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    It was early March this year. The inauguration of Joe Biden had taken place a few weeks previously and on the streets of Georgetown, one of the power-hubs of Washington, I ran into a senior European diplomat I knew well.  Very quickly I steered the conversation to the new administration. 'What's it like dealing with them?' I ventured. 'It's fantastic,' he told me. 'There is order, discipline, process and a chain of command again.' 'And what's the downside compared to the Trump administration?' I asked. 'There is order, discipline, process and a chain of command…' The Trump years really were the Wild West. And as I step down, after seven years as the BBC's North America correspondent, I can't help but reflect on quite how drama-packed every day of his four years in office was. It was unlike anything I could have imagined. When Trump held his first presidential news conference, he famously called me 'another beauty' because I had had the temerity to ask about the mayhem that ensued when he had tried to introduce his travel ban from...
    The omicron variant of the coronavirus is a grenade rolled into the heart of the Biden presidency. The White House’s only hope now is that it won’t explode. If it does so, setting back the nation’s progress against the pandemic in a fundamental way, the negative impact could be seismic. That’s something President BidenJoe BidenDearborn office of Rep. Debbie Dingell vandalized Pfizer to apply for COVID-19 booster approval for 16- and 17-year-olds: report Coronavirus variant raises fresh concerns for economy MORE can ill afford, given the way his standing has been dented by a succession of troubles in recent months. Biden’s handling of the pandemic has been one of his relative strengths. In the early months of his presidency, it helped him earn solid poll ratings. More recently, the COVID-19 response has been a much-needed shard of light amid darker issues such as inflation and the botched withdrawal from Afghanistan. But Biden’s poll ratings on the pandemic had already come some distance off their previous highs. In an Economist-YouGov poll released last week, he was in negative territory on the...
    President Donald Trump and First Lady Melania Trump leave the White House for Mar-a-Lago, December 2020. Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images Former President Donald Trump stopped receiving intelligence briefings entirely a month before the end of his term, according to new information released by the CIA. In an analysis of Trump’s briefings throughout his presidency, former CIA Inspector General John Helgerson described the 45th president’s tenure as a “unique challenge” for the intelligence community. Context: The info is in a new chapter of John Helgerson’s book GETTING TO KNOW THE PRESIDENT—a useful source for my book THE PRESIDENT’S BOOK OF SECRETS—written for the CIA’s Center for the Study of Intelligence. It’s on the CIA website here:https://t.co/4bYQINUKlP 2/16 — David Priess (@DavidPriess) November 29, 2021 According to Helgerson’s report, which serves as a new chapter of his book Getting to Know the President, Trump had regular briefings in the transition period between the 2020 election and his inauguration. He received regular briefings during his presidency as well, despite publicly attacking the U.S. intelligence community throughout. As his presidency matured, however, he took...
    (CNN)Former President Donald Trump is accusing the House select committee investigating January 6 of being so aggressive in its pursuit of his White House records that it could permanently damage the presidency, according to a court filing from his legal team on Wednesday.Trump is appealing a lower court's decision that his records should be turned over to the committee. The Biden administration and the US House are unified in opposing the former President's efforts to keep the records secret, arguing that more than 700 pages including White House call logs and notes from his top advisers should be available to the probe.A federal appeals court will hear oral arguments on November 30 in the historic case."The Appellees' clear disdain for President Trump is leading them to a course of action that will result in permanent damage to the institution of the presidency," lawyers for Trump wrote in their reply brief to the DC Circuit Court of Appeals on Wednesday. "A current president cannot destroy the confidentiality of Executive Branch communications and the important reliance interests attached to that confidentiality for...
    (CNN)In time for the holiday season, former President Donald Trump has found a new way to make a profit -- he's producing a picture book and promising to ship it mid-December. The price? It's $74.99 or, for those willing to splurge for that special person on their list, $229.99 for an autographed copy."Every photograph has been handpicked by me," the former president says, "and every caption is mine, some in my own handwriting."Michael D'AntonioNow, some of you may be thinking that the price of "Our Journey Together" is a bit steep. You can get photographer Pete Souza's picture book about President Barack Obama for about $30, and Obama's own memoir -- 768 pages all written by him -- for $25. But if you are hung up by these facts, you are not thinking about Trump's book in the proper context.For true loyalists, this book is more than photographs sandwiched in a hard cover. It's a president's first post White House book, and for that reason alone, it's going to be a must-have for the most fervent of the 75 million...
    We're demonizing the wrong people. This is not a call to "understand" or "have compassion" for Trump voters. Instead, it's a call for a wholesale political and social indictment of Trump's Big Lie, along with every elected Republican politician or media member who knows Trump lost but keeps perpetuating that Lie. If we fail, history may repeat itself and — this time — the result will be far worse than Bush's lying us into two wars and privatizing Medicare. That, in part, is because numerous Republican-controlled states are passing laws and gaming out scenarios that could enable a repeat of a variation on the election of 1876: if GOP-controlled swing states submit multiple slates of electors denying either candidate 270 uniquely certified Electoral College votes, the election could again get thrown to the House of Representatives (as was the election of 1800, too), where Trump (or another neofascist Republican) would win. Democrats tend to forget that Donald Trump received about 10 million more votes in 2020 than he did in 2016. It's why he's still a potent political force...
    House Speaker Nancy Pelosi called former President Donald Trump's term in office the 'dark period' as she took questions Wednesday at COP26 about U.S. efforts to curb climate change.  Pelosi is among a number of prominent American politicians who are attending the later portion of the Glasgow, Scotland conference - where President Joe Biden and former President Barack Obama already made appearances.  Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez is also there - and tweeted excitedly on Wednesday, 'I finally got a hold of some Irn-Bru,' a popular Scottish soda.  After addressing reporters at the White House on Monday, Transportation Secretary Pete Buttigieg also traveled across the pond to the United Nations gathering.  House Speaker Nancy Pelosi attended a press conference at COP26 on Wednesday and referred to former President Donald Trump's time in office as the 'dark period'  Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez is among a number of U.S. politicians who are at COP26 this week. The climate conference was already attended by President Joe Biden and former President Barack Obama  Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez excitedly tweeted Wednesday that she tracked down some of the popular...
    In the final moments of Donald Trump's presidency the outgoing commander-in-chief engaged in a stunning stand-off with the very political party that got him to the White House, a new report claimed on Monday.  A furious Trump told the Republican National Committee chair that he was 'done' with the GOP and would start a new party- adding that Republicans would 'lose forever' without him.   'This is what Republicans deserve for not sticking up for me,' he reportedly said.  The confrontation reportedly took place on January 20, his last day in office, according to an excerpt from the new book Betrayal: The Final Act of the Trump Show by ABC News journalist Jonathan Karl.  The excerpt, published by ABC, details the allegedly 'unpleasant conversation' between Trump and RNC chairwoman Ronna McDaniel when she called to 'wish him farewell.' What ensued was a tense four-day window in which the RNC played 'hardball' with the leader of its own party - threatening to withhold legal defense funds and a list of donor names that's estimated to be worth $100 million.  Trump was aboard...
    The Donald Trump presidency was a disgraceful disaster, what with all the grifting and colluding and treason and insurrection. Yet it was also an embarrassment of comedic riches, most of it due to Trump and company’s preternatural ability to say and do the dumbest and most ludicrous things imaginable. Sitting at a tiny desk. Complaining about toilets. Promoting bleach as a COVID cure. Remarking that George Washington “took over airports” during the Revolutionary War. Suggesting we nuke hurricanes. Drinking a bottle of water with two hands. Being laughed at by the UN General Assembly. Claiming the moon was part of Mars. Blaming windmills for causing cancer. Hugging and kissing the American flag. Wearing orange clown make-up. “Very stable genius.” “Yo-semite.” “Person, Woman, Man, Camera, TV.” Yet of all the inane moments of Trump’s Oval Office tenure, perhaps none was more humiliating—and thus encapsulated his administration better—than the press conference held by his team on Nov. 7, 2020, four days after the presidential election. At that infamous affair, Trump’s lawyer Rudy Giuliani spoke to the media in front of...
    Democrats should be petrified today. Glenn Youngkin's win is nothing short of a bloodbath for Democrats and what is arguably more dangerous for the left is the winning pathway he has shown the rest of the Republican party moving forward into midterms and the 2024 general. There are many takeaways as to why Youngkin has been able to pull off such a significant and historic win but first let's put things into context. The state of Virginia is a reliably blue swing state. President Biden won Virginia by 10 points.  President Obama won Virginia in both 2008 and 2012, Hillary Clinton won it in 2016. This is not a red state by any political analyst’s metric and many of the citizens of the state of Virginia have been reliable democratic voters for a very long time....up until today. So what has happened? In the simplest terms possible - it is revenge of the parents. Glenn Youngkin's win is nothing short of a bloodbath for Democrats and what is arguably more dangerous for the left is the winning pathway he has...
    Dr. David Schecter / USG Board of Regents Chairman Sachin Shailendra and University System of Georgia (USG) Acting Chancellor Teresa MacCartney have announced Dr. David Schecter as the sole finalist for president of East Georgia State College. “Dr. David Schecter is well prepared to lead, and his experience and passion make him the ideal candidate to serve as East Georgia State College’s next president,” MacCartney said. “I firmly believe Dr. Schecter will play a critical role in leading the college to achieve its mission and continue its transformative role in that community.” Schecter is the provost and senior vice chancellor for Academic Affairs at the University of South Carolina – Upstate in Spartanburg, S.C., where he manages a budget of $38 million, administers a department of 686 employees and supervises deans of the schools and colleges and the library. In his role as chief academic officer, Schecter focuses on student success, the development and assessment of programs, and support of faculty scholarship and teaching. He founded the state of South...
    President Joe Biden is heading into the United Nations climate summit in Glasgow with high hopes, while back home, the majority of Americans are unhappy with how he's representing them and unsure about the path he's guiding the country on, a new poll released Sunday suggests. Biden's approval rating among voting-age Americans has slipped to just 42 percent in the latest NBC News poll, nine months into his presidency. That's down from 49 percent in August, and 11 points lower than the outlet's first survey in April, when 53 percent of Americans approved of him.  His disapproval rating has surged past 50 percent - to 54 - for the first time since NBC began keeping track of Biden's presidency.  The last survey in August saw 48 percent of Americans unhappy with the 78-year-old Democrat's job in office. Just 39 percent disapproved in April. Forty-six percent of people polled said they 'strongly disapprove' of Biden, and only 18 percent 'strongly approve.' Meanwhile the poll indicates most American adults have lost confidence in the country in general.  A staggering seven out of...
    Longtime Hillary Clinton aide Huma Abedin opened up about her troubled relationship with convicted sex offender Anthony Weiner, sharing the guilt she feels over Weiner’s personal and legal woes potentially costing Clinton the 2016 presidential election. Speaking out to CBS Sunday Morning for the first time about her new memoir Both/And: A Life in Many Worlds, Abedin had already made news with the book’s revelation that an unnamed senator forcibly kissed her back in 2005. “Then, in an instant, it all changed,” she wrote of the encounter. “He plopped down to my right, put his left arm around my shoulder, and kissed me, pushing his tongue into my mouth, pressing me back on the sofa.” Despite writing that she was “utterly shocked” and “pushed him away,” Abedin told CBS anchor Norah O’Donnell that she considered the encounter an “uncomfortable situation” rather than a sexual assault. “In my own personal opinion, no, did I feel like he was assaulting me in that moment? I didn’t, it didn’t feel that way,” Abedin said. “It felt like I needed to extricate myself from...
    "Fox News Sunday" host Chris Wallace told "America’s Newsroom" on Friday that President Biden is failing to unite Democrats on passing the infrastructure bill, saying Biden's presidency is "not in good shape." PROGRESSIVES BLOCK INFRASTRUCTURE VOTE BEFORE BIDEN TRIP, BUT BACK RECONCILIATION PLAN: LIVE UPDATES CHRIS WALLACE: It's not in good shape. And the fact of the matter is that Joe Biden doesn’t have enough juice. Not with Republicans, he doesn’t have enough juice with his own party. Because remember, this has nothing to do with Republicans. This is something that his party could do. He doesn’t have enough juice with his own party. That's twice now in a month he has gone up to the Hill, met with the House Democratic Caucus, pleaded with them to pass the infrastructure bill and in effect, said I am going to cover you. I have your back and I’ll cover you on the big tax and spend. I think it's now down to 1.75 trillion … and the left wing of the party, that’s not enough for them.  … I’ve been covering...
    Fox News Sunday anchor Chris Wallace gave a bleak assessment of the current state of the Biden presidency on Friday while discussing the ongoing Congressional negotiations on Biden’s social agenda and the latest polling in the Virginia gubernatorial race. Appearing on America’s Newsroom Friday, Wallace argued that the Biden presidency is “not in good shape” and “that the fact of the matter is that [Joe] Biden doesn’t have enough juice. Not with Republicans. He doesn’t have enough juice with his own party.” While discussing Biden’s efforts to get Democrats to pass the infrastructure bill, Wallace said, “I have been covering Washington for 40 years and you don’t put the president in a room … unless you know what the result is going to be.” “And you normally know the result because people are too supportive of him or too scared to buck him. But, that’s not true with Joe Biden,” Wallace argued, highlighting progressive Democrats’ willingness to defy the president. The Fox News anchor added that a key election next week might lead to Democrats distancing themselves even further from...
                      by Newt Gingrich  More than 150 years after he led the Union Army to victory in the Civil War, Ulysses S. Grant may receive another military promotion. Recently, lawmakers introduced bipartisan legislation in the U.S. Congress that would promote Grant posthumously to the Army’s highest rank, General of the Armies. This honor has only been conferred twice: to John “Black Jack” Pershing following his leadership during World War I and to George Washington posthumously for the nation’s bicentennial in 1976. As Grant’s 200th birthday approaches (April 27, 2022), it’s understandable that supporters are looking for a new and proper way to honor one of our nation’s greatest and most consequential military leaders. After all, Grant played a vital role in preserving the U.S. by keeping the Union together. In short, he helped save the country. Before the war, Grant’s life was in a downward spiral. He wasn’t good at farming. He wasn’t good at business. He started drinking and didn’t handle his liquor well. But he had previously proven to...
    President BidenJoe BidenBiden to meet House Dems before Europe trip: report 21 House Democrats call for removing IRS bank reporting proposal from spending bill Overnight Health Care — Presented by Altria — Vulnerable House Dems push drug pricing plan MORE put everything on the table in his fight for his domestic agenda in the final hours before he left Washington for Rome on Thursday.  He delayed his departure to trek to Capitol Hill at the last minute in hopes of pleading with Democrats to rally around a new, scaled-down climate and social spending package. He raced back to the White House to deliver a speech on his new plan. He even had his old partner former President ObamaBarack Hussein ObamaBiden's finishing what Obama started with early learning Cotton tells Garland: 'Thank God you're not on the Supreme Court' Budowsky: Vote for Terry McAuliffe: The midterms have begun MORE — who rarely speaks out on an issue unless it’s dire — weigh in on the framework proposal. The all-out effort is coming for a reason: Biden is facing a critical juncture...
    Rome (CNN)President Joe Biden was preparing to leave Thursday for his second trip abroad with his massive domestic agenda -- and, by his own admission, his entire presidency -- hanging in the balance on Capitol Hill.The trip has become a potent intersection of Biden's domestic and foreign agendas as he pleads with Democrats to agree on a sweeping spending package before Air Force One takes off for the Group of 20 summit in Rome on Thursday. In remarks from the White House ahead of his midday departure to Rome, Biden framed the months-long haggling over the deal as a good-faith effort to find middle ground between liberal and moderate Democrats. "We spent hours and hours and hours over months and months working on this. No one got everything they wanted, including me. But that's what compromise is, that's consensus. And that's what I ran on," Biden said in a speech from the East Room. He appeared to acknowledge the disappointment among members of his party after popular items that he's long touted, like paid family leave and tuition-free community...
    It remains to be seen whether or not former President Donald Trump will seek the GOP nomination in 2024's presidential election. If he does run, it's hard to imagine him not winning the Republican primary. Never Trump conservative David Frum, in an article published by The Atlantic on October 28, predicts that Trump will run — and warns that Trump's 2024 campaign, fueled by grievance and rage, could be even more toxic than his 2016 and 2020 campaigns. "Trump has to be considered the massive frontrunner for the 2024 Republican nomination," Frum argues. "He's already running hard, and he's already dominating the field. Fox News' intense promotion of Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis as an alternative to Trump is not working out any better in 2024 than its similar effort on behalf of then-New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie in 2016." Frum continues, "Trump dominates in the polls. He has the lead in fundraising. Down-ballot races turn on loyalty to Trump. Potential rivals vow they will not run for president if Trump does." Time for campaign reporters to accept that Trump is...
    President Joe Biden is facing a tough week that will have long-lasting consequences for both his domestic and foreign policy agendas. To succeed, he needs to pass a multi-trillion dollar spending bill and maintain America’s role as global leader in overseas meetings. The Biden administration has been negotiating with Democrats on Capitol Hill for months to pass the president’s infrastructure legislation. Now, the deadline for key climate provisions in the legislation is fast approaching. Biden will meet with global leaders in Glasgow, Scotland, on Nov. 1 to discuss how the international community should address climate change. The problem, however, is that if Biden cannot shepherd his infrastructure bill through Congress before he leaves, he will have no box to stand on in Glasgow. (RELATED: Democrats Renew Pledge To Hold Infrastructure Votes By End Of October) “The president looked us in the eye, and he said: ‘I need this before I go and represent the United States in Glasgow. American prestige is on the line,'” Democratic California Rep. Ro Khanna told Fox News on Sunday, days after meeting with Biden in...
    President Joe Biden’s Build Back Better agenda, rife with welfare spending and tax hikes on American workers, is facing a critical nine days, in which the White House is hoping for a legislative victory to push Democrat gubernatorial candidates in New Jersey and Virginia over the finish line. “The next nine days are the most important of Biden’s young presidency: He needs to rescue his legislative agenda in Congress, [and] rescue his party’s political candidates in two states,” Politico Playbook wrote Monday. Within the next nine days, Biden will go across the country to promote the largest welfare package since Lyndon Johnson’s Great Society legislation and travel to Rome to talk about “climate change” with world leaders. Next Tuesday, November 2, New Jersey and Virginia elect new governors. Glenn Youngkin in Loudoun County, Virginia, June 30, 2021. (Ashley Oliver/Breitbart News) Both Republican candidates in New Jersey and Virginia have closed gaps in the polls in recent weeks. Republican Jack Ciattarelli is only six points behind Gov. Phil Murphy (D), overcoming a 26 point gap, while Republican Glenn Youngkin is now...
    Tuesday, during an appearance on FNC’s “Tucker Carlson Tonight,” Sen. Josh Hawley (R-MO) likened the Biden presidency to former President Jimmy Carter’s tenure in the late 1970s. Hawley said a central focus of Biden’s presidency has been to blame the public for the problems plaguing the nation and not to accept any of the blame. “So, there is this weird phenomenon where you point out wait, you know, in my case I’m 52 years old, it wasn’t always this way,” host Tucker Carlson said. “You didn’t normally — you didn’t have junkies living on school grounds when I was growing up. ‘What the hell is this?’ And they look at you like, ‘What? Are you crazy? It’s always been this way.'” “You know, I think that, ‘lower your expectations,’ Tucker, is really the slogan of the Biden presidency,” he said. “You talk about bringing back the old days, you know, the 1970s. I mean, this is like reliving Jimmy Carter’s worst years in office where we’re told that the American people are the problem.” “You know, you’re the problem,” Hawley...
    Republican Louisiana Sen. Bill Cassidy told Axios’ Mike Allen Sunday he’s not sure if former President Donald Trump would win the presidential nomination in 2024. Cassidy appeared on “Axios on HBO” to discuss his support for the potential nomination of Trump as the 2024 Republican candidate for the presidency. Axios co-founder Mike Allen hypothesized Trump would run in 2024 and win the nomination, but Cassidy interjected, saying, “I don’t know that.” “President Trump is the first president in the Republican side at least to lose the House, the presidency, and the Senate in four years. Elections are about winning,” the senator responded. Coming up on #AxiosOnHBO… Louisiana senator dismisses Trump in a way few Republicans do Full episode airs at 6pm on @hbomax. pic.twitter.com/dd4CHkQkQ4 — Axios (@axios) October 17, 2021 Allen asked if he thought Trump could lose the nomination, and Cassidy responded saying, “I think he might.” “If you want to win the presidency, and hopefully that’s what voters are thinking about, I think he might.” (RELATED: Mitt Romney Says Trump Will Win GOP Nomination If He Runs...
    Lara Trump blasted Hunter Biden for allegedly profiting off of his father’s presidency during a Thursday morning appearance on Fox & Friends focused on the high-dollar sales of his artwork. The controversial son of President Joe Biden has been selling artwork for five and six-figure amounts, despite the fact that he has relatively zero experience, training, or standing in the art world. This has raised a reasonable set of ethical questions surrounding the peddling of influence around the White House, though the Biden administration has from the very beginning of this story, have been careful with how they have handled this story. At issue in this segment is White House Press Secretary Jen Psaki dismissing a question about Hunter Biden’s artwork being sold for $75,000 by saying the purchaser is still unknown, an answer which drew criticism from Obama-era US Government ethics Director Walter Shaub: These are legitimate questions. It’s disappointing to hear @jrpsaki send a message that the WH thinks the public has no right to ask about ethics. After the last 4 years, these questions have never been...
    President Joe Biden's approval rating is 10 points behind President Barack Obama's at this point in Obama's presidency, as Biden's numbers have been battered by the prolonged COVID-19 pandemic, among other issues.  The Real Clear Politics polling average for Obama on October, 11 2009 stood at 53 per cent approval and 40 per cent disapproval, while Biden currently stands at 43 per cent approval and 52.3 per cent disapproval.   A new Axios/Ipsos poll released Tuesday found that Americans are getting more pessimistic about the pandemic, and losing trust in Biden at the same time.  President Joe Biden's approval rating is 10 points behind former President Barack Obama's during the same time in Obama's presidency   The poll found that currently 42 per cent of Americans surveyed trusted Biden a great deal or a fair amount on COVID-19.  That number, however, represents a seven per cent drop from last month and a 10 per cent drop from six months ago.  It was 16 points higher when Biden was sworn-in in January.  Biden is also losing ground among members of his own party.  ...
    By Mary Clare Jalonick, Eric Tucker and Colleen Long | Associated Press WASHINGTON — A report by the Senate Judiciary Committee’s Democratic majority details Donald Trump’s extraordinary effort to overturn the 2020 presidential election that he lost, with the Justice Department brought to the brink of chaos and top officials there and at the White House threatening to resign. The report released Thursday offers new insight into how the Republican incumbent tried to undo the vote and exert his will on the department, asking leaders to declare the election “corrupt” and disparaging its top official for not doing anything to overturn the results. Trump’s actions led to a near-revolt at department headquarters that receded only after senior officials warned of a mass resignation, with one White House lawyer describing the efforts to undo the election as a “murder-suicide pact.” “In attempting to enlist DOJ for personal, political purposes in an effort to maintain his hold on the White House, Trump grossly abused the power of the presidency” and arguably violated a federal law that prevents anyone from commanding that federal...
    A new poll reveals President Biden's lowest approval rating yet, as Congress remains at an impasse at the sweeping spend plans that will define his presidency and the threat of debt default loom.    Just 38% approve of Biden's job as president, and 53% disapprove, according to a poll from Quinnipiac University. Three weeks ago, the same poll found that 42% approved and 50% disapproved.   Thirty-two percent of Independents approve of Biden while 60% disapprove. Four percent of Republicans approve, 94% disapprove. Still, 80% of Democrats approve of the president's job overall and 10% disapprove.     Thirty-two percent of Independents approve of Biden while 60% disapprove. Four percent of Republicans approve, 94% disapprove. Still, 80% of Democrats approve of the president's job overall and 10% disapprove.    Biden received his lowest marks on immigration, where only 25% approve and 67% disapprove, and also received low marks on his 'first love,' foreign policy, where only 34% approved and 58% disapproved.  Of his job as commander-in-chief, 37% approved, 58% disapproved, according to the poll.   Roughly three in 10 Americans (28%) agreed with Biden's...
    (CNN)In the days before Rep. Adam Schiff became then-President Donald Trump's chief congressional nemesis, Trump praised the man who would go on to epitomize his toxic relationship with Democrats on Capitol Hill."You know, you do a good job," Trump told Schiff in the Oval Office in March 2017, according to new details from an upcoming book written by the House Intelligence chairman and obtained by CNN ahead of its release next week.Schiff, who went on to lead House Democrats' investigation into Trump and Russia and Trump's first impeachment, had been invited to the White House to view alleged intelligence about spying on Trump's campaign. Several months later, he would learn exactly what Trump had meant from his son-in-law, Jared Kushner, according to the book. "You know, you do a really good job on TV," Kushner told Schiff when he appeared for testimony before the Intelligence Committee in July 2017. "I don't think your father-in-law would agree," Schiff says he responded, prompting Kushner to lean in and say: "Oh, yes, he does, and that's why." New details about Schiff's interactions with...
    Stephanie Grisham said Tuesday that Jared Kushner and Ivanka Trump were running a shadow presidency in the Trump White House, where they could hire whom they please and would disappear when the going got tough.  'I believe that he and Ivanka kind of thought they were a shadow President and First Lady,' she said.  The former White House press secretary was on CNN's New Day as part of media tour for her memoir 'I'll Take Your Questions Now,' her tale about her work for Donald and Melania Trump, which is out on Tuesday.  She said Jared Kushner, the president's son-in-law whom she described as 'Rasputin in a slim-fitting,' grew 'heady with power' during his four years as Donald Trump's senior White House counselor.  Grisham said Kushner 'changed as we went through the White House. And he got really heady with power.' She said he hired his own chief of staff for his corner of the West Wing. 'He did what he wanted and nobody challenged him,' she noted. She described how then-White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows put a hiring freeze...
    (CNN)Philippines President Rodrigo Duterte said on Saturday he would retire rather than run for vice president next year, in a surprise move that sparked speculation over his political future, according to the Philippines News Agency (PNA).Duterte, 76, is barred by the Philippine Constitution from seeking a second term after his six years in office, but he said last month that he would campaign for vice president in the upcoming election in May. His plan to pursue the largely ceremonial post was criticized by rivals and many Filipinos as an attempt to maintain his political power and avoid potential legal action at home or abroad.But on Saturday, Duterte accompanied his longtime aide, Senator Christopher Lawrence Go, as he submitted papers to register for the vice presidential ticket in Pasay City. International court backs probe into Philippines war on drugs"The universal sentiment of the Filipino has been reflected in the different surveys and in many forums, caucuses, and meetings to discuss what should I do in my life," Duterte said, referring to opinion polls that suggested the public opposed his plan,...
    (CNN)Joe Biden has been president of the United States for a little over eight months now. And he may well be on the verge of radically overhauling the relationship between the federal government and the average American in ways that will linger well beyond his first (or even second) term. Consider this:* Congress passed -- and Biden signed into law -- the $1.9 trillion American Rescue Plan. * The Senate passed -- and the House is debating -- a $1 trillion bipartisan infrastructure deal that would fund much-needed repairs and updates on roads and bridges (and the like).* Senate and House Democrats are considering a budget bill that is likely to total somewhere between $1.5 trillion and $3.5 trillion -- probably closer to the lower number, if I had to make an educated guess -- in additional spending.Read MoreAdd it up and, on the conservative end, you get almost $4.5 trillion in additional government spending in the first year of Biden's first term.  THE POINT -- NOW ON YOUTUBE! In each episode of his weekly YouTube show, Chris Cillizza will...
    Late Thursday, the House's progressive caucus did what the long-received wisdom in D.C. believed they would never do: They stood their ground in the face of centrist sabotage. Months ago, conservative Democrats demanded that President Joe Biden's ambitious infrastructure and jobs agenda be divided into two separate bills. They promised that doing so was just a way to get bipartisan support for some of it. But progressives feared that it was actually a way to destroy the parts of Biden's agenda that are popular with voters but not so popular with right-wing lobbyists. Well, progressives had their fears confirmed this week. A small centrist minority of Democrats, led by Sens. Joe Manchin of West Virginia and Kyrsten Sinema of Arizona, made it quite clear that they very much always intended to renege on their end of the pass-both-bills bargain the second Congress passed the only bill they care about, which is a small and bipartisan infrastructure bill. But rather than be bullied into accepting the betrayal, the progressive caucus in the House refused to vote for the smaller bill...
    Fox News contributor Joe Concha joined "Fox & Friends First" Tuesday to call out President Joe Biden and the White House for acting selective towards the press. Concha argued that the Biden administration is trying to "script a presidency" and that "Jen Psaki wants the press to obey." PSAKI RIPS REPUBLICANS 'STANDING AT THE BORDER AND GIVING SPEECHES,' THOUGH BIDEN HAS YET TO VISIT JOE CONCHA: I'm old enough to remember Jen Psaki on day one saying that she and the administration, the president would always be transparent with the American people. They will tell you the truth, even if it's something that the truth hurts sometimes. … Jen Psaki says, in other words, the president is mad that some reporters … have the utter audacity to cover issues where he's struggling mightily, which is basically every issue right now, right? On the economy, he's got a big inflation problem. On rising crime, he's got a big police morale and police retirement and resigning problem. Police reform also just failed recently. On immigration, he's got a big open border problem....
    Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., apparently told former President Donald Trump at one point that he "f'd up" the presidency during a conversation earlier this year in which Graham tried to convince Trump that he had actually lost the 2020 election. Author and Washington Post legend Bob Woodward shared the anecdote, pulled from his new book "Peril," during an appearance on NBC's "Meet the Press" Sunday, outlining the tough love that Trump reportedly got over the phone from his South Carolina colleague. "We quote conversations between Sen. Graham and Trump in which Lindsey Graham says to Trump, 'You f'd up your presidency' at one point just a couple of months ago," Woodward said, adding that Trump hung up shortly after. The next day, Trump apparently called Graham back, at which point Graham said: "I would have hung up too." The incident seems a far cry from Graham's public statements about the former president, in which he is nothing but supportive. As recently as Saturday night, the South Carolina Republican told a Michigan GOP conference that he hopes Trump runs again. "I...
    The peculiarities of how different states oversee their elections could make result in the credibility of the 2024 election coming down to a campaign, which will be decided in the 2022 midterms. Most states have a secretary of state who is elected by the population, but the 2024 campaign for Pennsylvania's 19 electoral votes will be overseen by a secretary of state elected who will be appointed by the winner of the commonwealth's 2022 gubernatorial campaign. "Pennsylvania — the closest battleground state with the most electoral votes, where the election was called for Biden last November — is a powerful example of exactly what the Trump scheme to unwind American democracy looks like," Philadelphia Inquirer columnist Will Bunch noted on Sunday. "In Harrisburg, Republican legislative leaders — after weeks of lobbying and browbeating by Trump himself — are plowing ahead with their unpopular plan to yet again review (definitely NOT an audit) the 2020 outcome, which involves handing over my personal data and that of 9 million other voters to an unknown but probably dodgy vendor." Bunch noted Attorney General...
    Sen. Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamGraham says he hopes that Trump runs again Trump pushes back on book claims, says he spent 'virtually no time' discussing election with Lee, Graham The Hill's 12:30 Report - Presented by Facebook - Biden meets with lawmakers amid domestic agenda panic MORE (R-S.C.) reportedly told former President TrumpDonald TrumpGraham says he hopes that Trump runs again Trump says Stacey Abrams 'might be better than existing governor' Kemp Executive privilege fight poses hurdles for Trump MORE, "You f'd up your presidency" earlier this year when attempting to advise him to accept that he lost the 2020 presidential election. This apparent bit of hard truth from the South Carolina Republican was shared on Sunday by renowned Washington Post reporter Bob Woodward while he was discussing his new book "Peril" on NBC's "Meet the Press." Host Chuck ToddCharles (Chuck) David ToddThe press ever-so-politely turns on Biden, as troubles mount NBC's Chuck Todd: Biden currently battling 'pretty big credibility crisis' 'Highest priority' is to vaccinate the unvaccinated, Fauci says MORE asked Woodward and book co-author and fellow Post reporter Robert Costa how...
    The first look at the upcoming Kanye West documentary, Jeen-Yuhs, was released on Netflix's official YouTube account on Saturday. During the clip, the 44-year-old rap mogul was seen performing with his friend and collaborator, Mos Def, while hanging out with a group of other individuals who marveled at the pair's rapping skills. The feature has been in the works for just over two decades, and it is currently set to be released on the streaming service in 2022. New content: A first look clip from the upcoming Kanye West documentary Jeen-Yuhs was released on Netflix's YouTube account on Saturday The clip began by specifying that the clip shown was shot in New York nearly twenty years ago. An individual then asks Mos Def to perform the track Two Words, which was released on West's 2004 album, The College Dropout. RELATED ARTICLES Previous 1 Next Kanye West posts X-rays of son Saint, five, showing his... Kanye West reaches an agreement with tech company that sued... Share this article Share The 47-year-old rapper...
    Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images President Joe Biden’s approval fell to the lowest point of his eight-month presidency in a new Gallup survey. The number of Americans who said they approved of Biden’s job performance fell from 49 percent to 43 percent, according to the survey released on Wednesday, while 53 percent said they disapproved. The numbers give Biden a 10-point negative gap between the two groups, and the first negative gap of his presidency in the Gallup poll. Former President Donald Trump held a slightly lower approval rating of 38 percent at the same point in his presidency, representing a decline of 6 points compared to the time he took office. The number for Biden represents a decline of 13 points from his peak of 57 percent, which was recorded leading up to his second week in office. Biden’s falling ratings have been fueled predominantly by independent voters. Of that group, 37 percent said they approved of his performance, a 24-point decline from his personal best of 61 percent. It’s the second-lowest rating of any president among those voters in recent history,...
    Republican Senator Lindsey Graham told Donald Trump this summer that he 'f***ed your presidency up' with the false claims he lost the election due to mass voter fraud, a new book claims. Trump, in response, hung up on Graham, his on-again, off-again ally on Capitol Hill. In January, Trump's last White House chief of staff Mark Meadows tried to convince Graham and fellow conservative Senator Mike Lee that Trump really won the election. Graham demanded more details and hard evidence if the White House wanted him and Lee to launch a Senate investigation of the election, according to Bob Woodward and Robert Costa's new book Peril, out September 21.  Graham and Lee both got briefings on the claims being made by Trump attorney Rudy Giuliani, but Graham slammed the claims, saying they were suitable for 'third grade,' according to excerpts of the book published by The Washington Post.    Both senators ultimately voted to certify the election results. Graham denounced Trump on the Senate floor in the wake of the January 6th insurrection, which attempted to stop the certification. 'Trump and I,...
    (CNN)In the torrent of books published about Donald Trump's presidency, few have offered recommendations for both repairing the damage done by his norm-busting term and addressing the vulnerabilities he revealed in our existing system of checks and balances. Michael D'AntonioTake tax returns, for example: Whereas previous presidents made their tax returns public to assure the country they brought no financial conflicts of interest to the Oval Office, Trump declined to follow this tradition. Similarly, he issued pardons to a variety of personal friends -- including Roger Stone, Steve Bannon and Paul Manafort. This too departed from presidential norms. In "After Trump: Reconstructing the Presidency," legal scholars Bob Bauer and Jack Goldsmith offer a blueprint that the government could follow to correct those weaknesses.The pair advise amending laws so that, contrary to practices established by a Justice Department memo, it's crystal clear that US presidents are subject to obstruction of justice charges while in office. They also recommend that when Congress authorizes a president to use military force abroad, that authorization should be subject to a two or three-year "sunset" clause....
    Bob Woodward assessed that Donald Trump is very much interested in becoming president again, but warned that the repercussions of that scenario would not address the country’s needs. Woodward and Robert Costa were on Morning Joe together on Tuesday to talk about their reporting on the end of Trump’s presidency as they describe it in their upcoming book: Peril. During the conversation, Willie Geist noted the recurring questions about whether Trump will run for the White House again in 2024, so he asked Woodward and Costa for their take on that. Costa answered that after interviewing numerous subjects for the book over the last few months, “you start to hear a certain refrain…that he wants back, that he feels he has the political capital with his core supporters.” “This is someone who wants back into the presidency, and he believes the Republican Party is still very much in his grip,” Costa continued. “Even though there are others out there with ambition like Vice President [Mike] Pence and Florida Governor Ron DeSantis, it’s President Trump who really wants back, based on...
    Robert Costa shared a disturbing anecdote about former President Donald Trump and his desperation to “kill the [Joe] Biden presidency in the crib.” Costa and Bob Woodward joined Morning Joe on Tuesday to talk about Peril, their upcoming book full of major revelations about the tumultuous end of Trump’s presidency. As they spoke about Trump’s efforts to hang on to power after losing the 2020 election, Costa described how Trump allegedly tried to pressure former Vice President Mike Pence into overturning the results the day before the president’s supporters stormed the Capitol. “We have this scene of President Trump not only pressuring Vice President Pence in the Oval Office but then opening the air and having the cold air coming in and talking to his aides, saying ‘can you hear my supporters outside?'” Costa said. “It was a domestic political crisis, a national security emergency as well.” Woodward added that Trump was “enthralled” listening to the mob that night, and the Washington Post associate editor compared it to the Watergate scandal as it was poised to end Richard Nixon’s presidency....
    (CNN)It's funny what four years of a president who carries a healthy disregard for the Constitution, and a violent insurrection at the US Capitol, can do for people's knowledge of our democratic institutions!For the first time in 15 years, a majority (56%) of people could name all three branches of the federal government in a new survey conducted by Annenberg Public Policy Center.That number was under 30% in 2016 but has consistently risen every year since then -- suggesting strongly that Trump's assault on a variety of democratic institutions has made the average American pay more attention to how the government works (and doesn't). THE POINT -- NOW ON YOUTUBE! In each episode of his weekly YouTube show, Chris Cillizza will delve a little deeper into the surreal world of politics. Click to subscribe! People were also more aware of the rights afforded to them by the Constitution than in the past. Asked to name the five freedoms conferred by the First Amendment, 3 in 4 named the freedom of speech, while more than half (56%) were...
    (CNN)Whether you love Joe Biden, hate him or aren't totally sure how you feel about him, we can all agree on this: His first term -- and maybe his entire presidency -- will hinge on how he is perceived to have dealt with the Covid-19 pandemic.And that fundamental fact is why Thursday was such an important day in the Biden presidency. Because make no mistake: Biden just staked a whole lot of his first term on his plan to mandate vaccination against the coronavirus to upwards of 100 million people.Biden knew the outrage such a sweeping federal mandate would cause. He knew Republican governors would cast the move as a step toward authoritarianism and federal overreach.(Which, of course, they did. My favorite was South Carolina Gov. Henry McMaster, who cast the mandate in decidedly apocalyptic terms; "Rest assured, we will fight them to the gates of hell to protect the liberty and livelihood of every South Carolinian," McMaster promised.)What Biden is betting is that there are more people fed up with the unvaccinated than there are those who are up...
    BEIRUT (AP) — Lebanese presidency announces Cabinet formation, ending 13-month deadlock that worsened the country’s economic situation. Copyright © 2021 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, written or redistributed.
    WASHINGTON (AP) — For then-Sen. Joe Biden, Sept. 11, 2001, started like most days: riding the 8:35 a.m. Amtrak to work. He had a relatively quiet day planned, including meetings with constituents and a nomination hearing. Then his wife, Jill, called, telling him a plane had crashed into the World Trade Center. Mid-sentence, she cried, “Oh my God. Oh my God. Oh my God.” The second tower was hit. The terrorist attacks that day shattered Americans’ sense of security and ushered in an era of nebulous threats, hidden enemies and a seemingly never-ending war on terror. And for Biden, a failed presidential candidate whose political career appeared to have peaked, they marked a new phase of his public life. The Delaware senator and chairman of the Foreign Relations Committee would devote even more energy to international affairs. He would point to that experience during his ultimately successful White House bid last year to portray himself as a seasoned statesman who could restore American stability and prestige. And it would inform his controversial decision to withdraw from Afghanistan, effectively ending the...
    Ben Domenech, co-founder of The Federalist, appeared on "The Ingraham Angle" on Wednesday night, where he tried to explain the "buyers’ remorse" that many Democrat voters seem to be expressing about President Biden – as suggested by Biden’s sinking approval numbers. NEW YORK TIMES HASN’T UPDATED BIDEN’S ‘LATEST POLL NUMBERS’ PAGE SINCE MAY BEN DOMENECH: They’re practically screaming, ‘Not good, Joe.’ It’s not so much motivated by all the bad things that are happening, it’s that Joe’s making them look bad. It’s like, 'We vouched for you. We said you were competent. We said that you were compassionate. We said that you were an adult in the room. We said that you were able to manage the government in a way that President Trump was not. … … During this pandemic-weird campaign, where you were completely hidden from the voters … Oh no, you can trust in Joe.' And now they’re looking around and saying, ‘Joe, you’re making us look bad.’ ‘We promised that you were going to be good’ -- and now factor after factor is going against him....
    A NPR/PBS NewsHour/Marist poll carried out in late August also found that more disapprove (51%) of the job the president is doing than approve (43%). That survey found found that while 41% strongly disapprove of the job the president is doing, 10% disapprove, 23% approve, and 19% strongly approve.
    President Joe Biden’s approval ratings hit the lowest since the start of his presidency, dropping to 39%, the results of a Tuesday poll showed. Biden’s handling of the job was disapproved by 49% of respondents in the latest Economist/YouGov Poll. While 12% said they were unsure, 39% of those polled strongly disapproved of the president’s performance. The poll surveyed 1,500 U.S. adults online between September 4 – 7 and has a margin of error of 2.8% The president’s approval rating dropped by 6% since the previous poll from a week ago. Along with the fall in the overall job approval ratings, Biden’s handling of COVID-19 and the economy saw lower approval among the respondents of this poll compared to the previous ones, according to YouGov. (RELATED: ‘It’s A Nightmare Number For The White House’: Politico Reporter Breaks Down Biden’s Falling Approval Ratings) Latest estimate of Biden’s net approval rating in The Economist/YouGov polls is -6. The president is being dragged down this week by a low outlier among Democrats, but also a strong negative trend among Independents and people under...
    (CNN)President Joe Biden must define the politics of this fall before they define him, as he seeks to re-establish the authority of an administration that often appeared overtaken by a relentless summer of challenges.The weeks following Labor Day will reveal answers that will set the stage for next year's congressional elections. They will also help decide whether Biden has the potential for a historically significant presidency or gets swamped by the crises he was elected to conquer.A crush of challenges and political battles are dominated by a pandemic Biden hoped would now be history. But the crisis is beginning to feel endless, and, as it batters national morale, is denting his political standing. The fallout from a chaotic exit from Afghanistan that encapsulated the ignominy of a US defeat is meanwhile raising questions about Biden's core promise of competency. The internal Democratic Party tussle between progressives and moderates is highlighting the huge bet of the Biden presidency: That, at a time of national crisis, voters want a multi-trillion-dollar assault on climate change and the remaking of the social safety net.Reverberations...