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    SeeWinter/Facebook Winter the dolphin’s illness has intensified and her condition is now critical, according to her caregivers at the Clearwater Marine Aquarium. On Monday, the aquarium announced the “Dolphin Tale” star and beloved rescued dolphin was fighting a gastrointestinal infection. Winter’s animal care team noticed last week that she wasn’t eating or behaving normally. Tests indicated an infection, and Winter has been undergoing treatment ever since. Now, the aquarium said it’s consulting with animal care experts from around the country and “exploring all possible options to save Winter’s life.” “Today, test results show that despite treatment her intestinal abnormalities have intensified,” the aquarium said in a post on Twitter. The tweet also included a short video showing Winter’s team running tests and caring for the dolphin in and out of the water. Earlier this week we shared that initial tests indicated Winter the Dolphin was likely fighting a gastrointestinal infection. Today, test results show that despite treatment her intestinal abnormalities have intensified.Read more: https://t.co/23pbetBWbN pic.twitter.com/APx3Bvq0gk— Clearwater Aquarium (@CMAquarium) November 11, 2021 In an update posted to its website,...
    THE Royal Cornwall Hospital has declared a critical incident after 25 ambulances were left queuing outside amid "unprecedented" demand. The county's main hospital is at breaking point as 100 patients flooded the emergency department - that only has the capacity for 40. 1Ambulances were left queueing outside the Royal Cornwall Hospital as they struggle to cope with the influx of patientsCredit: BPM Staff have been forced to work "extraordinarily hard" to try and cope with the demand that the Trust says has been exacerbated by the number of patients attending the hospital, who should be seeking care elsewhere. The hospital escalated its operating level to an "internal critical incident" amid the influx of patients and the queue of ambulances waiting to offload. The hospital's medical director, Dr Allister Grant, said:"There is unprecedented demand on health and care services in Cornwall, more so this week than at any point during the pandemic. "As a result we have escalated our operational level from OPEL4 to an internal critical incident. "Pressure will always be most visible at the emergency department where ambulances are...
    Members of both parties expressed frustration during a House committee hearing this week on a federal report critical of Missouri’s foster care system. Almost a thousand children went missing at some point from foster care in 2019 in Missouri, according to a report from the Office of Inspector General (OIG) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The report stated thousands of children nationwide will be missing from their foster care placements on any given day and those children often experience “adverse outcomes.” In August 2019, OIG agents joined the Department of Justice and local law enforcement in Missouri metropolitan areas to locate children who were missing from foster care. Concerns by agents prompted an evaluation. Foster care programs receive federal funding and oversight from the Administration for Children and Families. The 35-page report found Missouri doesn’t have policies for identifying children who may be at heightened risk of going missing or interventions to reduce the risk. The agency reviewed 59 cases in detail and found: Missouri rarely demonstrated attempts to reduce children’s risk of going...
    Puerto Rico’s progress still stalled four years after Maria Taliban order female city workers in Kabul to stay home Thanks to two decades of background, we had a pretty good wrap about who the New England Patriots were. With Tom Brady under center, you could never really count them out of any matchup until the clock literally had zeros across the board. They also were famous for winning the games they were supposed to win, with upsets becoming a rarity around Foxborough. It's that trait that we're still looking to see if these 2021 New England Patriots -- led by rookie quarterback Mac Jones -- have.  © Provided by CBS Sports FOXBOROUGH, MASSACHUSETTS - SEPTEMBER 12: Mac Jones #10 of the New England Patriots looks to pass during the first half against the Miami Dolphins at Gillette Stadium on September 12, 2021 in Foxborough, Massachusetts. (Photo by Maddie Meyer/Getty Images) It'll be put to the test on Sunday when they roll into MetLife Stadium as a lofty six-point road favorite over Zach Wilson and the New York Jets. From...
    Arkansas on Tuesday ran out of intensive care unit beds for COVID-19 patients for the first time since the coronavirus pandemic began, Gov. Asa Hutchinson announced, as a surge in cases continued overwhelming hospitals in the state. The state’s ICU capacity for COVID patients barely eased hours after Hutchinson’s announcement, with only one hospital in southeast Arkansas showing availability, according to the state’s system for coordinating coronavirus patients. Virus patients make up about half of the state’s ICU beds. The number of virus patients in ICUs and on ventilators reached a new high in the state on Monday. "Everyone should know the strain this puts on our hospitals and the need to get our vaccinations and how critical our bed space is," Hutchinson told reporters at a news conference. Hutchinson said hospitals in the state were working to open more ICU beds for virus patients. Arkansas Department of Health Chief of Staff Renee Mallory said one hospital planned to open additional beds later Tuesday and possibly later in the week. The Department of Health on Tuesday said the state’s total...
    Over the weekend, Vicente Fernández was hospitalized after having suffered a fall at his ranch “Los tres colts”, for which he had to undergo a cervical surgery. Through a statement shared on the singer’s social networks, it was announced that he is “with ventilatory assistance and critical patient care in the Intensive Care unit.” “We thank the media, as well as his loyal followers and inform on behalf of his medical team with the permission of the Fernández Abarca family, that the current state of Don Vicente Fernández is undoubtedly serious, but stable, as is the sequence of trauma caused by the fall itself that generated spinal cord trauma at the level of the cervical spine. “ “At this point in the post-operative period, he is undergoing ventilatory assistance and critical patient care in the Intensive Care Unit. Thanking everyone for their concern. They will be kept informed according to its evolution ”, the statement continues.
    Through a statement shared on the singer-songwriter’s social networks, it was announced that he is “with ventilatory assistance and critical patient care in the Intensive Care unit.” “We thank the media, as well as his loyal followers and inform on behalf of his medical team with the permission of the Fernández Abarca family, that the current state of Don Vicente Fernández is undoubtedly serious, but stable, as is the sequence of trauma caused by the fall itself that generated spinal cord trauma at the level of the cervical spine. “ “At this point in the post-operative period, he is undergoing ventilatory assistance and critical patient care in the Intensive Care Unit. Thanking everyone for their concern. They will be kept informed according to its evolution ”, the statement continues.
    (CBSDFW.COM/CNN) — Hospitals are surging with unvaccinated patients infected with the Delta variant — which could affect car accident victims and other non-COVID-19 patients who need hospital care, doctors say. “None of these patients thought they would get the virus, but the Delta variant has proven to be so highly contagious that even the young and the healthy, including pregnant patients, are now starting to fill up our hospitals,” said Dr. Neil Finkler, chief clinical officer for AdventHealth Central Florida. More than 90% of the hospitalized COVID-19 patients are unvaccinated, he said. In Austin, Texas, “Our ICU capacity is reaching a critical point where the level of risk to the entire community has significantly increased, and not just to those who are needing treatment for COVID,” Austin-Travis County Health Authority Dr. Desmar Walkes said in a statement. “If we fail to come together as a community now, we jeopardize the lives of loved ones who might need critical care.” In Dallas County, Judge Clay Jenkins on Friday said COVID-19 hospitalizations jumped from 181 to 397 between July 15 and July...
    Connor Fields. Photos by Pete Dovgan/Speed Media/Icon Sportswire via Getty Image The BMX rider who suffered a horror crash is out of critical care but remains in hospital. American athlete Connor Fields suffered a bleed on the brain during an Olympic race. He now "knows where he is. He knows his birthday," according to his father, Mike Fields. Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. Connor Fields, the American BMX rider who was injured in a horror crash at the Olympics on Thursday, is out of critical care but remains hospitalized. The athlete crashed early in the final heat of this week's semifinal, having already qualified for the Olympic final. He suffered a brain hemorrhage at the venue, was transported away on a backboard, and was driven to St. Luke's International Hospital in Tokyo in an ambulance. In the days since, there's been "no additional bleeding and no new injuries found," according to a USA Cycling statement. The organization added that the Chief Medical Officer of USA Cycling, together with members of the medical team, and cycling coaches,...
    In the complaint, Gustilo alleges that the hospital removed her as the head of the OB/GYN department after she began openly objecting to race-based care initiatives at the hospital, which were inspired by critical race theory and the Black Lives Matter movement following George Floyd's death. The doctor alleged that during her six-year stint as head of the department, she worked hard to advance a multicultural care program. But she noticed that after Floyd's death, department members "began to transform the program from one that simply sought to respect and appreciate the various cultures to one of segregated care based on race." The hospital began to hold anti-racist training sessions and align itself with the Black Lives Matter movement. According to Gustilo, it even implemented a policy of assigning "black caregivers to black patients." When Gustilo refused to get on board with the ideology shift, her employer suggested she was suffering from "internalized whiteness" and determined that she was no longer "fit" to lead. "They contended that my opposition to the growing, racial essentialist philosophy could potentially cause our...
    People listen to speakers during a rally against critical race theory being taught in schools in Leesburg, Virginia, on June 12. In my work reporting on critical race theory, I don’t think I’ve effectively communicated how scary it is to understand what’s happening and what’s been happening in this country’s education system for decades—and that is an intentional deletion of Black history, really a significant portion of American history. So I wrote this work of fiction to communicate the kind of deception I feel is all too readily applied to matters of Black history and now critical race theory: Karen doesn’t want her Libby learning about flying in school. Karen doesn’t understand how planes work, so she views them as extremely dangerous and scary. The thought that Libby could learn about flying at school and come home wanting to get on an airplane is enough to drive Karen to action. Now, she can’t flat-out say she’s against flying. Too many people view it as important, even necessary. So Karen decides she won’t tell her local school board she doesn’t want flying...
    More On: Coronavirus 7,000 health workers facing termination if not fingerprinted A whole lot of winking and nodding at Albany’s impeachment ‘probe’ of Cuomo California virus cases rising as delta variant spreads In a first, US warns of dangers of systemic racism in human trafficking report The Queens nurse who bravely rolled up her sleeve for the nation’s first FDA-approved COVID-19 vaccine shot was honored on Friday by President Biden — and will have her scrubs sent to the Smithsonian. Biden presented Sandra Lindsay, an immigrant from Jamaica, with a framed “Outstanding American By Choice” award from US Citizenship and Immigration Services. Lindsay worse a vibrant pink suit to the White House East Room as Biden announced that her hospital scrubs and COVID-19 vaccination card will go on display at the Smithsonian Museum of American History. “Sandra immigrated to Queens, New York, from Jamaica when she was 18 years old. Over the past, and I don’t believe this, 30 years — she doesn’t look 30 years old — she’s pursued her dream of becoming a nurse to allow her...
    Fox News host Sean Hannity spoke out against Sen. Sheldon Whitehouse, D-R.I., and the Democratic party for pushing curriculums like critical race theory, but failing to call out racist actions in their own party, Wednesday on "Hannity."  Hannity pushed back against critical race theory saying, "This country succeeds with something called freedom, and individualism and capitalism and personal freedom, not collective guilt, not judging people based on the color of their skin, but the content of their character. What they are teaching and what they are preaching is the antithesis of what Martin Luther King Jr. dreamed of." Hannity went on to say that Democrats believe they are "immune" to racism, which is why they can't see how critical race theory could be considered racist. "Make no mistake, Democrats are anything but immune to racism," he continued. SEN. SHELDON WHITEHOUSE REVEALS HE BELONGS TO A YACHT CLUB THAT LACKS DIVERSITY After playing several clips of President Biden making racially insensitive comments, Hannity turned to the New York Times questioning why "so-called" journalists haven't asked the president about his "racist" past....
    Since the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic, long-term caregivers across Minnesota have worked day and night to provide care and support for our most vulnerable seniors. These remarkable people have risked their own health to serve residents in nursing homes and assisted living settings with unflagging dedication, clinical skills and innovation month after month in the face of this deadly threat to seniors’ health and well-being. The infection control protocols that forced senior care communities to close their doors to visitors helped save residents’ lives, but it also broke hearts, separating elders from those they held most dear. Our professional caregivers stepped in to help bridge that gap with empathy and innovation, fighting against the physical harm caused by COVID-19 and the emotional and mental harm left in its wake as well. With widespread vaccinations of residents, we believe we have reached a cautious turning point in our fight against COVID-19. New state and federal restrictions have eased visitation and quarantine restrictions in our care settings. Cases and outbreaks have dropped significantly and, thanks to the work of so many,...
    A FIT and healthy 34-year-old who ended up in intensive care with blood clots after receiving the AstraZeneca vaccine has urged others to still take it. Mohammed Choudhury initially thought he had "pulled a muscle" on a run nearly two weeks after he was inoculated - but within days he was in a critical care unit after suffering from an adverse reaction. 4Mohammed Choudhury, 34, was left in intensive care after developing blood clots from the AstraZeneca jabCredit: Reuters "In the space of 24 hours I went from expecting maybe a painkiller for a pulled muscle or something to being in a critical care ward on my own, unable to be visited by my wife," he recalled. He began experiencing pain in his calf, which developed into a series of frightening symptoms including chest pains, breathlessness and headaches, he exclusively told the Daily Mail. Mohammed, who lives in Poplar, London, received the jab by chance on March 10 after he was offered a spare dose when his wife Alia, 31, had an appointment to get hers. He initially had no...
    A hospital in Boston is set to offer “preferential care based on race” and “race-explicit interventions” as a part of its new “antiracist agenda for medicine.” Brigham and Women’s Hospital will implement the program, outlined in a Boston Review article titled “An Antiracist Agenda for Medicine,” later this spring. Harvard Medical School instructors Bram Wispelwey and Michelle Morse wrote that the program uses a “reparations framework” for allocating medical resources in order to “comprehensively confront structural racism.” “Together with a coalition of fellow practitioners and hospital leaders, we have developed what we hope will be a replicable pilot program for direct redress of many racial health care inequities,” Wispelwey and Morse wrote, noting that their program is in part based on Critical Race Theory. (RELATED: ‘Blatantly Lying Or They Do Not Understand Critical Race Theory’: Parents Group Releases Evidence Of Indoctrination In Virginia County Schools) Dr. Bram Wispelwey, and Dr. Michelle Morse, both of whom teach at Harvard Medical School, have called for the allocation of medical resources to be done on the basis of race. https://t.co/g73VMmiHkG — Arevalo &...
    DMX performs at the 10th Annual ONE Musicfest at Centennial Olympic Park on September 8, 2019 in Atlanta, Georgia. Prince Williams/Wireimage Grammy-nominated rapper DMX was reportedly hospitalized late Friday after a drug overdose. TMZ was the first to report DMX was transported to a critical care unit in White Plains, New York.  Sources told TMZ that the overdose led to a heart attack.  Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. Grammy-nominated rapper DMX has reportedly been hospitalized in a New York critical care unit after a drug overdose.  Sources told TMZ and Variety that the rapper, born Earl Simmons, overdosed and suffered a heart attack while at his home on Friday night. The 50-year-old rapper was transported to a hospital in White Plains, New York, according to the reports. A source told TMZ he "has some brain activity"  and another told the outlet he is in a  "vegetative state." The Yonkers, New York, native publicly spoke about his extensive battle with drugs throughout the years, which started when he was a teen, as Billboard previously reported. The multi-platinum...
    Rapper DMX is reportedly fighting for his life after overdosing on drugs. According to TMZ, the legendary rapper overdosed Friday night, and the drugs triggered a heart attack. He is currently in a critical care unit at a hospital in White Plains, New York. (RELATED: David Hookstead Is The True King In The North When It Comes To College Football) TMZ also reported that “doctors have cautioned he may not make it.” He’s reportedly in a “vegetative state” with “some brain activity.” DMX Suffers OD and in Grave Condition https://t.co/czhwXWQm42 — TMZ (@TMZ) April 3, 2021 This isn’t the news any of us wanted to see to start the weekend. DMX is one of the most famous rappers to ever live. Back in his prime, he was as big as any rapper in the game. DMX is a cultural icon for those of y’all who are confused. Not DMX ????pic.twitter.com/IhOjhAeZBE — minari lover (@DarkCollegeGuy) April 3, 2021 However, it’s not a secret that he’s struggled over the past several years, and he’s now fighting for his life after reportedly overdosing on drugs. It’s...
    New York : A group of nurses from New York took to the streets again, this time to honor dozens of health professionals who lost their lives after a year of pandemic, but also to demand the approval of the legislative bill “Safe personnel for a quality hospital care ”, which would require the incorporation of more staff to critical areas of the State health system. This Thursday members of the New York State Nurses Association (NYSNA) met at Greeley Square in Manhattan, to raise a slogan: “Many patients died from COVID-19 because there were not enough bedside nurses on the front line.” The complaint of these health professionals, especially those who serve in the poorest neighborhoods, is that while the number of patients that ideally should be attended by a single nurse, would be four to five depending on the areas, but many of them must be in front of more than six and up to eight sick at the same time. Judith Cutchin, a NYSNA board member, explained that in public hospitals in the Big Apple, the...
    “Dozens, even hundreds” of patients soon to be transferred, deprogramming of operations and a “critical threshold” which is approaching for resuscitation: the Covid-19 epidemic is particularly worrying in Ile-de-France, warned Thursday evening the Minister of Health, Olivier Véran. “The epidemic and health situation in Ile-de-France is of particular concern to us”, he admitted during his weekly press conference, stressing that “every 12 minutes, a Ile-de-France is admitted to intensive care”. “Tonight, 1,080 patients are being taken care of there: almost the peak of the second wave. If the rate continues to be the same, we will exceed 1,500 at the end of March, which corresponds to a critical threshold,” a he continued. > File: the race for vaccination Hundreds of transferred patients The virus is circulating at a high level in the most populous region of France, with 350 cases per 100,000 inhabitants on average each week against 220 nationally. To prevent resuscitation services from overflowing, “we are preparing major transfers of patients to other regions,” said Mr. Véran. “We are talking about dozens, even hundreds of patients”. Another...
    The Daily Beast Lawrence Ferlinghetti, Fearless Poet, Publisher, and Bookseller, Is Dead at 101 Carlos Avila Gonzalez/GettyLawrence Ferlinghetti, the innovative bookseller and publisher of Ginsberg and Kerouac, one of the best friends free speech ever had, and the man who wrote that most anomalous thing—a poetry bestseller: A Coney Island of the Mind—died today at the age of 101.“If amendments had addresses, the address of the First Amendment would be right here at City Lights Books,” said historian Kevin Starr, standing outside Ferlinghetti’s legendary San Francisco bookstore at its 50th Anniversary in 2003 (City Lights was also the name of the poet’s equally celebrated publishing company). “You will never see the First Amendment so fully and so happily ensconced as it is here. Lawrence Ferlinghetti, congratulations. Literature, Culture, the First Amendment is better because of you.”A brave bookseller, an innovative publisher, and an author who introduced several generations of readers to the idea that reading poetry could be more fun than work, Lawrence Ferlinghetti was born on March 24, 1919, in Yonkers, N.Y. Shortly before his birth, his father died...
    (CNN)The Biden administration is making use of the Defense Production Act in three key areas, the top official tasked with supplies announced Friday, including equipment and supplies for Pfizer vaccine production, an increase in at-home or point of care testing, and personal protective equipment, particularly gloves, for front-line workers.After President Joe Biden signed an executive order directing US agencies to use the law, the administration has identified shortfalls in 12 critical categories of supplies, the White House's supply coordinator Tim Manning said at Friday's briefing.CDC director says guidance on reopening schools to be released in the coming weekThe law, Manning said, will help address what he described as a critical shortage of rubber gloves, something that is a "grave need.""There's a grave need for masks, shields, and gloves, and we currently aren't producing these at the rate we need in order to keep up with demand. We're already working to increase the availability of N95 masks to frontline workers but another critical area of concern we hear over and over is surgical gloves. Right now we just don't have enough...
    A SUBSTANCE that 11 Fort Bliss soldiers were injured drinking turned out to be antifreeze - but they thought it was alcohol, US Army officials revealed on Friday.  The soldiers became sick, and two were in critical condition, after ingesting an unknown substance on Thursday following a 10-day field training exercise.  4Eleven soldiers at Fort Bliss were injured after ingesting an unknown substanceCredit: Getty Images - Getty 4US Army officials revealed the substance was antifreezeCredit: Getty - Contributor Laboratory reports showed that the soldiers drank ethylene glycol, which is often in engine coolant, brake fluid and other automotive products, according to Lt Col Allie Payne, a public affairs officer for Fort Bliss and the 1st Armored Division.  Ethylene glycol is a clear and colorless liquid at room temperature, and can cause euphoria, nausea, headaches and even organ failure if ingested.  Fluorescent coloring like green or yellow is commonly added to ethylene glycol when it is used in antifreeze.  During her press conference, Payne said Army personnel are not allowed to drink alcohol while on duty, including while they are training. ...
    A COVID denier who is being hunted by police for storming a critical care ward boasted of a huge New Year’s Eve party as he shared photos of the bash online. Toby Hayden Leigh, 45, is wanted by cops after demanding a sick coronavirus patient leave hospital despite medics warning “he will die”. ???? Read our coronavirus live blog for the latest news & updates 10 Toby Hayden Leigh is wanted by police after he stormed a critical care ward demanding a sick coronavirus patient to be released Facebook 10 The Covid denier was pictured celebrating a New Years Party with guests at his home Pictures show the man, from Maidstone, Kent, celebrating the new year with several guests at the large gathering held at his home. He took selfies with partygoers as they ate slices of pizza, drank beer and opened bottles of fizz. Guests gathered in small groups as they mingled in the living room and kitchen but face masks were not worn indoors. It’s not known if the man lives with...
    COPS are today searching for a Covid denier who stormed a hospital demanding a sick patient be released - with fears he could now be infected with the bug himself. Toby Hayden-Leigh, 45, is wanted after a group insisted the critical care ward coronavirus patient leave hospital despite medics warning "he will die". ???? Read our coronavirus live blog for the latest news & updates 9Toby Hayden-Leigh, 45, is wanted by Surrey Police after a group stormed into a critical care unit and tried to get a patient sick with Covid to leave 9The Covid patient can be seen surrounded by medics as they try to treat himCredit: Sun Online 9A medic was locked in a confrontation with Covid-deniers, insisting the patient needed treatment In footage of the confrontation, the man filming could be heard insisting there was no proof the deadly bug existed. The group was eventually removed from the ward - with cops now searching for the man from Maidstone, Kent. East Surrey Detective Chief Inspector Kimball Edey said Hayden-Leigh needed to be interviewed after the...
    THIS is the shocking moment a Covid denier is removed from a hospital ward after trying to take a virus patient home - despite medics warning "he will die". Staggering footage shows medics desperately trying to calm the situation as a man films them - insisting the clearly unwell patient should go home. ???? Read our coronavirus live blog for the latest news & updates 6The Covid patient can be seen surrounded by medics as they try to treat himCredit: Sun Online 6A Covid patient was told if he left the hospital he would die 6A medic was locked in a confrontation with Covid-deniers, insisting the patient needed treatment But the confrontation becomes more and more heated as the man filming insists there is no proof of coronavirus and claims the doctors have been lying. The doctor responds: "My main concern is his safety and at the moment you are making him unsafe. "He's taken his oxygen off, he's going to die if we don't put it back on." At one point, the doctor points to the patient's...
    MINNEAPOLIS (WCCO) — In 10 months, Mayo Clinic’s intensive care unit has cared for hundreds of patients with COVID-19. A team of nurses has been at their side as they’ve struggled to breathe and for every positive and, too often, tragic turn in their hospital stays. WCCO asked one to document her time inside the ICU over the holidays and we found perspective from the pandemic that will stay with front-line workers long after this virus is gone. Amy Spitzner believes what she’s witnessed this last year will stay with her forever. “I remembered they were very sick, I came back and most of them had passed. That was really hard to even fathom,” Spitzner said. Amy Spitzner is a Critical Care Nurse at Mayo Clinic Rochester. “These patients up here, they stay with us for weeks at a time, so we get to know them pretty well,” she said. Nurse Amy Spitzner (credit: CBS) “One of the hardest things was the loss and there was nothing we could do to help them,” she added. Her colleagues inside Mayo’s medical...
    ELEVEN hospitals in the South East are stretched to full capacity due to Covid patients flooding in. Seven more hospitals in the Midlands are also at breaking point, having declared they are "fully stretched" with no more beds. ⚠️ Read our coronavirus live blog for the latest news & updates 1   It comes as London mayor Sadiq Khan declared a serious incident as the capital's hospitals face running out of beds within weeks. An NHS dashboard, seen by the Health Service Journal, reveals one hospital has declared an emergency, meaning resources are overwhelmed and care cannot be given to some patients. Darent Valley Hospital, near Dartford in Kent, declared the highest alert level on January 7 - CRITCON level four. Dartford and Gravesham Trust, which runs the hospital, told the HSJ later that day it had been an "administrative error". However, it remains as level four on the NHS dashboard for critical care. There are five levels of CRITCON during the pandemic, which are used for a hospital to state its situation. The levels rank from CRITCON...
    Doctors at overflowing London hospitals say they are having to choose who gets life-saving critical care as a new highly contagious strain of the coronavirus ravages the UK.  “Sadly, some hospitals are now forced to follow . . . emergency triage of all patients requiring critical care,” Dr. Katharina Hauck, of Imperial College of London, told the Daily Mail. “Applying this guidance effectively means that patients under the age of 65 who are not frail will be prioritized over elderly and frailer patients for critical care. Frail patients would be cared for in general wards with less intensive care.” More than 7,000 patients are currently hospitalized in London, according to The Sun. The number of people on ventilators has almost doubled since Christmas.  The surge is being fueled by a new variant of coronavirus which emerged in the UK in September, and is believed to be 70 percent more transmissible than earlier strains of the disease.
    More On: Coronavirus ‘Inexcusable’: NY pols blast vaccine rollout amid new UK strain cases Tuskegee Airman dies of COVID complications days before 101st birthday US reports more than 4,000 COVID-19 deaths in one day — a new record Pope Francis books COVID-19 shot, calls it everyone’s moral duty Doctors at overflowing London hospitals say they are having to choose who gets life-saving critical care as a new highly contagious strain of the coronavirus ravages the UK.  “Sadly, some hospitals are now forced to follow . . . emergency triage of all patients requiring critical care,” Dr. Katharina Hauck, of Imperial College of London, told the Daily Mail. “Applying this guidance effectively means that patients under the age of 65 who are not frail will be prioritized over elderly and frailer patients for critical care. Frail patients would be cared for in general wards with less intensive care.” More than 7,000 patients are currently hospitalized in London, according to The Sun. The number of people on ventilators has almost doubled since Christmas.  The surge is being fueled by a new...
    DOCTORS in packed London hospitals are being forced to choose who gets critical care and prioritising younger patients, according to reports. Medics in the capital said a shortage of beds meant hospitals were implementing emergency guidelines - amid fears the NHS is reaching a point where it “simply won’t be able to cope”. ⚠️ Read our coronavirus live blog for the latest news & updates 4A nurse works on a patient in the ICU (Intensive Care Unit) in St George's Hospital in Tooting, south-west LondonCredit: PA:Press Association 4 Doctors are reportedly “triaging” patients for critical care, with younger patients in the queue ahead of elderly patients - who are more likely to die from the virus. Dr Katharina Hauck, from the faculty of medicine at Imperial College London, told the Daily Mail: “Hospitals in London are overwhelmed, which is a dangerous situation for all patients requiring urgent care...  “Sadly, some hospitals are now forced to follow ... emergency triage of all patients requiring critical care. “Applying this guidance effectively means that patients under the age of 65 who are...
    Man who posed at Pelosi desk said in Facebook post that he is prepared for violent death Chinese censorship invades the U.S. via WeChat Critical care nurse says she is shocked by reality shes living in © Provided by Daily Mail MailOnline logo A critical care nurse who tearfully urged the public to stop panic buying in March has said she is still shocked by the reality she's living in and  that people need to 'wake up and stick to the guidelines'. Speaking to Lorraine Kelly on her ITV show this morning, Dawn Bilbrough, 51, from York, said that the pandemic has been 'incredibly emotionally difficult' for careworkers and in another emotional plea asked the public to 'pay attention to what's going on in their country right now'.   It comes nine months after the health worker attracted attention for posting a video of herself to Facebook, which saw her unable to pick up any groceries following an exhausting 48-hour shift as panic buyers had stripped supermarket shelves bare.    'We have to remember we've been doing this for the last...
    NEW YORK CITY (WABC) -- A New York City frontline worker who was given the first COVID vaccine in the US received a second shot Monday.Sandra Lindsay, the director of critical care at Long Island Jewish Medical Center (LIJ) in Queens, got the all-important second Pfizer dose to lock in immunity against the virus.The second vaccination comes 21 days after her historic first shot. Lindsay received the first vaccine on December 14 with Governor Andrew Cuomo in attendance.EMBED More News Videos Sandra Lindsay, RN, a critical care nurse at Long Island Jewish Medical Center got the first COVID-19 vaccine in NY. Officials say the Pfizer vaccine has been deemed 95% effective after the second dose.Lindsay received it at the hospital where she oversees all intensive care patients. The second dose of the vaccine was administered by Michelle Chester, DNP, Northwell Health's director of employee health services, the same clinician who gave the first shot seen round the world."I feel good," Lindsay said. "I don't feel any way different before I got it. I hope the vaccine is available to everyone...
    Most mornings, Dr. Sterling Malish replaces his “home clothes” with “car clothes,” then departs his Carmel home, bound for Natividad Medical Center. There, he changes into scrubs, plus a protective gown, gloves, an N95 mask, and a PAPR (Powered Air Purifying Respirator) mask. Then, he enters the COVID ICU for a 12-hour shift that usually runs long. At the end of his day, Dr. Malish reverses his routine, abandoning his car clothes for the shower, followed by fresh home clothes, so he can greet his wife, public health professor Jennifer Nazareno, and two little girls, ages 7 and 4. When Malish signed his contract with Natividad in February, COVID was not yet a pandemic. Based in Rhode Island, he had been serving as director of Pulmonary Critical Care and Sleep for Care New England, a five-hospital system. Yet, after enduring a lot of administrative changes, Malish, realizing he really missed clinical work, sought a professional change that would return him to hands-on critical care. He got what he wanted. “I received a call from my friend, Dr. Chad Medawar, whom...
    Sign up here to get our daily updates on coronavirus in Minnesota delivered straight to your inbox each afternoon. And go here to see all of MinnPost’s COVID-19 coverage. In February, few people outside of health care settings knew what “PPE” meant. Then the novel coronavirus pandemic hit and not only did personal protective equipment become a familiar term, everyone in the world was trying to buy it. N95 respirators, medical gowns, gloves, shoe coverings, face shields and safety glasses were needed by health care workers as they treated those infected with a virus that no one knew much about. Toss in the need for other equipment — ventilators, BIPAC machines, infrared thermometers, pulse oximeters, swaps, virus testing supplies and even hand sanitizer — and procurement became a full-time job for a team of state workers. With state funds alone, they bought 227,000 N95s, 550 ventilators, 11.4 million surgical masks, 400,000 cloth masks, 353,000 face shields, 35.2 million gloves, 6.9 million gowns, 1.5 million testing swabs, and more.  The head of that team is Alice Roberts-Davis, the commissioner of the...
    The last words Kim Folsom told her husband over the phone Dec. 7, as she lay in the emergency room of Hi-Desert Medical Center in Joshua Tree, were terrifyingly simple. “I’m scared.” They were the last words that Billy, a retired mechanic for the city of Costa Mesa who was in the parking lot of the small hospital, ever expected his wife to say. Kim called Billy just as he had returned from their home with some of her clothes. She was a former nurse with a radiant smile and matronly toughness that could calm down angry drunks at the biker bars she and Billy loved to visit. A three-year bout with pancreatic cancer hadn’t diminished her spirit or resolve. Billy and Kim Folsom bought a house in Joshua Tree, Calif., three years ago, around the time she received her cancer diagnosis, so they could fight it together in an area they loved.(Folsom family) But now, as Billy prepared for a last, desperate dash to save his wife’s life, the two faced a sobering reality. The...
    Loading the player... A Black nurse in Queens was among the first to receive Pfizer’s COVID-19 vaccine. Sandra Lindsay is a critical nurse and patient services director in the intensive care unit at Long Island Jewish Medical Center. Lindsay is now the first to have received the vaccine for COVID-19 after volunteering. Her injection was livestreamed during a press conference with Gov. Andrew Cuomo on Monday morning. Sandra Lindsay, left, a nurse at Long Island Jewish Medical Center, is inoculated with the COVID-19 vaccine by Dr. Michelle Chester, December 14, 2020 in the Queens borough of New York City. The rollout of the Pfizer and BioNTech vaccine, the first to be approved by the Food and Drug Administration, ushers in the biggest vaccination effort in U.S. history. (Photo by Mark Lennihan – Pool/Getty Images) Lindsay was administered by Dr. Michelle Chester, the director of employee health services at Northwell Health. Read More: COVID-19 vaccine shipments begin in historic US effort “I feel great,” said Lindsay after being injected. “Sandra, you didn’t flinch. I take it that Dr. Chester has...
    NEW YORK CITY (WABC) -- The director of critical care at Long Island Jewish Medical Center (LIJ) in Queens has become the first person in New York to receive the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine.Sandra Lindsay, RN, received the vaccine just after 9 a.m. Monday as Gov. Andrew Cuomo looked on from Albany via livestream."The person who is going to take the first vaccine in the state of New York, maybe the first vaccine shot in the United States, Sandra Lindsay, an ICU nurse, it's a pleasure to be with you. And you are in Long Island Jewish Medical Center, which is in Queens. Good things come from Queens," Cuomo said.Watch the entire press conference and vaccinationEMBED More News Videos Sandra Lindsay, RN, a critical care nurse at Long Island Jewish Medical Center received the first vaccine. About two minutes after Lindsay received the shot, President Trump tweeted "First Vaccine Administered. Congratulations USA! Congratulations WORLD!"First Vaccine Administered. Congratulations USA! Congratulations WORLD!— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) December 14, 2020"She's been on the frontlines, how fitting that she was the first to get the...
    History was made as one of the first COVID-19 vaccinations in the United States was administered to a nurse in New York. Sandra Lindsay, an ICU nurse at the Long Island Jewish Medical Center in Queens received the first dose of the Pfizer vaccine shortly before 9:30 a.m. on Monday, Dec. 14 as New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo watched on virtually. “This was a modern-day battlefield, and that’s why the word 'heroes' is so appropriate for what you did,” Cuomo said to Lindsay. “You put your fear aside and stepped up every day and you did it very well. “The vaccine is exciting. It’s the weapon to win the war,” he continued. “This is the beginning of the last chapter of the book, now we just have to get through it.” Original story - COVID-19: 170,000 Vaccines Coming To New York, Here's Who Will Get Them Lindsay’s dose was the first of 170,000 allocations that were distributed across the state. In 21 days, she will receive a second dose to receive the full COVID-19 vaccination. “The vaccine doesn’t work if...
    A Queens critical care nurse who has been on the frontlines of the coronavirus pandemic has become the first person in New York – and the first person in the US – to receive Pfizer’s COVID-19 vaccine. Sandra Lindsay, a critical care nurse at Long Island Jewish Medical Center, was vaccinated on-camera at the Queens hospital as Gov. Andrew Cuomo looked on via livestream. Applause broke out as Lindsay was jabbed with the potentially life-saving shot. “It didn’t feel any different from taking any other vaccine,” Lindsay said right after she was given the shot by Northwell Health director of employee health services Michelle Chester. “I am feeling well. I would like to thank all the front line workers,” said Lindsay. “I feel hopeful. I feel relieved.”
    by Robbie Owens | CBS 11 The Covid-19 pandemic has taken an especially harsh toll on frontline healthcare workers– the promise of vaccines considered a light at the end of a very dark tunnel. “We are in a very critical situation,” says Francesco Mainetti, Vice President of Transformational Initiatives for Parkland Health & Hospital System. “Being able to find a way for people not to get sick, and not having to furlough them for several days due to exposure, would really improve our operations and our ability to provide care for our patients.” With emergency use approval expected later this week for the Pfizer vaccine, hospitals are right now engaged in meticulous planning to manage distribution. “We’re going to provide the vaccine first to our employees that provide direct patient care for us in the hospital so you’re looking at your emergency departments, your critical care units,” says Mainetti, while admitting that preparing to distribute the long-awaited vaccines has been a sometimes-moving target. Complicating the process, both the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines, if approved, will require a second booster shot....
    MINNEAPOLIS (WCCO) — As ICU beds get closer to reaching capacity in Minnesota, there’s a dedicated team working around the clock to make sure every patient gets the care they need Right now, one-third of all Minnesotans in the ICU are there because of COVID-19. Only on WCCO, we give you the first look inside the state’s critical care command center, or C4. The room has been dubbed mission control. Set up in May in response to the pandemic, it is where hospital critical care availability is coordinated, according to Dr. Karyn Baum, professor of medicine at the University of Minnesota Medical School. “The idea that as capacity rises and certain hospitals get busy, we want to make sure that all of our hospitals and our patients are taken care of,” Baum said. M Health Fairview already had the infrastructure for its hospital system, and its staff stepped up to also take on ICU patient placement for the state. What they do here is critical to patient survival. This is where hospitals turn for help when they’ve exhausted...
    AUSTIN, Texas (CBSDFW.COM/AP) — Texas Governor Greg Abbott and the Texas Department of State Health Services [DSHS] released “guiding principles” on Monday, November 23 regarding how the state will distribute a COVID-19 vaccine once available. Texas officials said COVID-19 vaccines could be expected as early as December of this year. But that all depends on FDA authorizations. As of Monday, there are three companies that claim they have highly effective vaccines in the pipeline. One company, Phizer, has already applied for an Emergency Use Authorization from the FDA, others AstraZeneca and Moderna could soon follow. Pharmaceutical company AstraZeneca said late-stage trials showed its vaccine was up to 90% effective as it became the third major drug company to report late-stage results for a potential coronavirus vaccine. United States officials said that a vaccine could start being administered to the public in some parts of the country as soon as 24 hours after authorization is given. The timetable is not clear yet as to when a vaccine will be available in Texas. A post on the FDA.gov web site on November...
    EL PASO, Texas – San Antonio physicians, nurses, medical technicians and pharmacists are providing care or services in El Paso after the U.S. Department of Defense deployed 60 medical personnel members as coronavirus cases surged in the city. “It’s no secret that this COVID-19 virus has sort of swept the nation at a critical status here in El Paso,” said First Lt. Ian Krug, a U.S. Air Force critical care nurse. On the front lines of COVID, Texas nurses confront life and death Krug is part of the medical team supporting hospitals in El Paso. He arrived in the border city on Nov. 6. “What we’re doing here with myself and my team at University Medical Center is providing the absolute best medical care that we can,” Krug said. Krug, originally from Detroit, was stationed at Brooke Army Medical Center in September 2019. This year, he was fighting COVID-19 on the frontlines in San Antonio and cared for critically ill patients. This helped prepare him for what was to come in El Paso. “What they’re doing is they’re integrating us...
    The «high healthcare pressure» in the Valme Hospital in Seville has forced to activate new measures in its intensive care unit (ICU), which will go from 14 to 36 positions, which represents an increase of 157%. This expansion responds to Contingency Plan against coronavirus (Covid-19) of the Directorate of the South Sanitary Management Area of ​​Seville, which thus seeks to adapt spaces and reorganize surgery in need of intensive post-surgical care for critical patients due to Covid. The measures, as indicated in a statement by the management of the hospital center, respond to “the care needs detected in the course of the evolution of the pandemic.” The restrictions adopted by the Junta de Andalucía last Tuesday, with the extension of the curfew and the forced closure of non-essential businesses at 6 p.m. They have managed to relieve the health pressure in their first week: this Monday there were 22 deaths, the lowest figure in eight days, and 2,127 cases, 1,200 less than last Monday. In addition, the data reflect a “contained decrease” in hospital admissions for...
    PORTSMOUTH — Southern Ohio Medical Center was recently awarded accreditation by the American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) for the Practice Transition Accreditation Program (PTAP). The credentialing is for their Critical Care Nurse Residency Transition to Practice Program. PTAP accreditation is awarded to organizations that demonstrate excellence in transitioning nurses to new practice settings. SOMC’s program focuses on new graduates who will be providing critical care in the Intensive Care Unit and Heart Care areas. It is a six-month program that has been offered since June of 2019. “Our program supports new graduates entering the ICU and Heart Care,” SOMC’s PTAP Program Director Ashley Salyers said. “It helps them acclimate and see what healthcare looks like outside of nursing school. The program helps new critical care nurses develop skills, competency and confidence as they transition into the critical care environment.” In addition to preparing new nurses to work in critical care, the program also supports them as they adjust to the stresses and demands of the job. “We do more than just teach new nurses how to do the job. We...
    HOSPITAL intensive care capacity is no busier than normal for the majority of trusts, leaked NHS documents reveal. Capacity is tracking as normal in October with the usual numbers of beds available that would be expected in the autumn - even without the extra Nightingale capacity - raising doubts that another lockdown is needed. ⚠️ Read our coronavirus live blog for the latest news & updates 5Capacity in ICU was at normal levels in October, NHS documents revealed Credit: PA:Press Association An NHS source told the Telegraph: "As you can see, our current position in October is exactly where we have been in the last five years." The new data shows that even in the peak in April, critical care beds were never more than 80 per cent full. Following the closure of the Nightingale hospitals, there is still 15 per cent capacity across the country - which is fairly normal for this time of year. The documents show there were 9,138 patients in hospital in England as of 8am on November 2, although it had since...
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