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    Two of the 13 siblings rescued from a California 'House of Horrors' three years ago have told of how their parents used the Bible to justify the abuse they meted out. Jennifer, 33 and Jordan Turpin, 21, speaking with Diane Sawyer, explained in detail the extremes parents David and Louise would keep the children captive and in line, and even quoted the Book of Deuteronomy to claim they would be justified in choosing to murder their offspring.  The kids were threatened with belts and sticks and even told that if they didn't behave, the parents would chain them to their beds and pull their hair.   'To be honest, not even all of us know every single thing each one of us went though,' Jordan told Sawyer. They also said that the parents 'literally' used the Bible to justify how they treated the siblings.   Jennifer and Jordan Turpin (second from left) spoke to Diane Sawyer about their rescue. The full interview is set to air on Friday Jennifer (left) and Jordan (right) Turpin spoke out for the first time about their horror...
    SOUTH ST. PAUL, Minn. (WCCO) – As America grapples with supply-chain bottlenecks—including fewer truck drivers on the road carrying goods—a new program in the federal infrastructure package would allow some 18-year-olds to drive 18-wheelers. The apprenticeship pilot program would allow 3,000 adults under 21 train to drive long hauls across state lines. They would have to complete hundreds of hours of study with an experienced driver to be certified. READ MORE: With Carjackings On The Rise, Here's How To Protect Yourself, And Your Vehicle, This Holiday SeasonThe legal age limit for interstate commerce right now is 21, though many states allow 18, 19 and 20-year-olds to drive semi-trucks carrying goods within state lines, according to the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration. Bill Collins, owner of Interstate Truck Driving School in South St. Paul, said he doesn’t think the new change will make a big dent in solving the problem. Enrollment in his program has remained mostly steady, even this year in wake of demand for drivers and companies offering higher pay. Keeping drivers well compensated—wages are as high as Collins...
    HARRISBURG, Pa. (AP) — A bill to allow people to carry concealed weapons without a permit was passed by a divided Pennsylvania House on Tuesday, but faces a veto threat from the governor. The parties were split in the vote, as occurred in the state Senate last week, with Republicans mostly supporting it and Democrats mostly opposed. READ MORE: Backpacks Banned From Sto-Rox High School After Student Killed In McKees Rocks ShootingSupporters said getting concealed carry permits under current law can be subject to the whims of county sheriffs and that concealed carry permit holders can forget when their licenses expire and therefore unknowingly violate the law. Opponents pointed out the proposal is unlikely to be enacted, as Democratic Gov. Tom Wolf’s office said he will veto the legislation, and argued the bill would make people less safe by making guns more readily accessible. READ MORE: Pittsburgh Penguins In 'Active' Negotiations To Be Acquired By Fenway Sports GroupPennsylvanians are generally allowed to openly carry loaded firearms, although current law is silent on it. Only in Philadelphia is a permit required...
    HARRISBURG, Pa. (AP) — Pennsylvania’s state Senate on Tuesday approved two veto-bound firearms bills, including one to allow people to carry a loaded gun openly or concealed, without a permit, and another to punish municipalities that impose firearms ordinances that are stricter than state law. Despite a certain veto from Gov. Tom Wolf, a Democrat, floor debate lasted nearly three hours, as Democrats warned that the result of such legislation becoming law would be more death and more violence amid already-spiking gun violence and the spread of illegal guns. READ MORE: Arthur Hubish, Penn Township Stabbing Victim, Remembered As 'Kind Soul'Republicans brushed aside the arguments, saying cities elsewhere with strict gun laws still have problems with gun violence and that law-abiding gun owners should not need the government’s permission to carry a firearm. “This is about our Second Amendment and our right to bear arms,” said Senate Majority Leader Kim Ward, R-Westmoreland, during floor arguments. “The Second Amendment doesn’t say anything about restrictions on our right to bear arms.” Debate became testy after the sponsor of the permitless-carry bill, Sen....
    Apple CEO Tim Cook declared that he personally owns cryptocurrency, but dismissed the idea that the world's second-most valuable company would allow its products to be purchased with the digital currencies. 'I do. I think it's reasonable to own it as part of a diversified portfolio,' Cook said in an interview with The New York Times' Andrew Ross Sorkin during its DealBook conference.  'I'm not giving anyone investment advice by the way.' Cook did not specify which particular cryptocurrency he owns, however. The 61-year-old Cook said he had been interested in cryptocurrency 'for a while,' though he added his interest was a 'personal point of view' and that he was not speaking for the company. Apple CEO Tim Cook said that he personally owns cryptocurrency, but did not specify which one Apple CEO Tim Cook just said he owns Bitcoin and Ethereum.This shouldn¿t surprise anyone that a technologist is interested in new technologies. pic.twitter.com/8vyxjPQST5— Pomp ¿¿ (@APompliano) November 9, 2021  He added that Apple would not take cryptocurrency in exchange for its products, such as iPhones, iPads or Macs. Cook, whose...
                        Amidst Pennsylvania Republicans’ efforts to make elections more secure, a Democrat in the state House of Representatives has proposed his own very different voting reforms. The legislation, sponsored by Rep. Scott Conklin (D-State College), would explicitly authorize “curing” of mail-in and absentee ballots on which there are errors or omissions. County election-board staffers who observe that a mail-in ballot’s declaration either lacks the voter’s signature or the date or exhibits some other error would be instructed to notify the voter and allow him or her to make a correction before polls close on 8 p.m. on Election Day.  The practice of curing ballots, something not yet provided for in Pennsylvania law, gave rise to controversy in the 2020 election. Last November, Republican congressional candidate Kathy Barnette, who ran against U.S. Rep. Madeleine Dean (D-4), filed a lawsuit aiming to get cured ballots thrown out.   At a hearing in that case, Montgomery County Chief Operating Officer Lee Soltysiak testified that he had earlier told members of the press...
    Almost a year after its founder announced, the instant messaging app adds the option to advertise on channels for a fee. But these are not ads that you are accustomed to through Facebook or Google Source: Unsplash In December last year, Telegram founder Pavel Dorov called for the economy to continue. Its platform will add premium features like ads And paid sticker bags – now it happens. Telegram opens its advertising platform to individuals and companies, and how it works. Not ads you know from elsewhere Telegram’s new advertising site (Telegram Advertising Platform) is now available to anyone who wants to get started with instant messaging apps and reach new audiences – it has 500 million active users on a monthly basis and its users generate about half a trillion of content a month. Those channels. The new site will allow those who wish to advertise on Telegram to reach multiple Telegram users on public channels with more than 1,000 users and will not operate in public or private groups. Telegram’s system gives advertisers the ability to target what...
                       
                        A bill introduced in the Michigan House of Representatives would allow barbers-to-be to obtain the 1,800 hours of training as an apprenticeship rather than a classroom. The Mackinac Center reported: A new bill would make the life of prospective barbers a little easier. House Bill 4207, sponsored by Rep. John Roth, R-Traverse City, would allow future barbers to fulfill the time requirement by working under a licensed barber in a shop, instead of attending a barber college. This is similar to how many people fulfill the apprenticeship requirement in construction fields. It’s a no-brainer. Most people understand that the best training occurs on the job, and lawmakers responded. The bill passed with wide, bipartisan margins in the state House and unanimously passed a state Senate committee. It is not clear why the barrier to entry is so high in the hair styling field. As the Mackinac Center pointed out, barbers are required to receive nearly 10 times the amount of training of emergency medical technicians. “Hands-on learning is...
                      by Benjamin Yount  Wisconsin’s latest open enrollment suggestion would allow parents to send their kids to a new school based on whether or not the school enforced mask mandates. The Senate Committee on Education on Thursday heard from lawmakers on Senate Bill 587, which would give parents the ability to send their kids to a new school based solely on a school district’s coronavirus policy. “Parents made enrollment decisions [this year] based on what their district was going to do,” the plan’s author Rep. Barb Dittrich, R-Oconomowoc, told The Center Square. Dittrich’s plan would give parents a choice to move their kids to or from a public or private school if their local school district requires masks or vaccines, or if their local school district does not require masks or vaccines. “This is for parents of both persuasions, if you will,” Dittrich explained. “Some say ‘No, I want my kids masked-up, and my school is only optional right now.’ What do they do? Because right now there is only a narrow...
    Representative Adam Schiff (D-CA) said on this week’s broadcast of MSNBC’s “The Sunday Show” that House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-CA) would do anything that former Donald Trump told him to do, “no matter how wrong or unethical.” Schiff said, “One of the most frequent questions I get from my constituents around the country is what do they really say. And this story of this chance meeting on a plane with Kevin McCarthy and him going off to completely misrepresent a conversation, you can see how duplicitous so many of my colleagues are. That conversation was in 2010. It was long before Donald Trump, but he was really made for an hour like this. When his party is led by someone who believes that the truth isn’t truth and you’re entitled to your own alternate facts. And in my view, there’s nothing more corrosive to a democracy than the idea that there’s no truth.” He added, “You cannot allow someone with that little regard for the truth to get anywhere near the speaker’s office. If Kevin McCarthy were to become speaker,...
                        A bill that would allow loved ones and legal guardians to put cameras in nursing home rooms, allowing them to monitor the treatment of the resident, is making significant progress in the Ohio legislature. SB 58 provides that as long as the resident’s guardian or attorney fills out a form notifying the nursing facility they will be placing a camera in the resident’s room, and as long as the resident’s guardian or attorney installs and pays for the camera out-of-pocket, they may proceed with monitoring the resident’s room. The bill passed the Ohio Senate unanimously, and is quickly making its way through House committees. The bill is also called Esther’s Law, named after the mother of Steve Piskor. In 2011, Piskor, suspecting abuse, placed a hidden camera in his mother’s nursing home room at a facility run by MetroHealth Medical Center. He said at the time that he had noticed suspicious bruises on his mother’s body, and that her demeanor had changed. She had become quieter. On the...
    Washington (CNN)Recently, the Internal Revenue Service has gotten a lot of attention on social media -- specifically, an obscure proposal by the Biden administration to widen the authority to root out tax evasion by allowing the IRS to get annual, aggregated reports of flows from bank accounts with a minimum of $600. But it's not Biden officials or Democrats who are pushing the topic most aggressively on Twitter and other platforms. It's Republicans and right-wing media outlets attacking the proposal as a violation of privacy and arguing that the IRS would be improperly spying on everyday Americans' bank accounts.Over the past several days Sen. Tom Cotton, Fox News host Sean Hannity, Sen. Chuck Grassley, Rep. Jody Hice, GOP Chairwoman Ronna McDaniel, former US Ambassador Nikki Haley and many top Republicans have tweeted about the proposal, framing it as a big government breach of privacy. This month Mitch McConnell wrote an op-ed for the Courier-Journal warning people not to "let Joe Biden snoop on your bank account."The proposal, issued by the Treasury Department, would require banks to provide the IRS with...
    A Colorado woman with stage-5 renal failure says she will not get the Covid-19 vaccine because of her religious beliefs - despite her refusal meaning that she will be denied a life-saving kidney transplant. Both Leilani Lutali, 56, and her friend and potential donor Jaimee Fougner, 45, have refused to get the vaccine, siting their religious beliefs. The University of Colorado Health hospital informed  that would be placed on a waiting list for 'non-compliant by not receiving the COVID-19 vaccine.'  They were given 30 days to begin the vaccination process or be removed from the kidney transplant list. Born-again Christian Lutali has refused to get inoculated because of the use of stem cells in developing some vaccines.  'As a Christian, I can't support anything that has to do with abortion of babies, and the sanctity of life for me is precious,' Lutali said. Fougner, Lutali's friend and potential donor, has also denied the vaccine citing religious reasons.  Cells taken from elective abortions have been used to develop effective vaccines since the 1960s including current vaccines for rubella, chickenpox, hepatitis A, and shingles.  None of...
    LOS ANGELES (CBSLA) — Gov. Gavin Newsom signed a new law this week that will allow homeowners across the state to build more housing on the land they own. Planned Desert Community In lancaster California, USA. (Photo by Sam Lafoca/Construction Photography/Avalon/Getty Images) The law is aimed at easing the housing crisis in California by streamlining the permit process, increasing density and diversity in neighborhoods, and making housing more affordable near major employment hubs. READ MORE: Service Interrupted This Weekend On Metros A & E Lines Most of California’s cities and towns have been zoned as “single-family home,” stipulating that only one housing unit could be built on the lot, for decades. The new legislation, SB 9, facilitates the process for homeowners to build a duplex or split their current residential lot in order to add units on their existing properties. READ MORE: Orange County Sees Drastic Spike In Anti-Asian Hate Incidents, Report Finds It’s “an opportunity for our neighbors to be able to create housing for other neighbors, or even their own family members,” said State Sen. Lena Gonzalez of...
    Chicago mayor Lori Lightfoot is taking a new approach to combatting gang violence  by proposing a new Victims' Justice Ordinance that would allow the city to sue gang members in civil court and seize their property. The ordinance, which would hold gangs accountable by suing members for the damage they inflict and allow authorities to size their property, is the latest effort from the mayor to tame the out of control violence in the city that is overrun by gangs.  Lightfoot introduced the ordinance on Tuesday and Chicago police leaders said they supported the measure that could allow judges or court officers to impose up to $10,000 fines per offence and seize 'any property that is directly or indirectly used or intended for use in any manner to facilitate street gang-related activity,' the Chicago Tribune reported.  Chicago mayor Lori Lightfoot (pictured) proposed a new 'Victims' Justice Ordinance' that would allow the city to sue gang members in civil court and seize their property Just this weekend, at least 64 people were shot, including several children, and nine people were...
    After the England Premier League issued an official statement in which he made it clear that he will not allow any soccer player summoned to his National selection that is scheduled to travel to one of the destinations marked with a red traffic light during the current pandemic of Covid 19, so there will be several countries and confederations affected. There are currently 80 countries that are on Great Britain’s Covid red list, in addition to an update pending where more could be added. Also read: Diana Chiquete, ex Acapulco Shore, shows off her enormous attributes with revealing swimsuit Premier League clubs have decided today reluctantly, but unanimously, not to release players for international matches played in red-list countries next month. The clubs’ decision, which is strongly supported by the Premier League, will apply to nearly 60 players from 19 Premier League clubs who will travel to 26 red-list countries in the September international window. These are the countries included in the Covid 19 red list by Great Britain: Andorra Argentina Aruba Bahamas, Bahrain Bangladesh Botswana Brazil British...
    NASSAU COUNTY, Long Island (WABC) -- Nassau County Executive Laura Curran is defending her veto of a bill that would allow police and other first responders to sue protesters and collect financial damages.On Tuesday, Curran vetoed a bill to permit the county to sue on behalf of individuals who say they have been harassed, menaced or injured stemming from their status as a first responder.On Thursday she said she fully supports the first responders but called the bill "flawed.""The concern is that it could open up the county to a barrage of lawsuits and at the end of the day I have to make the decision in the best interests of our county," Curran said.Republicans in the Nassau Legislature are considering how to override her veto.Curran says she respects the democratic process and will address that if it happens.Civil Rights activists argue the bill is payback for last year's demonstrations against police brutality, and would violate free speech.ALSO READ | Census: NYC population surges to 8.8 million with almost all growth in citiesEMBED More News Videos Almost all of the...
    More On: nassau county How parasites poison NYC suburbs’ property tax system Nassau County to roll out body-worn cameras for police Private eye tried to ‘shake down’ client after murder exoneration: prosecutors One injured in massive Long Island house fire A proposed law in Nassau County, Long Island would allow cops to sue protesters for harassment if they “seriously annoy” them while they’re on duty. The controversial measure, approved 12-6 by county lawmakers Monday, would allow first-responders to sue protesters and others who give them a hard time or threaten to cause them bodily harm, Fox News reported. The proposal from the GOP-led county board comes in the wake of last summer’s widespread clashes between police and Black Lives Matter protesters following the police custody death of George Floyd in Minneapolis. The bill still needs to go before County Executive Laura Curran, a Democrat seeking re-election, who said she would consult with the state Attorney General’s Office before making a call on the proposal. “I’m proud of the dedicated first responders who’ve made Nassau the safest...
    MINEOLA, N.Y. (CBSNewYork) – A bill on Long Island is dividing Democrats and rallying Republicans in Nassau County. It would allow police to sue protesters for discrimination, in certain cases. READ MORE: Clear Water On The Jersey Shore Dazzling Visitors As CBS2’s Jennifer McLogan reports, the bill would protect Nassau Police from hate crimes, and it is sparking controversy. “This bill is a clear act of retaliation against Black Lives Matter,” said civil rights attorney Frederick Brewington. Minority leaders and activists rallied to reject a Nassau legislative bill that would elevate police officer to “a protected class of first responders,” allowing cops to seek financial damages from protesters. “This is trying to shut down and dampen and chill the voices of those who would dissent and raise their voices against abuse by police,” Brewington said. The bill garnered national attention when a legislator who caucuses with the Democrats proposed enhancing the local human rights law by allowing the county to sue on behalf of police officers for discrimination if they are harassed, menaced or injured. “I, for one, do not go...
    NASSAU COUNTY, Long Island (WABC) -- A long debate continued at the Nassau County legislature on Monday. They are considering controversial legislation that would allow police officers to sue protesters and collect financial damages.'Newsday' reports the proposal would make police officers and other first responders a protected class under the county's human rights law.More than 40 people have spoken so far on Monday -- both for and against the bill.The law currently bars discrimination based on race, religion, gender, and sexual orientation, but no professions are protected under the law.Civil Rights activists argue that the bill is payback for demonstrations after the police killing of George Floyd last year in Minneapolis.ALSO READ | 10 people shot, 7 innocent bystanders, in 'brazen, coordinated attack' in QueensEMBED More News Videos Diana Rocco reports from the scene of the shooting in North Corona. ----------* More Long Island news* Send us a news tip* Download the abc7NY app for breaking news alerts * Follow us on YouTube Submit a News Tip
    (CNN)The Nassau County, New York, legislature will vote on a bill Monday that would allow all first responders, including police officers, to sue protesters and seek damages of up to $50,000.If the bill passes, first responders would be able to sue individuals they believe harassed, injured, menaced or assaulted them due to their status as a first responder or while they were in uniform. It also would allow officers and first responders to collect compensatory damages, punitive damages, and attorney's fees. Florida passes bill to crack down on riots, but critics warn it threatens peaceful protestThe County Attorney would serve as a lawyer for first responders, and individuals could be subject to a civil penalty of no more than $25,000 per violation to the "aggrieved" first responder, according to the bill. If the violation occurs during a "riot," the bill states the penalty can go up to $50,000.In May 2019, the county passed legislation to include first responders under its Human Rights Law, prohibiting discrimination against them. "Protecting our first responders must always be a top priority, especially in the...
    NEW YORK (CBSNewYork) — Proposed legislation would allow survivors of gender-based violence to seek legal recourse even after the statute of limitations has run out. Standing with survivors, New York City Council members Carlina Rivera and Selvena Brooks-Powers introduced a bill creating a so-called “look-back window” for civil actions under the Gender-Motivated Violence Act. READ MORE: NYC Helping Out-Of-Work NYCHA Residents Receive Training To Install Solar Panels “There is no timeline on processing trauma,” Rivera said. READ MORE: Several Arrested Near City Hall While Protesting Transfer Of Homeless Residents Out Of Hotels “With the new addition of a two-year look-back window to the GMVA, countless others would be able to come forward,” Brooks-Powers said. MORE NEWS: Teens Train To Become Next Generation Of Volunteer Firefighters At Long Islands Camp Fahrenheit 516 The legislation was drafted in partnership with survivors and is supported by Democratic nominee for Manhattan District Attorney Alvin Bragg.
    Vladimir Putin is to get two new ultramodern 'Doomsday' planes for use during a nuclear war. The adapted Ilyushin 96-400M's allow the Russian leader to control troops and missiles during an atomic catastrophe. The first of the new airborne command and control planes is now under construction, said a source in the military-industrial sector. The flying Kremlin command aircraft will replace the existing Ilyushin Il-80 Maxdomes which are on permanent standby. Vladimir Putin is to get two new ultramodern 'Doomsday' planes for use during a nuclear war The adapted Ilyushin 96-400M's (pictured) allow the Russian leader to control troops and missiles during an atomic catastrophe
    The Democrat-controlled House of Representatives has approved various spending packages that would effectively tear down a longstanding, legislative wall between taxpayer money and abortions.  In a series of unprecedented moves, Democrats removed language barring funding for abortions overseas (Helms Amendment, passed in 1973) and at home (Hyde Amendment, 1976) – both of which polling has shown to be unpopular with majorities of the American public.  A Marist poll, released in conjunction with the anti-abortion Knights of Columbus this year, showed 77% of Americans oppose "using tax dollars to support abortion in other countries." House committees, led by Democrats, also voted for appropriations that omitted longstanding bans on funding federal prisoners' abortions, abortions in D.C. (a.k.a. Dornan Amendment), funding through the Peace Corps (Young), and funding for elective abortion services or coverage administrative expenses under the Federal Employees Health Benefits Program (Smith FEHBP). The approved spending so far also excludes a requirement that foreign, nongovernmental organizations not perform abortions if they receive federal funding. That's in addition to the administration deciding to repeal the Mexico City Policy, which blocks taxpayer money...
    BOSTON (CBS) — Massachusetts lawmakers have reportedly agreed on a measure to extend early voting and voting by mail in local elections. The full Legislature is set to take up the proposed bill Monday, and it could be on Gov. Charlie Baker’s desk by the end of the week. Secretary of the Commonwealth Bill Galvin told WBZ-TV he’s optimistic that the bill will be approved. READ MORE: Red Cross Offers Amazon Gift Cards, Chance To Win Gas For A Year In Push For Blood Donations Galvin last month told legislative leaders that “urgent action” was needed to preserve mail-in voting, which was adopted in Massachusetts for the first time in 2020 during the pandemic. According to the State House News Service, House and Senate negotiators reached a compromise to essentially put pandemic voting rules back into effect until Dec. 15. READ MORE: Weymouth Police Looking For Volkswagen Jetta In Deadly Hit-And-Run Voters will be able to cast ballots by mail until then. Municipalities can also offer early voting no sooner than 10 days before an election. Cities and towns would...
    Texas Gov. Greg Abbott (R) on Sunday said that drive-thru voting would allow passengers riding in vehicles to have a "coercive effect" on voters while defending proposed state laws that would ban the practice. Abbott was asked by "Fox News Sunday" host Chris WallaceChristopher (Chris) WallaceTucker Carlson says he was pursuing Putin interview around time of spying claims Democrats should campaign on actually funding the police WaPost fact-checker shoots down GOP 'fiction' on Biden and 'defund the police' MORE why he would support laws that would make it harder for some to vote, questioning whether or not the motivation was to suppress the votes of people of color. Abbott initially argued that Harris County, where many voting practices are being challenged by the proposed state legislation, simply did not have the authority to "create its own election system." Wallace shot back, asking why Abbott would oppose these measures if they increased voter turnout, as the Texas governor himself has said he is in favor of, noting that no evidence of widespread voter fraud was ever discovered in Harris County. Abbott then stated that it is...
    Sen. Marsha Blackburn (R-TN) went after Taylor Swift in a new interview, claiming the pop star would be “the first victim” of a Marxist government. Swift has often called out the Tennessee Republican. In the 2018 midterm elections, Swift endorsed Democratic candidates in a rare political statement, writing that Blackburn’s voting record “appalls and terrifies” her. And in a documentary out in 2020, Swift derided Blackburn as “Trump in a wig”. In an interview with Breitbart this week, Blackburn made an appeal for Swift’s support, suggesting the alternative is Marxist authoritarianism. “When you talk about country music, and I know the left is all out now and trying to change country music and make it woke,” Blackburn said. “When I’m talking to my friends who are musicians and entertainers, I say, ‘If we have a socialistic government—if we have Marxism—you are going to be the first ones who will be cut off because the state would have to approve your music.’” “Taylor Swift came after me in my 2018 campaign,” she continued. “But Taylor Swift would be the first...
    By: KDKA-TV News Staff HARRISBURG (KDKA) — Part of the budget plan proposed in Pennsylvania would allow for college athletes to be compensated for their name, image, and likeness. READ MORE: Senate Majority Leader Kim Ward Undergoes Double Mastectomy Athletic scholarships couldn’t be reduced or revoked because of such compensation. READ MORE: Pittsburgh Weather: Temps Hit 90s, Humidity Expected To Stick Around On Monday, an NCAA committee recommended that all “Name, Image, Likeness” rules should be the responsibility of individual schools. MORE NEWS: Saint Vincent College Cleared After Bomb Threat 22 states have passed bills or had governors issue executive orders allowing athletes to cash in.
    Senate Democrats are making a push to give undocumented immigrants the opportunity to vote in school board elections. The proposal could require the State Board of Education to create an affidavit helping non-citizens register for school board elections. Current bill language requires potential voters to verify they are a parent, legal guardian or caregiver of a student. They must also live within the boundaries of a school district and intent to stay there until the next school board election. The bill's sponsor, Celina Villanueva, D-Chicago, said families should have the opportunity to play a bigger role in shaping their child’s future. “For too long, these families have been systematically excluded from participating in our democracy even at the most basic level,” Villanueva said. Thomas Bride, spokesman for the Illinois Association of County Clerks and Recorders said the change would create chaos. “The association has some real concerns about introducing the non-citizen voting into the school board elections primarily from a process point,” Bride said. “The elections are complicated in Illinois.” Tazewell County Clerk John Ackerman has been joined by a...
    Loading the player... On Monday, Republican Kentucky senator Mitch McConnell said it would be “highly unlikely” that a Biden-nominated Supreme Court justice would be confirmed by him and the Republican party if a vacancy opened up in 2024, CNN reports.  Also Read: McConnell leads GOP in attack on Dems’ voting rights bill McConnell’s update came from a Monday conversation on the Hugh Hewitt radio show. “I think in the middle of a presidential election, if you have a Senate of the opposite party of the president, you have to go back to the 1880s to find the last time a vacancy was filled,” said McConnell.  “So I think it’s highly unlikely. In fact, no, I don’t think either party if it controlled, if it were different from the president, would confirm a Supreme Court nominee in the middle of an election. What was different in 2020 was we were of the same party as the president,” the 79 year-old senator added. In 2020, Republicans in Congress who held the majority, infamously pushed former President Donald Trump’s...
    Senate Minority Leader McConnell suggested Monday it was “highly unlikely” that the Senate, if controlled by the GOP, would confirm a Supreme Court nomination from President Joe Biden in 2024. “Well, I think in the middle of a presidential election if you have a Senate of the opposite party of the president, you have to go back to the 1880s to find the last time a vacancy was filled,” McConnell said during an interview with radio host Hugh Hewitt. “I think it’s highly unlikely – in fact, no, I don’t think either party, if it were different from the president, would confirm a Supreme Court nominee in the middle of an election.” “What was different in 2020 was we were of the same party of the president and that’s why we went ahead with it,” he added. McConnell rejected former President Barack Obama’s nomination of Merrick Garland to fill the Supreme Court vacancy in 2016, months before the election took place. (RELATED: Democrats Introduce Bill That Would Add Four Justices To The Supreme Court: REPORT) WASHINGTON, DC – OCT. 22: Senate...
    SACRAMENTO, Calif. (KABC) -- Across California, many stores, restaurants, strip malls and shopping centers now stand vacant after shutting down during the COVID-19 pandemic. But could those brick-and-mortar buildings be repurposed to help solve the state's housing crisis?The Huntington Oaks shopping Center in Monrovia is just one of the many strip malls, large and small, struggling to stay alive. But even before the pandemic, consumer spending habits had already shifted."There has been an acceleration of retail to online sales," said state Sen. Anna Caballero, "and what that means is that people are not walking into retail stores like they were before."The result is vacant commercial and retail property on prime real estate, near major highways and with plenty of parking -- ideal, some lawmakers say, for multi-family housing."There's a real need for apartments, condos and townhouses," Caballero said.According to Caballero, California needs to build as many as 3.5 million housing units by 2025 to meet Gov. Gavin Newsom's campaign goal -- and production is way behind.Its why she's authored Senate Bill 6, known as the Neighborhood Homes Act. If passed,...
    The revenue from a waterfront ballpark at Howard Terminal would allow the traditionally penny-pinching A’s to pay as much as the top 10 teams in baseball, according to team president Dave Kaval. “We can go from having one of the lowest five payrolls in the league to a top-five or 10, depending on the year,” Kaval told this news organization on Tuesday. “It’s going to be such a remarkable change in our business and I think with the savvy and business acumen of (executive vice president) Billy Beane and (general manager) David Forst, giving them that type of resource is going to be incredible and that’s what we’re striving to do.” Oakland city officials will vote July 20 on the A’s $12 billion development proposal in West Oakland. Kaval, the A’s and MLB say Howard Terminal is the only site they will consider in Oakland. Kaval, owner John Fisher and other team officials visited Las Vegas last week to explore possible new ballpark sites. Despite their success on the field, the A’s annually rank in the cellar...
    NEW YORK (CBSNewYork) — During the pandemic you may have noticed an extra service fee added on to your restaurant bill. Those surcharges could be here to stay, CBS2’s Nick Caloway reported Tuesday. Those extra fees were temporarily allowed by the city last year to help businesses cover extra costs during the pandemic. They’ve gotten mixed reviews from customers. “I think the surcharges are kind of ridiculous, because, I mean, people have been out of work,” Harlem resident Tayler Harrison said. “Like as long as my food is good, it’s clean, and the ambiance is nice, like I said, I’m okay with it,” Dawn Hurd said. READ MORE: New York City Council Approves Optional 10% Restaurant Surcharge Fee But some say the surcharges, while well intentioned, ended up hurting workers. “They said if a consumer came in and they planned to tip 20%, they see a 10% surcharge, they think it’s going to workers, and they tip only 10% on top of that,” Saru Jayaraman said. CORONAVIRUS PANDEMIC Ask CBS2’s Dr. Max Your Vaccine Questions COVID Vaccine FAQ From CDC...
    SAN FRANCISCO (KPIX) — With much of the Bay Area already built out, it is a challenge to find places to create much-needed housing. But a bill in the state legislature would make it easier to build homes in commercial areas such as shopping malls. The Hilltop Mall in Richmond isn’t really a mall at all anymore. Its main anchor stores Macy’s, Sears and JC Penney closed up years ago. READ MORE: EDD Fraud: Federal Judge Issues Sweeping Injunction Against Bank of America It’s not so bleak at Stonestown Galleria in San Francisco, but inside, there are currently a number of vacant storefronts. “A lot of people that I know just shop online, honestly. Or they find cheaper options online,” said Jennifer Gonzalez. She and Valerie Varrigan are students at nearby SF State University. There is a proposal by the mall’s owners to turn the property into a town-center setting, adding 3,000 housing units to the mall’s vast parking lots. “I think it’s really interesting that we’re trying to use the resources that we already have, creating housing for people...
    OAKLAND — People would be allowed to move RVs or mobile homes onto private residential properties throughout the city under a proposed change to Oakland’s zoning and building codes. “Our old codes and zoning are no longer serving our needs,” Mayor Libby Schaaf said Tuesday during a news conference announcing the proposal she and council members Dan Kalb and Sheng Thao are backing. The proposal would provide a “comprehensive update to zoning and building codes to promote more flexibility and innovation, so we can build housing faster and cheaper,” Schaaf said. The proposal would mark a dramatic change for Oakland, which has banned mobile homes throughout the city, although some have been parked on public lots or city streets. “Our old codes and zoning are no longer serving our needs,” Schaaf said. The amendments to the city’s codes would allow people to live in RVs, mobile homes, manufactured homes and tiny houses on private properties in all residential zones if they comply with building codes. A few cities have adopted similar regulations to allow tiny homes on wheels, including San...
    PITTSBURGH (KDKA) — With more and more kids getting the coronavirus vaccine but many parents still hesitant, there are questions about when a teenager should be allowed to make their own medical decisions. A Pennsylvania state senator is now sponsoring a bill to allow kids ages 14 and older to get vaccines if their doctors recommend it, even if their parents don’t. READ MORE: Pitcairn Steps Up Enforcement Of 10 P.M. Curfew For Juveniles Right now, kids under 18 years old need consent from parents to get a vaccine. State Senator Amanda Cappelletti from Montgomery County is writing a bill to allow anyone 14 and older to make their own decision about vaccines after talking with their family doctor or pediatrician. The Taylor sisters are ready to get the coronavirus vaccine at a clinic at Imani Christian School. It’s not that they like shots, but they like the idea of being protected from the virus. “It makes sense to get it instead of risking everything without it,” said Amber. Their mom was excited too. “It was a no-brainer after...
    Sunday on New York City WABC 770 AM radio’s “The Cats Roundtable,” Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton (R) discussed the efforts his state and others are making to ensure voter integrity in elections after the 2020 election cycle. Paxton warned if states like Arizona, Wisconsin and Pennsylvania “don’t get their act together” when it comes to signature verification for mail-in voting, “we’ll never know if we have secure elections.” When asked about the argument that requiring voter ID is discriminatory, Paxton advised, “That’s just a red herring, and it’s just not true.” He went on to argue that anyone against requiring photo ID to vote wants to allow for others to be able to cheat in elections. “The only argument that they had was that they claimed it was discriminatory. The reality is everybody knows that’s not true because you have to have a photo ID [for everyday life],” Paxton stated. “We know it’s not discriminatory because everyone knows you have to have a photo ID,” he added. “The only reason you don’t want people to have a photo ID...
    U.S. House members plan to introduce two bipartisan bills Friday that address the origins of the coronavirus pandemic and would allow victims' families to sue China.  The first bill, the "Made in America Emergency Preparedness Act," would establish a 9/11-style bipartisan commission to investigate how the pandemic started. It is being introduced by five Democrats and five Republicans.  The second bill, dubbed the "Never Again International Outbreak Prevention Act," calls for allowing families of coronavirus victims to sue China by stripping sovereign immunity from it and any other countries "that have intentionally misled the international community on the outbreak." It will be introduced by U.S. Reps. Brian Fitzpatrick, R-Pa., and Conor Lamb, D-Pa. "In response to this current crisis, we must never again find ourselves caught off-guard, unable to protect our communities," a press release announcing the first bill says. "We should never again see nearly 600,000 American lives lost at risk and day to day life turned upside down."  Along with investigating the origin of the virus, the panel proposed by the first bill would also look into the...
    CHICAGO (CBS) — After months of stalling, Mayor Lori Lightfoot on Monday announced her plan to create a civilian police oversight board, one which would have significantly less authority than a competing proposal championed by a coalition of progressive, Black, and Latino aldermen. Under her plan, Lightfoot would retain the power to hire and fire the superintendent of the Chicago Police Department, the chief administrator of the Civilian Office of Police Accountability, and members of the Chicago Police Board. She also would also keep final say over the departments’ policies and budgets. READ MORE: Police: Woman Calls 911 In Villa Park To Report Person With Gun, Gets Shot And Killed By Officers After Coming At Them With Pellet Gun The mayor repeatedly has said, because she “wears the jacket” for crime in Chicago, she’s not willing to essentially hand over control of CPD to a civilian oversight board. She reiterated that stance on Monday. “Public safety, I think, is one of the most critical responsibilities of any mayor – me and anybody who will come from me. The relationship between...
    Sen. Tommy Tuberville (R-AL), along with Sens. Thom Tillis (R-NC) and Mike Rounds (R-SD), introduced legislation this week to allow local and state law enforcement to enforce federal immigration law. The legislation, known as the Empowering Law Enforcement Act, aims to combat the Biden administration’s gutting of interior immigration enforcement through a series of “sanctuary country” orders that are preventing about nine-in-ten deportations of illegal aliens by the Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) agency. The legislation grants local and state law enforcement the ability to investigate, identify, apprehend, arrest, detain, or transfer illegal aliens while extending the period by which illegal aliens can be detained in ICE custody to ensure they are not released back into American communities. “If the Biden administration is insistent on taking away ICE’s ability to enforce our immigration laws, then we should make sure our state and local law enforcement has the authority to respond to the influx of illegal migrants in our communities,” Tuberville said in a statement. The legislation would amend the Immigration and Nationality Act to: Delegate immigration enforcement authority to local and...
    Bipartisan legislation from a group of 15 senators would provide payments to government employees injured by so-called Havana syndrome attacks while serving abroad. The legislation comes amid reports that officials are investigating two suspected attacks on U.S. soil, one of which took place near the Ellipse, the grassy oval lawn just south of the White House, harming a National Security Council official. The suspected attacks, which first occurred in Havana, Cuba, in 2016, have since surfaced in a number of countries, leaving U.S. diplomats and analysts with neurological symptoms ranging from vertigo to insomnia to cognitive difficulties. The legislation would allow both the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) and the State Department to provide injured employees additional financial support, and gives each agency until next year to outline how much funding they will need for the compensation. “The injuries that many ‘Havana Syndrome’ victims have endured are significant and life-altering.  To make matters worse, some of the victims did not receive the financial and medical support they should have expected from their government when they first reported their injuries.  This is...
    Rep. Ilhan Omar (D-MN), in a statement Monday, said the “United States should not stand idly by” allowing casualties to rise in Gaza while President Joe Biden lets “precision-guided weaponry” be given to Israel “without any strings attached.” “The violence in Israel and the Gaza Strip is spiraling out of control,” Omar said in the statement. The congresswoman has blamed Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu for “at least 1,505 casualties in Gaza, including 200 deaths, 59 of them children.” She added Israel is going ahead with this, with the “direct funding and military assistance from the United States of America.” “It would be appalling for the Biden administration to go through with $735 million in precision-guided weaponry to Netanyahu without any strings attached in the wake of escalating violence and attacks on civilians,” Omar continued to say in her statement when referring to Netanyahu. In her statement, Omar had also called out the attacks from Hamas by mentioning the “indiscriminate” attacks that have killed at least ten Israelis and two children, saying, “to be clear, this is also a war crime.” “We...
    A new Illinois bill would allow bars and restaurants to give customers who have been vaccinated a free drink as businesses across the country work to boost inoculation efforts. The legislation, known as HB 4078, would allow “a retail licensee” to provide one free alcoholic drink to a customer “to encourage participation in any COVID-19 vaccination program.” The bill, filed Tuesday by Democratic state Rep. Michael Zalewski, would allow customers to get a free drink after providing proof that they received a vaccine. The proposed giveaway would last six months after being enacted. It applies to bars and restaurants, according to multiple reports. Businesses large and small are getting more involved fighting off the coronavirus pandemic by offering incentives for people to get vaccinated. Offers have included the NFL giving vaccinated consumers 25 percent off purchases made on its website later this year, Target offering $5 coupons to customers who get vaccinated in stores and more.  Other businesses and city and state governments have partnered to offer beer and other beverages to people as a vaccine incentive. Washington, D.C., officials offered free beer at...
    Oregon lawmakers are working on giving teacher bonuses for having too many kids in classrooms a required component of school-union negotiations, something that costs Portland taxpayers millions of dollars. A bill being considered in the Oregon Legislature this session, Senate Bill 580, would make class sizes a required component allowed in teacher union contract bargaining. The bill provides no increased state funding to schools. Brad Cole, a student counselor and social studies teacher at North Clackamas School District, testified to state lawmakers in March that he feels under-equipped to teach 35 to 40 students at a time in his classroom. Cole told the Senate Committee on Education he feels like a doctor with three hours to perform a six-hour surgery every day he steps into the classroom. "You might be able to perform the surgery in that time, but what will the outcome be for your patients?" Cole said. "Is it really fair to them?" Critics have called the bill an unfunded mandate that could outsource costs onto lower-income school districts when they can least afford to hire more teachers....
                      by J.D. Davidson  Ohio businesses would be able to continue to operate during a public health emergency if a bill passed by the Ohio House clears the Senate and is signed by Gov. Mike DeWine. House Bill 215 would require businesses to comply with safety standards from government orders or regulations to stay open, but it does provide an avenue to keep businesses up in running in times of emergency. “Small business owners had their worlds turned upside down when they were forced to shut down last year,” Rep. Jon Cross, R-Kenton, said. “Getting this bill signed into law will send a strong message that Ohio will remain open for business and keep our economy moving forward.” The Business Fairness Act, which was passed in the House on Thursday, designates all businesses as essential. Cross, along with Rep. Shane Wilkin, R-Hillsboro, said it promotes fairness among big and small businesses by giving any business the ability to maintain operations during a public health emergency. The legislation now moves to the Senate...
    Getty Mac Jones Everyone is seemingly still trying to get Cam Newton away from the New England Patriots. Bill Belichick selected Alabama’s Mac Jones with the No. 15 selection in the 2021 NFL Draft, so he is obviously the guy earmarked as the Patriots’ quarterback of the future. The future can’t come soon enough for some Patriots fans and members of the media. Despite the fact Belichick announced Newton is his starting quarterback, there is still a cry for Jones to start from Day 1. NFL.com analyst Bucky Brooks went as far as to suggest the Patriots trade Newton, whom he believes has a personality so big and a physique so intimidating, that his presence may swallow Jones, thereby stunting his growth as a quarterback. Think that’s an exaggerated interpretation? Here is Brooks’ quote from Daniel Jeremiah’s Move the Sticks podcast on Tuesday: I will say this though, when Mac Jones shows up in the locker room hopefully he’s been working out a little bit. Because he’ll be standing next to Cam Newton, and it’s going to be hard. Now...
    ELMHURST, Ill. (CBS) — A neighborhood in west suburban Elmhurst is an uproar about a house serving as a home for former addicts. The house has been in violation of city code for more than a year. And as CBS 2 Political Investigator Dana Kozlov reported Wednesday night, neighbors are fighting a zoning change that would allow for seven people to stay there. READ MORE: New Chicago Heights Park District Board Refusing To Pay $212,000 Buyout To Departing Superintendent, But It May Not Be So Simple This is not your typical not-in-my-backyard story. The people living in the area are not opposed to a recovery home. What they don’t like is the way the City of Elmhurst, or the property owner, are going about it. The house in question is an unassuming one on a quiet Elmhurst block – except, that is, for a sign in front that notifies neighbors of a pending conditional use permit – or a zoning change – allowing it to become a so-called sober house for seven people. “We actually are OK with the concept...
    A new proposal in Florida would allow a student to record their college professors' lectures in order to use the information as evidence of political bias.  TENNESSEE PROFESSOR REJECTS 'RACIST' LABEL IN FLYERS DISTRIBUTED BY COLLEAGUES According to the bill, students would be permitted to conduct "free-speech activities", including "all forms of peaceful assembly, protests, and speeches; distributing literature; carrying signs; circulating petitions; faculty research, lectures, writings, and commentary, whether published or unpublished; and the recording and publication, including the Internet publication, of video or audio recorded in outdoor areas of campus." "The State Board of Education may not shield students, faculty, or staff at Florida College System institutions from free speech protected under the First Amendment to the United States Constitution," the text of the bill adds.  The legislation specificies that the audio and video recordings are for students' "own personal educational use, in connection with a complaint to the public institution of higher education where the recording was made, or as evidence in, or in preparation for, a criminal or civil proceeding." The lecture recording is prohibited from being published publicly without the consent of the professor.  CALIFORNIA, MARYLAND UNIVERSITY SYSTEMS...