Tuesday, Dec 07, 2021 - 13:47:16
328 results - (0.007 seconds)

the newspaper:

latest news at page 1:
    At the age of 10, Tesha Christensen launched her journalistic career when her letter to the editor was published in her hometown paper. Now, more than 40 years later, Christensen has parlayed a life-long interest in community journalism into a successful business venture. The publisher of two community papers, Minneapolis’s Messenger and St. Paul’s Monitor, Christensen recently started a third paper, the Southwest Connector, to cover the South Minneapolis neighborhoods that had been served by the now defunct Southwest Journal. “I knew a potential market was waiting for me there, now that the Journal had stopped publishing. People in those neighborhoods were reaching out to me, telling me that they wanted to see a new publication in their area,” Christensen said. A former journalism instructor and a long-time newspaper freelancer, Christensen purchased her first two papers in 2019 at a time when community papers all across the country were struggling. “Tesha took ownership of the Messenger and the Monitor during a challenging time for print journalism,” noted Denis Woulfe, Christensen’s advertising manager, who served in a similar position for the...
    The United States in general has a weaker social safety net than major developed countries in Europe, but red states are especially bad — and that includes Utah, where public assistance for the poor is hard to come by. And the Salt Lake Tribune’s editorial board, in a scathing editorial published on December 3, not only slams Utah’s Republican-dominated government for its lack of public assistance, but also, for suggesting that those it rejects need to become Mormons. “Utah’s rules for giving cash assistance to the poor are so Scrooge-like that almost nobody qualifies,” the Tribune’s editorial board explains. “As recently as 2019, Utah was providing cash assistance, beyond food stamps and Medicaid, to only about 3000 households, out of 30,000 families living below the poverty level. Applications for Temporary Assistance for Needy Families — what Bill Clinton put in when he kept his promise to ‘end welfare as we know it’ — are rejected at the rate of 1300 a month in the state. So, state employees often accompany a rejected application with a suggestion that people seek out...
              more   Employment in journalism has taken a hit in recent years, and The Arizona Republic, known as AZCentral online, is no exception. The Republic was bought by the left-leaning publisher Gannett in 2000, which bought up several large newspapers in the 2000s. The paper took a sharp lurch to the left politically, and since then, there have been numerous high-profile layoffs and furloughs as the paper shrank faster than most other large newspapers. Rebekah Sanders, a consumer protection reporter and the president of the paper’s union, Arizona Republic Guild, tweeted about the latest cutback on December 2. “The company is planning to discontinue work cell phones,” she complained. “A [bat sh*t crazy] idea for a company whose entire workforce depends on phone calls! But we will push back and make sure our members are taken care of.” 5/4 Naturally, @Gannett giveth with one hand and taketh away with the other. The company is planning to discontinue work cell phones. A ????????????idea for a company whose entire workforce depends on phone calls! But we will push back and make sure...
    In 1928, a Danish newspaper ran a competition to mark 100 years since the birth of celebrated French author Jules Verne. The winner would echo the globe-trotting adventure embarked on by Verne's character Phileas Fogg in his famous novel, Around the World in 80 Days, which has just been adapted for TV by the BBC and stars Doctor Who star David Tennant. Open only to teenage boys, it was won by a red-haired, freckled 15-year-old boy scout named Palle Huld. In a 44-day blitz that saw him travel through countries including England, Canada, Japan, China and Communist Russia, Huld completed his trip and returned a hero. A year later, a fictional boy with a similar globetrotting streak appeared in the pages of a Brussels newspaper. He too had bright red hair and freckles. Tintin, the creation of comic artist Georges Remi – who was popularly known as Herge – went on to become one of the world's best-known comic book characters. Whilst no one is certain that Huld, who died in 2010 after a successful career as an actor, inspired...
    Sales of a men’s cologne promoted by Johnny Depp have risen since a High Court judge ruled that wife-beating allegations against the actor were ‘substantially true’. While the ruling saw the 58-year-old star ‘cancelled’ by some in Hollywood, Christian Dior retained Depp as the face of its Sauvage aftershave. A source close to the actor told The Mail on Sunday: ‘Johnny’s fanbase has stuck by him and remains loyal to him. ‘He has enjoyed a professional relationship with Dior since 2015 and he is currently promoting the new Sauvage Elixir cologne, which is selling out on both sides of the Atlantic. The Pirates Of The Caribbean star was dropped by Warner Brothers from its Fantastic Beasts franchise within days of a High Court ruling last December but remains attached to Dior ‘Sales have actually increased and Dior has no plans to drop him. In fact, many fans are going out and buying the new cologne to show their support for him.’ The Pirates Of The Caribbean star was dropped by Warner Brothers from its Fantastic Beasts franchise within days of...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden’s $1.85 trillion social spending bill includes a provision that, if it becomes law, would mark the first time the federal government has offered targeted support in response to the decline of local news. The help would come in the form of a payroll tax credit for companies that employ eligible local journalists. The measure would allow newspapers, digital news outlets and radio and television stations to claim a tax credit of $25,000 the first year and $15,000 the next four years for up to 1,500 journalists. It’s a response to growing alarm that the elimination of newsroom jobs is leaving communities without access to critical information. The concern has grown since a hedge fund with a reputation of ruthless cost-cutting acquired Tribune, one of the nation’s largest newspaper chains, in May. Already, about one-fourth of the country’s newspapers have closed and half of local journalism jobs have evaporated in the past 15 years, according to research from the University of North Carolina. That leaves about 1,800 communities with no local newspaper. But...
    PORTSMOUTH — Extra, extra read all about it! Students at Portsmouth Elementary School and facility, Beth Born, Portsmouth Elementary Principal and Ms. Dutton, the librarian, have started a school newspaper. Around 18 students came down to the office to get a photo and many of them talked about what they do for the paper and about articles they have written. The newspaper, which can be viewed online, includes news-related articles, opinion pieces, and feature stories all about their school. “We wanted to create a newspaper that was completely created and driven by our students and their interests and what they wanted to talk about,” Born said. “Our librarian, Ms. Dutton, actually gave them a whole list of topics that we could put in the newspaper and then our teachers talked to the students about what they could contribute and that’s where this all came from.” Born shared the school newspaper has photographers, writers and artists. The paper also has students who review video games and share fun stories. “There are lots of real-life activities for the kids to create...
    Appointments for grade-school kids to be vaccinated against COVID-19 are starting to become available, and the media continues to send the message that this is something to fear.  Significant side effects from the Pfizer vaccine (the only vaccine that has gotten emergency use authorization for children) are much rarer than significant health impacts from COVID-19 itself, even in children. But after close to a year of the right-wing media, social media conspiracy theorists, and too many Republican politicians spreading fear and outright lies about the safety of the vaccines, a significant number of parents are opposed to or hesitant about vaccinating their kids. And of course they are all we hear about. Less than 5% of people are willing to leave their jobs rather than be vaccinated? The media is on it, giving that very small fraction of people blanket coverage. Meanwhile, around one-third of parents can’t wait to get their kids vaccinated? Crickets. Here’s a headline from the Boston Globe: "‘In your heart, it does tug at you.’ Parents weighing COVID-19 vaccines for kids 5-11 must first battle their own anxiety." Here’s the reality of...
    Hassina Leelarathna, a co-founder of the only Sri Lankan newspaper in the U.S. and an activist who spurred fellow immigrants to help when disasters struck their homeland, has died at age 73. Leelarathna died in Sherman Oaks on Oct. 17 after battling lung cancer for the last five years, said her son, Sahan Gamage. After moving to California from her native Sri Lanka, Leelarathna founded the Sri Lankan Express in 1981 with her husband, Deeptha Leelarathna. The paper initially published biweekly, in English, moving completely online in 2015. For her, it was an “intense” labor of love. Leelarathna worked full time at other jobs, most recently as a financial analyst for the Department of Veterans Affairs. Hassina Leelarathna co-hosted a bilingual radio show called “Tharanga,” focusing on news, music and culture. The program began in San Francisco at KFJC-FM, pictured here, before migrating to Los Angeles when the family relocated south in 1985.(Sahan Gamage) The couple also broadcast a radio program, “Tharanga,” in English and Sinhalese for a Sri Lankan community that in Los Angeles County numbers nearly 20,000...
    OAKLAND, Calif. (KGO) -- The Black Panther Party celebrated its 55th anniversary in October and ABC7 sat down with the members who put the newspapers together.Emory Douglas' bright, smile draws you in, and so does his art. Douglas is the former Minister of Culture for the Black Panther Party.RELATED: Black Panther Party Co-Founder Huey P. Newton honored with bronze statue"As a youngster, at my age, how could I build a Ministry of Culture?" said the 78-year-old.Led by Douglas, the group of artists, Gayle "Assali" Dickson, Malik Edwards, Tarika Lewis and a few others, created and printed the Panther's newspaper and the caption-filled art that went inside, and on the front and back pages. Together, they solidified a cultural movement."The fact that we were so young," said Dickson, a retired teacher, at her home in Richmond, California who worked for the Panthers in her late teens and early 20s. "And so dedicated."Malik Edwards, now a teacher in Oakland, had just returned from Vietnam where he fought in the war as a Marine.WATCH: Original Black Panther member creates trailblazing community organizations in...
    At least 130,000 foreign students are enrolled in Australian universities unable to attend. For months, they have been taking courses online, paying high tuition fees and struggling to see the end of the tunnel. “I feel like a puppet. They are the ones controlling me.” For fifteen months, Gregory, a Bangladeshi student from Haryana Beijing, waited to set foot at the University of Adelaide in Australia. Although she was accepted there a year ago, nothing worked: the island’s borders were closed, and international students who were not there before the spring of 2020 “could not go there to pursue face-to-face lessons. Reported by South Chinese Morning Post (SCMP), About 130,000 students study abroad online, hoping that one day a pass will allow them to get to know the benches of Australian universities. Those who wanted to postpone their studies until they reached Australia, Victoria Cao, a Vietnamese woman, were interviewed by the newspaper, whose departure had already been postponed four times: This condition affects not only our future life but also our mental health due to this unexpected wait. Boundaries...
    On Friday, October 22, at midnight local time, residents of Australia’s second largest city finally regained their freedom. After spending more than two hundred and sixty days since the outbreak on the island-continent, it was time for celebration. In short Australian newspaper Age In an editorial, “This is a world record and we must not forget it.”. Melbourne, the second most populous city in the country, From March 2020, not less than two hundred and sixty days In prison. In total, there were six, which made an impact “Be on the roller coaster” Paradoxically, the newspaper that wants to be optimistic is: Melbourne’s sixth lock, fingers crossed and tapping the tree [qui avait débuté le 5 août] Will be the last. “ A prediction was dictated by two factors: first, Australia abandoned its use of the “zero govt” strategy, which aimed to eradicate the virus from its territory altogether; Second, the progress of the vaccine (which was delayed this summer) makes it possible to approach the future more calmly. “People will be a little freer” “As the percentage of vaccines...
    Canadian author Margaret Atwood has been labelled transphobic for sharing on Twitter an article complaining about gender neutral language. Atwood, author of The Handmaid's Tail, on Tuesday shared a Toronto Star op ed entitled: 'Why can't we say 'woman' anymore?'   Columnist Rosie DiManno, argued that the adoption of gender-neutral language creates an 'erasure of women,' which leaves 'well-meaning people tongue-tied, lest they be attacked as transphobic or otherwise insensitive to the increasingly complex constructs of gender.' DiManno claimed that 'woman' was 'in danger of becoming a dirty word.' She said the word was at risk of being 'struck from the lexicon of officialdom, eradicated from medical vocabulary and expunged from conversation.'  The 81-year-old shared it without comment, but the article sparked an immediate backlash. Margaret Atwood, pictured on October 6 being presented with the Lattes Grinzane Special Prize in Alba, Italy, sparked controversy on Tuesday with a tweet sharing an article about gender identity Atwood shared an article by columnist Rosie DiManno, sparking a furious response Cosmologist Katie Mack replied: 'No one is banning the word 'woman.'  'Many organizations are...
    Senators Joe Manchin and Bernie Sanders hugged it out for the cameras on Monday evening, posing in front of the Capitol amid a squabble about President Joe Biden's $3.5 trillion budget of social programs.  The Democratic senator from West Virginia met with his progressive colleague as Manchin has pushed for cuts to the budget package, which led to clashes between the two men. Not helping matters was an op-ed Sanders wrote in West Virginia's largest newspaper, the Charleston Gazette-Mail. The Vermont senator took to Machin's backyard to urge support for Biden's plan, prompting Manchin to launch out in fury at the move. But it was more cordial when Manchin and Sanders ran into each other outside the Capitol building on Monday night. Manchin approached Sanders, putting his arm around him and encouraging him to pose for the surrounding reporters.  'Get a picture of us,' Manchin told reporters. 'We're talking.' 'We're talking. We're going to make some progress,' Sanders said. The two men were leaving the Senate after the evening's votes. They got into their respective vehicles, which were parked next to...
    As Japan’s yakuza mob weakens, former gangsters struggle to find a role outside crime, Washington Post The ranks of the yakuza criminal networks in Japan are dwindling because of government intervention. What does life look like for defectors? One man opened a noodle shop, but had to win over nearby vendors first, and also the owner of a shop the mob had rammed a car into. —Walker Orenstein, Greater Minnesota reporter A Secretive Hedge Fund is Gutting Newsrooms, The Atlantic Truth be told, there’s not a lot new in this McKay Coppins story about Alden Global Capital — one of the largest newspaper operators in America — at least not to anybody who has been paying the slightest bit of attention to the media industry in recent years. Alden, which counts the Pioneer Press among the papers it owns, has become infamous for its strategy of slashing newsroom resources and soaking subscribers; the phrase “strip-mining” comes up a lot when talking about its business model. And though Coppins scores an interview with one of the elusive figures behind the...
    New York (CNN Business)Bari Weiss says her publication on Substack, Common Sense, is meant to be "the newspaper for the 21st century, ultimately. I'm starting it out as the op-ed page that I want to read."One year after quitting The New York Times, Weiss has not drifted off into obscurity, as detractors hoped she would. Quite the opposite: She has amassed more than 100,000 subscribers, including enough paying supporters to hire a staff. "I've made a lot more money than I ever thought was possible in journalism," she remarked to me, "but I'm making less because I've hired four, about to be five, people, So I'm reinvesting all of it because I really, really, really believe in this model."I recently interviewed Weiss about her business model; about free speech; and "woke orthodoxy." The full interview is now up on the "Reliable Sources" podcast, and it will be featured on air at CNN Sunday morning.Listen to the podcast here:In her pitch for Common Sense, Weiss wrote, "There are tens of millions of Americans who aren't on the hard left or the...
    Joe Manchin has condemned Bernie Sanders for writing an op ed in Manchin's home state urging voters to support Joe Biden's infrastructure bill, as the Democratic infighting over the legislation escalated. Manchin, 74, the senator for West Virginia, is stubbornly refusing to back Biden's $3.5 trillion plan, saying it is too much money. Sanders, 80, senator for Vermont, insists that it is essential to right some of the wrongs of U.S. society. On Friday Sanders took the unusual step of appealing directly to Manchin's constituents with an op ed in the state's biggest newspaper, the Charleston Gazette-Mail.  Bernie Sanders, 80, a senator for Vermont, on Friday took the highly unusual step of writing an op ed in another senator's state. He wrote in West Virginia's biggest newspaper that voters should support a $3.5 trillion infrastructure bill Sanders' intervention was not appreciated by the senator for West Virginia, Joe Manchin. Manchin, 74, has stubbornly refused to support the $3.5 trillion plan and said Sanders could not sway him 'The $3.5 trillion Build Back Better bill, supported by President Biden and almost...
    Jacob Moscovitch/Getty Images Gov. Mike Parson (R-MO) is threatening the St. Louis Post-Dispatch with criminal charges because he is apparently unable to grasp the concept of web page HTML source codes. If you’re not familiar, the source code of a web page can be viewed by anyone who knows how to find it. For example, in Google Chrome for desktop, simply right clicking on a page will give you the option to “View Page Source.” Selecting this option will allow you to view the HTML source code underlying what you see on the page. Viewing the source code is how the Post-Dispatch found a glaring security issue with a website maintained by Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education (DESE). The paper discovered teachers’ social security numbers contained in the code, though the SSNs were not clearly visible on the web pages themselves. Now the governor is furious at the Post-Dispatch, even though it alerted the DESE of the vulnerability on Tuesday, and delayed publication of its story by reporter Josh Renaud until the pages were removed. As the paper...
    Photo by ISAAC LAWRENCE,YURI KADOBNOV/AFP via Getty Images. Two journalists were awarded the 2021 Nobel Peace Prize, announced the Norwegian Nobel Committee on Friday. Maria Ressa and Dmitry Muratov won the annual prize for their critical reporting in the Philippines and Russia, respectively, in what the committee called “their efforts to safeguard freedom of expression.” Both countries are known to be hostile toward the press. Ressa became the first Filipino to win the award and the first female Nobel recipient this year. According to the committee: In 2012, she co-founded Rappler, a digital media company for investigative journalism, which she still heads. As a journalist and the Rappler’s CEO, Ressa has shown herself to be a fearless defender of freedom of expression. Rappler has focused critical attention on the Duterte regime’s controversial, murderous anti-drug campaign. The number of deaths is so high that the campaign resembles a war waged against the country’s own population. Ms. Ressa and Rappler have also documented how social media is being used to spread fake news, harass opponents and manipulate public discourse. Muratov co-founded the...
    LONDON—This Nobel Prize committee has just made one of the most aggressively political statements in its history by awarding the Peace Prize to two known enemies of powerful, serving heads of state. The joint winners are a pair of journalists known as the bête noirs of two of the world’s most despotic, democratically elected leaders. Make no mistake; elevating the top critics of Russian President Vladimir Putin and Philippines President Rodrigo Duterte is intended as a direct insult. Putin, who craves respect from the international community, dreams of winning the Peace Prize himself. Someone even nominated him this year—although the Kremlin claims to have absolutely no idea who submitted his name. Putin will be fuming to see one of his critics receive the award instead. Dmitry Muratov is the editor-in-chief of Novaya Gazeta, the leading independent newspaper yet to be snuffed out by the Russian authorities. He won the prize along with Maria Ressa, a former CNN investigative reporter who founded a fiercely independent news site in the Philippines. She was thrown in jail last year under spurious circumstances...
    In literal terms, there’s no denying that the five people killed inside the Capital Gazette newsroom three years ago were targeted specifically for being employed by the newspaper. But after having time to reflect, some of the victims who survived say they also think something bigger and broader was attacked too — the First Amendment — something they worry is under continued attack today. Former Capital Gazette reporter Selene San Felice, who now works for Axios in Florida, said it was an attack on the First Amendment, “but the First Amendment is still being attacked even if people aren’t shooting us,” she said. She and photographer Paul Gillespie cited the low wages many community news outlets pay as well as the steep decline in jobs and publications that still exist as ongoing threats to the news industry as a whole, and the First Amendment in particular. “Local news is so important to this country,” Gillespie said. “We’re in the hearts of these neighborhoods all across our country telling stories of our neighbors. Us closing down as much as we have,...
    Bob Woodward and Robert Costa's new book, "Peril" takes a disturbing look at former President Donald Trump's final weeks in the White House. And according to the Kansas City Star's editorial board, the book paints an especially damning picture of one of Trump's worst enablers during that chaotic lame duck period: Sen. Josh Hawley of Missouri. Hawley's refusal to accept the democratic results of the 2020 presidential election and his role in the January 6 insurrection are the focus of a scathing Star editorial published on September 29. "Vice President Mike Pence, alas, had to be convinced not to end our democratic experiment," the Star's editorial board writes, "but he did come through in the end…. But you know who never caved to reality, or ever tried to protect the republic instead of his Republican self? Missouri Sen. Josh Hawley, that's who. Yes, we knew that, but 'Peril' reminds any who might have forgotten that in putting his ambition ahead of all else, Hawley was a standout both before and during the attempted coup." In "Peril," Woodward — who is...
    Canberra, Australia — A 64-year-old fugitive walked into a Sydney police station to give himself up almost 30 years after he used a hacksaw blade and bolt cutters to escape from prison, police said on Wednesday. Darko Desic decided to go back to prison because Sydney's COVID-19 lockdown made him jobless and homeless, media reported.   Desic surrendered at Dee Why Police Station at Sydney's fashionable northern beaches on Sunday morning and was denied bail when he appeared in a downtown court on Tuesday charged with escaping from lawful custody in 1992, a police statement said. The charge carries a potential seven-year prison sentence. Sydney's lockdown, which began in June, had cost Desic his cash-in-hand work as a laborer and handyman, unnamed police sources told Sydney's The Daily Telegraph and Australian Broadcasting Corp. People enjoy the afternoon sunshine at Avalon Beach, January 10, 2021, in Sydney, Australia, where fugitive Darko Desic is believed to have spent 30 years living on the lam, until COVID-19 deprived him of work. James D. Morgan/Getty "He slept on the beach on Saturday night and said:...
    The student newspaper editorial board at Case Western Reserve University in Ohio criticized the school for allowing a pro-life group to be established on campus because it poses “a danger to the student body.” The Observer newspaper titled its editorial, “Case For Life is a danger to the student body — the failure of CWRU to protect its community.” The editorial reveals students have embraced the narrative promoted by the abortion industry, including Planned Parenthood, that promotes “bodily autonomy” for the mother but not the unborn child, which the authors refer to as a “group of cells.” The editorial says, in part: This goes to show that despite the outrage by the student body and despite the fear that Case for Life instills, the university continues to refuse to take action. To put it simply, CWRU does not care about its students. If they actually cared, they would have immediately considered concerns about the student body’s immediate safety and the broader school-community impacts, and they would have easily determined this organization to pose a danger. Case for Life may have...
    ESTILL, S.C. -- A family attorney says a lawyer from a prominent South Carolina legal family who found his wife and son shot to death at their home three months ago has been shot in the head and wounded.Attorney Jim Griffin told The State newspaper that Alex Murdaugh was shot Saturday in Hampton County after he had car trouble en route to Charleston.Griffin told the newspaper a family member told him Murdaugh was taken to the hospital, but didn't know his condition.Alex Murdaugh found the bodies of his wife Maggie and son Paul on June 7 at their Colleton County home. They were found shot near dog kennels.The Murdaughs are one of South Carolina's most prominent legal families.Paul was awaiting trial on a charge of boating under the influence causing death in a February 2019 crash that killed 19-year-old Mallory Beach. The woman's body was found seven days after the crash.The wreck led to stories questioning whether his family's ties to the legal system in the area affected the investigation.No arrests have been made in that case.
    The United States Department of Justice on Wednesday disclosed special counsel Robert Mueller scrutinized "a member of the news media suspected of participating in the conspiracy" to hack Democrats and publish their emails online, The New York Times reports. Then-Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein approved a subpoena for the person's phone and email records and a authorized a subpoena to force the person to testify before a grand jury. "All of this information was necessary to further the investigation of whether the member of the news media was involved in the conspiracy to unlawfully obtain and utilize the information from the hacked political party or other victims," the DOJ said. The newspaper noted DOJ did not say whether the person testified or whether "member of the news media" referred to a journalist or a commentator. The newspaper noted "the disclosure on Wednesday left many questions unanswered" and that a DOJ spokesperson "declined to provide further clarity." From Your Site Articles
    08/26/2021 at 2:13 PM CEST At PSG they are preparing for what may be an imminent sale of Kylian Mbappé to Real Madrid. Since ‘Le Parisien’ they assure that the Parisian club wants 220 million, 60 more compared to the 160 ‘kilos’ that Florentino Pérez has offered. In view of the fact that both clubs are likely to reach an agreement, the newspaper ‘L’Equipe’ have not been slow to speculate on PSG’s plans if Mbappé finally ends up leaving. According to the aforementioned newspaper, the Parisians would immediately go for Haaland, Kane or Lewandowski. If finally the Parisian entity ends up receiving these close to 200 million euros, no one doubts that it could face any major operation tocateja. It is also true that Dortmund, Tottenham and Bayern are not willing to sell at any price, but it remains to be seen what they would do if they received a succulent last minute offer. And more considering that, in the case of Tottenham and Bayern, it would possibly be the last chance to make...
    New York, Aug 25 (.) .- The American technology company Western Digital is negotiating the purchase of the Japanese Kioxia for a value that could exceed 20,000 million dollars, according to the newspaper The Wall Street Journal (WSJ), which cites sources close to conversations. According to the newspaper, negotiations between the two companies have accelerated in recent weeks and could end in mid-September. Western Digital would pay for the deal with shares and the combined company would likely be led by its chief executive, David Goeckeler, according to the sources. In any case, the WSJ points out that Western Digital, whose market value is around 19,000 million dollars, could not close the deal and that Kioxia, which makes NAND memories that are used in mobile phones, could opt for another option. Western Digital shares appreciated today on the New York Stock Exchange about 8.5%. (c) . Agency
    CHARLOTTE, N.C. (AP) — Rana Cash, executive editor of the Savannah Morning News in Georgia, has been named to the same position at The Charlotte Observer, the North Carolina newspaper’s first Black editor in its 135-year history. Kristin Roberts, McClatchy’s senior vice president for news, announced Cash’s hiring on Wednesday, the newspaper reported. Cash, 50, begins her new job in early October, replacing Sherry Chisenhall, who announced last month that she was leaving the newspaper. “She shares our commitment to the mission of independent, essential journalism that serves the full community. And she is an advocate for deep community engagement that ensures we create unique value for our readers, viewers and listeners every day,” Roberts said. In her role in Savannah, Cash oversees the Augusta Chronicle and Athens Banner-Herald for the Gannett chain. Cash’s appointment marks a return to Charlotte after she served as deputy editor of The Sporting News from 2010 to 2016. Her experience includes stints at The Miami Herald, The Dallas Morning News and the Atlanta Journal-Constitution. She also worked at The Minneapolis Star-Tribune...
    Andrew Harrer/Getty Images Nexstar Media Group is acquiring The Hill from long-time owner Jimmy Finkelstein, he said in a Friday announcement. “Let me say it was an honor successfully producing one of the great news products in the country,” Finkelstein said in an afternoon announcement. “And it was an honor working with all of you.” The Hill was founded in 1994 by Finkelstein’s father, Jerry Finkelstein, a New York publisher and business magnate who oversaw it until his death in 2012. The paper developed a reputation for putting a special focus on Washington’s inner workings, but also drew ire from liberal critics in more recent years who took issue with Finkelstein’s ties to former President Donald Trump through New York social circles. Nexstar, which said it was paying $130 million for the publication, is mostly known for its work in the TV industry. It employs approximately 5,500 journalists at nearly 200 stations around the United States. The Hill will add around 100 employees to that figure. Have a tip we should know? tips@mediaite.com
    The future of Cristiano Ronaldo still giving a lot to talk about. Especially in Italy, where rumors of a possible exit of the Portuguese from the Juventus of Turin on the verge of starting his fourth season as a Bianconero footballer. The newspaper Tuttosport, published in Turin and close to the environment of the Vecchia Signora, speculates today that the absence of the Portuguese in the traditional friendly summer duel against the team Juve Spring (U23) could be related to a departure from the club. The newspaper also asserts that the newspaper itself Christian He has not said that he is going to stay after the rumors that have placed him in the Madrid or that they have related to PSG or Manchester City. At the beginning of the week, the El Chiringuito program reported that Carlo Ancelotti had contacted the attacker’s surroundings to test him for the possibility of returning to Santiago Bernabeu. The next day, both the Italian coach and Cristiano flatly denied the information. “I have never considered signing him. We look forward,” Ancelotti said in...
    Leading in the polls and fundraising amid a crowded field in the campaign to try to replace Gov. Gavin Newsom, talk radio personality Larry Elder has launched a time-honored new front in the California recall election: bashing the media. Elder has banned one of the state’s top newspapers from covering his events and refused to take questions from a Los Angeles Times opinion columnist, depicting himself as a victim of duplicity and unfairness. The Elder campaign revoked the Sacramento Bee’s access Monday, charging that the newspaper “doctored” responses the candidate gave for an online “Voter Guide” feature. Elder included critiques of Newsom in his written responses. The Bee’s editors edited out the attacks, saying they had requested candidates limit their responses to policy. A few days earlier, Elder sharply rejected Times columnist Jean Guerrero when she tried to ask him a question about immigration during a video interview with opinion editors and writers from the newspaper. The candidate’s spokeswoman accused the writer of engaging in “bigotry masquerading as journalism.” California Larry Elder’s outspoken conservative radio rhetoric is under scrutiny...
    New York (CNN Business)Falls. Collapses. Chaos. Those are some of the words splashed across the front pages of newspapers in the US and around the world after the Taliban took control of Afghanistan's capital city, Kabul. Reflecting on Monday's front page, USA Today Editor-in-Chief Nicole Carroll told CNN Business, "There was so much we needed to convey on this historic front page: the panic on the ground and the scrambling effort to evacuate; the revived security fears; the political fallout; and, of course, the lead photo with the US Chinook helicopter flying over the American embassy, which drew comparisons to the US withdrawal from Vietnam." USA TodayThe Guardian The New York TimesRead MoreLos Angeles TimesThe Wall Street JournalThe Washington Post The Boston GlobeStars and StripesThe TimesDaily MailArab NewsThe Globe and Mail
    In this Saturday, July 24, 2021, file photo a firefighter passes a burning home as the Dixie Fire flares in Plumas County, Calif. AP Photo/Noah Berge,File 72-year-old Alan Kuhl was trapped by California's Dixie Fire last week. Unable to drive through the blaze, he considered killing his dog and then himself to avoid burning to death.  Firefighters were able to rescue him and he now plans to leave California for Michigan.  10 Things in Politics: The latest in politics & the economy Loading Something is loading. Email address By clicking ‘Sign up’, you agree to receive marketing emails from Insider as well as other partner offers and accept our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. A California man trapped by the raging Dixie Fire said he was prepared to shoot his dog, then himself to avoid burning to death — but managed to escape the inferno.  During an interview in the evacuated town of Chester, 72-year-old Alan Kuhl told the Record Searchlight he "barely survived," and planned to shoot his labrador, Slim, before turning his 9-millimeter handgun...
    08/05/2021 On at 21:46 CEST . The announcement that Lionel Messi will not continue at Barcelona is the main story of most of the news portals of Argentina, who consider the Argentine’s departure as a “world bomb“and an” unexpected twist. “ “World bomb: Barcelona announced that Leo does not follow“, headlined the sports newspaper Olé, which has the news as the most prominent of the moment. “Unexpected turn. Lionel Messi leaves Barcelona: a bomb that shakes the world of football“, headlined the newspaper La Nación, which publishes several related articles. The mythical diary The capital, from the city of Rosario, also used the word “bomb“to refer to Messi’s departure from Barcelona. The website Infobae highlights that Messi is a “free agent” and that Barcelona “blamed La Liga for not having been able to close the agreement with the player.” The news of the Messi’s departure too became a trend in social networks and most netizens reacted with surprise to the ad.
    A Chinese state-owned newspaper on Tuesday condemned online gaming as “opium for the mind,” prompting Chinese tech giant Tencent to announce new game controls and fueling investor fears of a start to government crackdowns on the gaming industry. The original version of the Economic Information Daily article included an argument that “society has come to recognize the harm caused by online gaming and it is often referred to as ‘opium for the mind’ or ‘electronic drugs,’” according to The Wall Street Journal.  While the article was eventually deleted and reposted with some of the harsher language removed, both versions detailed a rise in gaming addictions, arguing that it is negatively impacting child education and is fueling social alienation.  While the article did not target specific media companies by name, it criticized Tencent’s game Honor of Kings, which has been the world’s top-grossing game for the past two years.  The article argued, “No industry, no sport, can be allowed to develop in a way that will destroy a generation.” Hours later, Tencent announced that it would be implementing a series of new...
    CARACAS, Venezuela (AP) — After boarding a bus in Venezuela’s capital, Juan Pablo Lares sits in front facing the passengers, turns on a microphone and speaker, and delivers the news while a colleague holds a black cardboard frame around his face to mimic a television screen. “Good morning! This is the newscast of El Bus TV Capitolio,” he reads from his script to the passengers, most of whom listen carefully while others brush past him to get on or off at their stops. The news he delivers is not always flattering to Venezuela’s socialist government. That rudimentary news delivery system is one of several ways journalists are fighting to preserve press freedom in the South American nation. Media in Venezuela, like in other countries, have been struggling to stay afloat, but their difficulty is not just dwindling advertising revenue. They face mounting pressures from a government trying to control the flow of news, including fines over criticism of officials and barriers to purchase of newsprint. This has left millions with access to information largely through state media. “This...
    Outside the angle of television cameras and also of the set of the Olympic Games, the sporting event is being a thrown weapon between the opposition and the government these days with the increase in infections (247% from one week to another), up to more than 10,700 in one day, and the refusal of several citizens to the Games had been held. It is observed each morning on the approaches that two of the newspapers The most important of the country, the ‘Asahi Simbun’ and the ‘Yomiuri Simbun’, give to any of the news outside the competition. The first is critical of Prime Minister Yoshihide Suga; the second has been openly in favor of the celebration of Tokyo 2020. In its Sunday issue, the ‘Assahi Simbun’ published a report in which it denounced that while millions of people in Tokyo “stay at home glued to their televisions to watch the Olympic Games, many others are partying in the parks every night, drinking cans of alcohol while applauding the medals of the Olympics. Japanese athletes “. The positive effect...
    The then President United States, Donald Trump, Pressing the U.S. judiciary late last year to declare the election “corrupt,” although there were no widespread fraud cases, this Friday (30) the newspaper “The New York Times” revealed. Trump’s intention is to use this statement, along with his allies in Congress, to try to undo the defeat caused by the current U.S. president. Joe Biden. The newspaper claims to have released the information based on documents provided to lawmakers and obtained by journalist Katie Penner. The judiciary provided the documents Home Oversight and Reform Commission examines Trump administration’s efforts to manipulate election results. During a phone call on December 27, 2020, Jeffrey A., then-interim Attorney General, was charged in connection with the Trump election interim charge. Rosen and his deputy Richard b. (See below). In the United States, the Attorney General has the same characteristics as the Minister of Justice and the Attorney General of the Republic of Brazil. According to the newspaper, Donok warned that the judiciary does not have...
    (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images) The New York Times announced Friday morning that they will be joining the ranks of other large companies in altering their return to office plans, in the midst of the Delta variant of Covid-19 that is surging across the country. The initial plan was for employees to begin the return to in-person work on Sept. 7, starting with at least three days a week in the office. The newspaper has since stated that they are indefinitely postponing the full staff return to office, following recent updated guidelines from the CDC. Meredith Kopit Levien, chief executive of The New York Times Company, sent an email to the staff saying, “In light of the evolution of the virus, including new trends around the Delta variant and the updated guidance from the C.D.C. this week on masking, we have decided to push out our plans for a full return at this time.” The New York Times joins the ranks of companies such as The Washington Post, Uber and Lyft, who have all made alterations to their safety guidelines...
    New Delhi (CNN Business)Tax authorities in India raided several offices of one of the world's biggest-selling newspapers on Thursday, a move journalists and leading opposition politicians described as an attack on press freedom.The newspaper, Dainik Bhaskar, said that tax inspectors visited its offices in the capital New Delhi and the states of Gujarat, Madhya Pradesh, Maharashtra and Rajasthan in the early morning. The paper shocked India with its reporting of dead bodies in the river Ganges during the brutal second wave of the Covid-19 pandemic this spring. It criticized authorities for under-reporting Covid-19 deaths and challenged state officials and the government of Prime Minister Narendra Modi over their handling of the crisis. "The government has clamped down on the group that represented an accurate picture of what happened to the country during the second wave of Covid-19," the paper wrote in a report on the tax raid published Thursday on the homepage of its Hindi edition. The 63-year-old company also publishes newspapers in Gujarati and Marathi languages.In its report, the paper added that tax officials also raided the homes of...
    I came to The New York Times in 1992, 29 years ago this summer, as the first intern in its graphics department. I arrived in Manhattan, a little Black boy from a hick town in Louisiana, and it blew my mind. In those first months I saw how one of the best newsrooms in the country covered some of the biggest stories of the era, and it shaped me as a journalist and my reverence for the invaluable role that journalists play in society. It was an extraordinary time to be a journalist. Newsroom employment was at a high, and throughout the 1990s, and even into the early 2000s, a slight majority of Americans still had a great deal or fair amount of trust in the news media to report the news “fully, accurately and fairly,” according to Gallup. In 1992, there was no MSNBC or Fox News, no Google, Facebook, Twitter, Instagram or TikTok. Also, there weren’t many, if any, mainstream news organizations online. The Times didn’t start online publication until 1996, and then it was not the truly...
    Washington (CNN)Thirty-seven smartphones owned by journalists, human rights activists, business executives and two women connected to the slain Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi were targeted by "military-grade spyware" licensed by an Israeli company to governments, according to an investigation by a consortium of media organizations, including The Washington Post, published Sunday. The Post reported Sunday that the phones were "on a list of more than 50,000 numbers that are concentrated in countries known to engage in surveillance of their citizens" and are known to be clients of the company, NSO Group, whose Pegasus spyware is ostensibly licensed to track terrorists and major criminals. The newspaper reported that through the investigation, which was also conducted with the help of Amnesty International and Forbidden Stories, a Paris-based journalism nonprofit, the outlets "were able to identify more than 1,000 people spanning more than 50 countries through research and interviews on four continents: several Arab royal family members, at least 65 business executives, 85 human rights activists, 189 journalists, and more than 600 politicians and government officials -- including cabinet ministers, diplomats, and military and...
    In a dramatic shift from breathless 'if true...' coverage of damaging leaks and rumors during Donald Trump's presidency, the mainstream US media remains notably silent after a British newspaper claimed to reveal documents proving a Russian plot to support Trump.   The Guardian on Thursday published an explosive report based on the purported Kremlin documents, but nearly all US outlets have refrained from covering the story, aside from commentary expressing skepticism about the documents. More than 24 hours later, the New York Times, CNN, MSNBC, ABC, NBC and CBS all remain silent on the left-leaning British newspaper's claims. Perhaps unsurprisingly, conservative-leaning outlets including Fox News and the New York Post have also shied away from the story. But after years of exuberantly hyping every whisper that could be damaging to Trump, the left-wing media's caution signaled their quiet doubts about the report. The Guardian on Thursday published an explosive report (above) based on the supposed Kremlin documents, but nearly all US outlets have refrained from covering the story The Guardian report cited documents supposedly leaked from the Kremlin, showing that...
    London.- President of Russia, Vladimir Putin, Authorized a covert operation to help Republicans Donald Trump As the British newspaper “The Guardian” reported this Thursday, to win the 2016 US election Kremlin. Documents allegedly signed Putin, Approved at the closed door meeting of the National Security Council Russia, On January 22, 2016, in the presence of the Russian President, his intelligence leaders and senior representatives of the administration, the newspaper adds. In this private session, they agreed that they would work to ensure the success of the three Russian spy agencies Trump In elections, a victory is appropriate Russia Because, in his opinion, it will cause “social unrest” ME And weakening the president’s negotiating position. According to The Guardian, which has verified the authenticity of the documents with several independent experts, it is a “serious and very unusual” leak from the inside. Kremlin. Spokesman for the British newspaper Vladimir Putin, Dmitry Peskov, denied the facts and promised to create a secret plan to support the idea of ​​a meeting between Russian leaders Trump This is a “big fiction”. The report, classified...
    Very convenient for art Agreement With the diplomacy of Joe Biden’s democratic policies, Poland is giving the United States a strange deal: Donald Trump “Against tanks The TV”, Daily headlines on anti-Polish Gazette Viborxa Comment on the announcement made by Poland on Wednesday 14 July July with a view to acquiring 250 Abrams tanks from the United States. The deal, worth a total of more than 5 billion euros, “The most expensive military order in Polish military history”, Adds the newspaper, but it must be verified by the U.S. Congress before it can be published. Gazette Viborxa The decision comes a week after a bill was introduced that, if passed, would force the US media group to sell its majority stake in Discovery Polish television. The TV, “Priority to state-owned companies”. Liberal in orientation and criticism of the conservative national government, The TV Thus coming under the control of the long-desired power. “Reuse media”. Theories or pragmatism Gazette Viborxa ‘S business value of The TV There is “That could be less than the 5 billion euros the government wants to...