during the Great Recession. All told, 4.3 million Americans are...
    A ‘gobsmacking number of students in need aren’t applying to college. Are we missing an entire generation? Ethiopia: After CNN reveals Tigray massacre UN rights chief says war crimes may have been committed Millions of workers filed for unemployment benefits in March 2020 as the Covid pandemic upended the labor market. They will soon reach the end of their "benefit year." Ordinarily, many would be disqualified from receiving more aid or would get a lesser amount per week. A $1.9 trillion Covid relief bill would prevent this from happening, experts said. © Provided by CNBC People line up to receive free food donations Nov. 19, 2020 outside the St. Charles Borromeo Church in New York. It's been almost a year since the pandemic upended the labor market and hurtled millions into unemployment. Load Error Normally, that demarcation line would spell trouble: States re-calibrate...
    Former political appointees for Donald Trump are waiting on lump-sum payouts from their saved vacation days, a Thursday report revealed, while others still need the proper forms to apply for unemployment benefits as they face challenges finding a job in Washington following the former president's departure. 'I'm sitting here going, how do I pay my rent? How do I pay my cell phone bill?' one former Commerce appointee told Politico in expressing their struggles in a post-Trump D.C. Another former Commerce official in the Trump administration said: 'I have enough money to make it a month, but when rent's due next month, what happens then? Rent in D.C. isn't cheap.' Many former Trump appointees revealed, according to the Thursday report, that they have still not received lump-sum checks in exchange for the vacation days they piled up during the administration. At least three former Commerce appointees claim they are still...
    Unemployment numbers are reported by the Bureau of Labor Statistics. (Getty Images/iStockphoto/designer491) New unemployment filings in Maryland and the District fell last week, and there was only a modest increase in initial jobless claims nationwide — but initial claims rose sharply in Virginia. Nationwide, 745,000 Americans filed for unemployment benefits for the first time during the week ending Feb. 27. Up 9,000 from the previous week. Unadjusted, excluding seasonal factors, initial claims last week totaled 748,078. The number of Americans currently receiving standard unemployment benefits fell to a pandemic low of 4.3 million. That’s 124,000 fewer than the previous week, though the Labor Department does not distinguish between benefits voluntarily ended or those that have expired. Initial claims for unemployment benefits, unadjusted, during the week ending Feb. 27 for D.C., Maryland and Virginia: D.C. Week ending Feb. 27: 938 Week ending Feb .20: 971 Maryland Week ending Feb. 27: 7.004...
    More On: unemployment benefits Jobless claims brings COVID total to nearly half US workforce Jobless claims unexpectedly rose last week amid COVID pandemic US workers file 793,000 new jobless claims amid COVID-19 crisis Yellen urges Congress to approve $1.9 trillion COVID relief plan The number of Americans seeking unemployment benefits rose slightly last week as February’s massive winter storm roiled the coronavirus-battered labor market, the feds said Thursday. The 745,000 initial jobless claims filed last week brought the total for the COVID-19 pandemic to nearly 80.4 million — a number more than twice the size of California’s population. The uptick likely had to do with the cold snap that caused widespread blackouts in Texas and other southern states, which may have caused the unexpected drop in jobless filings in the third week of February, experts say. “Inclement weather and power outages affected large areas of the country and many Americans...
    COLUMBIA, S.C. (AP) — More than 2,800 unemployment insurance claims have been sent to authorities to be investigated for fraud, South Carolina officials said. As of February 2021, officials have referred 2,855 claims to either federal or state law enforcement for possible prosecution of fraud for financial gain during the pandemic, news outlets reported. The Department of Employment and Workforce said federal programs aimed at providing pandemic relief have been “susceptible to criminals eager to take advantage of these funds." The agency said they've added new security measures and additional staff to help combat the fraudulent claims. DEW Executive Director Dan Ellzey said the agency expects charges to be filed against some of the claimants. If someone is found guilty of unemployment insurance fraud, they will be disqualified from receiving benefits for up to a year, officials said. Guilty parties will also have to repay the benefits and may face...
    FRESNO, Calif. (AP) — A California prisoner is one of two people accused of stealing more than $100,000 in unemployment benefits in the latest allegation related to what authorities say is a multibillion-dollar fraud aided by lax safeguards at a state agency. Alana Powers, 45, an inmate at the Central California Women’s Facility in Chowchilla, was indicted by a federal grand jury last week, along with 51-year-old Jason Vertz of Fresno, federal prosecutors said Wednesday. The indictment was unsealed, and Vertz was arraigned on Tuesday after his arrest, prosecutors said. They said neither has yet listed a defense attorney. Officials say the state has paid at least $11 billion in benefits to people whose identities it has been unable to verify, which they say is likely fraud. Of that, $810 million was tied to ineligible prisoners. The pair is charged with submitting several fraudulent unemployment insurance claims to the state...
    SUV in California crash entered through hole in border fence, report says Bowl Bought at Yard Sale for $35 Turns Out to Be Ancient Chinese Artifact That Could Fetch $500K © Provided by The Motley Fool Stimulus Check Update: What Comes Next for $1400 Direct Payments, Extra Unemployment Benefits © Getty Images $100 bills, a stimulus check from the U.S. Treasury, and American flags surround a COVID-19 vial. It appears that the nation may finally be making headway in the fight against the COVID-19 pandemic. Vaccines are rolling out to more and more Americans, and numbers have plateaued, at least temporarily. While there are still plenty of hurdles ahead to overcome this global pandemic, it does appear there could be light at the end of this year-long tunnel. That said, the road to full recovery is going to be a long one. Millions of Americans are still struggling to...
    MILLIONS of Americans could be sent $400 a week in unemployment benefits under the new relief bill. The Senate could begin discussing the president's $1.9trillion Covid stimulus package as soon as today, meaning the fate of the relief bill could be determined in the coming weeks. 4Joe Biden's American Rescue Plan includes enhanced unemployment benefits of up to $400 a weekCredit: Getty Images - Getty Joe Biden's $1.9trillion Covid relief package, which includes $1,400 stimulus checks, made it through the lower chamber last week by 219-212 with every Republican and two Democrats voting against the measures. As the bill currently stands, eligible Americans will receive an extra $100 in unemployment benefits. Congress wants to move quickly before the current $300 unemployment assistance - which was extended under former President Donald Trump's $900billion relief package - expires on March 14. Biden's $1.9trillion relief bill seeks to extend enhanced unemployment benefits until the end of August, as...
    New York : In 2020 scammers diverted more than $ 40 billion earmarked for unemployment benefits. Photo: Joe Raedle / . Congress is preparing to pass the stimulus bill that could be ready later this week. In the bill, Congress is required to approve another $ 260 billion in unemployment benefits. That money is expected to go through the same state systems that scammers used to divert more than $ 40 billion in pandemic aid to Americans who lost their jobs last year. Cybercrime experts warn that scams could be repeated again so have recommended that the government adopt stricter anti-fraud measures to verify the identity, employment history and location of applicantsOtherwise it could be a time of “Christmas for fraudsters”, Haywood Talcove, CEO of information company LexisNexis Risk Solutions told Los Angeles Times. Talcove said criminals have gotten smarter, but the federal government has not....
    Congress is poised to pass another quarter of a trillion dollars in COVID-19-related unemployment benefits, even though the country’s state-based mosaic system remains vulnerable to the same rampant fraud that allowed Scammers last year diverted more than $ 40 billion of aid destined for Americans in need as part of the pandemic. That means the $ 1.9 trillion stimulus package that could pass in Congress this month, including another $ 260 billion in unemployment insurance, is likely to bring another windfall for cybercriminals, including many foreigners posing as laid off workers. and they exploit loopholes created by the CARES Act, as happened last year. “It’s like Christmas for scammers,” said Haywood Talcove, CEO of information firm LexisNexis Risk Solutions, for whom the government should adopt stricter anti-fraud safeguards to verify the identity, employment history and location of applicants. . “I wouldn’t let a penny come out until the government puts...
    CHICAGO (WLS) -- A year after the pandemic, there's a new problem in Illinois' embattled unemployment system: extended benefits. Some people are having trouble getting renewed.With no work prospects during the pandemic, initial benefits for some people have stopped. They say they can't get through to unemployment, so they reached out to the ABC7 I-Team for help."I haven't had benefits, going on three months now," says Alexander Flores, who worked at McCormick Place.Due to the coronavirus, conventions started canceling in early March. Soon after, it shut down completely. Flores received unemployment benefits until November. He has been trying to re-apply ever since.SEE ALSO | Illinois IDES unemployment fraud reports top 1 million; how the scam became widespread"I'm having problem after problem after problem. I'm on a call list, I get called back, I get dropped, they don't call you back, no one seems to have an answer," he said. "Right...
    PITTSBURGH (KDKA) — We’re one year into the coronavirus pandemic and people are still struggling to secure unemployment benefits. At the same time, prosecutors say fraud is widespread. READ MORE: Kennywoods Jack Rabbit Roller Coaster Gets Squeaky Clean During Offseason KDKA first broke the news about jail inmates filing for unemployment benefits in August, but charges have also been filed against people allegedly acting as accomplices. The U.S. Attorney’s Office in Pittsburgh told KDKA Meghan Schiller that pandemic fraud is a definite problem in our area. “I think it’s important to get this word out now because, as I think you know, Congress is considering extending the federal unemployment assistance,” said Stephen Kaufman, the acting U.S. attorney for the Western District of Pennsylvania. The decision on that extension of benefits could come March 14, and Kaufman told KDKA’s Meghan Schiller that more money could mean more fraud “We’ve indicted 43...
    President Joe Biden is struggling to hold Senate Democrats together as they prepare to vote on his $1.9 trillion COVID relief plan this week. And, to make sure his legislation passes, the president is working the phones. He'll call into the Senate Democrats' weekly luncheon on Tuesday afternoon and he spoke to a group of wavering moderate senators on Monday.    'The president's focus this week and in coming weeks, until it's passed, is on the American Rescue Plan,' White House press secretary Jen Psaki said Monday.  'We've reserved time in his schedule to ensure that he can be engaged, roll up his sleeves and be personally involved in making phone calls, having more zoom meetings, potentially having people in the Oval Office, to make sure we can get this across the finish line. He will be very involved personally,' she noted.  The clock is ticking at the long-term unemployment benefit for...
    RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) — People who are unemployed in North Carolina will be required to prove they're searching for work in order to keep their jobless benefits. The Raleigh News & Observer reports that Gov. Roy Cooper issued an executive order to that effect on Monday. But people who are currently on unemployment will not be affected. The governor's order will impact only “new claimants who apply for unemployment benefits on or after March 14, 2021.” The work search requirement is typically required of everyone on unemployment. But Cooper waived that requirement a year ago when the coronavirus began. But more businesses are reopening. And federal unemployment benefits are set to expire. The governor said this change will help ensure that people are able to get help finding and landing jobs. “More jobs are being created as we begin to emerge from the pandemic, and people who are out of...
    It's still not fixed. In just two weeks, the $300 weekly unemployment insurance (UI) boost from the federal government to unemployed workers could end. At the same time, two additional emergency pandemic unemployment programs could start to wind down, expiring over the next month for about 7.3 million people. That is, if the Senate doesn't quickly pass the American Rescue Plan approved by the House last week. Everyone, including Republicans, knew that there was no way people would be back to work by mid-March—but here we are. That deadline was set by Republicans who controlled the Senate, because they refused to spend the kind of money that's necessary for the economy to recover after this pandemic and because they love to create cliffs—artificial deadlines that make governing more complicated and difficult. That happened while millions haven't received assistance they qualify for at all, the nonpartisan Century Foundation estimates. Because of aggressive...
    A group of Democratic lawmakers are calling on Joe Biden to take it upon himself to include recurring direct checks for Americans in his coronavirus recovery plan on top of the $1,400 checks included in the latest relief package. 'We urge you to include recurring direct payments and automatic unemployment insurance extensions tied to economic conditions in your Build Back Better long-term economic plan,' a Tuesday letter, spearheaded by Senate Finance Committee Chairman Ron Wyden, reads. 'This crisis is far from over, and families deserve certainty that they can put food on the table and keep a roof over their heads.' It adds: 'Families should not be at the mercy of constantly-shifting legislative timelines and ad hoc solutions.' The group of 10 Democratic senators say the Build Back Better program should fund recurring payments as well as boosted and automatic unemployment insurance benefits for those who have lost their jobs....
    TALLAHASSEE (CBSMiami/AP) — After months of tech issues and glitches, Florida officials are recommending the state’s antiquated unemployment processing system be replaced after a review confirmed it was incapable of handling the unprecedented deluge of jobless claims spawned by the coronavirus outbreak. The state’s Department of Economic Opportunity is recommending that the current system, known as CONNECT, be discarded and replaced with a more robust and modern system that employs cloud-based technology that could allow the system to more nimbly respond to increased demands. READ MORE: Miami PD Still Searching For Jackson Hospital Escapee Connected To Rough Arrest The department, which oversees the state’s unemployment system, is asking lawmakers for $73 million over the next two years to modernize the system that left hundreds of thousands of jobless Floridians without unemployment checks for weeks and sometimes months. The director of the agency, Dane Eagle, told lawmakers Monday that Florida was not...
    Hi there, MarketWatchers. Don’t miss these top stories:Personal FinanceU.S. consumers made a record number of complaints in 2020 — this was their No. 1 grievance ‘As consumers dealt with the economic fallout of the pandemic, they increasingly faced problems with financial companies.’11 million Americans face an unemployment-benefits ‘cliff’ if lawmakers don’t extend COVID-19 relief programs President Biden's stimulus package proposal would allow gig workers, independent contractors and self-employed workers to continue to collect unemployment benefits through September. How COVID-19 is keeping kids away from the dentist — especially children on Medicaid Kids with oral-health issues are more likely to experience problems at school and miss school days.‘Asian-American businesses are dealing with two viruses’: Reeling from racist incidents, many are hurting financially during COVID-19 Almost a quarter of employed Asian Americans work in hospitality and leisure, retail, or 'other services' industries like personal care.We started a homeschool pod with another...
    TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (AP) — Florida officials are recommending that the state’s antiquated unemployment processing system be replaced after a review confirmed what had long been known: a broken system full of glitches that was incapable of handling the unprecedented deluge of jobless claims spawned by the coronavirus outbreak. The state’s Department of Economic Opportunity is recommending that the current system, known as CONNECT, be discarded and replaced with a more robust and modern system that employs cloud-based technology that could allow the system to more nimbly respond to increased demands. The department, which oversees the state’s unemployment system, is asking lawmakers for $73 million over the next two years to modernize the system that left hundreds of thousands of jobless Floridians without unemployment checks for weeks and sometimes months. The director of the agency, Dane Eagle, told lawmakers Monday that Florida was not alone in its struggles. “We are far...
    By BOBBY CAINA CALVAN, Associated Press TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (AP) — Florida officials are recommending that the state's antiquated unemployment processing system be replaced after a review confirmed what had long been known: a broken system full of glitches that was incapable of handling the unprecedented deluge of jobless claims spawned by the coronavirus outbreak. The state's Department of Economic Opportunity is recommending that the current system, known as CONNECT, be discarded and replaced with a more robust and modern system that employs cloud technology. The state's Department of Economic Opportunity, the agency that oversees the state's unemployment system, is asking lawmakers to approve more than $73 million over the next two years to modernize a system that left hundreds of thousands of jobless Floridians without unemployment checks for weeks and sometimes months. The director of the agency, Dane Eagle, told lawmakers Monday that Florida was not alone in its struggles....
    According to a US Department of Labor report, Georgia ranks 22nd in the nation in timeliness for all first payments for initial unemployment insurance (UI) claims while ranking first among the top 22 states for number of claims processed. Georgia reports releasing first payments to 75.5% of claimants with initial claims within 21 days outpacing the national average of 66.4%. This USDOL metric is used to judge timeliness of payments during normal, non-pandemic times. The state’s 4,605,425 initial claims processed since March 2020 accounts for 20% of the total claims of the top 22 states on the list and is greater than the combined totals of the top seven states on the list: MN – 1.2 million, LA – 1.3 million, WY – 78,000, RI – 305,000, ND – 118,000, VA – 1.4 million, and MT – 180,000. Florida has...
    A woman walks past tents for the homeless lining a street in Los Angeles, Calif. on Feb. 1, 2021.FREDERIC J. BROWN | AFP | Getty Images More than one million Americans were lifted out of poverty in January as a result of federal stimulus checks and additional unemployment benefits, according to economists at the University of Chicago and University of Notre Dame. It's the first drop in poverty since the summer, they said, though they cautioned the gains may quickly erode absent of more relief. Federal lawmakers in December passed a $900 billion Covid-19 relief measure that offered $600 stimulus checks and a $300 weekly boost in jobless benefits. It also extended unemployment benefits to those who don't typically qualify, like self-employed and gig workers. More from Personal Finance:Relief bill would make health insurance more affordable for millionsCovid relief may trigger cuts to Medicare, higher student loan feesYou may be...
    New York : If the new stimulus package is approved by the Senate, more extra money will be given to the unemployed. Photo: Karolina Grabowska / Pexels The $ 1.9 billion relief package was approved by the House of Representatives this week. In the bill a third stimulus check is contemplated, but also unemployment checks of $ 400 extra per week that would be delivered until August of this year. This is important to be approved as soon as possible, since the extra $ 300 a week that is currently being given in unemployment benefits will expire on March 14. If the relief package is approved by the Senate, unemployed people will be able to receive $ 400 a week to support their expenses during the current crisis caused by the coronavirus. This would be an increase of $ 100 dollars compared to the $...
    Republican governors waged a decade-long attack on social services provided to families and those who are needy. The Republican playbook remained the same: setting up guidelines requiring that recipients return to work in set timeframes, that work requirements be built into the programs, and that they heckled those who didn’t agree. In Kansas we can see the results: Grift is at record levels in Republican businesses. Meanwhile, the Republicans were so concerned about how these funds could be misused that they pushed through legislation about how and where the money could be spent—like on cruise ships and casinos. When Republican states focused on how to make sure people couldn’t get access to social services, they set themselves up for an outright disaster. When COVID-19 hit, states under Republican leadership that focused on these issues were completely unprepared to reverse course on their strategy and get assistance to the people. Now the results are devastating. The Republican response, in essence, is: ‘Let’s...
    COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — With the floodgates set to open on another round of unemployment aid, states are being hammered with a new wave of fraud as they scramble to update security systems and block scammers who already have siphoned billions of dollars from pandemic-related jobless programs. The fraud is fleecing taxpayers, delaying legitimate payments, and turning thousands of Americans into unwitting identity theft victims. Many states have failed to adequately safeguard their systems, and a review by The Associated Press finds that some will not even publicly acknowledge the extent of the problem. READ MORE: Mon Wharf To Be Closed After Flood Advisory Issued The massive sham springs from prior identity theft from banks, credit rating agencies, health care systems, and retailers. Fraud perpetrators, sometimes in China, Nigeria or Russia, buy stolen personal identifying information on the dark web and use it to flood state unemployment systems with bogus...
    By GEOFF MULVIHILL and ANDREW WELSH-HUGGINS, Associated Press COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — With the floodgates set to open on another round of unemployment aid, states are being hammered with a new wave of fraud as they scramble to update security systems and block scammers who already have siphoned billions of dollars from pandemic-related jobless programs. The fraud is fleecing taxpayers, delaying legitimate payments and turning thousands of Americans into unwitting identity theft victims. Many states have failed to adequately safeguard their systems, and a review by The Associated Press finds that some will not even publicly acknowledge the extent of the problem. The massive sham springs from prior identity theft from banks, credit rating agencies, health care systems and retailers. Fraud perpetrators, sometimes in China, Nigeria or Russia, buy stolen personal identifying information on the dark web and use it to flood state unemployment systems with bogus claims. The U.S....
    Al Drago | Getty Images News | Getty Images The $1.9 trillion Covid relief bill passed early Saturday by the House of Representatives would extend unemployment benefits by more than five months and offer recipients an extra $400 a week. The Senate will now consider the legislation. Democrats in the chamber can pass the bill with a simple majority using a budget rule called reconciliation. More from Personal Finance:The $15 minimum wage is in trouble. Here's what to knowTexas judge finds national eviction ban unconstitutionalSome families could get more than $14,000 in new Covid relief Democrats aim to send the measure to President Joe Biden by March 14. At that time, millions would lose jobless benefits without additional legislation. More than 19 million Americans were collecting benefits as of early February, according to the Labor Department.Unemployment benefits extendedThe bill, the American Rescue Plan Act of 2021, would increase the duration...
    The unemployed at the end of their rights will see their compensation extended again until the end of March in the face of the Covid-19 crisis, the Minister of Labor, Elisabeth Borne said on Sunday. “Since November, we have extended the rights of those who have reached the end of their rights and I can confirm that we are going to extend these rights again until the end of March”, announced the Minister on BFM-TV. Until then and after two extensions, these rights concerned the unemployed arriving at the end of their rights between October 30, the start of the second confinement, and February 28. Unedic, which manages the unemployment insurance scheme, estimated in early February that a one-month extension would affect some 120,000 additional people. The organization had estimated the number of unemployed concerned at 480,000 for the months of November, December, January and February. The exceptional extension...
    New York : The Department of Labor expanded the conditions for receiving unemployment insurance benefits. Photo: Karolina Grabowska / Pexels The Department of Labor expanded the possibility of receiving unemployment benefits those who have had to work in unsafe places, as well as parents who lost their jobs when schools and daycare centers closed and they were out of work when their children returned to class. The Department of Labor expanded the circumstances in which workers can opt in to receive unemployment insurance payments through the Pandemic Unemployment Assistance Program (PUA). Today’s benefits open the door to relief for workers who have faced difficult, if not impossible, choices between accepting a job in an unsafe workplace to receiving a stable source of income and protecting their health and that of their loved ones. dear ones, ”Patricia Smith, senior adviser to the Secretary of Labor, said...
    Three of the region’s largest banks have agreed to refund overdraft fees to District workers collecting unemployment benefits who missed a payment last week due to a tech snafu at the D.C. Department of Employment Services. About 39,000 people received late payments because of the tech glitch. The three banks — Bank of America, Capital One and Wells Fargo — represent nearly half of the consumer banking market in the D.C. region, according to a statement Friday issued by At-Large Council member Elissa Silverman. “D.C. workers receiving unemployment shouldn’t lose money for our error, that’s adding insult to injury,” Silverman said in the statement. Silverman said she worked with the banks to get them to agree to cover any overdraft fees. “It wasn’t the fault of our unemployment claimants that the money wasn’t in their accounts; it was the District’s error, and they shouldn’t have to pay a penalty for...
    PHILADELPHIA -- Theodore Taylor was pretty surprised when he received a tax document recently from Ohio's unemployment agency showing that he had been paid $1,300 in benefits last year.A Philadelphia resident, Taylor was employed in Pennsylvania during all of 2020 -- by the Internal Revenue Service. So when he got a 1099-G tax document earlier this month, he found out the hard way that he was a victim of unemployment benefits fraud -- where criminals steal people's identities and file jobless claims in their names.This scam has exploded over the past year, triggered by the historic federal expansion of unemployment benefits in Congress' Covid relief packages.What's even more frustrating, Taylor says, is that he hasn't been able to obtain a corrected tax document from Ohio's Department of Job and Family Services although he filled out a fraud report, called and emailed the agency, and even reached out to elected officials."Until...
    (CNN)Theodore Taylor was pretty surprised when he received a tax document recently from Ohio's unemployment agency showing that he had been paid $1,300 in benefits last year.A Philadelphia resident, Taylor was employed in Pennsylvania during all of 2020 -- by the Internal Revenue Service. So when he got a 1099-G tax document earlier this month, he found out the hard way that he was a victim of unemployment benefits fraud -- where criminals steal people's identities and file jobless claims in their names. 2020 taxes: Everything you need to know about filing this yearThis scam has exploded over the past year, triggered by the historic federal expansion of unemployment benefits in Congress' Covid relief packages.What's even more frustrating, Taylor says, is that he hasn't been able to obtain a corrected tax document from Ohio's Department of Job and Family Services although he filled out a fraud report, called and emailed...
    CHICAGO (CBS) — Week after week – practically daily – we’re Working for Chicago and investigating problems with the Illinois Department of Employment Security. Today, the Morning Insiders found two women pleased with the system for months. Then 2021 hit. Now they’re swept up in IDES drama too. READ MORE: Chicago Weather: Rain Friday Night; Weekend Temperatures In The 50s Morning Insider Lauren Victory take us on their rollercoaster ride. “I’ve been working in the hospitality industry for almost 20 years now,” said former restaurant server Bex Geraci. It’s a job she loves so much, she jumped right back in mid-pandemic. “I worked fully until November, when the governor and the mayor shutdown indoor dining again,” she said. Despite the restaurant server’s stops and starts, she was able to collect unemployment without a problem, until a letter came after she worked over the December holidays, informing her of “possible ineligibility”...