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    New York City has once again issued an advisory urging people to wear a mask indoors on Monday morning amid concerns of the new coronavirus variant, Omicron. “I’m also issuing a commissioners advisory strongly recommending that all New Yorkers wear a mask at all times when indoors and in a public setting. Like at your grocery or in building lobbies, offices, and retail stores,” Dr. David Chokshi, who serves as the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene commissioner, said in a statement. This story is developing. 
    Over the weekend, the New York Times published a long article about Minneapolis Public Schools district redesign plan, focusing on white students in south Minneapolis being zoned to attend North High. The article looks at issues of segregation, gentrification and school choice in Minnesota. One stat from the story: as a result of the changes, North High went from 98 percent students of color to 93. President Joe Biden is visiting Rosemount on Tuesday to tout the recently passed infrastructure bill. Approximately 30% of fully vaccinated Minnesota adults have gotten booster shots. A study of long-haul COVID at Mayo Clinic identified more women experiencing the disease than men. The Minnesota Spokesman-Recorder has another of its Q&As with newly elected and re-elected Minneapolis City Council members. This one’s with Ward 6’s Jamal Osman. Article continues after advertisement Parents in Hastings attacked a school board member for having a trans child, CNN reports. She was not re-elected and her family is leaving town. An Austin man was killed in Ethiopia while caring for his father there. A school bus driver pleaded guilty...
    Jennifer Aniston and Brad Pitt’s marriage may have ended in 2005, but the ex-spouses apparently still have something in common: A willingness to seek personal guidance from a psychic medium named Carissa Schumacher, who claims to channel the spirit of Jesus Christ. That’s according to a New York Times profile of Schumacher, a San Diego-area-based medium who says she can receive messages from people who have died, which she conveys to her A-list clients to aid in their spiritual healing. Aniston, who has been been seeing Schumacher since 2019, acknowledged to the New York Times that the idea of anyone being able to communicate with Jesus is “way out there” and will be “insane” for some people. Aniston spoke up for Schumacher’s abilities to help her navigate personal struggles, including with work, friendships and relationships. “It’s more about the message that she’s tapped into,” Aniston told writer Irina Aleksander. “Everything she’s communicated to me just resonates with me and excites me.” The spiritual adviser Carissa Schumacher channels the dead for a celebrity clientele that includes Jennifer Aniston and Rooney Mara....
    The media continues to downplay mass inflation in today’s economy, including New York Times columnist David Brooks, who encouraged a "white-hot economy" and said he has a "high tolerance" for inflation. "I want a white-hot economy," he said. "I want a white-hot economy that will raise wages at the bottom, which is happening, that will bring people back into the labor force, which is happening, which is spreading wealth around the country and not concentrating in a few cities." Brooks' push for a hyperactive economy is due to his recognition of society "coming apart" in recent years, he said, in areas like income inequality and labor. But the consequence of these pressures is what’s causing inflation to surface. LIBERAL MEDIA ROUTINELY DOWNPLAY INFLATION OR TURN IT INTO A POSITIVE: ‘SLASH YOUR SHOPPING BURDEN’ "Since we can’t really fine-tune an economy, we’re probably overheating and we’re getting inflation," he said.  Post-pandemic inflation, he said, is less of a threat than Jimmy Carter’s inflation of the 1970s which he said "builds on itself." "I have a high tolerance for inflation in this...
    NEW YORK -- Stephen Sondheim, the songwriter who reshaped the American musical theater in the second half of the 20th century with his intelligent, intricately rhymed lyrics, his use of evocative melodies and his willingness to tackle unusual subjects, has died. He was 91.Sondheim's death was announced by his Texas-based attorney, Rick Pappas, who told The New York Times the composer died Friday at his home in Roxbury, Connecticut. Pappas did not return calls and messages to The Associated Press.Sondheim influenced several generations of theater songwriters, particularly with such landmark musicals as "Company," "Follies" and "Sweeney Todd," which are considered among his best work. His most famous ballad, "Send in the Clowns," has been recorded hundreds of times, including by Frank Sinatra and Judy Collins.The artist refused to repeat himself, finding inspiration for his shows in such diverse subjects as an Ingmar Bergman movie ("A Little Night Music"), the opening of Japan to the West ("Pacific Overtures"), French painter Georges Seurat ("Sunday in the Park With George"), Grimm's fairy tales ("Into the Woods") and even the killers of American presidents...
    Staffers from the New York Times are openly revolting against their employer in solidarity with colleagues who went on strike during Thanksgiving weekend.  Wirecutter, which the Times describes as its "product recommendation service" offering consumers trusted advice on the latest merchandise being sold, published an article Thursday on the "75+ Best Early Black Friday Deals for 2021" ahead of the biggest shopping day of the season.  However, when the Times shared the article on Twitter, the paper faced significant blowback, including from several employees.  NEW YORK TIMES EDITORIAL WRITER HAILS ‘REPUBLICANS WE’RE THANKFUL FOR': LIZ CHENEY, ADAM KINZINGER AMONG "100 PERCENT of @wirecutterunion is ON STRIKE starting today!" Times reporter Davey Alba exclaimed. These posts are brought to you by NYT assigning work to middle managers & freelancers instead of paying @wirecutterunion a TOTAL OF $300,000 in raises distributed across 66 PEOPLE! NYT has ONE BILLION DOLLARS in cash!" Alba urged Twitter users, "Don’t click these links! Don’t shop through Wirecutter this Black Friday! Pass it along!" The New York Times is accused holding a story about damage to...
    New York Times editorial board member Michelle Cottle commemorated Thanksgiving with a piece hailing "The Republicans we're thankful for." "It has been a tough year for fans of American democracy. The sacking of the Capitol on Jan. 6 set the tone. Former President Donald Trump’s chokehold on the Republican Party continues to fuel its most unhinged impulses and elements. More than two-thirds of Republicans buy the lie that the 2020 election was stolen," Cottle began her piece on Wednesday.  NEW YORK TIMES SLAMMED BY FEMALE SENATORS FOR ‘SEXIST’ FOCUS ON KYRSTEN SINEMA'S STYLE "Too many party leaders who know better are playing along… But there have been exceptions, select Republicans who have put the public good ahead of partisan and personal interests — some more dramatically than others. Not that these folks are saints, or even consistent in their commitment. But these days, even glimmers of responsible, pro-democratic behavior amid the miasma of Trumpism merit a shout-out. So in the spirit of the season, let us give thanks for these rare Republican pockets of character and duty," Cottle wrote.  ...
    The New York Times delivered a dire statistic the day before Thanksgiving, admitting more people in the United States have died of the Chinese coronavirus this year, under President Joe Biden’s leadership, than last year, despite the widespread availability of vaccines. The Times cited the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) Tuesday figures, which reported 386,233 coronavirus related fatalities in the U.S. for 2021. In all of 2020, the U.S. recorded 385,343 fatalities. The former figure is only expected to rise, as there is still over one month left of the year. Citing “experts,” the Times attributed the increased fatalities this year on a “confluence of factors,” focusing primarily on what it described as “crucially lower-than-needed vaccination rates, but also the relaxation of everyday precautions, like masks and social distancing, and the rise of the highly contagious Delta variant.” Per the Times: Essentially, public health experts said, many Americans are behaving as though Covid-19 is now a manageable, endemic disease rather than a crisis — a transition that will happen eventually but has not happened yet. Yet many are also...
    Prices are up. That’s absolutely true. Inflation has increased since the beginning of 2021 at a rate unmatched since 2009. But that’s what happens every time a Democratic president drags the economy back out of the ditch where a Republican administration left it. It’s not, as the media seems to be insisting, a sign of the apocalypse. Two weeks ago, CNN ran a segment that was supposedly about how families are “constrained by inflation” and that this is putting “a burden” on their lives. In the segment, CNN’s Brianna Keilar throws over to reporter Evan McMorris-Santoro with an expression of deep concern about how inflation is affecting how families “feed their kids.” McMorris-Santoro, handily standing in front of a gas station sign, moves directly into how gas is “up by more than a dollar since last year” without noting that the prices in 2020 were heavily depressed by the pandemic.  He then goes on to interview his typical American family in Texas—who have nine kids and buy 12 gallons of milk each week.  Most of the criticism about the story has focused on that astounding...
    The New York Times published a report about the growing concerns over President Biden's "low-key media strategy" among his allies.  "As president, Donald J. Trump was a media maximalist whose unavoidable-for-comment style helped generate saturation news coverage, for better or worse. President Biden has taken a stingier approach to his dealings with the press — and not all his allies believe it’s working out," the Times began its report on Tuesday.  POLITICO CALLS OUT BIDEN FOR NOT DOING INTERVIEWS: ‘REFLECTS THE BUNKER MENTALITY THIS WHITE HOUSE HAS TAKEN’ After noting the "roughly dozen" one-on-one interviews Biden has done with the media since taking office, paling in comparison to President Trump's 50+ interviews and President Obama 100+ interviews, the Times indicated that the president "has opted to rely more heavily on fleeting, impromptu exchanges with White House reporters" before boarding a helicopter or leaving a photo-op. "He has not sat for interviews with The Associated Press, The New York Times, Reuters, The Washington Post, The Wall Street Journal or USA Today. Even friendly venues like ‘The Late Show With Stephen Colbert’...
    More On: janet jackson Janet Jackson’s Super Bowl stylist speaks out on wardrobe malfunction Super Bowl producer ‘felt betrayed’ by Janet Jackson, Justin Timberlake Kim Kardashian buys Janet Jackson’s ‘If’ music video outfit for $25K Jackson Brothers thank Justin Timberlake for Janet Jackson apology Janet Jackson doesn’t need help from the New York Times, thank you very much. Over the summer the newspaper brought the “Free Britney” movement — which sought to have Britney Spears released from her conservatorship — into the mainstream with its “Framing Britney Spears” documentary. And last week it followed it up with “Malfunction: The Dressing Down of Janet Jackson,” which railed against the way Jackson was vilified in the wake of the infamous 2004 halftime performance, during which Justin Timberlake exposed her breast. But Jackson’s former stylist Wayne Scot Lukas, who created the Super Bowl costume, tells Page Six that Jackson wanted no part of it. “She wants that documentary to go away. She didn’t ask for a ‘Free Janet’ documentary. She’s not interested,” Lukas said. Jackson declined to participate in the New...
    The New York Times was dealt an extended ban from a New York judge preventing the newspaper from publishing materials related to Project Veritas. Westchester County Supreme Court Justice Charles Wood made the decision during a defamation lawsuit hearing on Tuesday, Reuters reported . The extension of the ban, initially put in place on Nov. 18, will run through at least Dec. 1. That is the deadline for Project Veritas to respond to the newspaper's arguments in favor of ending the ban. Wood explained during the hearing that the lawsuit dealt with the collision of two "bedrock principles" of law, according to the report, which are, "freedom of speech and freedom of the press, and attorney-client privilege." FORMER NEW YORK TIMES REPORTER SAYS EDITORS SAY ON HER DAMNING KENOSHA COVERAGE UNTIL AFTER THE 2020 ELECTION The ban came after The New York Times published an article on Nov. 11 about memos from the conservative group's lawyer. This report came after the FBI raided multiple locations tied to Project Veritas for what is reported to be...
    An article for The New York Times offering advice on how to mitigate coronavirus risks at family Thanksgiving gatherings featured an expert calling on kids aren't fully vaccinated to "eat quickly." "If our child, 9, and a cousin, 10, have each received one dose of the vaccine two weeks prior to Thanksgiving, is it safe for us to eat indoors? There will be about 20 guests, all vaccinated, and the 65 and older crowd have all received boosters," one reader from San Francisco asked in the essay. 4 SMART TIPS FOR THANKSGIVING TRAVEL "I’m glad to hear that the children and all guests are vaccinated. As the kids will not be fully vaccinated until two weeks after their second shot, I think some care is warranted, especially because some attendees are 65 and older and thus at greater risk of more serious breakthrough infections. You could have the kids wear masks, eat quickly and stay away from the older adults when eating," Virginia Tech engineering professor Dr. Linsey Marr wrote in response.  Children wear a masks and wait for...
    Former senior Trump aide Peter Navarro says the New York Times is keeping his book In Trump Time off the forthcoming nonfiction bestseller list, despite the fact he says that it trumps the vast majority of books on the list in terms of units sold. Speaking to Breitbart News Saturday, Navarro said it shows that the “newspaper of record” is nothing more than a “propaganda rag dedicated to promoting left-wing causes [and] lying about what exists in America. Navarro, who served as director of the Office of Trade and Manufacturing Policy (OTMP) and ran the Defense Production Act during the Chinese coronavirus pandemic, recently released In Trump Time, which exposes the “Faucis” of the world.  According to Book Scan sales data that Navarro provided to Breitbart News, Paul McCartney’s The Lyrics will be No. 1 with 36,954 units sold, followed by Immune with 38,525 units sold and The President and the Freedom Fighter with 28,587 sold. Navarro said his book should be in third, as he said it has 33,314 sales, 90 percent of which he said were individual sales. Most of the sales, he added, were from Amazon and Barnes...
    "Now it could be that the piece was just bad. I've sent in bad ones before, and I'll do it again," Bowles acknowledges. "A few weeks after I filed, an editor told me: The Times wouldn't be able to run my Kenosha insurance debacle piece until after the 2020 election, so sorry." She then reveals that her article titled "Businesses Trying to Rebound After Unrest Face a Challenge: Not Enough Insurance" was published on Nov. 9, 2020 – two days after Joe Biden was officially named the president-elect. "Eventually the election passed. Biden was in the White House," she writes. "And my Kenosha story ran. Whatever the reason for holding the piece, covering the suffering after the riots was not a priority." "The reality that brought Kyle Rittenhouse into the streets was one we reporters were meant to ignore," she explains. "The old man who tried to put out a blaze at a Kenosha store had his jaw broken. The top editor of the Philadelphia Inquirer had to resign in June 2020 amid staff outcry for publishing a piece with...
    New Year’s Eve may look more familiar this year in Times Square, at least to those who are vaccinated for COVID-19, according to the New York Times. "We want to welcome all those hundreds of thousands of folks, but everyone needs to be vaccinated," Mayor Bill de Blasio said. FILE - In this Jan. 1, 2017 file photo, revelers celebrate the new year as confetti flies over New York's Times Square. Year after year, people watching New York City's New Year's Eve celebration are told by city dignitaries and TV personalities that they are watching a million people gathered in Times Square. The AP asks experts whether it is actually possible to fit that many people into the viewing areas. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer, File) "Join the crowd, join the joy, join a historic moment as New York City provides further evidence to the world that we are 100 percent back." NYC WORKERS VACCINE MANDATE PROTEST SHUTS DOWN BROOKLYN BRIDGE TRAFFIC INTO MANHATTAN  Although the police are charged with the responsibility to confirm people are fully vaccinated (in addition...
    Former President Donald Trump is calling on the Pulitzer Prize Board to rescind awards given in 2018 to the staffs of the New York Times and the Washington Post for their reporting that fueled the hoax that the Trump campaign had colluded with Russia to win the 2016 presidential election. In a letter dated September 30 but released Tuesday afternoon, Trump wrote to Pulitzer Prize interim administration Bud Kliment: I call on the Pulitzer Prize Board to immediately rescind the 2018 Pulitzer Prize for National Reporting awarded to the staffs of the New York Times and the Washington Post, which was based on false reporting of a non-existent link between the Kremlin and the Trump campaign. As has been widely publicized, the coverage was no more than a politically motivated farce which attempted to spin a false narrative that my campaign supposedly colluded with Russia despite a complete lack of evidence underpinning this this allegation. Trump added, “For two years, these institutions feverishly pushed one Russia story after another and — despite lacking any credible evidence — attempted to persuade the public that my...
    New York Mayor Bill de BlasioBill de BlasioBiden signs trillion infrastructure bill into law New York City expands COVID-19 booster shot access to all adults NYC reaches deal with four unions over COVID-19 vaccine exemptions MORE (D) announced Tuesday that the Times Square New Year's Eve celebration would be returning next month after being greatly scaled down last year during the coronavirus pandemic. “We want to welcome all those hundreds of thousands of folks, but everyone needs to be vaccinated,” de Blasio said during the news conference, as reported by The New York Times.  “Join the crowd, join the joy, join a historic moment as New York City provides further evidence to the world that we are 100 percent back," he added. BREAKING: @NYCMayor announces that New Year’s Eve in @TimesSquareNYC is BACK at Brooklyn Borough Hall #inBrooklyn. We have fun. https://t.co/whheEaB3kC pic.twitter.com/nIkOjd0vwa— City of New York (@nycgov) November 16, 2021 The Times reports that would-be attendees who cannot be vaccinated due to disability will need to have a negative COVID-19 test within 72 hours of the event and will need to be...
    New York City's richest residents were nearly five times more likely to flee the five boroughs during the height of the coronavirus pandemic than less affluent inhabitants, new data from the city comptroller's office reveals. The findings, which come from an analysis made public Monday by New York Comptroller Scott Stringer, show that the bulk of the Big Apple's exits came between March 2020 and June 2021 - when COVID restrictions were lifted by the state - with the vast majority of movers hailing from the city's wealthiest neighborhoods. According to the report, which reviewed New Yorkers' change-of-address information offered by the United States Postal Service, the vast majority of those movers came from areas where the median income exceeds $110,000 annually. The data revealed that residents of well-to-do neighborhoods like Brooklyn's Park Slope and Carroll Gardens, as well as Battery Park City, Greenwich Village, Murray Hill, Midtown, Chelsea, and the Upper East and Upper West sides in Manhattan, were 4.6 times more likely to leave than other residents during 2020, recording 109 net move-outs out of every 1,000 residents.  Stringer's office...
    The New York Times published an article Sunday on the Loudoun County Public Schools controversy after a month of near silence on the sexual assault scandal that made national headlines. The article argued that race was a driving factor in this year’s events in Loudoun County and characterized parents’ resistance to policies which allow students to choose bathrooms based on gender identity as being pushed by “evangelical Christians.” I mention this in my @nypost column tomorrow but a reminder that in March a group of Loudoun teachers & school board members shared information (incl place of employment, etc) about parents who opposed wokeness in the curriculum. This was, ahem, before district was on Fox News. https://t.co/bVaNbj5IJb — Karol Markowicz (@karol) November 14, 2021 The NYT article quoted Beth Barts, a former Loudoun County school board member, on the changing racial demographic of Loudoun schools. “Whites are now less than half our student population … It was important that we recognize that, and we teach that other voices should also have a place at the table,” she told NYT. “They...
              moreby Debra Heine   Someone from the Department of Justice appears to have tipped off the New York Times about recent raids on current and former employees of Project Veritas, and leaked privileged communications between founder James O’Keefe and his lawyers to the paper. These potentially illegal actions come amid a Project Veritas defamation lawsuit against the NYTs that claims the paper’s coverage of a Veritas video was incorrect, defamatory and driven by resentment on the part of the newspaper’s reporters. FBI agents raided the homes of O’Keefe, and several of his employees last week, in connection to the alleged theft of the diary of Joe Biden’s daughter Ashley. The group considered publishing the sordid contents of the diary—which include Ashley Biden’s claims of being molested as a child, and taking inappropriate naked showers with her dad—but passed on the story because they were unable to verify the information. The conservative website the National File ended up publishing the entire contents of the diary in October of 2020. Early Saturday morning, the FBI conducted a raid at O’Keefe’s New York home, seizing two of O’Keefe’s cell phones,...
    Wachter declares that now is the best time to return to normalcy because he believes that COVID-19 will be with us for years or possibly forever. "This belief stems from the fact that the virus is unlikely to go away, ever," Leonhardt wrote. "Like most viruses, it will probably keep circulating, with cases rising sometimes and falling other times. But we have the tools — vaccines, along with an emerging group of treatments — to turn it into a manageable virus, similar to the seasonal flu." Wachter recently warned that the COVID-19 pandemic is not likely not to get too much better or too much worse. "My feeling now is that we're nearing a steady state where things might get a little better or worse, for the next few years. It's not great, but it is what it is," Wachter told the Washington Post. "There's no cavalry coming, so decisions now should be predicated on this being something near steady state," he continued. "To me, particularly once I got my booster, it prompts me to accept a bit more...
    The New York Times published an article Thursday in which it attempted to cast suspicion on James O’Keefe and his Project Veritas for using lawyers to keep investigations within legal bounds, something every news organization does, or should do. The Times has its own legal team that reviews stories and advises reporters and editors on how to avoid libel suits. But the Times uses the fact that Project Veritas hires lawyers to case aspersions on its reporting, calling it a form of “political spying.” The Times based its reporting on legal memos obtained from Project Veritas’s lawyers: The documents, a series of memos written by the group’s lawyer, detail ways for Project Veritas sting operations — which typically diverge from standard journalistic practice by employing people who mask their real identities or create fake ones to infiltrate target organizations — to avoid breaking federal statutes such as the law against lying to government officials. … The legal documents obtained by The Times were written several years ago, at a time when Project Veritas was remaking itself from a small operation running on a shoestring...
    Meghan Markle with Prince Harry on September 25. She spoke on Tuesday at the New York Times' DealBook summit Meghan Markle insisted she is not playing politics with her royal title by calling for paid family leave for all, which she says is a 'humanitarian issue', during an appearance at the New York Times DealBook summit on Tuesday. The Duchess of Sussex appeared for a 30-minute panel to discuss her efforts to enforce paid family leave in America at the event in New York City.   Meghan was interviewed by Andrew Sorkin, who edits DealBook, the Times' financial newsletter, and appeared alongside Mellody Hobson, co-C.E.O. and President of Ariel Investments, a Chicago-based investment firm, who she said she had become friends with.  During the session, she also said she uses online discount codes to shop, after growing up 'clipping coupons' to find bargains, and that it gave her a sense of pride and worth.  Her appearance comes three weeks after she stepped outside of royal protocol with a letter to US Congress, asking them to consider making paid family leave law for all Americans. ...
    NEW YORK (CBSNewYork) — New York City schools launched pop-up COVID-19 vaccine sites Monday for children ages 5 to 11. More than 1,000 sites will open this month at schools across the city, and the Pfizer shots are administered by trained medical professionals, CBS2’s John Dias reported. READ MORE: CBS2's Jenna DeAngelis Joins International Travelers For Long-Awaited Reunions At JFK Airport“Overall, I guess I just have a little jump in my step,” said Sylvan Booudo, a student who was vaccinated. “I’m now just able to do way more things.” Students must be accompanied by a parent, legal guardian or an adult designated by one. Vaccination records are kept strictly confidential, and no appointment is needed. Outside PS 40 in Manhattan where parents have been waiting in line, holding a spot for their kids to get vaccinated, since around 7am @CBSNewYork pic.twitter.com/WLkP9GaXqE — Lisa Rozner (@LisaRoznerTV) November 8, 2021 “What we’re seeing is unprecedented demand at certain school’s sites,” said city Health Commissioner Dr. Dave Chokshi. “If we have a school where there’s parents that really want to get their...
    Former New York Times columnist Bari Weiss announced on Twitter Monday the creation of a new university “dedicated to the pursuit of truth.” “We got sick of complaining about how broken higher education is. So we decided to do something about it,” Weiss added. The “we” Weiss refers to is a laundry list of contrarian writers, academics, and cultural commentators from right-wing figures like Sohrab Ahmari to former Bill Clinton Treasury Secretary Larry Summers to playwright David Mamet. A new university dedicated to the pursuit of truth. pic.twitter.com/8mQRFPK53B — The University of Austin (UATX) (@uaustinorg) November 8, 2021 Called “The University of Austin (UATX)” —not to be confused with the University of Texas at Austin — was announced on Weiss’s substack in a post by Pano Kanelos. Kanelos, the former president of St. John’s College in Annapolis, writes he left his job to found UATX to fight back against a dominant academic culture in which “faculty are being treated like thought criminals.” Weiss resigned from the New York Times in July 2020 citing “bullying by colleagues” and an...
    Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images. Throughout the pandemic, many observers and pundits argued that due to demographic, socioeconomic, and behavioral differences a gap would emerge between Covid-19 death rates in red and blue states — a prediction which bore false, until now, argues David Leonhardt of the New York Times.  Leonhardt explains the new trend, “October was the fifth consecutive month that the percentage gap between the death rates in heavily Trump counties and heavily Biden counties widened.”  The comparison of Covid-19 statistics between states and cities, especially red and blue states (like Florida and California for example), figures prominently in media coverage of the pandemic in the U.S. as commentators look for evidence of success and failure in different leaders and policy approaches. Leonhardt notes that many believed early in the pandemic that red America would outpace blue America in terms of Covid-19 deaths due to factors like “lower income, older, [and] more mask resistance” among the population.  But, Leonhardt reminds us that blue America too had its risk factors for Covid-19 that “largely offset each other in 2020 —...
    On Saturday morning before sunrise, the FBI arrived at the front door of Project Veritas founder James O’Keefe‘s apartment to conduct a court-ordered search as part of an investigation into the alleged theft of the diary of Ashley Biden, daughter of President Joe Biden. The search comes two days after the FBI raided the homes of other Project Veritas staff, and just one day after O’Keefe released a video about the investigation. The New York Times, which broke the news of the initial searches, reported Saturday on the search of O’Keefe’s home, and included comments from neighbors who witnessed it. Jimmy Maynes, who lives next to Mr. O’Keefe at an apartment complex in Mamaroneck, said a handful of F.B.I. agents arrived early Saturday morning. “They asked for James,” Mr. Mayne said, an entertainment manager. “I thought they were banging on my door. I opened the door.” “They told me to close the door and I closed the door,” he added. “That’s exactly what happened. It was still dark.” Another neighbor told the Times that he “clearly saw an...
    The debut roles of musicians-turned-actors Here’s How Much You Need To Earn To Be ‘Rich’ in 23 Major Countries Around the World The 50th New York City Marathon takes place on Sunday, Nov. 7 after not occurring last year due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Known as the biggest marathon in the world, this year's marathon was capped at 33,000 runners because of health and safety concerns. The runners will start in five waves, and within those waves, there are three starting areas. The runners are required to wear masks while in the crowded starting areas. Last October, the NYC Marathon held a virtual race that brought in around 16,000 participants from 108 different countries. In 2019, Geoffrey Kamworor of Kenya finished first in the men's division with a time of 2:08:13. It was his second NYC Marathon win. Joyciline Jepkosgei of Kenya won the women's division with a time of 2:22:38. Here's everything you need to know about the 2021 New York City Marathon, including start times, prize money and route. MORE: Watch the NYC Marathon live with fuboTV (7-day free trial) When is...
    The New York Times snubbed Joe Biden as too moderate last year while endorsing candidates in the Democratic primary, and annoyed White House aides reminded the paper of that Friday after the editorial board urged Democrats to embrace "moderate policies" following brutal results for Democrats this week. Following an electoral drubbing in Virginia and warning signs for Democrats across the country on Tuesday, the editorial board said it was a "political nightmare" for its preferred party. "What would do justice, and what is badly needed, is an honest conversation in the Democratic Party about how to return to the moderate policies and values that fueled the blue-wave victories in 2018 and won Joe Biden the presidency in 2020," the board wrote. It echoed words from endangered Virginia Rep. Abigail Spanberger, D, about President Biden not being elected to be "FDR" after Republican Glenn Youngkin won the state's governorship. (Getty Images) NEW YORK TIMES KNOCKED FOR USING ‘REPUBLICANS POUNCE’ FRAMEWORK' ON SCHOOL ISSUE "Mr. Biden did not win the Democratic primary because he promised a progressive revolution. There were plenty...
    New York Times journalist Nikole Hannah-Jones asserted on Thursday that Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. never called for a color-blind society.  Hannah-Jones posted a series of tweets on the growing opposition against critical race theory in education. CHRIS RUFO CALLS MEDIA DENIAL CRT EXISTS IN SCHOOLS A ‘DELIBERATE STRATEGY’: ‘THEY HAVE NO CHOICE’ BUT TO LIE  New York Times Magazine reporter Nikole Hannah-Jones was called out Thursday for claiming there is no need to "leave out context and inconvenient facts" from a strong argument when critics pointed out she did exactly that with her controversial "1619 Project." (Getty Images for Tribeca Festival) (Monica Schipper/Getty Images for Tribeca Festival) "There’s a wink-and-nod game being played right now tht [sic] those who acknowledge the construct of race are being racist/race obsessed, that CRT is bad because it ‘forces’ people to acknowledge the role of race in a society built on it. This 700 pp book is a *survey* of US race laws," Hannah-Jones tweeted. In her tweet, she included an image of a book titled "States’ Laws on Race and Color."...
    Hide your classic rock LP’s. The thought police at the New York Times are coming for them. The New York Times opinion section has run a column advocating for classic rock songs like Don McLean’s “American Pie” to be reconsidered and maybe even “toppled” like historic Confederate statues, arguing that reevaluating beloved songs will help create a world that is “inclusive and more just.” Other rock singers ripe for cancellation include Eric Clapton, Jerry Lee Lewis, Johnny Cash, and even Elvis Presley. Johnny Cash performing on stage at Festival of Country Music (Photo by David Redfern/Redferns) Jennifer Finney Boylan, who is a male-to-female transgender, laid out the case in the op-ed titled “Should Classic Rock Songs Be Toppled Like Confederate Statues?” “As we take another look at the sins of our historical figures, we’ve also had to take a hard look at our more immediate past and present, including the behavior of the creators of pop culture,” Boylan wrote. “That reassessment extends now to the people who wrote some of our best-loved songs.” Chief among the candidates for cancellation is “American Pie,”...
    The New York Times was mocked by critics Thursday for using the phrase "Republicans pounce" to describe the party's efforts to address issues relating to schools and the rights of parents to be involved in their children's education. In a Wednesday report, The Times claimed the Republicans were "stoking White resentment and tapping into broader anger at the education system," citing efforts of conservatives to fight for "parental rights" to be involved in their children's schools.  The Times later changed the headline of the article to read, "Republicans seize."  Virginia Republican gubernatorial nominee Glenn Youngkin speaks during his election night party at a hotel in Chantilly, Virginia, U.S., November 3, 2021. (REUTERS/ Elizabeth Frantz) "After an unexpectedly strong showing on Tuesday night, Republicans are heading into the 2022 midterm elections with what they believe will be a highly effective political strategy capitalizing on the frustrations of suburban parents still reeling from the devastating fallout of pandemic-era schooling," the report said.  ASSOCIATED PRESS FRAMES NATIONAL DEBATE OVER SCHOOL BOARD AS GOP CULTURE WAR "Seizing on education as a newly potent...
    Photo by DON EMMERT/AFP via Getty Images. Despite shrinking print subscriptions, the New York Times announced Wednesday that its net profit rose by 63% in this year’s third quarter — thanks in large part to the addition of nearly half a million new digital subscribers. The surge in new subscribers bucks a trend felt throughout the media world as cable networks, local newsrooms, and online media continue to contract in an ever changing landscape and without former President Donald Trump dominating headlines.  The New York Times’ first “Trump bump” took place in the fourth quarter of 2016, in which it added 276,000 subscribers to its news products. The month after Trump was inaugurated, the company announced it was “the single best quarter since 2011, the year the pay model launched.” The bump was five times the growth of the fourth quarter of 2015, when it added only 53,000 subscribers.  However, that pales in comparison to the 627,000 subscribers the company added in the fourth quarter of 2020 – with about 425,000 of those signing up for news products.  New York...
    The New York Times gained nearly half a million digital subscribers in the third quarter of 2021. Around 320,000 of the subscribers who signed up over the last three months did so for the Times's news content. The rest subscribed to alternative content platforms like Games, Cooking and Wirecutter, the newspaper reported. The Times has previously stated that it's aiming to hit 10 million subscribers by 2025. These new digital subscriptions keep it on track to reach that goal. “This was our best third-quarter performance in both News and total net subscription additions since the launch of the digital pay model more than a decade ago, and, outside of 2020, our best quarter ever for digital subscription additions,” the chief executive officer of the New York Times Company, Meredith Kopit Levien, said in a statement.  The Times now has a reported 8.4 million subscribers, of which 7.6 million are digital.  Levien said the subscriber growth in the third quarter was likely due to "a busy news period." In August, the Times said it had added a record percentage of subscriptions to platforms beyond its core news product in...
    In this article NYT CVS HUM CPRI TUP NCLH VIDEO1:2101:21News Update – Pre-MarketsNews BriefingCheck out the companies making headlines before the bell: New York Times (NYT) – The newspaper publisher's shares jumped 3.9% in the premarket after it beat estimates by 3 cents with an adjusted quarterly profit of 23 cents per share. Revenue also beat estimates amid rising advertising and digital sales. CVS Health (CVS) – The drug store operator and pharmacy benefits manager beat estimates by 19 cents with adjusted quarterly earnings of $1.97 per share and revenue topping Wall Street forecasts as well. Results got a boost from increased demand for Covid testing and vaccinations. Humana (HUM) – The health insurer reported adjusted quarterly earnings of $4.83 per share, beating the consensus estimate of $4.66, while revenue beat Street forecasts on strength in Humana's Medicare Advantage business. Capri Holdings (CPRI) – The company behind the Michael Kors and Versace brands saw its stock surge 9.9% in premarket trading, after beating earnings and revenue estimates for its latest quarter. Capri earned an adjusted $1.53 per share, well...
    A Covid-19 vaccine is now available for 5-11-year-olds in the US Trump’s ‘Heads I win, tails you lose’ play in Virginia Discover player props odds, plays, and insights for Mo Alie-Cox in his Week 9 contest with the Indianapolis Colts against the New York Jets. © Provided by Sports Illustrated Indianapolis Colts quarterback Carson Wentz (2) fakes a pass to running back Jonathan Taylor (28), leading to a touchdown by tight end Mo Alie-Cox (81), during the first half of the game Sunday, Oct. 24, 2021, at Levi's Stadium in Santa Clara, Calif. Indianapolis Colts Visit The San Francisco 49ers For Nfl Week 7 At Levi S Stadium In Santa Clara Calif Sunday Oct 24 2021 Before Mo Alie-Cox hits the field for Thursday's game, which starts at 8:20 PM ET on FOX, here are some key facts and figures you should know ahead of placing a bet on his player prop bets. Alie-Cox and the Indianapolis Colts (3-5) take the field against the New York Jets (2-5) in Week 9 at Lucas Oil Stadium. Want more in-depth sports...
    The New York Times has embarrassed itself once again in the exact same way it embarrassed itself just last week: by using a right-wing activist as an example of the man or woman on the street, just happening to take a right-wing position due to liberal overreach. What are the freakin’ odds that the same thing would happen to the same newspaper two weeks in a row? Last week, it was Sarah Maslin Nir’s report on a public school paraprofessional leaving her job and moving in with her parents over a vaccination mandate—a report that left out the woman’s history as a Trump-supporting anti-vaccine activist who took part in an attack on a COVID-19 testing site. This time around, here’s what Jeremy Peters and Matthew Cullen report: “I’m a Hillary-Biden voter,” said Glenn Miller, a lawyer from McLean, as he walked into a Youngkin rally in southern Fairfax County on Saturday night that drew more than 1,000 people. He explained his tipping point: Working from home and hearing his teenage daughter’s teacher make a comment during a virtual lesson about white men...
    The New York Times reported Sunday that enthusiasm in the Virginia's gubernatorial contest's closing stages appeared to be on Republican Glenn Youngkin's side rather than Democratic opponent Terry McAuliffe.  "The size and atmosphere of dueling events during the last weekend of campaigning before Election Day on Tuesday reflected the trends in the most recent polls. Mr. Youngkin, the Republican candidate, greeted crowds of more than 1,000, while Mr. McAuliffe, the Democrat, hustled through sparsely attended events from morning to night," The Times wrote.  DANVILLE, VIRGINIA - OCTOBER 26: Virginia Republican gubernatorial candidate Glenn Youngkin gives remarks at a campaign rally at the Danville Community Market on October 26, 2021 in Danville, Virginia. Youngkin is contesting Democratic candidate and former Gov. Terry McAuliffe in the state election that is a week away on November 2. (Photo by Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images) _____ DUMFRIES, VIRGINIA - OCTOBER 21: Former Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe speaks at a campaign event featuring U.S. VIce President Kamala Harris October 21, 2021 in Dumfries, Virginia. The Virginia gubernatorial election, pitting McAuliffe against Republican candidate Glenn Youngkin, is...
    Meghan Markle is set to appear at an online conference organised by the New York Times to discuss 'women reaching economic and professional parity.' The Duchess of Sussex, 40, who is currently living in her $14 million mansion in California having stepped back from royal duty, has been announced as a speaker at the NYTDealbook Online Summit next Tuesday. The mother-of-two will appear in a half-hour session called 'Minding the Gap' alongside Mellody Hobson, Co-C.E.O. and President, Ariel Investments and the chairwoman of Starbucks Corporation. Online the session is described as: 'How can women reach economic and professional parity? Two groundbreaking figures join us to discuss top-down solutions, and reflect on how their shared experiences influenced their thinking about creating opportunities for others.' It comes days after Meghan Markle bought Starbucks coffee for employees working overtime to campaign for paid family and medical leave in the US after writing to politicians pleading for it to be made a 'national right'.   At the time she was accused of using her British royal title to meddle at the top of US politics and adopting the...
                      by Ailan Evans  The New York Times published an article late Thursday castigating YouTube for removing the channel of British left-wing news channel Novara Media. The article, titled “How a Mistake by YouTube Shows Its Power Over Media,” criticized the tech platform’s “opaque and sometimes arbitrarily enforced” rules, describing the company as an information “gatekeeper.” Novara, a British news company publishing “left-leaning” content according to the NYT, had its YouTube channel removed Tuesday for several hours. The company posted a statement to its Twitter account informing the public that its channel had been deleted and then reinstated, with YouTube claiming the channel’s suspension was a mistake. “They are a monopoly, there is no alternative,” Novara employee Michael Walker told the NYT. “If we move to Vimeo or whatever other platform, we wouldn’t acquire the viewers.” The NYT described Novara as “unapologetically left-wing” and lamented its plight, along with that of “independent journalists, activists and creators” who were removed from YouTube. “We had this ambient awareness of our dependence on these big tech...
    The New York Times published an article late Thursday castigating YouTube for removing the channel of British left-wing news channel Novara Media. The article, titled “How a Mistake by YouTube Shows Its Power Over Media,” criticized the tech platform’s “opaque and sometimes arbitrarily enforced” rules, describing the company as an information “gatekeeper.” Novara, a British news company publishing “left-leaning” content according to the NYT, had its YouTube channel removed Tuesday for several hours. The company posted a statement to its Twitter account informing the public that its channel had been deleted and then reinstated, with YouTube claiming the channel’s suspension was a mistake. “They are a monopoly, there is no alternative,” Novara employee Michael Walker told the NYT. “If we move to Vimeo or whatever other platform, we wouldn’t acquire the viewers.” (RELATED: POLL: Majority Of Americans Want Facebook To Censor More Content) Google has deleted one of the best and largest left-wing media outlets in the UK. No warning or explanation was provided. Just zapped it out of existence. Congratulations to online censorship advocates: this is the system of repression...
    The New York Times highlighted the latest enemy causing climate change: leaf blowers. On Tuesday, the Gray Lady published an opinion piece titled "The First Thing We Do, Let’s Kill All the Leaf Blowers" by contributing opinion writer Margaret Renkl. Renkl describes her utter disdain for leaf blowers, referring to them as "mechanical locusts." KATIE COURIC LAUGHS OFF BRIAN STELTER AS PARTISAN JOURNALIST: I’M SURE HE’S ‘PURE AS THE DRIVEN SNOW’  "They come in a deafening, surging swarm, blasting from lawn to lawn and filling the air with the stench of gasoline and death. I would call them mechanical locusts, descending upon every patch of gold in the neighborhood the way the grasshoppers of old would arrive, in numbers so great they darkened the sky, to lay bare a cornfield in minutes. But that comparison is unfair to locusts," Renkl wrote. A worker wearing a protective mask uses a blower to remove leafs from a walkway during sunny autumn weather near Stallikon, Switzerland October 27, 2020. REUTERS/Arnd Wiegmann (Reuters) However, Renkl insisted that her hatred for leaf blowers primarily...
    The New York Times mentioned the now-famous Loudoun County Public Schools sexual assault incident for the first time in an Oct. 27 article on the Virginia gubernatorial race. The article portrays the rape of a high school student in a school restroom by a boy wearing a skirt as “a sexual assault case that revived Republican criticism of gender-inclusive bathroom policies in schools.” The authors’ commented that conservative media have “lavished national attention on local events,” including the rape case in Loudoun County and makes no further mention of the incident or the ensuing scandal. A female Loudoun County student was raped in a school bathroom by a male student wearing a skirt on May 28; the perpetrator was found guilty Tuesday. The Loudoun County school board held public comment in June on a transgender bathroom policy during which Superintendent Scott Ziegler denied any knowledge of sexual assaults in school restrooms. Ziegler had in fact sent an email to the school board detailing the incident the day it happened, WTOP Radio reported. The attacker allegedly sexually assaulted another student in...
    Geraldo Rivera has some words for his Fox News colleague Tucker Carlson on Twitter and in a New York Times profile on Thursday. On Wednesday night, Carlson teased a trailer to an upcoming miniseries called “Patriot Purge” as part of his Originals programming. The trailer is downright deranged. In it, one person suggests liberals will send Republicans to Guantanamo Bay prison. Another voice floats the idea that the January 6th attack on the Capitol was a “false flag” event. Yet another claims, “The left is hunting the right.” Rivera took to Twitter on Thursday and bluntly took exception. He quote-tweeted Rep. Adam Kinzinger (R-IL) who called Carlson’s series “disgusting.” For his part, Rivera said, “False flags!? Bullshit.” “False flags!?” Bullshit https://t.co/FBi03zAvoc — Geraldo Rivera (@GeraldoRivera) October 28, 2021 That wasn’t Rivera’s only missive at his coworker on Thursday. In a profile published in the Times, he praised but also critiqued Carlson. “Tucker’s wonderful, he’s provocative, he’s original, but — man oh man,” he said in a phone interview. “There are some things that you say that are more...
    Former New York Times columnist Nicholas Kristof reflected on the most meaningful people and places he has covered over his decades-long career in journalism as part of his final column published in the Times this week.  "In particular, I want to make clear that while I’ve spent my career on the front lines of human suffering and depravity, covering genocide, war, poverty and injustice, I’ve emerged firmly believing that we can make real progress by summoning the political will," Kristof wrote. "We are an amazing species, and we can do better."  Kristof gave shout outs to several people he has met and recalled stories from far-flung corners of the globe, praising the courage he found in many of them and saying those experiences have collectively inspired him to better the world through public service.  "Good things are happening that we often don’t acknowledge, and they’re a result of a deeper understanding of what works to make a difference," Kristof wrote. "That may seem surprising coming from the Gloom Columnist, who has covered starvation, atrocities and climate devastation. But just because journalists cover planes that crash, not...
    Nicholas Kristof, a former New York Times columnist, launched a Democratic campaign for governor of Oregon on Wednesday. Kristof, who grew up in Oregon, spent 37 years as a journalist at the New York Times, first as a foreign correspondent and then as an opinion columnist. He left the New York Times several months ago as he started to prepare for a gubernatorial bid. “It broke my heart when I returned from crises abroad only to find crises here at home,” Kristof said in his campaign announcement video. The 2022 Oregon gubernatorial election will be an open race, as Gov. Kate Brown is term-limited. Kristof joins a crowded field of candidates for the Democratic nomination, including state House Speaker Tina Kotek and State Treasurer Tobias Read. BIDEN AND MCAULIFFE MAKE ‘BELOVED’ BOOK-BANNING FEAR KEY TO CLOSING ARGUMENT Kristof featured a woman in his announcement video named Mary, one of his friends in grade school, who in the decades since experienced homelessness for seven years despite being hardworking and honest. “Let's make...
    Washington, DC (CNN)Former New York Times columnist Nicholas Kristof announced Wednesday that he is running for governor of Oregon."I've never run for political office in my life, but I have spent a lifetime shining a light in the darkest corners of the globe, and it broke my heart when I returned from crises abroad only to find crises here at home, and that's why I'm running for governor," Kristof, a Pulitzer Prize winner, said in a video posted on social media and his campaign website.Kristof, who grew up outside Yamhill, Oregon, previously worked as an opinion columnist at The New York Times and was among the newspaper's most prominent journalists. He traveled across the world reporting on international and humanitarian crises and had been on leave at the Times since July as he explored whether to run for the office. He announced his resignation from the news organization earlier this month.The former journalist enters a crowded Democratic primary to succeed current Democratic Gov. Kate Brown, who is term limited. Oregon state House Speaker Tina Kotek and state Treasurer Tobias Read...
    Conservatives produced some fiery responses for New York Times editorial board member Binyamin Appelbaum after he concluded Republicans' "resistance to taxation" exposes the "rotten core" of the party. "Resistance to taxation is the rotten core of the modern Republican Party. Republicans in recent decades have sharply reduced the federal income tax rates imposed on wealthy people and big companies, but their opposition to taxation goes beyond that. They are aiding and abetting tax evasion," Appelbaum wrote in his Sunday piece. He targeted House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy, R-Calif., for condemning a provision in the Democrats' proposal, part of President Joe Biden's "Build Back Better" agenda, that creates a new IRS surveillance program "designed to target low and middle-income earners" and "snoop" into their bank accounts, the leader said in a video. "Democrats want to track every penny you earn so they can tax you and your family at the maximum possible amount," McCarthy added, calling the plan "un-American." DEMOCRATS MAY GO FOR BROKE THIS FALL WITH THEIR MASSIVE SPENDING PACKAGE. WILL VOTERS REWARD THEM? Appelbaum saw it differently, arguing the provision...