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    Two Pennsylvania women were arrested Friday for allegedly storming the U.S. Capitol building during the Jan. 6 breach and expressing intent to kill Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi. Dawn Bancroft and Diana Santos-Smith are facing three charges of knowingly entering or remaining in a restricted building without lawful authority, violent entry, and disorderly conduct on Capitol grounds. In a Friday affidavit, an FBI special agent described how cellphone footage, apparently filmed by Bancroft, show the pair exiting the Capitol. "We broke into the Capitol…we got inside, we did our part," Bancroft, who wore a MAGA ski-cap, says in the video. "We were looking for Nancy to shoot her in the friggin’ brain but we didn’t find her." But when prosecutors interviewed Santos-Smith, who is also depicted in the affidavit wearing a red MAGA baseball cap, on Jan. 20, she denied ever entering the building. They later showed her a video of the two...
    Kyle Rittenhouse listens to defense attorney John Pierce during an extradition hearing in Lake County Courthouse, in Waukegan, Illinois on October 30, 2020. Nam Y. Huh/Pool/AP Photos The terms of Kyle Rittenhouse's bond were modified after he was seen at a bar with his mother and members of the far-right Proud Boys, according to FOX 6.  Kenosha County prosecutors previously requested to adjust his bond conditions after being spotted using white power associated hand symbols and drinking beers following his release.  Rittenhouse,18, is the gunman associated with the deaths of two people and injuring another during a Jacob Blake protest in Kenosha, Wisconsin last summer.  Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. The bond conditions for  18-year-old Kyle Rittenhouse were modified on Friday by a judge, forbidding him from drinking alcohol after he was recently sighted consuming beers and using a white supremacist associated "OK" hand signs at...
    Prosecutors said the man arrived at O'Hare from Los Angeles in October, but was just discovered Saturday. tupungato/iStock A 36-year-old California man lived at Chicago's O'Hare International Airport for three months before being discovered, according to multiple reports. Prosecutors said the man arrived at O'Hare from Los Angeles in October, but told police he was too scared to fly because of COVID-19. He was discovered Saturday when two United Airlines employees asked him for identification and he displayed a badge that had been reported missing in October. Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. A 36-year-old California man lived at Chicago's O'Hare International Airport for three months before being discovered, according to multiple reports. Prosecutors said the man told police he was too scared to fly because of COVID-19, the Chicago Tribune reported. Aditya Singh arrived at O'Hare from Los Angeles on October 19, and lived in the...
    Jeffrey Epstein and Ghislaine Maxwell in 2005. Joe Schildhorn/Patrick McMullan via Getty Images In a federal court filing on Monday, lawyers for Ghislaine Maxwell — the multimillionaire, jet-setting longtime associate of the now-dead sex offender Jeffrey Epstein — argued that Maxwell should be released on bail. She'd never try to flee the United States, they said, because Maxwell is in a loving relationship with her husband and would never turn his back on him. "She will not risk destroying the lives and financial well-being of those she holds most dear to live as a fugitive during a worldwide pandemic," the lawyers wrote. But earlier this year, prosecutors say, Maxwell told government officials she was "in the process of divorcing her husband." The revelation comes from a new court document filed on Friday afternoon arguing against Maxwell's bail application. Maxwell was arrested in July and charged with various crimes related...
    Getty Police tape in Minnesota On August 19, 2015, 40-year-old Janette Pigman-Kruse was shot in the chest and killed while in her bed at her home in Brewster, Minnesota, a small town northeast of Worthington. At the time, her husband Christopher Kruse called 911 and said an intruder had broken in and killed her. The case stayed unsolved for over three years, with detectives remaining tight-lipped about the investigation and possible suspects. In March 2019, Pigman-Kruse’s husband was indicted by a grand jury and charged with first-degree premeditated murder, The Globe reported. The indictment was not made public so it wasn’t until Kruse’s trial that the evidence against Kruse was revealed, including that prosecutors said he was the only person with the motive to kill Pigman-Kruse. Kruse’s trial took place in early 2020, at which point the prosecution called 37 witnesses to argue the case against him.Law Enforcement...
    A Snipes store in Hamburg, Germany. Daniel Reinhardt/dpa (Photo by Daniel Reinhardt/picture alliance via Getty Images Two sisters were asked to wear a face mask while shopping at a Snipes show store in Chicago and responded by stabbing a security guard 27 times, prosecutors said Tuesday in a bail hearing streamed on YouTube and reported by the Chicago Sun-Times. The women were charged with attempted murder, which a defense attorney argued in the hearing was too hefty for an act of self-defense, the Chicago Tribune reported. The charges come after retail workers have faced months of tense confrontations and violent attacks over face masks, which many states have mandated in public places and top health experts have recommended to prevent the spread of the novel coronavirus. Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. When 18-year-old Jayla Hill and her older sister Jessica, 21, entered a Snipes shoe store...
    A bi-racial woman received national media attention for her story that she had been attacked by four white males who doused her with gasoline and lit her on fire, but law enforcement agencies say they could not find any evidence to support her claims. 18-year-old Althea Bernstein said that she was attacked by four white males while she was driving through a protest in Madison, Wisconsin, in June. She claimed that the men yelled a racial slur at her when she stopped at a red light, and someone sprayed lighter fluid on her before lighting her on fire. Bernstein's harrowing story made national headlines and many media figures championed her cause, including PBS White Correspondent Yamiche Alcindor. An 18-year-old black woman says white men yelling racial slurs set her on fire yesterday in Wisconsin. Althea Bern… https://t.co/mnFBn7ZZQn — Yamiche Alcindor (@Yamiche Alcindor)1593114179.0Berstein received a...
    MADELEINE McCann’s parents refuse to believe their daughter is dead until her body is found - despite German cops claiming she "cannot be alive." Kate and Gerry have been left exasperated by prosecutors saying their daughter is a murder victim and they are investigating a key suspect but do not have enough evidence to charge him. 4Kate and Gerry McCann are said to have been left in limbo by German prosecutorsCredit: PA:Press Association A family source has now said: "Until a body is found and it is proved to be Madeleine’s, Kate and Gerry are not giving up hope. "These latest ‘she’s dead but there's no body’ theories have been repeated over the past three-and-a-half months but in all this time there appears to be no significant new development."It leaves Kate and Gerry on tenterhooks and in a state of limbo not knowing if there will be a breakthrough or...
    Attorney General Bill Barr said during a conference call with U.S. Attorneys last week that charging Americans with sedition was on the menu of criminal statutes available to federal prosecutors examining how to charge violent protesters, the Wall Street Journal reported on Wednesday. According to the Journal, which cited “people familiar” with the conference call, the attorney general “encouraged the prosecutors to seek a number federal charges, including under a rarely used sedition law, even when state charges could apply.” The seditious conspiracy statute, 18 U.S. Code § 2384, is a means of punishing those who conspire to violently overthrow or who oppose by force the authority the U.S. government or who by force conspire to seize federal property: If two or more persons in any State or Territory, or in any place subject to the jurisdiction of the United States, conspire to overthrow, put down, or to destroy by...
    A Louisiana grand jury indicted eight Shreveport police officers over the violent beating of two men who were not resisting arrest. YouTube/ArkLaTex Homepage Eight Shreveport police officers have been indicted in the beating of two men in January who had surrendered with their hands in the air. Each officer was charged with malfeasance in office, and was booked into the local jail and released on bond. Prosecutors said the officers broke one man's orbital bone and another man's nose in the beating, and punched, kicked, and tased the men. Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. A Louisiana grand jury has indicted eight police officers, alleging that they brutally beat two men who had surrendered with their hands in the air. Each officer was charged with a count of malfeasance in office over the beating that left one victim with a broken orbital plate and another with a...
    For seven hours Monday, family members of the dozens of victims of the Golden State Killer listened while he croaked out his guilty pleas. With a plastic visor covering his face, Joseph James DeAngelo Jr. — mouth agape, seated between his attorneys and dressed in an orange jail jumpsuit, sitting behind a table on top of a stage in the middle of a university ballroom — pleaded guilty to 13 murders and 13 kidnappings he committed over about 13 years across California. In case after case, DeAngelo, 72, admitted his guilt. In 161 other crimes, including rapes, robberies and burglaries, DeAngelo was not charged, but he admitted he did those, too. “Guilty,” Joseph James DeAngelo Jr. said in a raspy, high-pitched voice. “I admit.” Each time, the 74-year-old DeAngelo slowly leaned forward to speak into the mic, then haltingly entered his plea. Sometimes his head swayed, or nodded slightly, often...
    NICOLE WINFIELD, Associated Press ROME (AP) — Vatican prosecutors have ordered the seizure of documents and computers from the administrative offices of St. Peter’s Basilica in an apparently new investigation into financial irregularities in the Holy See. The Vatican said Tuesday that Pope Francis also named a special commissioner to run the basilica, reorganize its offices, update its statutes to comply with new Vatican norms on procurement and contracting, and to “clarify its administration.” The Vatican said both decisions stemmed from a report from the Vatican’s auditor general. It said based on the auditor’s report, the Vatican’s criminal prosecutors authorized the seizure Tuesday of documentation and computers from the “Fabbrica di San Pietro,” the offices that manage the pope's basilica. The Vatican provided no details about what the auditor flagged or the specific problems the extraordinary commissioner has been tasked with fixing. The commissioner, Bishop Mario Giordana, previously conducted an...
    ROME (AP) — Vatican prosecutors have ordered the seizure of documents and computers from the administrative offices of St. Peter’s Basilica in an apparently new investigation into financial irregularities in the Holy See. The Vatican said Tuesday that Pope Francis also named a special commissioner to run the basilica, reorganize its offices, update its statutes to comply with new Vatican norms on procurement and contracting, and to “clarify its administration.” The Vatican said both decisions stemmed from a report from the Vatican’s auditor general. It said based on the auditor’s report, the Vatican’s criminal prosecutors authorized the seizure Tuesday of documentation and computers from the “Fabbrica di San Pietro,” the offices that manage the pope’s basilica. The Vatican provided no details about what the auditor flagged or the specific problems the extraordinary commissioner has been tasked with fixing. The commissioner, Bishop Mario Giordana, previously conducted an investigation into financial...
    Reuters June 29, 2020 0 Comments An ex-policeman accused of being the “Golden State Killer,” a serial predator who terrorized much of California with a string of slayings, rapes and break-ins over 10 years, pleaded guilty on Monday to multiple murder and kidnapping charges. Joseph James DeAngelo, 74, entered the pleas as part of a broader agreement outlined by prosecutors at Monday’s court hearing, to admit to all the offenses he stands accused of, charged and uncharged, stemming from a crime wave dating back to the mid-1970s. Under terms of the plea deal, DeAngelo will face a sentence of life in prison without the possibility of parole. While sparing the defendant from a potential death sentence, the deal also saves a dwindling number of aging survivors, victims’ families, witnesses and investigators involved in the case from legal proceedings that would likely have stretched on for years, prosecutors said. The...
    EAST PALO ALTO (CBS SF) — A 34-year-old man has been sentenced to more than 95 years in prison for a fatal shooting in East Palo Alto in 2015 as well as a non-fatal shooting months earlier, San Mateo County prosecutors said Monday. Freeman Owens III was sentenced Friday after being convicted last November of second-degree murder and other charges for the fatal shooting of 27-year-old Mark Jack on the evening of July 18, 2015, and a separate shooting in the same area on April 25, 2015, according to the San Mateo County District Attorney’s Office. Owens shot Jack outside of the Light Tree Apartments on East Bayshore Road in East Palo Alto following an argument over a woman, prosecutors said. During the investigation into the fatal shooting, authorities learned Owens had been involved in the April shooting, which also happened at the same apartment complex. Owens shot someone once in...
    A married Virginia couple was busted trying to flee the country after they illegally received nearly $1.5 million in federal funds meant for struggling businesses during the pandemic, prosecutors said. Monica Magdalena Jaworska, 43, and her husband, Tarik Jaafar, 42, were arrested at JFK Airport in New York for the alleged scam earlier this month after buying one-way tickets to Poland, according to US Attorney’s Office Eastern District of Virginia. Prosecutors allege the pair filed 18 different loan applications under the federal Paycheck Protection Program, using bogus IRS forms to claim they were supporting dozens of employees. They were ultimately approved for four loans totaling more than $1.4 million, prosecutors said. But an investigation revealed the businesses didn’t really exist, according to an affidavit filed by the Small Business Administration. The couple bought the plane tickets after officers contacted them for an interview, prosecutors said. Most of the funds...
    PITTSBURGH (AP) — Prosecutors asked a judge to stiffen the home confinement and probation sentences imposed on a former librarian and a bookseller who pleaded guilty in the theft of rare books from the Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh in a years-long scheme. Common Pleas Judge Alexander Bicket sentenced 56-year-old John Schulman earlier this month to four years of home confinement and 64-year-old Gregory Priore to three years of home confinement. Both were ordered to spend a dozen years on probation after completing their sentences. Priore, former manager of the rare books room at the library, pleaded guilty in January to theft and receiving stolen property. Schulman, the owner of Caliban Book Shop, pleaded guilty to theft by deception, receiving stolen property and forgery. The judge told the two men that if not for the pandemic, their sentences would have been stiffer. Deputy District Attorney Brian Catanzarite suggested Friday that Bicket...
    KINSHASA (Reuters) - The Democratic Republic of Congo's Justice Minister Celestin Tunda was released from custody on Saturday just hours after his arrest in the capital Kinshasa, the city's chief of police said. Tunda was questioned by prosecutors for several hours at the court of cassation after surrendering to police at his home on Saturday afternoon. "He's been released," said Kinshasa's police chief, Sylvano Kasongo. (Reporting by Stanis Bujakera; writing by Hereward Holland; editing by Jonathan Oatis) Copyright 2020 Thomson Reuters.
    Los Angeles County authorities have received 25 new complaints of sexual misconduct against Ron Jeremy this week, including 13 that may have taken place in Southern California, a prosecutor said in court Friday. While arguing over a motion to reduce bail for the adult film star — who was charged Tuesday with sexually assaulting four women in West Hollywood — Deputy Dist. Atty. Paul Thompson disclosed the new complaints in a downtown courtroom. Thompson said it is “certainly possible” the new claims could lead to additional charges, and noted the claims ranged from groping to overt acts of sexual violence. The allegations were all received by law enforcement officials after news broke that Jeremy was being prosecuted, Thompson said. Jeremy surrendered to authorities Tuesday after the Los Angeles County district attorney’s office charged him with eight counts of forcible rape, forcible oral copulation and sexual battery stemming from allegations...
    (CNN)Notorious former Washington insider Jack Abramoff appears headed back to prison after entering into a plea deal with federal prosecutors in San Francisco.Prosecutors announced on Thursday that Abramoff is charged with conspiracy to commit wire fraud related to cryptocurrency and lobbying disclosure.At a news conference in San Francisco, US Attorney David Anderson said Abramoff has agreed to plead guilty and faces up to five years in prison.The Securities and Exchange Commission also sued Abramoff for conducting a fraudulent, unregistered offering and sale of the digital token called AML Bitcoin.Abramoff served 43 months in prison in the early 2000s for his role at the center of a lobbying scandal that also resulted in the conviction of officials from the George W. Bush White House, US Representative Bob Ney and nine other lobbyists and congressional aides. He pleaded guilty to a raft of federal corruption charges and agreed to cooperate with prosecutors...
    WAYNE COUNTY, MI (PATCH) — A 28-year-old Roseville woman is accused of killing her mother’s pet dog, Wayne County Prosecutors said Wednesday. Shavon Lewis Roby is charged with one count of second-degree animal killing, a felony punishable by up to seven years in prison, prosecutors said. Prosecutors said that on June 14, Roby took her mother’s dog and hung it from a gate in the 990 block of East Euclid Street with jumper cables. For the complete story, visit here. © 2020 CBS Broadcasting Inc. All Rights Reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. Related
    EAST BRUNSWICK, N.J. (AP) — Authorities say electricity didn't play a role in the drowning deaths of three family members in their backyard swimming pool in New Jersey. Sixty-two-year-old Bharat Patel, his 33-year old daughter-in-law Nisha Patel and her 8-year-old daughter were found unresponsive in the above-ground pool Monday afternoon by East Brunswick police responding to a 911 call from neighbors who heard screams. Middlesex County prosecutors and police said Wednesday that electricity played no part in their deaths. They said that while the above-ground pool was mostly shallow at 3 1/2 feet deep, a portion of the pool was 7 feet deep and “It doesn't appear that the victims knew how to swim." The county's regional medical examiner determined the cause of death to be drowning and ruled the manner of death as accidental for all three victims. The investigation is continuing, and anyone with information is asked to...
    By Jeremy Herb and Katelyn Polantz | CNN Two prosecutors in the Justice Department leveled remarkable allegations against Attorney General William Barr and the Justice Department on Wednesday, accusing senior Justice Department officials of politicizing DOJ investigations and the sentencing of a friend of President Donald Trump. Aaron Zelinsky, a prosecutor on former special counsel Robert Mueller’s team, told a congressional committee that the sentencing recommendation for Trump’s longtime friend and adviser Roger Stone was watered down due to political pressure from the “highest levels” of the Justice Department as a result of Stone’s “relationship with the President.” Zelinsky, who now works in the Maryland US Attorney’s Office, said in response to questions from House Judiciary Chairman Jerry Nadler that Barr’s decision in the Stone case was wrong, unethical and against department policy. “What I heard, repeatedly, was that this leniency was happening because of Stone’s relationship to the...
    OMAHA, Neb. (AP) — An Omaha man has been sentenced to nearly four years in prison and ordered to pay more than $809,000 in restitution for Medicare fraud he conducted in 16 states. Nereus Sutko, 38, visited assisted-living facilities, retirement centers and low-income housing complexes in Nebraska, Iowa, Kansas, Missouri and 12 other states, federal prosecutors said, where he held pizza and ice cream parties and convinced elderly residents to sign up for Medicare-funded products that he never delivered. Sutko collected more than $1.8 million from Medicare, Nebraska Medicaid and Iowa Medicaid, much of it based on fraudulent claims, prosecutors said. Sutko pleaded guilty in December to health care fraud. U.S. District Judge John Gerrard on Tuesday also ordered Sutko to forfeit a Corvette and speedboat, among other property he paid for with the ill-gotten money. Sutko is scheduled to report to prison on Sept. 9 to begin serving the...
    BURLINGAME (CBS SF) — A 55-year-old San Francisco man has been charged with making criminal threats with a hate crime enhancement for allegedly threatening to shoot people wearing Black Lives Matter shirts at a restaurant in Burlingame earlier this month, prosecutors said Wednesday. Steven Cibotti is accused of confronting a family of five at about 5:25 p.m. on June 7 at Flights Restaurant at 1100 Burlingame Ave. after the family had attended a march in San Francisco, according to the San Mateo County District Attorney’s Office. The family, which includes children ages 7, 5 and 2, had T-shirts on that said Black Lives Matter, and Cibotti allegedly approached their table and yelled “blue lives matter” and pushed their table, prosecutors said. The children’s father told Cibotti not to speak to the family like that, and Cibotti then allegedly yelled, “f— you, if I had a gun, I would shoot...
    MEMPHIS, Tenn. (AP) — A Tennessee convict serving prison time for a 2001 rape has been charged with killing two women later that year, prosecutors said. A Shelby County grand jury has indicted Thomas Maupin, 70, on murder charges in the deaths of two women whose bodies were found in a remote area of Memphis in 2001. Maupin is currently serving an eight-year prison sentence after pleading guilty in 2017 to stabbing and raping another woman in Memphis, also in 2001. Dentures collected by investigators in that case had been placed in a police property room with a sexual assault kit, including DNA evidence. But the rape kit evidence became part of a heavy backlog and wasn't tested until 2016, prosecutors said Tuesday. Evidence from the rape investigation led to the reopening of the two murder cases, prosecutors said. Maupin also served 12 years in prison in Washington for the...
    PHOENIX (AP) — A Fort Defiance man accused of a fatal stabbing has been sentenced to 17 ½ years in federal prison. Prosecutors said 25-year-old Lodi Gene Bitsie II was sentenced Monday in U.S. District Court in Phoenix. Bitsie previously pleaded guilty to second-degree murder in the April 2019 incident on the Navajo Nation reservation. Prosecutors said Bitsie argued with the victim before punching him and then stabbing him in chest with a large knife. They said the victim died from the stab wounds. The FBI investigated the case because it was on tribal land. Copyright 2020 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed. Tags: New Mexico, Arizona
    Dozens of former prosecutors are voicing concerns over the criminal charges against a pair of New York City lawyers accused of firebombing a police vehicle amid violent protests last month, with some claiming the prosecution appears to be based more on politics than public safety. In a written brief to a federal court on Tuesday, 56 former federal prosecutors urged the 2nd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals to reject government efforts to keep Colinford Mattis and Urooj Rahman in custody. Both face a series of charges that could carry at least 45 years in prison. “The government seems to be trying to do everything it can to punish people charged in these protests as harshly as possible, and they’re going way overboard here,” said Duncan Levin, a former prosecutor who worked for the U.S. Attorney’s Office in Brooklyn. NY POST: PHOTO SHOWS WOMAN HOLDING MOLOTOV Colinford Mattis, 32, and Urooj Rahman, 31, were ordered to...
    NEW YORK (AP) — Dozens of former prosecutors are questioning the government’s handling of a case against two lawyers hit with charges that could put them in prison for nearly 50 years for torching an empty New York City police vehicle last month. Colinford Mattis and Urooj Rahman, a pair of young Brooklyn attorneys, face federal counts that would carry at least 45 years in prison if they are convicted of all counts, including conspiracy. No one was injured in the attack, which came amid an eruption of demonstrations following the death of George Floyd. A magistrate judge had freed the lawyers on bail, but they were detained again after federal prosecutors in Brooklyn appealed the decision. The 2nd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals heard arguments Tuesday. Fifty-six former federal prosecutors urged the court in a written brief to reject the government’s efforts to keep the attorneys behind bars...
    A high schooler in Chicago has confessed to killing a woman after she told him she was transgender, according to police. Orlando Perez told officers he shot Selena Reyes-Hernandez twice in her home, then came back and fired into her body again, the Chicago Sun-Times reported. "It's even more heinous crime," a rep for the Chicago Police Department told reporters. "Like, 'I'm going to kill someone because of how they choose to live their life.'" Reyes-Hernandez is at least the 16th transgender person killed so far in 2020. Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. A high-school student in Chicago has confessed to killing a transgender woman after she disclosed her gender identity to him, according to police. Orlando Perez told law enforcement he shot Selena Reyes-Hernandez twice in her home, then came back and fired his gun again into her body, the Chicago Sun-Times reported. At a press...
    NEW YORK (WABC) -- A U.S. Army soldier gave classified information about American troops stationed overseas to a white supremacist group based in Britain, federal prosecutors alleged Monday.Ethan Melzer, 22, allegedly planned to attack his own Army unit by sending sensitive details about its location, movements and security to members of an extremist group, Order of the Nine Angels, according to an indictment unsealed in Manhattan federal court.The FBI and the U.S. Army thwarted Melzer's plot in late May and he was arrested on June 10.Melzer is charged with conspiring and attempting to murder U.S. nationals, conspiring and attempting to murder military service members, providing and attempting to provide material support to terrorists, and conspiring to murder and maim in a foreign country."As alleged, Ethan Melzer, a private in the U.S. Army, was the enemy within," said acting U.S. Attorney Audrey Strauss. "Melzer allegedly attempted to orchestrate a murderous ambush...
    THE HAGUE, Netherlands (AP) — Prosecutors sought Monday to overturn former Ivorian President Laurent Gbagbo’s acquittal last year on crimes against humanity charges stemming from his alleged role in post-election violence that killed 3,000 people nearly a decade ago. Gbagbo and former Ivorian youth minister Charles Ble Goude have both been unable to return to the West African nation since their January 2019 acquittals under the terms of their release set by the International Criminal Court. They remain in Belgium and have handed over their passports awaiting the outcome of the appeal. Their trial had been halted at the halfway stage when the court said prosecutors had failed to prove their case. In appealing that decision, the prosecutor’s office said that decision was “legally and procedurally defective such that it cannot have the legal effect of dismissing all charges against M. Gbagbo and Mr. Ble Goude.” No decision is immediately...
    KABUL, Afghanistan (AP) — Gunmen opened fire at a car belonging to the Afghan attorney general’s office on Monday morning in eastern Kabul, killing five people inside, including two prosecutors, an official said. The driver of the car and two other employees were among those killed, said Kabul police spokesman Ferdaws Faramarz. No one immediately claimed responsibility for the attack but recently violence has spiked in Afghanistan, with most of the attacks claimed by the Islamic State group’s affiliate in the country. The IS in Afghanistan is headquartered in eastern Nangarhar province. According to a statement from the attorney general’s office, the car was on the way to office when it was targeted. The gunmen fled the scene, the police said. Faramarz said an investigation was underway. In early June, IS claimed responsibility of a bomb explosion in a mosque in Kabul that killed two people, including the...
    BERLIN (AP) — A Syrian man accused of torturing an inmate while working as a doctor at a prison run by military intelligence in his homeland has been arrested in Germany, prosecutors said Monday. The suspect, identified only as Alaa M. in line with German privacy rules, was arrested in the central state of Hesse on Friday, federal prosecutors said. He is suspected of bodily harm and committing a crime against humanity. The case relates to M.’s alleged actions at a prison in the Syrian city of Homs in late 2011, when a doctor was called as a man arrested for taking part in a demonstration suffered an epileptic fit after being tortured, according to a statement from prosecutors. The suspect beat the man with a plastic pipe and then kicked him after he fell to the ground, they said. After the victim’s condition worsened the following day,...
    NEW YORK (AP) — Former Manhattan U.S. Attorney Preet Bharara had a snickering response to news that his successor as top federal prosecutor was “stepping down” from the job. “Doesn’t sound like ‘stepping down,’” Bharara tweeted soon after the announcement was made Friday night that Geoffrey S. Berman was out. He would know. The Southern District of New York, an office older than the Justice Department itself, has long prided itself on the talent of its prosecutors, the import of its cases and an independence from Washington that has earned it the moniker of “Sovereign District.” But that hasn’t spared officials from being fired by Washington, as both Bharara and Berman have learned in 3 1/2 years. The top prosecutors there have enjoyed an outsize celebrity status, including Rudy Giuliani (later mayor of New York), James Comey (later FBI director) Mary Jo White (later head of the Securities and Exchange...
    NEW YORK – Former Manhattan U.S. Attorney Preet Bharara had a snickering response to news that his successor as top federal prosecutor was “stepping down” from the job. “Doesn't sound like ‘stepping down,’” Bharara tweeted soon after the announcement was made Friday night that Geoffrey S. Berman was out. He would know. The Southern District of New York, an office older than the Justice Department itself, has long prided itself on the talent of its prosecutors, the import of its cases and an independence from Washington that has earned it the moniker of “Sovereign District.” But that hasn't spared officials from being fired by Washington, as both Bharara and Berman have learned in 3 1/2 years. The top prosecutors there have enjoyed an outsize celebrity status, including Rudy Giuliani (later mayor of New York), James Comey (later FBI director) Mary Jo White (later head of the Securities and...
    ATLANTA (AP) — A former high-ranking city official has been indicted in an ongoing federal investigation into corruption at Atlanta City Hall. Former commissioner of the Department of Watershed Management, Jo Ann Macrina, 63, is charged with conspiratorial bribery, bribery and tax evasion, federal prosecutors said in a news release Friday. The charges stem from her acceptance of money and other items of value from Lohrasb “Jeff” Jafari, a former contractor for the city and for DeKalb County, prosecutors said. A February 2019 indictment accused Jafari of tax evasion, money laundering and bribing former city chief procurement officer Adam Smith, who has pleaded guilty and was sentenced to prison. Jafari has pleaded not guilty to those charges. Additional counts of bribery and tampering with a witness have been filed against Jafari for bribes he paid to Macrina, prosecutors said. Macrina, who now lives in Daytona Beach, Florida, headed Atlanta’s Department...
    BOWLING GREEN, Ky. (AP) — A new sentencing date has been set for a Kentucky man who tackled U.S. Sen. Rand Paul, breaking several of the lawmakers ribs. Rene Boucher was scheduled to be re-sentenced on July 27 on a count of assaulting a member of Congress, The Bowling Green Daily News reported. Boucher had served a 30-day sentence, paid a $10,000 fine and performed community services after pleading guilty to attacking his then-neighbor Paul over a lawn maintenance issue along their property line in 2017. Paul had six broken ribs and later suffered bouts of pneumonia and underwent surgery to remove part of his damaged lung. Federal prosecutors appealed the sentence, stating 30 days was too lenient considering Paul’s injuries. A federal appeals court agreed with prosecutors in September 2019 and order Boucher to be re-sentenced, vacating his 30-day sentence. Boucher’s attorney, Matt Baker, said the decision to re-sentence...
    BERLIN (Reuters) – German federal prosecutors accused Russia on Thursday of ordering the killing of a former Chechen rebel in Berlin last summer and indicted a Russian man for the murder, which has severely strained diplomatic ties. FILE PHOTO: Police officers investigate a crime scene in Berlin, Germany, August 23, 2019, after a cyclist shot at a man in the Moabit district. REUTERS/Fabrizio Bensch/File Photo Investigators have gathered enough evidence to charge the man, identified only as Vadim K., with the murder as well as with the illegal possession of a weapon, the prosecutors said. “The accused accepted the order from state authorities to kill. He either hoped for a financial reward or shared the motive of the order-givers to kill a political opponent and thereby retaliate for participating in previous conflicts with Russia,” they said in a statement. The dead man, identified in the statement as...
    A Chinese manufacturer shipped thousands of “adulterated and misbranded” respirator masks to the US in the middle of the coronavirus pandemic, federal prosecutors said. The feds accused Crawford Technology Group (HK) Co. of selling more than 140,000 bogus “KN95” masks similar to the N95 respirators used by health-care workers battling COVID-19. Crawford claimed the masks could filter out 95 percent of harmful airborne particles — but testing showed they only filtered roughly 22 percent on average, prosecutors said Wednesday. A complaint filed in New Jersey federal court charged the company with violating the Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act. “It is not enough that this pandemic has upended lives around the world and caused countless suffering and hundreds of thousands of deaths,” Jason Molina, the special agent in charge for US Homeland Security Investigations in Newark, said in a statement. “In the midst of that, we have companies like...
    By AMY FORLITI | The Associated Press MINNEAPOLIS  — Minnesota prosecutors acknowledged Wednesday that a Minneapolis police officer had his knee on the neck of George Floyd for 7 minutes, 46 seconds — not the 8:46 that has become a symbol of police brutality — but said the one-minute error would have no impact on the criminal case against four officers. The initial May 29 complaint alleges Derek Chauvin “had his knee on Mr. Floyd’s neck for 8 minutes and 46 seconds in total. Two minutes and 53 seconds of this was after Mr. Floyd was non-responsive.” But timestamps cited in the document’s description of the incident, much of which is caught on video, showed Chauvin had his knee on Floyd for 7 minutes, 46 seconds, including 1 minute, 53 seconds after Floyd appeared to stop breathing. “These kinds of technical matters can be handled in future amendments to the...
    Prosecutors across the country are defying traditionally cozy relationships with police departments, swiftly charging officers with murder, assault and other crimes following protests over the death of George Floyd and dropping charges against demonstrators. Even just a few years ago, when protests erupted over the killings of other black men by police, officers were rarely arrested for suspected criminal acts during the demonstrations. It’s been rare to charge police with crimes in the death of civilians, and winning a conviction is harder. But the tide may be turning, led by progressive prosecutors pressing for criminal justice reforms to better hold police accountable for wrongdoing. “Prosecutors realize that they’re being watched,” said Mark Dupree Sr., district attorney for Kansas’ Wyandotte County, which includes Kansas City. “My hope is that this is a change and that we are turning a tide.” On Wednesday, Fulton County prosecutors charged Atlanta officer Garrett...
    New York City has been electing more and more prosecutors who want to reform law enforcement, ones who see the racial disparities in policing and in the (in)justice system and are doing something about it. Right now, that includes refusing to prosecute Black Lives Matter protesters who police arrested simply for being at the protests, and who weren't violent and weren't destroying property. The New York Police Department (NYPD) is retaliating by pulling out officers assigned to prosecutors' offices. That happened in the Manhattan, Bronx, Brooklyn, and Queens district attorney (DA) offices. Police Commissioner Dermot F. Shea said last week that his decision to remove the officer had nothing to do with their decisions not to prosecute protesters, but many in the DAs' offices aren't buying it. Particularly after four out of five of the city's DAs issued a statement supporting the state legislature's decision to ban chokeholds and repeal a law...
    Minnesota prosecutors acknowledged Wednesday that a Minneapolis police officer had his knee on the neck of George Floyd for 7 minutes, 46 seconds — not the 8:46 that has become a symbol of police brutality — but said the one-minute error would have no impact on the criminal case against four officers. The initial May 29 complaint alleges Derek Chauvin “had his knee on Mr. Floyd’s neck for 8 minutes and 46 seconds in total. Two minutes and 53 seconds of this was after Mr. Floyd was non-responsive.” But timestamps cited in the document’s description of the incident, much of which is caught on video, showed Chauvin had his knee on Floyd for 7 minutes, 46 seconds, including 1 minute, 53 seconds after Floyd appeared to stop breathing. “These kinds of technical matters can be handled in future amendments to the criminal complaint if other reasons make it necessary to...
    By AMY FORLITI MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — Minnesota prosecutors acknowledged Wednesday that a Minneapolis police officer had his knee on the neck of George Floyd for 7 minutes, 46 seconds — not the 8:46 that has become a symbol of police brutality — but said the one-minute error would have no impact on the criminal case against four officers. The initial May 29 complaint alleges Derek Chauvin “had his knee on Mr. Floyd’s neck for 8 minutes and 46 seconds in total. Two minutes and 53 seconds of this was after Mr. Floyd was non-responsive.” But timestamps cited in the document’s description of the incident, much of which is caught on video, showed Chauvin had his knee on Floyd for 7 minutes, 46 seconds, including 1 minute, 53 seconds after Floyd appeared to stop breathing. “These kinds of technical matters can be handled in future amendments to the criminal complaint if...
    A California man charged with killing a federal officer and a sheriff’s deputy has ties to the far-right “Boogaloo” movement, according to federal authorities. Air Force Staff Sgt. Steven Carrillo, 32, was charged with killing federal service officer David Patrick Underwood, 53, near a Black Lives Matter protest at an Oakland courthouse on May 29, the Department of Justice announced on Tuesday. Carrillo faces federal murder charges in Underwood’s death, as well as an attempted murder charge after allegedly severely wounding a fellow federal officer at the courthouse. Both officers were members of Homeland Security’s Federal Protective Service. A second man, Robert Alvin Justus Jr., was charged with aiding and abetting after he admitted to serving as Carrillo’s getaway driver in the drive-by attack on the officers, according to the FBI. Justus used the phrase “let’s boogie,” a reference to the far-right “Boogaloo boys” movement, in messages sent to Carrillo, the complaint said. Inside the vehicles...
    RUTLAND, Vt. (AP) - A former Quechee, Vermont, man was sentenced Tuesday to more than four years in prison after pleading guilty to wire fraud in a scheme to embezzle $1.2 million from payroll clients, federal prosecutors said. Ryan Wall, 42, who now lives in Florida, was indicted by a federal grand jury in Rutland in 2019 on charges of wire fraud and possessing firearms as an unlawful user of narcotics. Wall was the only employee of TSBS Payroll, a payroll processing business in West Lebanon, New Hampshire, that provided services to 35 people, businesses and nonprofits in Vermont and New Hampshire. TSBS received regular funds from clients to provide payroll checks to workers and tax withholdings to be paid to state and federal tax authorities, prosecutors said. TOP STORIES Governor seeks larger venue for Trump rally as ticket requests approach 1 million Coronavirus hype biggest political...
    OMAHA, Neb. (AP) - Prosecutors in Omaha have agreed to drop misdemeanor charges against scores of people who were arrested for violating a curfew during protests two weeks ago. The decision comes too late for at least six people who have already pleaded guilty or no contest and were sentenced to seven days in jail, the Omaha World-Herald reported. Some 200 people were arrested for breaking curfew May 31 through June 2 at protests over the May 25 police killing of George Floyd in Minneapolis. Omaha Mayor Jean Stothert and City Prosecutor Matt Kuhse said at a news conference Monday that charges against those with no criminal history will be dropped and their bail refunded. Those with a criminal history will either be entered into a pretrial diversion program or fined $50. Asked about the handful of people who already entered pleas and have been sentenced to jail, Kuhse...
    DALLAS — Texas prosecutors are examining potential irregularities in a scandal-ridden former Houston police officer’s arrest of George Floyd on a minor drug charge - a probe that could expand the body of convictions possibly tainted by the officer’s conduct. Floyd, whose death last month under the knee of a white Minneapolis police officer sparked national protests, pleaded guilty in 2004 and served time in a state jail over what prosecutors now describe as selling $10 worth of crack in a police sting. But Harris County District Attorney Kim Ogg said Saturday that Floyd’s case may be among scores built on false evidence from Gerald Goines, who is facing murder charges after he allegedly lied to obtain the warrant in a botched 2019 drug raid that left two people dead. He has pleaded not guilty. TOP STORIES Abraham Lincoln monument torched in Chicago: An absolute disgraceful act NASCAR rejects advertising...
    DALLAS (AP) - Texas prosecutors are examining potential irregularities in a scandal-ridden former Houston police officer’s arrest of George Floyd on a minor drug charge - a probe that could expand the body of convictions possibly tainted by the officer’s conduct. Floyd, whose death last month under the knee of a white Minneapolis police officer sparked national protests, pleaded guilty in 2004 and served time in a state jail over what prosecutors now describe as selling $10 worth of crack in a police sting. But Harris County District Attorney Kim Ogg said Saturday that Floyd’s case may be among scores built on false evidence from Gerald Goines, who is facing murder charges after he allegedly lied to obtain the warrant in a botched 2019 drug raid that left two people dead. He has pleaded not guilty. TOP STORIES NASCAR rejects advertising from gun companies, causing fans to question its...
    (CNN)A New Jersey police officer was charged with two counts of assault on Wednesday after allegedly deploying pepper spray on two people "without provocation," the Camden County Prosecutor's office said in a press release. Ryan Dubiel, 31, a police officer with Woodlynne Police Department, was charged with two counts of simple assault, prosecutors announced.Dubiel and another officer were dispatched on a call in the afternoon of June 4 for a complaint of possible trespassing and loitering, according to a recording of a 911 call released by prosecutors.Body camera footage was also released by prosecutors and shows Dubiel talking with several young men sitting on a front porch. An officer is heard on the video telling the young men they are responding to a call for trespassing. Officers are seen on video asking the people on the porch for their names and other identifying information, but many refuse. One of the...
    ROME (AP) - Italian Premier Giuseppe Conte is being questioned by prosecutors investigating the lack of a coronavirus lockdown of two towns in Lombardy’s Bergamo province that turned into one of the hardest-hit areas of the country’s outbreak. Doctors and virologists have said the two-week delay in quarantining Alzano and Nembro allowed the virus to spread in Bergamo, which saw a 571% increase in excess deaths in March compared with the average of the previous five years. Lead prosecutor Maria Cristina Rota arrived with a team of aides Friday morning at the premier’s office in Rome, Palazzo Chigi. In addition to Conte, she is expected to question the health and interior ministers. In previous days, Rota has interviewed the head of the Superior Institute of Health. TOP STORIES D.C. mayor sued over Black Lives Matter on street to White House Divided Democrats make Biden one of weakest primary winners...
    ROME (AP) — Italian Premier Giuseppe Conte is being questioned by prosecutors investigating the lack of a coronavirus lockdown of two towns in Lombardy’s Bergamo province that turned into one of the hardest-hit areas of the country’s outbreak. Doctors and virologists have said the two-week delay in quarantining Alzano and Nembro allowed the virus to spread in Bergamo, which saw a 571% increase in excess deaths in March compared with the average of the previous five years. Lead prosecutor Maria Cristina Rota arrived with a team of aides Friday morning at the premier’s office in Rome, Palazzo Chigi. In addition to Conte, she is expected to question the health and interior ministers. In previous days, Rota has interviewed the head of the Superior Institute of Health. To date no one has been placed under investigation and it’s unclear what, if any, criminal blame will be assigned to public officials...
    A California man was charged Thursday for allegedly poisoning eight homeless people and filming their reactions after eating the laced food, prosecutors said. The alleged victims believed that they were taking part in a "spicy food challenge," prosecutors said. Several were hospitalized, according to the Orange County District Attorney's Office. William Robert Cable, 38, of San Andreas, allegedly filmed their reactions to eating food laced with oleoresin capsicum, which is twice as strong as pepper spray used by police. Police said the crime started in mid-May. Cable was previously arrested on May 22 in Huntington Beach -- where all of the alleged poisonings were conducted. “These human beings were preyed upon because they are vulnerable,” said Orange County District Attorney Todd Spitzer. “They were exploited and poisoned as part of a twisted form of entertainment, and their pain was recorded so that it could be relived by their attacker over and over again." CALIFORNIA MAN WANTED...
    SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) - A purported leader of the Mexican Mafia whom the federal government once accused of running street gang operations from inside California’s most secure prison has been killed by two other inmates, officials said Thursday. Danny Roman, 64, was killed Wednesday at the Substance Abuse Treatment Facility and State Prison in Corcoran, said corrections department spokeswoman Terri Hardy. He was pronounced dead of multiple stab wounds to his face and body within minutes after officials say he was assaulted by two fellow inmates, Raul Alvarado and Edward Cisneros. TOP STORIES Gov. Cuomo: Pro-life, pro-gun conservatives have no place in New York Seattle protesters demand city abolish police, hire black doctors to treat black patients Mass. college deeply sorry for letting police officers use restroom: It will not happen again Hardy would not say if they are believed to be members of the same or a rival...
    Berlin (CNN)German prosecutors have said they have evidence that a man jailed for another crime killed British toddler Madeleine McCann 13 years ago -- just not enough to charge the suspect in court. Prosecutors last week said that they "assumed" McCann, who went missing in 2007 while on holiday in Portugal with her family, was dead. She was aged 3 at the time of her disappearance.German police reportedly pursue connection between Madeleine McCann case and another The long-running mystery of what happened to the missing toddler has captivated people around the world. German police announced last week that a man jailed in the city of Kiel for an unrelated crime had become a suspect, in a major breakthrough after years of little progress.The development came after police found a potential link between McCann's disappearance and that of a five-year-old girl named Inga in Germany in 2015.In an interview with CNN...
    The president of a Silicon Valley medical technology company was charged Tuesday with misleading investors by falsely claiming the company had developed a government-approved blood test for the new coronavirus — the first criminal securities fraud prosecution related to the COVID-19 pandemic, federal officials said. Mark Schena, the president of Arrayit Corporation, was charged with one count of securities fraud and one count of conspiracy to commit health care fraud after authorities said his company billed Medicare $69 million for coronavirus and unnecessary allergy tests. Schena did not immediately return a message seeking comment. Trending News Business bankruptcies surge in the coronavirus recession Walmart knocked for locking up beauty products for black people Home Depot distances itself from Trump-supporting co-founder Black NASCAR star urges move away from Confederate flag CrossFit CEO apologizes for offensive George Floyd tweet Schena, 57, touted the Sunnyvale company has having the only laboratory in the...
    PRISTINA, Kosovo (AP) — Kosovo prosecutors on Wednesday filed terrorism charges against an ethnic Albanian woman on allegations she joined the Islamic State extremist group in Syria. The woman, identified only as V. I. in line with privacy laws, left with her husband for Sweden in November 2014 where they established ties with the Islamic State, prosecutors said in a statement. From there, they’re alleged to have flown to Turkey, then crossed by land into Syria. V.I. worked in different cities helping her husband and other IS fighters with logistics, earning $150 (132 euro) per month, prosecutors said. She was apprehended by Kurdish forces in 2018 and turned over to Kosovo as part of a group of 110 citizens repatriated in April, 2019 with the assistance of the American army, according to prosecutors. Many already face terrorism charges. The suspect faces up to 15 years...
    A former Texas banker has admitted setting a fire in the bank to prevent state regulators from uncovering the theft of $11 million in bank funds. Anita Gail Moody, 57, of Cooper, Texas, pleaded guilty to conspiracy to commit bank fraud and arson before a federal judge last week. Moody was president of Enloe State Bank in rural Cooper at the time of the fire in May 2019, prosecutors said in a news release. Enloe State Bank in Cooper, Texas, was the first bank in Texas to fail since 2013. (Google Maps) “The fire was contained to the bank’s boardroom, but the entire bank suffered smoke damage,” prosecutors said. “Several files had been stacked on the boardroom table, all of which were burned in the fire.” Prosecutors said further investigation into the fire and the bank revealed that Moody had been creating false nominee loans in the names of several...
    KUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia (AP) - Malaysian prosecutors on Tuesday dropped 46 corruption charges against a former state leader, the second high-profile graft case to be dismissed since a new government took over in March. Musa Aman, ex-chief minister of Sabah state on Borneo island, was among several senior politicians from the United Malays National Organization charged with corruption after the party’s shocking defeat in 2018 elections. Still, the party became part of a new alliance government that took over in March amid political maneuvering. Musa, who insists the charges against him were politically motivated, said justice had prevailed. He said he was grateful to have been vindicated of the 30 corruption charges and 16 money laundering charges relating to timber concessions in Sabah. TOP STORIES Judge blocks removal of Confederate monument in Richmond, Virginia Milwaukee Sheriff David Clarke: Black Lives Matter will join forces with Islamic State Abraham Lincoln monument...
    Get all the latest news on coronavirus and more delivered daily to your inbox. Sign up here.Two suspects robbed a jewelry store of more than $150,000 in a broad-daylight heist over the weekend while impersonating NYPD cops amid George Floyd protests raging in the city, federal prosecutors said Monday.NEW YORK JEWELRY STORE HEIST SUSPECTS TRIED TO ESCAPE IN TAXIS – BUT WERE REFUSED PICKUPS, REPORT SAYS Ismael Igartau of Queens and Jose Rodriguez of the Bronx, both 59, were buzzed into a jewelry store on 92nd Street at about 1:30 p.m. Saturday because the storeowner believed they were cops from the 19th Precinct. The suspects were wearing bulletproof vests and one had what appeared to be a detective badge.— Federal prosecutorsThe suspects were wearing bulletproof vests and one had what appeared to be a detective badge, according to prosecutors. The pair asked to see the storeowner’s pistol permit, claiming firearms at...
    Two suspects robbed a jewelry store of more than $150,000 in a broad-daylight heist over the weekend while impersonating NYPD cops amid George Floyd protests raging in the city, federal prosecutors said Monday. Ismael Igartau of Queens and Jose Rodriguez of the Bronx, both 59, were buzzed into a jewelry store on 92nd Street at about 1:30 p.m. Saturday because the storeowner believed they were cops from the 19th Precinct. The suspects were wearing bulletproof vests and one had what appeared to be a detective badge, according to prosecutors. The pair asked to see the storeowner’s pistol permit, claiming firearms at city stores were at risk of being stolen because of looting in the city, prosecutors said. They pulled out guns and zip-tied the owner’s wrists, a federal complaint said. They grabbed between $150,000 and $165,000 worth of jewelry and fled the store. But the store owner called the police,...
    A Minnesota man was hit with federal arson charges Monday in the May 28 torching of a Minneapolis police precinct amid George Floyd protests, federal prosecutors said. Branden Wolfe, 23, of St. Paul, allegedly pushed a wooden barrel into the Third Precinct during the protest to spread the flames inside the stationhouse, the US Attorney’s Office in Minnesota said in a release. The fire forced police to evacuate the precinct while protesters showered them with insults and debris. “Wolfe admitted to being inside the Third Precinct the night of the arson, to taking property from the building, and to pushing a wooden barrel into the fire,” prosecutors said in a press release. “Wolfe also identified himself in multiple witness photographs depicting Wolfe in front of the Third Precinct holding a police baton, with smoke and flames visible in the back,” they added. Police responding to a 911 call arrested Wolfe...
    Los Angeles prosecutors on Monday announced they will not bring charges against protesters who violated the city’s curfew and other police orders to disperse during demonstrations sparked by the death of George Floyd. City Attorney Mike Feuer said his office will develop an alternative court that will not punish those cited for violating curfew or failing to obey orders to leave protests. District Attorney Jackie Lacey said she won't file charges in protest misdemeanor cases from other parts of Los Angeles County. Demonstrators being arrested for curfew violations in downtown Los Angeles during a protest over the death of George Floyd. (AP, File) The announcement came amid nationwide demonstrations against police brutality and racial injustice in the wake of Floyd’s death while in police custody. Los Angeles saw the largest number of protest arrests in the U.S. tracked by The Associated Press, which tallied over 10,000 people arrested...
    SILVER SPRING, Md. (AP) — A former Coast Guard lieutenant accused of plotting politically motivated killings inspired by a far-right mass murderer asked a federal appeals court on Monday to let him withdraw his guilty plea or else throw out his sentence of more than 13 years in prison. In a court filing, a defense attorney argued that Christopher Hasson’s 160-month prison term was roughly four times longer than sentencing guidelines would have called for if U.S. District Judge George Hazel had not mistakenly applied a “terrorism enhancement” to the sentence. Prosecutors didn’t charge Hasson, 50, with any terrorism-related offenses. He pleaded guilty last October to possessing unregistered and unserialized silencers, being a drug addict in possession of firearms and illegal possession of tramadol, an opioid painkiller. The judge “clearly erred by finding Hasson’s offenses were intended to promote a federal crime of terrorism,” assistant federal public defender Cullen Macbeth...
    Federal prosecutors in the United States have requested to interview Britain's Prince Andrew as a part of an investigation into Jeffrey Epstein, NBC News reported. The U.S. Attorney's Office for the Southern District of New York made the request for Prince Andrew's testimony of the British government under a Mutual Legal Assistance Treaty, which is similar to a subpoena. Although Prince Andrew has previously stated publicly that he would assist with the investigation, prosecutors now say he is unwilling to cooperate. "Contrary to Prince Andrew's very public offer to cooperate with our investigation into Epstein's co-conspirators, an offer that was conveyed via press release, Prince Andrew has now completely shut the door on voluntary cooperation," said U.S. Attorney Geoffrey Berman. Prince Andrew's lawyers say he has offered his testimony at least three times, and that the U.S. prosecutors are giving an "entirely misleading account" in claiming he hasn't offered...
    BERLIN (AP) - A man has been arrested in Germany after allegedly threatening an attack on Muslims, citing the assailant who attacked mosques in New Zealand last year, prosecutors said Monday. The 21-year-old from the northern city of Hildesheim is suspected of announcing his intention to carry out an attack “with multiple dead” in an internet chat on Friday, prosecutors in Celle said in a statement. He was detained on Saturday. Investigators found weapons at his apartment that he had apparently acquired to carry out an attack and “data files with radical right-wing contents,” prosecutors said. The suspect’s name was not released. TOP STORIES Speedway declares race a protest to skirt coronavirus rules, draws 2,000 Bigger than life: George Floyd known for big heart, good works, struggles with drugs, crime Bill de Blasio flips, now vows to defund New York police A judge on Monday ordered him kept...
    By MICHAEL TARM CHICAGO (AP) — As damning as video evidence in the George Floyd case appears to be, prosecutors know they must bring the right charges underpinned by sound legal logic if they hope to convict a Minnesota officer in Floyd’s May 25 death. Exhibit No. 1 at trial is likely to be bystander video showing Officer Derek Chauvin pressing his knee into the back of Floyd’s neck as the handcuffed Floyd says he can’t breathe. Chauvin held his knee there even after the 46-year-old black man stopped moving. But strong video evidence doesn’t mean a conviction will be easy. When it comes to police officers charged with crimes in the line of duty, it never is. “This is not a shoo-in,” said Mike Brandt, a Minnesota defense attorney. “There are lots of lines prosecutors have to connect. If you raise questions about even one, you could raise reasonable...
    (CNN)A Philadelphia police inspector is facing charges after prosecutors said a video shows him striking a student protester on the head with a metal baton.Staff Inspector Joseph Bologna faces charges of aggravated assault, simple assault, possession of an instrument of crime and recklessly endangering another person, Philadelphia District Attorney Larry Krasner announced Friday.Prosecutors say Bologna was captured on cell phone video striking a Temple University student in the back of his head while he was participating in a mass demonstration on Monday.The unidentified student suffered "serious bodily injury, including a large head wound that required treatment in a hospital while under arrest, including approximately 10 staples and approximately 10 sutures," Krasner's office said.Philadelphia police arrested the student protester and detained him for more than 24 hours and referred him to the district attorney for prosecution. But after prosecutors reviewed the video and other evidence, Krasner declined to charge the student...
    Moscow (CNN)Emergency services in Russia have completed the first stage of a major cleanup operation after 20,000 tons of fuel spilled into a river in the Siberian city of Norilsk. The fuel entered the water from a nearby power station, causing damage that one environmental group described as "catastrophic."Yevgeny Zinichev, the local head of the Russian Emergencies Ministry, told President Vladimir Putin on Friday that the first stage of the cleanup operation was complete, according to Russian state news agency TASS."The event, the emergency situation was localized on June 1,"Zinichev said, according to the agency.Putin has declared a state of emergency in Norilsk over the spill.Read MoreIn a statement released Friday, Russia's prosecutor general linked the disaster in the Arctic city to permafrost thawing. Antarctic ice sheets capable of much faster melting than we thought "According to available data, a preliminary reason for the depressurization of the tank with diesel...
    MEMPHIS, Tenn. (AP) - A Tennessee attorney faces up to 30 years in prison after he pleaded guilty to stealing more than $600,000 from clients by settling cases without telling them and forging their signatures on settlement checks. The U.S. attorney’s office in Memphis said 50-year-old Michael Skouteris has pleaded guilty to bank fraud in connection with a scheme to defraud clients. Prosecutors said Skouteris defrauded clients in cases dating from 2011 to 2016. Prosecutors have said the cases involved nursing home neglect, medical malpractice, personal injury and worker’s compensation. TOP STORIES Richmond police chief says rioters blocked firefighters from burning home with child inside Eye-gouging and PowerPoint: Project Veritas infiltrates Antifa in undercover video Twitter removes Trump campaigns George Floyd tribute Prosecutors said Skouteris forged endorsements on settlement checks made jointly payable to him and the client. He then deposited the checks into his bank accounts. Sentencing is...
    Three white men with ties to a right-wing extremist movement plotted terrorist attacks against protesters in Las Vegas, federal prosecutors said in a criminal complaint. Prosecutors said three men with military experience and ties to the far-right “boogaloo” movement, which aims at inciting a second American Civil War, plotted attacks against individuals protesting the death of George Floyd and coronavirus restrictions. Stephen Parshall, 35, Andrew Lynam Jr., 23, and William Loomis, 40, were arrested Saturday en route to a protest over Floyd’s death. Police allegedly found the group filling gas canisters and making Molotov cocktails in a parking lot in downtown Las Vegas. Federal prosecutors charged each of the men with conspiracy to damage and destroy by fire and explosive and possession of unregistered firearms. They were separately charged with terrorism, conspiracy and explosives possession in state court, according to the Associated Press. “People have a right to peacefully protest. These men are agitators and...
    BRUNSWICK, Ga. -- A special prosecutor for the state of Georgia said Thursday that evidence in the killing of Ahmaud Arbery shows the young black man was repeatedly boxed in by two pickup trucks as he desperately tried to escape.The lead Georgia Bureau of Investigation agent in the case testified that the white driver of the first pickup, Travis McMichael, finally got out and shot Arbery in the chest, the first of three shots with a pump-action shotgun that sent Arbery staggering and falling onto the road, mortally wounded.Agent Richard Dial said the driver of the second pickup truck, William "Roddie" Bryan, said he heard the gunman say a racist epithet as he stood over Arbery's body before police arrived.Special prosecutor Jesse Evans said Arbery "was chased, hunted down and ultimately executed."The evidence was presented to support murder charges against McMichael and his father as well as Bryan. It challenges...
    BRUNSWICK, Ga. -- Evidence revealed in court Thursday in the killing of Ahmaud Arbery alleges that the young black man was repeatedly boxed in by two pickup trucks as he desperately tried to escape.A Georgia Bureau of Investigation agent says a white man then shot him in the chest, the first of three shots with a pump-action shotgun. Agent Richard Dial testified that the driver of the second pickup truck, Roddie Bryan, said Travis McMichael then stood over Arbery's body and said a racial epithet before police arrived.The evidence was presented to support murder charges against McMichael and his father as well as Bryan. It also could factor into a federal investigation into whether hate crime charges are warranted.THIS IS A BREAKING NEWS UPDATE. AP's earlier story follows below.BRUNSWICK, Ga. (AP) - Three men who were charged with murder months after the fatal shooting of Ahmaud Arbery appeared Thursday by...
    MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — The case against a man who drove his semitrailer into a crowd of protesters on a closed Minneapolis freeway has been delayed pending further investigation, prosecutors said Tuesday. Hennepin County Attorney Mike Freeman said in a statement Tuesday that the case against the man has been deferred and that he’ll be released from jail. “Investigators are in the process of gathering additional information and answers to aid in the charging decision,” Freeman said. The 35-year-old man drove his tanker truck into a crowd of thousands of people who were marching on Interstate 35W near downtown Minneapolis on Sunday to protest George Floyd’s death. Floyd, who was black, died May 25 when a white police officer pressed his knee into Floyd’s neck for several minutes even after he stopped moving and pleading for air. The incident has sparked protests across the country. Gov. Tim Walz said Monday...
    NEW YORK (AP) — Two attorneys charged with firebombing a police vehicle amid the unrest convulsing New York City were granted bail Monday over the objections of federal prosecutors who warned the pair might “return to rioting.” “One night of behavior is not a basis on which to reject somebody’s ability to make rational decisions,” U.S. Magistrate Judge Steven Gold said. Colinford Mattis, a 32-year-old corporate attorney, and Urooj Rahman, 31 year-old human rights lawyer, are accused of torching a police vehicle in Brooklyn on Saturday during an eruption of violent demonstrations over the death of George Floyd, a black man who died after a white Minnesota police officer pressed his knee into Floyd’s neck for several minutes even after he stopped moving and pleading for air. The magistrate ordered another woman detained in a separate firebombing late Friday that authorities said targeted four New York City police officers as...
    She’s been arrested ‘olotov times. The Catskill woman who was arrested for allegedly tossing a Molotov cocktail at a filled police van in Brooklyn Friday night has a lengthy rap sheet that includes collars in 11 separate states, federal authorities said Monday. Samantha Shader’s arrest history includes a bust in January 2019 for interfering with a police officer in Waterford, Connecticut, federal prosecutors said in a detention memo Monday. She was also convicted in February 2017 for possession of a controlled substance in Shawnee, Oklahoma, and sentenced to 90 days in jail, authorities said. In 2013, she was busted in Austin, Texas, for assault. In arguing to detain her, prosecutors said none of her previous arrests have stopped her from traveling the country and committing more crimes. The convictions haven’t stopped her “from escalating her crimes to the point where her actions could have seriously injured or killed four police...
    The woman who allegedly threw a lit Molotov cocktail into an NYPD car full of cops early Saturday has been slapped with a federal charge of damaging a police vehicle — a far cry from the attempted murder charges sought by the NYPD. Samantha Shader, 27, of Catskill, New York, allegedly tossed the makeshift explosive into the marked police vehicle parked at Eastern Parkway and Washington Avenue in Crown Heights, Brooklyn around 1:12 a.m, as a night of destructive protests over the killing of George Floyd winded down, federal prosecutors said. The bottle shattered two of the vehicle’s windows as four cops sat inside — but the gas inside did not ignite, the feds said in a criminal complaint released early Sunday. The complaint cites a single charge against Shader: Causing Damage by Fire and Explosives to a Police Vehicle. Prosecutors obtained a witness video they said showed Shader hurl...
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