Sunday, Dec 05, 2021 - 16:01:15
1000 results - (0.012 seconds)

in Afghanistan:

latest news at page 1:
    KABUL, Afghanistan (AP) — Women’s rights activists in the Afghan capital of Kabul insisted Sunday they would continue fighting for their right to education, employment and participation in Afghan political and social life, and said a recent Taliban decree banning forced marriage was not enough to address the issue of women’s rights. The decree, issued Friday, comes as poverty surges in Afghanistan following the Taliban takeover of the country in mid-August amid the withdrawal of U.S. and NATO troops. Foreign governments have halted funds to the aid-dependent country since then. Social rights activist Farida Akbari said the new Taliban government should permit women access to education and employment. Currently education at the secondary school level and above has been banned, while most women have been banned from working. Akbari said Friday’s decree on forced marriage would not have any particular benefit to women living in cities, where such practices are rarer. “It is not acceptable for us to get married, eat and stay at home,” she told reporters. “We want our role in politics, economics, jobs, education and...
    Donald Trump lashed out at Gen. Mark Milley during a Mar-a-Lago event where he referred to the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff as a “f*cking idiot.” The former president’s tirade happened on Saturday when he spoke at an event for Turning Point Action, a branch of the conservative activist organization Turning Point USA. At one point, Trump went on a tangent about America’s withdrawal from Afghanistan, and he described a conversation where he and Milley disagreed about whether to transport America’s equipment out of the country. “I’ll never forget Milley saying to me, ‘Sir, sir. It’s cheaper to leave the equipment than to bring it,'” Trump said in a mocking imitation. “You think it’s cheaper to leave it there so they can have it than it is to fill it up with a half tank of gas and fly it into Pakistan or fly it back to our country?” “‘Yes, sir, we think it’s cheaper, sir,'” Trump said, once again impersonating the general. “That’s when I realized he was a f*cking idiot.” As America chaotically attempted to withdraw...
    BELGRADE, Serbia (AP) — They practiced in secret and struggled to get to an international tournament in Europe. Now, members of the Afghan national boxing team are seeking refuge in the West, hoping to continue both their careers and their lives without danger or fear. The Afghan boxers, their coach and a top boxing federation official remained in Serbia after the AIBA World Boxing Championships finished in early November, saying they could face retribution from the Taliban if they returned home. “When the Taliban regime came to Afghanistan, everything became changed,” Waheedullah Hameedi, the secretary general of Afghanistan’s boxing federation, said. “It was difficult to come for a world championship during the new regime, the new government.” The team has contacted several foreign embassies about securing humanitarian visas and asylum protection. Some European Union nations have turned them down, but the 11-member group has not given up hope of finding a safe haven. Tens of thousands of Afghans, including athletes, have fled the country since troops from the United States and other foreign nations pulled out in...
    Secretary of Defense Lloyd Austin gave a noticeably awkward silence when asked about his regrets regarding the chaotic withdrawal of US troops from Afghanistan.  'Do you have any regrets about the Afghan withdrawal?' Fox's Bret Baier asked Austin during a keynote discussion at the Reagan National Defense Forum in Simi Valley, California, on Saturday.  After an uncomfortable silence that lasted for nearly 10 seconds, Austin finally replied. 'Bret, I regret the fact that we lost 13 of our finest at Abbey Gate. I regret that we lost 10 civilians in an errant strike.' 'Having said that, Bret, I want to make sure that we don't lose sight of the fact that our American forces, in 17 days, evacuated 124,000 people from Afghanistan,' Austin added.  SCROLL DOWN FOR VIDEO  Eleven Marines, a Special Forces member and a Navy Corpsman were all killed in the ISIS-K suicide attack on August 26 as US forces frantically tried to get people on evacuation flights before the August 31 deadline.  Also, a drone airstrike that the US government had said killed an...
    (CNN)More than 20 countries, including the United States, issued a joint statement Saturday expressing deep concern over allegations of extra-judicial killings and disappearances of former member of former security forces in Afghanistan.The statement comes after a report was released by Human Rights Watch on Tuesday alleging more than a hundred former Afghan security forces had been killed or forcibly disappeared by the Taliban since their surrender in late summer.The report, based on interviews with witnesses, relatives and friends of the victims, detailed "the summary execution or enforced disappearance" of military personnel, police, intelligence service members and paramilitary militia, who had surrendered to or were apprehended by Taliban forces between August 15 and October 31.CNN has not able to independently confirm the claims in the report.In their statement Saturday, the 21 countries, including the United States, Germany, Japan and the United Kingdom, said the alleged actions "constitute serious human rights abuses and contradict the Taliban's announced amnesty." Read More"We call on the Taliban to effectively enforce the amnesty for former members of the Afghan security forces and former Government officials to...
    The day before Thanksgiving, Sayed Hofioni finally opened the door to his family’s new home. His daughters, Kowsar, 5, and Zainab, 3, rushed inside, eyes wide and giggling. His wife, bundling their 3-month-old baby in her arms, followed closely behind. It had been three months since they fled Afghanistan on a military plane — and almost as long that they had spent waiting in a single room at a Contra Costa County hotel. The small space grated on the entire family, and every day, Hofioni’s daughters would ask him: “Padar,” which means father in their native language Dari, “when are we moving out of here?” When the family finally found a home late last month in Antioch, the two-bedroom apartment before them felt unreal. “I saw a very good smile on my family’s faces,” said Hofioni, 55. “After everything we’ve been through, that was priceless.” The Hofionis are among hundreds of Afghans who have arrived in the Bay Area since August. When they first landed in California, they were greeted by resettlement agencies, non-profits and the county government, all of...
    While serving in the U.S. Air Force, I integrated with a U.S. Army brigade during a deployment to Iraq in 2007-2008. At a forward operating base outside of Baghdad, I became close friends with one of the local Iraqi interpreters who worked alongside our infantry troops. My friend had to work under an alias as she accompanied U.S. forces on missions. As is the fate for many local interpreters who assisted the United States or allied militaries, my friend knew that bad actors would eventually find out that she was assisting the coalition, and she began to fear for her life. She applied for a Special Immigrant Visa, a visa designed specifically for foreign nationals assisting us overseas who found their lives in danger. Unfortunately, her application languished for years due to slow processing and the small annual allocation of these visas from Congress. Just by luck, she later gained admittance to the United States through the Refugee Admissions Program (another avenue for entry, whose annual number of admissions is determined by the president) and is now a proud California...
    BRASILIA, Brazil (AP) — A female judge, Muska, was hiding with her family from newly empowered Taliban militants in Afghanistan when an apparent reading mistake 7,000 miles away helped to drastically change her life. Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro opened his nation’s doors to potential refugees from the Asian nation during remarks at the United Nations General Assembly on Sept. 21. “We will grant humanitarian visas for Afghan Christians, women, children and judges,” he read on the teleprompter — apparently mispronouncing the final word, which was “jovens” — youngsters — in his printed speech as “juizes,” or judges. Error or not, his government fulfilled that offer. Muska and her family were taken by bus to the northern city of Mazar-i-Sharif and were then flown to Greece with six female colleagues. By the end of October, they found themselves in Brazil — a country with very little in common with Afghanistan beyond their shared love of soccer. Speaking to international media for the first time, Muska told The Associated Press this week that she and the other judges still fear retribution...
    An Illinois Republican with ties to Afghanistan said that she aided in the August U.S. evacuation efforts after Taliban forces took over the country and that she knows people who are still stuck there. Esther Joy King, who was recently promoted to captain in the U.S. Army Reserve Judge Advocate General (JAG) Corps, told Breitbart News on Wednesday that from her military background and from being a former aid worker in Afghanistan, she has a “very personal connection” to the country and found President Joe Biden’s withdrawal process to be a “tragic situation.” “I know people that are even still in Kabul,” King said after the Taliban’s fast-paced surge in August prompted Biden to lead a rushed mission to evacuate American citizens and Afghan allies from the country. The hasty withdrawal lasted roughly two weeks, and, amid the chaos, a bombing outside of the Kabul airport — where the evacuation mission was confined to — killed 13 U.S. servicemembers and more than 100 Afghans. Days later, just before the conclusion of the withdrawal, the Department of Defense carried out a...
    A 9-year-old child bride from Afghanistan has been returned to her family after she was witnessed being sold in November by CNN. A U.S. based non-profit, Too Young To Wed (TYTW), helped free Parwana Malik from the marriage and returned her to her family, CNN reported Friday. “I am really happy,” Malik said after being rescued. “The (charity) rid me from my husband and my husband is old,” CNN reported. Malik is one of many young girls that have been sold to older Afghani men in order for their families to eat due to an ever worsening economic situation, CNN reported. Her parents claimed that they have no choice, and that life has gotten harder since the Taliban took over in early August. They already had to sell another daughter, aged twelve, CNN reported. (RELATED: Father Reportedly Tries To Sell 4-Year-Old Daughter In Afghanistan After Taliban Takeover) Malik’s father, Abdul Malik, told CNN that he was broken with guilt, shame and worry, the outlet reported. “We are eight family members,” he told CNN. “I have to sell to keep other family members...
    A nine-year-old girl who was sold by her father to a 55-year-old man as a child bride in Afghanistan has been rescued by a charity. Parwana Malik was sold for the equivalent of £1,600  in land, sheep and cash to a stranger named Qorban so her father Abdul Malik could pay for food in the Taliban-ruled nation. Parwana had cried day and night before her sale, begging her father instead to go to school to become a doctor.  The horrific deal drew international outrage with all 24 female senators in the US pushing President Joe Biden to take action to prevent child marriages in Afghanistan. A US-based charity, Too Young to Wed, helped free the girl from the barbaric arrangement and her siblings and mother were moved from their camp to a safe house in Herat - the first time they had even been in a real home after living in tents. A nine-year-old girl (pictured) who was sold by her father to a 55-year-old man as a child bride in Afghanistan has been rescued by a charity Qorban was also forced...
    An American citizen is fighting for him and his family to be able to return home to the United States after leaving Afghanistan, telling Fox News' Dana Perino Friday about the ordeal. Bilal Ahmad and his family remained stuck overseas for several months since the U.S. withdrawal from Afghanistan and have been living in a humanitarian village in the United Arab Emirates.  Ahmad was given the approval to return home to America, however his wife and son are waiting on paperwork.  FORMER AFGHAN WOMEN'S SOCCER CAPTAIN DESCRIBES 'NIGHTMARE' TALIBAN RULE AFTER ESCAPE: 'THEY ARE TRAUMATIZED' "I'm still here, and I keep going to the State Department and keep asking for help from them…my wife and my child’s cases [have] been approved. They already did their background check, which I applied for them in 2017," Ahmad told "America’s Newsroom," Friday.  Video"[They] keep giving me excuses [like]…’ Hold on.’ Sometimes they're telling me that ‘we don't have enough people to get them in a flight…’ every time when I go to the State Department, they keep giving me a different excuse,"...
    The Taliban have banned giving women away in marriage without their consent, the latest in the group's monthslong efforts to adopt a more progressive image. Women should not be considered "property" and must consent to any arranged marriages, according to a decree released by Afghanistan's Taliban-controlled government Friday. "A woman is not a property, but a noble and free human being; no one can give her to anyone in exchange for peace ... or to end animosity," read the decree, released by Taliban spokesman Zabihullah Mujahid. MAN BRANDISHING SHOTGUN OUTSIDE UN HEADQUARTERS ARRESTED BY NYPD  The edict mandated "adult women's consent is necessary during Nekah/marriage," adding, "No one can force women to marry by coercion or pressure." Government leadership has instructed all Afghan institutions, religious scholars, and tribal elders to enforce the rules and prevent "the ongoing oppression" against women, the Taliban spokesman said. While the edict is expected to affect court cases involving widows or women's rights in Afghanistan, it did not mention girls' education or whether women could work outside of...
    KABUL, Afghanistan (AP) — The Taliban decreed Friday that they are banning the forced marriage of women in the war-torn country, in what appears to be a move to address criteria that developed nations consider a precondition to recognize their government and restore aid. The move announced by Supreme Leader Hibatullah Akhunzada came as poverty is surging in Afghanistan, following the religious militia’s takeover in August that pushed out U.S. and international forces and led foreign governments to halt funds that had been a mainstay of the economy. “Both (women and men) should be equal,” said the decree, adding that “no one can force women to marry by coercion or pressure.” Women’s rights improved markedly over the past two decades of international presence in Afghanistan, but are seen as under threat with the return of the Taliban, whose earlier rule in the 1990s saw them virtually cloistered. Forced marriages have become more commonplace in the poor, conservative country, as the internally displaced marry off their young daughters in exchange for a bride-price that can be used to pay debts and...
    Taliban forces in Afghanistan are responsible for the death or disappearance of more than 100 former police and intelligence officers, according to a report from Human Rights Watch. The report, released on Tuesday, documents the killing or vanishing of 45 former Afghan National Security Forces soldiers who had surrendered to or were apprehended by the Taliban between Aug. 15, when they rose to power, and Oct. 31. In all, the group “gathered credible information on more than 100 killings from” four provinces, according to a statement. PENTAGON MAKING SPACE ASSETS APPEAR 'LESS JUICY' FOLLOWING RUSSIA MISSILE TEST These incidents occurred in Ghazni, Helmand, Kandahar, and Kunduz provinces. “The Taliban leadership’s promised amnesty has not stopped local commanders from summarily executing or disappearing former Afghan security force members,” said Patricia Gossman, associate Asia director at Human Rights Watch. “The burden is on the Taliban to prevent further killings, hold those responsible to account, and compensate the victims’ families.” “The Taliban’s unsupported claims that they will act to prevent abuses and hold abusers to account appears, so far, to be nothing...
    Doha, Qatar (CNN)Five years ago, Breshna Musazai was studying law at the American University of Afghanistan in Kabul. Her future seemed bright. She was attending the best university in Afghanistan, a coed institution offering an American-style education and was on a full scholarship provided by the US government. Then, on August 24, 2016, Taliban gunmen stalked the campus killing anyone who moved. One of them shot Musazai in the leg. She pretended to be dead and the gunman shot her again to finish her off. A bullet struck her in the foot. For the next six hours, as the terrorists rampaged on the campus Musazai lay motionless in a hallway. Afghanistan hurtling toward collapse, Sweden and Pakistan sayThe Taliban killed a total of 15 students and staff that day. The university was a prominent symbol of the American presence in Afghanistan, which made it an appealing target for the Taliban. For students, particularly women like Musazai, the university represented the modern world of Enlightenment values to which the Taliban have long stood in staunch opposition.Five years after their assault on...
    Ahmad Fanoos is one of Afghanistan’s most famous musicians, but he was no longer safe in his home country after the Taliban took over. Now, thanks to help from the Fox Corporation and the Juilliard School, Fanoos was able to bring his family to the United States and reunite with his son in New York City. Fanoos was the host of a popular Afghan TV show, Afghan Star, a singing competition show similar to American Idol, and was well-known in his own right for his musical performances playing the harmonium and singing traditional Afghan epic poetry. The last time the Taliban ran Afghanistan, music was illegal. The reinstated regime seems to be supporting similar restrictions, and on August 15, the Taliban left a threatening letter for Fanoos warning him and his family to stop playing music — “these dirty activities” — and demanding that they leave. Fanoos went into hiding and began desperately seeking a way to evacuate with his family. One relative, Fanoos’ 24-year-old son, Elham Fanoos, had left Afghanistan a few years before. The younger Fanoos shares his father’s...
    A famous Afghan musician has been reunited with his son in New York City after Fox Corp. helped his family evacuate Afghanistan following a Taliban threat made against them. On Aug. 15, the Taliban left a threatening letter on Ahmad Fanoos’ instrument case warning him and his family to stop playing music or else. "All your family members are busy with these dirty activities," the letter read. "We are warning you for the last time to leave…" Under Taliban rule, music was illegal in Afghanistan in the late '90s. Since then, Fanoos rose to fame playing the harmonium and singing Ghazal or Afghan epic poetry. As a talent judge on the TV show "Afghan Star," Fanoos became a household name and a target of the Taliban as it retook control of Afghanistan this summer. OPINION: FROM MY DAD'S DEATH IN AFGHANISTAN 20 YEARS AGO TO TALIBAN RETAKING THE COUNTRY – HOW DID WE GET HERE? "It was very shocking for him," Elham Fanoos, Ahmad’s 24-year-old son, said of the Taliban letter.  "He actually couldn’t really focus on the music anymore."...
    Malala Yousafzai graduated from Oxford University with a philosophy, politics and economics degree on Friday, nine years after being shot by the Taliban after campaigning for girls to be to be educated in her native Pakistan. The youngest ever winner of the Nobel Peace Prize, now 24, took to Instagram to share moving pictures of her graduation ceremony, which was initially due to take place in May 2020, but was delayed by Covid and moved to the Autumn of 2021. Malala was seen posing in her hat and gown as she stood by the university, as well as alongside her proud parents Ziauddin Yousafzai and Toor Pekai Yousafzai and new husband Asser Malik. It comes just months after the Taliban excluded girls from returning to secondary school and replaced Afghanistan's women's ministry with an all-male 'vice and virtue' department.  Malala Yousafzai graduated from Oxford University with a philosophy, politics and economics degree on Friday, nine years after being shot by the Taliban as she campaigned for girls to be to be educated in her native Pakistan Sharing pictures on campus and surrounded...
              moreby Sebastian Hughes   As Ethiopia heads towards a potential collapse, the Biden administration worries the situation will turn into another Afghanistan, Axios reported. The government of Ethiopia has called on its citizens to arm themselves as rebels make their way towards the capital, Addis Ababa, Axios reported. The rebels are reportedly from the Tigray region, where concerns have risen about ethnic cleansing and the use of starvation by the government as a tactic of war. State Department officials have issued multiple advisories and held numerous briefings in an attempt to avoid a fallout similar to the evacuation from Afghanistan, Axios reported. Non-emergency staff was ordered to leave the country in early November, a move which the administration hopes will prevent the need for an airlift like the one required in Kabul. “There are no plans to fly the U.S. military into Ethiopia to facilitate evacuations or replicate the contingency effort we recently undertook in Afghanistan, which was a unique situation for many reasons,” a senior State Department official told reporters in a briefing Monday. “There should be no expectation, particularly after we have issued so...
    This photo gallery highlights some of the most compelling images made or published by Associated Press photographers in the Middle East, Afghanistan & Pakistan Region between Nov. 18-24, 2021. This week’s selection includes scenes from across the region, including daily life in Afghanistan. Israel returned the bodies of two Palestinians after withholding them under its controversial policy of holding the remains of Palestinians killed while reportedly carrying out attacks. A South African immigrant to Israel was laid to rest after a Palestinian man opened fire in Jerusalem’s Old City. Britain’s Prince Charles and his wife, Camilla visited the Giza Pyramids in their first tour since the start of the coronavirus pandemic. The gallery was curated by Oded Balilty, AP Chief photographer for Israel, the West Bank and Gaza. Follow AP visual journalism: Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/apnews AP Images on Twitter: http://twitter.com/AP_Images AP Images blog: http://apimagesblog.com Copyright © 2021 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, written or redistributed.
    A Republican Senate memo claims that few of the roughly 82,000 Afghans evacuated to the United States after the calamitous American pullout from Kabul in August were not properly vetted.  The memo claims that screenings have not been done on the evacuees to sort out possible threats and are only reliant on criminal and terrorist databases in a process that those interviewed called 'reckless.' Senate Republicans interviewed federal officials from the Department of Homeland Security, Department of Defense, Department of Justice and the State Department.  The memo, reported by the Washington Examiner, claimed that the Biden administration wanted the screening process streamlined.    About 75 percent of the evacuees from Afghanistan are not U.S. citizens, green card holders or Afghan Special Immigrant Visa (SIV) holders or applicants.   Only 700 of 82,000 admitted held SIVs. Those grant the evacuees permanent American residency for helping the government during the 20-year occupation of Afghanistan.  A Republican Senate memo claims that few of the roughly 82,000 Afghans evacuated to the United States after the calamitous US pullout from Kabul in August were not properly vetted President...
    THE Taliban have reportedly won their first deal as a legal drugs seller since seizing control of Afghanistan by selling cannabis crops to Australians.  The militant group, which taxed drug traffickers to fund its successful bid to regain power, has signed a deal with a company to invest in a pot processing centre in Afghanistan. 2The Taliban has struck a lucrative deal to sell cannabis 2Despite bans on drug productions, narcotics markets have been trading freely The Times newspaper reports the project will give Sydney-based pharmaceutical company Cpharm, which produces medicinal cannabis cream, access to huge Afghan cannabis crops. Cannabis is illegal in Afghanistan but authorities typically turn a blind eye and take a cut of the profits.  Afghanistan’s deputy narcotics minister met a representative of the Australian company on Tuesday that has pledged £330 million, according to the Pajhwok Afghan news agency. After regaining power in August, the Taliban vowed to ban drug production.  But for Helmand and Kandahar farmers of cannabis and poppy fields nothing has reportedly changed, with traders also openly operating. Afghanistan is the world’s largest...
    Women have been banned from appearing in Afghan TV dramas and female news readers told to wear 'Islamic hijabs' under repressive new Taliban laws. All TV dramas in which women have appeared are now banned from the screen, edicts handed down by Afghanistan's Ministry of Vice and Virtue this week said.  Female news readers - who are already compelled to wear headscarves - must now wear 'Islamic hijabs' the rules added, without specifying exactly what that means. It is just the latest repression of women's rights by the Taliban since the Islamists seized control of the country in August, and further undermines their claims to have reformed and become more moderate.  All TV dramas featuring women have been banned in Afghanistan while female news readers have been told to wear 'Islamic hijabs', despite already wearing headscarves (pictured) The laws were contained in a new rulebook issued by the Ministry of Vice and Virtue - which under the old Taliban regime was charged with enforcing its strict interpretation of Sharia - to ensure all media reinforces 'Islamic or Afghan values'. 'Those dramas...or programmes...
    As Ethiopia heads towards a potential collapse, the Biden administration worries the situation will turn into another Afghanistan, Axios reported. The government of Ethiopia has called on its citizens to arm themselves as rebels make their way towards the capital, Addis Ababa, Axios reported. The rebels are reportedly from the Tigray region, where concerns have risen about ethnic cleansing and the use of starvation by the government as a tactic of war. State Department officials have issued multiple advisories and held numerous briefings in an attempt to avoid a fallout similar to the evacuation from Afghanistan, Axios reported. Non-emergency staff was ordered to leave the country in early November, a move which the administration hopes will prevent the need for an airlift like the one required in Kabul. “There are no plans to fly the U.S. military into Ethiopia to facilitate evacuations or replicate the contingency effort we recently undertook in Afghanistan, which was a unique situation for many reasons,” a senior State Department official told reporters in a briefing Monday. A member of the Ethiopian Federal Forces holds a...
    Cristiano Ronaldo and his family are being protected by twin brothers who served in an elite special forces unit in Afghanistan. The footballer, 36 - who signed for Man United for a second time in August - was previously seen guarded by the brothers in September shortly after they were hired as he prepared to jet to Switzerland with the squad for a Champions League tie. One of the twins was also spotted earlier this month at the birthday party organised by his pregnant girlfriend Georgia Rodriguez for their daughter Alana Martina, four,  in Madrid.  Security: Cristiano Ronaldo and his family are being protected by twin brothers who served in an elite special forces unit in Afghanistan The bodyguards have now been revealed as brothers Sergio and Jorge Ramalheiro, former soldiers who fought in Afghanistan before going on to join a Portuguese police close protection unit protecting judges and politicians. Portuguese celeb magazine Flash said the twins, part of a set of triplets, had been hired by Cristiano after they requested to go on unpaid leave from the PSP police to pursue other interests....
    CRISTIANO RONALDO and his family are being protected by twins who served as soldiers with an elite special forces unit in Afghanistan. The brothers were seen with the Manchester United striker as he prepared to travel to Switzerland in September with the rest of the squad for a Champions League tie shortly after they were hired. 7Security guards Sergio and Jorge Ramalheiro - pictured here with Ronaldo - are looking after the Portuguese superstarCredit: Eamonn and James Clarke 7One of the brothers was spotted with Georgina at daughter Alana Martina's birthday And one of the twins was spotted earlier this month at the Madrid birthday bash Cristiano’s pregnant partner Georgina Rodriguez organised for their daughter Alana Martina. This week the strongmen were named as Sergio and Jorge Ramalheiro, two former crack soldiers who served in Afghanistan and went on to become part of a Portuguese police close protection unit tasked with watching over the likes of politicians and judges. Portuguese celeb magazine Flash said the twins, part of a set of triplets, had been hired by Cristiano after they asked...
    VELIKA KLADUSA, Bosnia-Herzegovina (AP) — Ibrahim Rasool loved his job as a soccer referee because of sportsmanship and fair play. But the 33-year-old from Afghanistan says there’s nothing fair about the way the European Union treats people flocking to its borders in search of a better life. Rasool told The Associated Press that police in Croatia ignored pleas from a pregnant woman and families with small children and instead deported him and 16 others back to Bosnia when they crossed into the EU country this month. Rasool provided video that he said he had filmed inside a Croatian police van and in a forest at Croatia’s border with Bosnia. Croatian police insulted the people who tried to make it in and told them to go back to Afghanistan, Rasool said. Croatian police have not responded to an AP request seeking information about the alleged Nov. 10 border incident. “Police didn’t (pay) attention to kids, to woman pregnant, (to) women, nobody,” Rasool said. “They show (us) gun, (say) ‘Don’t move. Stop. We are police.’” The video provided by Rasool...
    During an interview that aired Sunday on Fox News Channel’s “Life, Liberty & Levin,” former President Donald Trump tore into his successor over the “catastrophic events” that have taken place over the last 10 months. Trump, pointing to inflation, the crisis at the U.S.-Mexico border and the Afghanistan withdrawal, argued President Joe Biden’s tenure in office had been “the most embarrassing and humiliating period in the history of our country.” “Inflation is eating our people alive,” Trump lamented. “The southern border has never been like this, ever — I mean in any country possibly. You know, you may go to most remote places in the world, and nobody has had borders like this. We have millions and millions of people. This isn’t hundreds of thousands or tens of thousands. These are millions of people that are just coming in here unchecked. And when you think of it, countries are emptying out their jails into the United States. We’re like a dumping ground. When you see that, then I think the single most embarrassing moment in the history of our country...
    Former President Donald Trump called President Biden's botched withdrawal from Afghanistan "the single most embarrassing moment in the history of our country" Sunday on "Life, Liberty & Levin." "I think it’s the most embarrassing and humiliating period in the history of our country," Trump told host Mark Levin. "I was all set up to withdraw with dignity and tremendous strength," he said earlier in the interview. "Nobody was going to be killed. We weren’t leaving $85 billion behind; we weren’t leaving 10 cents behind. I said, ‘Every bolt, every screw, every nail comes out.’" TRUMP SLAMS BIDEN'S 'SURRENDER' OF AFGHANISTAN, WARNS CHINA COULD TAKE BAGRAM He added that he does not think "there’s ever been anything so terrible" and that "nobody" discusses the soldiers injured in the Kabul bombing. He said he met with "many of the parents" of the 13 soldiers killed and they "cannot believe this happened to their child."  Trump also knocked Biden for high gas prices, saying that "[i]nflation is eating our people alive." As for the crisis at the southern border, "nobody’s had borders like...
    DUBAI, United Arab Emirates (AP) — The ICC will review cricket in Afghanistan following the takeover of the country by the Taliban and a reported ban on women participating in the sport. “The ICC Board is committed to continuing to support Afghanistan Cricket to develop both men’s and women’s cricket moving forward,” ICC chairman Greg Barclay said in a statement on Wednesday. “We believe the most effective way for this to happen will be to support our Member in its efforts to achieve this through its relationship with the new government.” A new working group, which includes Pakistan Cricket Board chairman Ramiz Raja, will carry out the review of cricket in the central Asian country. Earlier this month, Cricket Australia postponed a scheduled one-off test against Afghanistan on Nov. 27, saying it would have “no alternative” but to scrap the historic test after reports that women’s cricket would be banned in Afghanistan. Former Afghan international cricketer Mirwais Ashraf was appointed acting chairman of the Afghanistan Cricket Board (ACB) last week. Ashraf is the latest person to head the board in...
    Check out our must-buy plant-based cookbooks! Learn more During the Taliban’s takeover in August, students and teachers from all over Afghanistan began to flee the country in expectation of the harsh crackdown on education in Afghanistan. Many of these individuals included college students and teachers from the American University of Afghanistan. The students and teachers feared for their lives as the Taliban was particularly vicious towards anyone at the American University of Afghanistan. Over 100 students were able to flee Afghanistan but were concerned when they realized that they would be going to Iraq. Their fears ended up being unfounded as the students arrived at the American University of Iraq in Sulaimaniya. Sulaimaniya is considered to be the safest major city in Iraq and proved to be the perfect escape from the Taliban. The Afghan students were welcomed with open arms and were made to immediately feel safe in the new place. Despite this wonderful story of how these students made it to safety, they are still traumatized and worried about the safety of their families. Many...
    This past summer, as thousands were fleeing Afghanistan during the Taliban takeover of Kabul, photojournalist Massoud Hossaini stayed put. Working with Foreign Policy magazine, he documented the chaotic ending of the 20-year-conflict and what life was going to be like under the Taliban. In one article, he captured photos of Afghan women who feared being sold into sex slavery or forced into marriage. In another, he snapped a dramatic shot of a female Afghan politician looking down the sight of a gun. It’s a body of work that the San Jose State University School of Journalism and Mass Communications will honor by giving Hossaini their annual Hearst Award, offered since 1995 to those who have made contributions to the free press. Past recipients include Dr. Anthony Fauci, CNN’s Jim Acosta, news anchor Dan Rather and local filmmaker Alexander Shebanow. “He has an ability to draw beauty even in times of despair,” said Halima Kazem-Stojanovic, an SJSU journalism and human rights lecturer. “The ups and downs of having to photograph war makes his work unique.” The virtual award ceremony will be held...
    MINNEAPOLIS (WCCO) — A Minnesota man and his family continue to fight to leave Kabul more than three months after the Taliban took control of the city. “The new government, they are just against the people like me, like interpreters and citizens,” Qais said, speaking of the Taliban. For the past three months, Qais has been working with the U.S. State Department to get him and his family on a plane to Qatar and from there the U.S. However, they recently learned of a new requirement. “They told me I need to have a passport for my son, which is like a 3-month-old baby, and I told them it’s not easy to get a passport in this current situation,” Qais said. RELATED: Minnesota Man Stuck In Afghanistan Still Struggling To Get Home Taliban officials working in the offices of the Ministry of Interior are advising Qais to register his son as a citizen of Afghanistan and get a certified ID issued before he can get a passport. Qais was told once he gets the passport and gets to Qatar, an...
    This month, dozens of U.S. service members have notified the Department of Defense about relatives who are still in Afghanistan but want to get out. Pentagon spokesman John Kirby acknowledged during Monday’s briefing that “60 service members have come forward and expressed concerns about family members in Afghanistan” in the last two weeks. Colin Kahl, the undersecretary of defense for policy, issued a memo on Nov. 4 urging those in the military with family members trapped and seeking an escape to email his office and provide them with their information. NO 'DEFENSIVE SYSTEMS ARE CAPABLE OF DEALING WITH' CHINA'S HYPERSONIC MISSILE, MILLEY SAYS None of the people whose names were submitted to Kahl’s office were eligible for parolee status, the spokesman said. “Our policy shop put out a memo to the services to let them know that the immediate family members of our service members in Afghanistan are eligible for facilitated departure, and it lists who they are and encouraging military personnel and DOD civilians, quite frankly, with immediate members to contact the Office of Policy here at the...
    Brady Duke – who was a sniper during his deployment to Afghanistan – ripped the Biden administration for the chaotic withdrawal. "I think it's really sad to see the leadership at this point seeming to be careless about taking responsibility for what was a botched withdrawal," Duke stated. "And I think withdrawal is going too far. I think it's really just a retreat, you know, you can't say that it's a success when you turn your back to the enemy on the battlefield." He added that there are "Americans that we must, we must rescue from this country." "You know, I think that we have to, we have to understand that this was a failure, that this was a failure," he continued. "And we cannot continue this way. It was deeply un-American." Morgan Luttrell – who is running in Texas' 8th Congressional District – wanted to know why Biden hadn't done more to help stranded Americans and allies in Afghanistan. Luttrell asked, "If the Biden administration is so concerned about saving American lives with these mandates, these mask...
    KABUL (AP) — A bomb exploded on a mini-bus Saturday on a busy commercial street in a Kabul neighborhood mainly populated by members of Afghanistan’s minority Hazara community, emergency workers and the bus driver said. At least one person was killed and five wounded. Workers with the ambulance teams at the scene told The Associated Press that the blast appeared to have been caused by a bomb on the bus. The bus driver, speaking to the AP at the hospital, said that at one point during his route, a suspicious man got onto the bus and a few minutes later, the explosion went off at the back of the bus. The driver, who goes by a single name Murtaza, said he saw two passengers with their clothes on fire falling out of the back of the vehicle while other passengers escaped out the front. The spokesman for Afghanistan’s ruling Taliban, Zabihullah Mujahid, told the AP that a fire broke out on the mini-bus and caused an explosion, killing one person and wounding another. Photos from the scene showed...
    Hundreds of Afghans, including U.S. Citizens, have been forced to leave safe houses after a volunteer group said they had failed to successfully arrange for a way out of Afghanistan with the U.S. government, the Wall Street Journal (WSJ) reported Friday. Group leaders said that they had access to three flights ready to ship off, however, the U.S. government had not approved passenger manifests or clear departures. Therefore, while they had planes ready to evacuate people, there had been no locations cleared to land the aircrafts, according to the WSJ. Task Force Argo, one of the largest volunteer groups consisting of current and former U.S. government officials, veterans, as well as other individuals chartering evacuation flights out of Afghanistan, also told those placed in safe houses that they had run out of money to support them, reported the outlet. One of our SIV families still trapped in Afghanistan wanted to show their support to our challenge and our cause. #feetorreceipt #showmeyourfeet #taskforceargo #AfghanEvac #Evacuate_SIV pic.twitter.com/VXyV5Mtigk — Task Force Argo (@task_force_argo) November 12, 2021 The task force was able to...
    A CHARITY has issued an urgent warning as baby girls as young as 20-DAYS-OLD are being offered up for marriage. UNICEF said they received "credible reports" of the days-old babies promised for future marriages in exchange for a dowry in Afghanistan. 2A family takes shelter in the Peer Mohammad Kakar high-school in Dasht-e-Padola, southern KabulCredit: © UNICEF The charity estimates 28 per cent of Afghan women aged between 15 and 49 are married off before they reach 18. It comes amid worrying evidence child marriage in the Central Asian country is on the rise. Even before the latest political instability, Uthere were 183 child marriages and ten cases of children being sold over 2018 and 2019 in Herat and Baghdis provinces alone. The children involved were between six-months-old and 17-years-old. UNICEF Executive Director Henrietta Fore said she was "deeply concerned" by the reports. She said: "We have received credible reports of families offering daughters as young as 20-days-old up for future marriage in return for a dowry." Most read in US NewsOH JOE! Biden suffers awkward gaffe while paying...
    At least 15 people were injured after a bomb exploded at a mosque in Traili, Afghanistan, a Taliban spokesperson said, the Associated Press reported Friday. ISIS militants have orchestrated several attacks in the region, according to the AP. The bomb was likely placed in the mosque before Friday prayers, the Taliban spokesman for Nangarhar Province, Qari Hanif, said. Witness photographs show at least three dead bodies and the mosque’s interior covered in broken glass and rubble, the AP reported. Hanif wasn’t able to confirm the fatalities. Forces with Afghanistan’s National Directorate of Security (NDS) escort an alleged militant as Taliban and Islamic State (IS) fighters are presented to the media in Jalalabad on May 23, 2019. (Photo by NOORULLAH SHIRZADA / AFP) (Photo credit should read NOORULLAH SHIRZADA/AFP via Getty Images) ISIS militants have targeted mosques in three major attacks all on Fridays over the last five weeks, according to the AP. ISIS gunmen and suicide bombers attacked Shiite Muslim worshipers in Kunduz and then Kandahar. (RELATED: Taliban Calls On US To Recognize Their Government, Says Failure To Do So...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — Secretary of State Antony Blinken said Friday that the Gulf nation of Qatar has agreed to represent American interests in Afghanistan following the closure of the U.S. embassy in Kabul in late August. Blinken said Qatar will serve as the “protecting power” for the United States in Taliban-run Afghanistan, a move that suggests the Biden administration has little confidence that it will re-open the embassy in the near future. Qatar will establish a U.S. interests section within its own embassy in Kabul to provide consular and other services to American citizens in Afghanistan, Blinken said. Qatar will also assume responsibility for the security and protection of now-vacant U.S. diplomatic facilities in the Afghan capital. The U.S. has numerous protecting power agreements in countries where it does not have diplomatic representation. Those notably include Switzerland in Iran, Sweden in North Korea and the Czech Republic in Syria. Qatar has been a key player in discussions between the Taliban and the United States for many years. It hosted months of U.S.-Taliban peace talks and has since been critical...
    (CNN)The US and Qatar signed an agreement Friday to have Qatar's embassy in Kabul represent US interests in Afghanistan as senior officials from the two countries met in Washington for the US-Qatar Strategic Dialogue.Secretary of State Antony Blinken and Qatari Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Foreign Affairs Mohammed bin Abdulrahman Al-Thani held the signing ceremony in the State Department's ceremonial Benjamin Franklin dining room before taking questions from reporters. "Today, we're signing two new agreements that reflect our deepening collaboration on Afghanistan," Blinken said. "The first establishes Qatar as the United States protecting power in Afghanistan. Qatar will establish a US intersection within its embassy in Afghanistan to provide certain consular services and monitor conditions security of US diplomatic facilities in Afghanistan." The second agreement will formalize the US partnership with Qatar "to facilitate the travel of Afghans with US Special Immigrant Visas, a role that it's already been playing in many instances," Blinken said, "and serve as a transit point for eligible Afghans as they complete their application process." ShutteredRead MoreThe diplomatic compound in Kabul -- once one...
    KABUL, Afghanistan (AP) — A Taliban provincial spokesman says a bomb exploded in a mosque during Friday prayers in a town near the eastern Afghanistan city of Jalalabad, wounding 15 people. Qari Hanif, the government spokesman for Nangarhar Province, said the bomb appeared to have been planted in the mosque in the town of Traili. The Islamic State group has been waging a campaign of violence in Nangarhar Province, where shootings and bombings against Taliban fighters take place frequently. Copyright © 2021 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, written or redistributed.
    (CNN)An explosion went off during Friday prayers at a mosque in eastern Afghanistan, a local resident told Reuters on Friday. The blast occurred in the Spin Ghar district of Nangarhar province, a local journalist told CNN. This is a breaking story, more to follow...
    KABUL, Afghanistan (AP) — A Taliban spokesman says a bomb exploded in a mosque near Jalalabad, Afghanistan during prayers, wounding 15 people. Copyright © 2021 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, written or redistributed.
    Republican Virginia Lt. Governor-elect Winsome Sears tore into President Joe Biden Thursday over the withdrawal from Afghanistan, accusing him of abandoning the “people who have put their lives on the line.” Sears, a Marine veteran, appeared Thursday on Fox News’ “The Faulkner Focus,” where she was asked to weigh in on Veterans Affairs (VA) Secretary Dennis McDonough’s statement about an uptick “in the number of calls, texts, chats into … the Veteran Crisis Line” after the August withdrawal of U.S. troops from Afghanistan. WATCH: “My husband and I, we’re both Marines. And when we saw the pullout from Afghanistan, no rhyme, no reason,” Sears said. “You just say to yourselves, ‘Who’s in charge? Where’s our commander-in-chief?'” The Marine veteran then went on to blast Biden for taking no responsibility for what happened in the aftermath of the pull-out. “You’re giving your all to the country, and you expect that it won’t be taken lightly. Your life, your sacrifice, the sacrifice that your family back home is making,” Sears said. (RELATED Lindsey Graham Blames Biden For Afghanistan Being ‘Hell On...
    DENVER (AP) — Navy veteran Jordon Daniel was busy when the United States pulled its last troops out of Afghanistan at the end of August. More than 7,000 miles (11,265 kilometers) and a world away, he and a group of fellow veterans were moving furniture, folding towels and sorting silverware in drawers during a hot, dry summer day in the Denver area. Their mission: To furnish homes for Afghan refugees seeking safety in the United States. Daniel had just finished furnishing the last of three or four homes for refugees that day when he received an alert on his cellphone that the final U.S. military aircraft had departed Kabul after two decades of war. “I got in my truck and just sat there and was just kind of reflecting,” said Daniel, who signed up for the Navy after 9/11 and spent time in Afghanistan on a security detail. “You know, 20 years of war, America’s longest war coming to an end. And you know, for me it was kind of coming full circle.” On Wednesday, Daniel and volunteers with...
    Donald Trump sent out on Thursday morning a pre-recorded video honoring those who served in the U.S. armed forces, where he took a swipe at President Joe Biden for putting veterans 'through a lot.' 'We will come back,' Trump vowed in his 39-second Veterans Day message sent just after 7:00 a.m. and posted to Rumble, a Canadian online video platform. 'Our country has gone through a lot,' the former president continued. 'The last period of time has been very, very tough – watching what you had to watch. But our country will be back and we'll be stronger than ever. Happy Veterans Day.' Trump's message to veterans took aim at Biden's actions since taking office – including the bungled withdrawal from Afghanistan, which resulted in the deaths of 13 U.S. servicemembers in a suicide bombing outside the Kabul airport. Many veterans of the 20-year war in the Middle East were enraged that the withdrawal was so mishandled and immediately led to the Taliban takeover and collapse of the Afghan government that U.S. forces helped put in place. Donald Trump took...
    Fox News host and Daily Caller co-founder Tucker Carlson engaged in a fiery debate with Ohio Republican Rep. Mike Turner Wednesday night on whether the United States should send additional troops to Ukraine to defend the country from Russian aggression. Turner was a signatory to a letter to President Joe Biden urging his administration to increase assistance to Ukraine, an ally of NATO. According to Ukrainian officials, Russia has left more than 90,000 troops on its border after recent training exercises. “May I just ask really quick – so the lesson of 20 years in Afghanistan, and the tragic and cowardly and counterproductive exit from Afghanistan, is that we need more troops in Ukraine?” Carlson asked Turner, who cited Biden’s Afghanistan withdrawal as a reason to be tough on Russia. “Why should the average American care about the territorial integrity of Ukraine? Sincerely.” “Ukraine is a strategic import of the Black Sea, most of the reports that you’ve been seeing of Russia being aggressive with our ships, being aggressive with our planes, are in the area of the Black...
    Wednesday on Fox News Channel’s “America’s Newsroom,” Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-SC) blasted President Joe Biden for his withdrawal of U.S. troops out of Afghanistan. Graham said Biden “doesn’t understand the nature of the war on terrorism,” adding that he was the “most incompetent president in my lifetime.” He said that giving the Taliban, which took over Afghanistan as a result of the bother withdrawal, aid “would be the ultimate betrayal” of those harmed by the Taliban. “The military told President Biden that if you withdraw our force, if you leave Bagram Airbase, we can’t defend what is left, and the place will collapse,” Graham advised. “Joe Biden has been the most incompetent president in my lifetime on foreign policy, worse than Jimmy Carter. He doesn’t understand the nature of the war on terrorism. He believes we can withdraw from these regions, and we’ll be safe. I’ve been saying for years, along with Senator McCain and many others, that we have to have some of our troops in the backyard of the enemy, so they don’t come to our backyard. President...