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    The brazen shooting of an 81-year-old woman in her Los Angeles home and ongoing “smash and grab” crimes at area retailers have put the city at a policing crossroads — follow progressive policies that let suspects back on the streets or beef up policing efforts. Although some crimes are down in the L.A. area, homicides and violent crimes are surging. The L.A. Times reported: Homicides are up 46.7 percent compared with 2019, while shooting victims are up 51.4 percent, according to police data,” “As of the end of November, there had been 359 homicides in L.A. in 2021, compared with 355 in all of 2020. There have not been more homicides in one year since 2008, which ended with 384.   VIDEO: Criminals posing as cops seen beating and robbing three victims on the doorstep of their home in the #Wilshire area of Los Angeles. 11pm @ABC7 pic.twitter.com/adjrvljlYW — Amy Powell (@abc7amy) December 4, 2021 Jacqueline Avant, a well-known and beloved philanthropist and wife of musician Clarence Avant, was shot, but her husband and a security guard who were in...
    Los Angeles voters frustrated with widespread homelessness want officials to act swiftly and focus on shelter for individuals living on the street, a recent poll of county voters found. The majority of voters expressed empathy for the homeless but cited impatience and disappointment with the area’s leadership, according to the poll done by the Los Angeles Business Council Institute and the Los Angeles Times. “A key finding: Nearly four in 10 voters said that homeless people in their neighborhood made them feel significantly unsafe,” the Times’ Wednesday report said. When asked to describe their concerns, participants mentioned urine and feces on the streets, an increasing sense of disorder, and worry about their own children, the outlet continued: “I didn’t feel safe over there, especially raising my children,” said Amber Morino, a 35-year-old student and mother of seven who took part in a focus group done in conjunction with the poll. She moved this year to the San Fernando Valley from a home in Mar Vista after a camper caught fire near the park where her kids played. “I am also considering...
    "[I] didn't get any treats. he just took the decorations for my daughters 7th birthday party and left bloody hand prints," Neistat responded, "serious question; how did you get your car broken into 15 times?" i didn\u2019t get any treats. he just took the decorations for my daughters 7th birthday party and left bloody hand prints. serious question; how did you get your car broken into 15 times? — Casey Neistat (@Casey Neistat) 1637802692 "I lived in West Hollywood for 20 years and parked on the street," Rogen responded. "Also it sucks your shit was stolen but LA is not some s***hole city. As far as big cities go it has a lot going for it."What was the response?Rogen's comments triggered a raucous response. Critics said that Rogen's dismissive response highlighted just how privileged he is: that he is rich enough that he doesn't need to worry about crime. Others pointed out the irony of Rogen saying his car has been broken into 15 times while at the same time downplaying crime levels in Los Angeles. ...
    Los Angeles Police Chief Michel Moore on Tuesday said that he would set up a "Follow Home Task Force" to address a recent trend of robberies.  Moore said that he would create the task force of over 20 detectives from elite divisions like Robbery-Homicide and other units in the department, the Los Angeles Police Department announced in a statement. The task force will attempt to address instances when "suspects target victims in Los Angeles, follow them and commit the robberies as the victims go into isolated areas such as a parking lot or as they arrive home." The trend has targeted high-end restaurants and celebrities in the past few months and escalated on Tuesday when a man was fatally shot in an attempted robbery outside Bossa Nova, a Hollywood restaurant, according to The Los Angeles Times. The department is already investigating over 133 robberies, including the fatal shooting earlier this week. In that incident, a man and woman were sitting in a car, and when the woman stepped out, eight people tried to rob her. The 23-year-old man "was coming to...
    Outside Carson City Hall, a small gathering of residents couldn’t quite agree how to describe the stink that has been plaguing their town. “It’s like a dirty gym sock,” said Jacob Avery, a Carson resident and football coach at Banning High School in Wilmington, chuckling. “I don’t know; it’s like an unclean locker room.” Resident Sarah Fong popped a menthol cough drop into her mouth to combat what she described as the stench of dead fish and dirty diapers. Fong playfully pointed to the marketing on the bag of Halls she carried inside her purse that promised “max strength” and “relief” in capital letters. “If only,” she said. “God, if only.” The debate after a demonstration last month — a bit of levity amid weeks of sickening odors from the Dominguez Channel — hit at a question that stinky cities throughout Southern California have grappled with for years: “How do we describe an assault on the nostrils?” Especially when places in Los Angeles and beyond have had nostrils assaulted by all manner of stank. “We haven’t really developed a good...
    Restaurants in Los Angeles are now prohibited from freely passing out disposable items and will only supply things like plastic utensils and paper napkins upon customer request. The ordinance took effect on Monday but will not be enforced until Jan. 1, and it is currently applicable to food and beverage organizations with more than 26 employees. From April 22 on, it will apply to all organizations that serve food and drinks. Officials said that the goal of the new policy is to reduce plastic waste and costs for businesses, according to The Los Angeles Times. City Councilman Paul Koretz, who was involved in proposing the policy, said in April it could save businesses between $3,000 and $21,000 annually, according to the Times.  Still, some California business owners were unhappy with the change.  "The new rules will cost more money than it saves," Norm Langer, who owns a deli in downtown Los Angeles, told the Times. "It’s not worth the amount of money to save on plastic utensils than it is to have an unhappy customer." Customers at Los Angeles restaurants are also subject to additional policies related to the...
    LOS ANGELES (AP) — Customers at Los Angeles restaurants will only get plastic utensils and napkins if they ask for them, under a new ordinance taking effect Monday that aims to reduce waste. The rule requires all restaurants with more than 26 employees to remove all single-use plastic utensil dispensers, the Los Angeles Times reported. Businesses must also stop including plastic utensils and napkins with takeout orders or for dine-in meals unless a customer specifically asks for them. Enforcement won’t begin until January. Over 32,000 mailers were sent out earlier this year to update restaurants on the new rules. The letters were printed in Chinese, Korean, Spanish, Tagalog and English. The City Council passed the ordinance last April. The city of Malibu set the plastic-ban standard in 2008 when it phased out plastic shopping bags, then a decade later cracked down on single-use plastics. The cities of Davis and San Luis Obispo have similar laws, according to the Times. Copyright © 2021 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, written...
    More than 200,000 people have lost their homes because of freeway construction in the last three decades across the country. And in some of the largest modern-day projects, residents living in Black and Latino neighborhoods are being disproportionately affected by the displacements. A new Los Angeles Times investigation examines how highway planners’ decisions to route the U.S. Interstate Highway System through Black neighborhoods a half-century ago continues to resonate today. The Times found that expansions of existing freeways through cities in recent decades have inflicted a second round of dislocation and disruption on largely Black and now Latino communities as well. On this episode of “Gimme Shelter: The California Housing Crisis Podcast,” we discuss The Times’ findings in depth, examining the effects of modern freeway widenings in Los Angeles, Houston and Tampa. Our guest is Alexandria Contreras, whose great-grandparents saw the 101 Freeway built a block from their home in Boyle Heights in the 1950s. Today, Contreras is fighting a proposed expansion of Interstate 5 near the home of Contreras’ parents in Downey. Gimme Shelter: The California Housing Crisis Pod...
    Rep. Karen BassKaren Ruth BassDemocrats brace for flood of retirements after Virginia rout Black Caucus pushes for priorities in final deal Rep. Brown to run for Maryland attorney general MORE (D-Calif.) received approval from the House Committee on Ethics to accept a significant scholarship from the University of Southern California's School of Social Work, a move that has now called into question the university’s motives in providing the scholarship.  Bass received the scholarship, worth over $95,000, during her first year in Congress in 2011. Bass graduated from USC in 2015 and has said the program increased her understanding of child welfare policy, according to The Los Angeles Times. She told the Times that she accepted the scholarship and got her graduate degree because it would "assist me in being a member of Congress focused on an area of policy that impacted the young people in my district and around the country."  But now, USC's efforts to connect with local politicians have become the subject of increased scrutiny. Bass did not apply directly to the program, but instead was offered the scholarship by Marilyn Flynn, then...
    It was a hot Sunday in August 1962 when photographer Bill Beebe got a tip from volleyball players on a Santa Monica beach. The president of the United States had ditched the Secret Service and was heading into the surf. A staff photographer for the Los Angeles Times, Beebe raced to the ocean’s edge a mile north of the pier, where he found John F. Kennedy coming out of the water, as frantic Secret Service members struggled to contain gleeful and stunned admirers, who rushed to touch and talk with the president. Beebe splashed into the water with his high-end German camera, a Rolleiflex, and a strobe with a 510-volt battery, to snap one of the most iconic shots of the Kennedy presidency. The photo ran worldwide and provided a glimpse of an unusually accessible president somewhat cavalier about his safety, 15 months before he would be assassinated in an open limo by a sniper in Dallas. It would become the crowning achievement of a long career in Southern California papers for Beebe, who died Oct. 24 at his home...
    LOS ANGELES (CBSLA) — Leticia Ruiz doesn’t enjoy sitting out on her porch in Koreatown as much these days because of the mountain of trash that covers her neighbor’s front yard. The putrid smell and the numerous critters have her retreating into the safety of her home. READ MORE: WATCH LIVE: Gov. Larry Hogan To Make COVID-19 Vaccine Update“Every time I had a complaint somebody would come, they would take a picture and that’s it,” said Leticia Ruiz. “They would just write a letter…and nothing (would) happen.  The 8-foot wall of junk contains items like old doors, lamps and laundry baskets. It has been cited for code violations by the city multiple times since 2010, according to Los Angeles Department of Building and Safety records. Ruiz and her neighbors along Harvard Boulevard said they have filed complaints with the city for several years but nothing ever happens. However, a day after the airing of this story, the City Attorney’s office confirmed that the homeowner signed a “Right of Entry” which allows crews to clean up the junk on Thursday at...
    A mug shot of Robert Durst, a convicted killer who tested positive for the coronavirus, has surfaced following the inmate's transfer to a different California prison facility. Durst, a 78-year-old New York real estate heir, was sentenced to life in prison in a Los Angeles County courtroom earlier this month for the 2000 murder of his longtime friend Susan Berman and was placed on a ventilator earlier this month after he tested positive for COVID-19. ROBERT DURST GETS LIFE FOR CALIFORNIA MURDER OF BEST FRIEND New York real estate scion Robert Durst, 78, answers questions from defense attorney Dick DeGuerin, left, while testifying in his murder trial at the Inglewood Courthouse on Aug. in Inglewood, Calif. Defense attorneys on Thursday requested a new trial for Durst, alleging several missteps prevented him from receiving a fair proceeding. (Gary Coronado / Los Angeles Times via AP, Pool) In September, Durst was convicted of first-degree murder for shooting Berman in her Los Angeles-area home just before Christmas. Prosecutors alleged he killed her in an effort to silence her, as she was slated...
    Two men were killed in separate shootings in Los Angeles overnight. The first took place shortly after 7:30 p.m. Friday in the 8900 block of Orion Avenue in North Hills, the Los Angeles Police Department said in a news release. Officers responded to find a man with multiple gunshot wounds, police said. Paramedics pronounced him dead at the scene. Authorities identified him as Ryan Castellanos, 18. Investigators received preliminary information that a compact sedan was seen fleeing the area, police said. Anyone with information was asked to call the LAPD’s Valley Bureau Homicide detectives at (818) 374-9550. The second shooting took place in the 1300 block of 97th Street near Normandie Avenue in unincorporated L.A. County near South Los Angeles, according to investigators. Los Angeles County Sheriff’s deputies responded shortly after 12:30 a.m. and found a wounded man lying on the sidewalk. He was pronounced dead at the scene. The Los Angeles County Coroner’s Office identified him as Glenn Burton, 34, of Los Angeles. Anyone with information was asked to call the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department’s Homicide Bureau at...
    Gigi Hadid and Zayn Malik split confirmed after he denies claim he struck her mom, more celeb breakups of 2021 Is it cheaper to buy or build a house? © Provided by NBC Sports Replay Video SETTINGS OFF HD HQ SD LO Skip Ad The 2021 NFL season is finally here! However, 2021 will be a season like no other as the league debuts an enhanced playing structure featuring a 17-game schedule. Every team will play 17 games with one bye week, hosting 10 games–either nine regular-season games and one preseason game or eight regular-season games and two preseason games. Additionally, Super Bowl LVI will take place on February 13, 2022–a week later than normal–at SoFi Stadium in Los Angeles. This week on NBC the Dallas Cowboys take on the Minnesota Vikings at U.S. Bank Stadium. Live coverage begins at 7:00 p.m. ET with Football Night in America. Tonight’s match-up will also be available via live stream on Peacock. RELATED: FMIA Week 7 – Road Wins At Ravens, Steelers? Joe Burrow’s Bengals Are Scary, And It’s Not Even Halloween...
    Los Angeles County Sheriff Alex Villanueva will testify in a lawsuit filed by Vanessa Bryant alleging that deputies shared photos of the helicopter crash that killed her husband and daughter.  U.S. Magistrate Judge Charles F. Eick ruled that both Villanueva and Los Angeles County Fire Chief Daryl Osby would be ordered to testify as both have "unique first-hand, non-repetitive knowledge" about the case, according to The Los Angeles Times. Bryant sued last year, saying she and her family endured emotional distress after deputies shared photos of human remains at the crash scene where her husband Kobe Bryant, daughter Gianna Bryant and seven others died. Attorneys representing the county, however, argued that the sheriff did not have any relevant information that could not be obtained elsewhere.  "Their testimony will not change the fact that there is no evidence any photos taken by County first responders have ever been publicly disseminated,” Skip Miller, an attorney for the county, said in a statement to the Times. "I said, if you can’t bring my husband and baby back, please make sure no one takes photographs of them. Please secure the area," the Times quoted Bryant testifying of...
    Listen to this episode of The Times: Apple Podcasts Spotify Stitcher Google Podcasts Hundreds of thousands of sailors worldwide are stuck on cargo ships far longer than they’d intended, with few chances to contact the outside. Usually ports offer opportunities for a break, but most of these sailors haven’t had access to COVID-19 vaccines, so they’re not allowed to set foot in the United States. Today, L.A. Times Business reporter Ronald D. White takes us to the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach, the nation’s largest. A huge backlog of cargo ships is waiting offshore for a turn to unload merchandise. Meanwhile, the crew aboard is going nowhere fast — and there’s basically no internet access, no visitors, no nice restaurant food delivery. They’re trapped. Host: Gustavo Arellano Guest: Los Angeles Times Business reporter Ronald D. White More reading: They’ve been stuck for months on cargo ships now floating off Southern California. They’re desperate When will supply chains be back to normal? And how did things get so bad? A tangled supply chain means...
    Democratic California Gov. Gavin Newsom signed a new law Saturday banning gas-powered lawn tools, according to Los Angeles Times. The new law will be effective as early as 2024. It states that small-motor tools like chainsaws, leaf blowers and lawn mowers must be battery-operated. In addition, plug-in, gas-powered generators will be required to be zero-emission by 2028, the Los Angeles Times reported. (RELATED: Newsom Signs Bill Requiring Every Registered Voter Be Mailed A Ballot) And one of the final bill actions: Newsom agrees to a California phaseout of gas-powered lawnmowers & leaf blowers, no doubt a law that will receive national attention. https://t.co/Skssy6JTip — John Myers (@johnmyers) October 10, 2021 “This is the most impactful step our state can take to fight climate change,” Newsom said in a Sept. 23 press release announcing the imminent move to sign the bill. “For too many decades, we have allowed cars to pollute the air that our children and families breathe. Californians shouldn’t have to worry if our cars are giving our kids asthma. Our cars shouldn’t make wildfires worse – and...
    Getty Chippendales cast members Ryan Worley (L) and Ricky Rodgers participate in a fashion show in front of the Welcome to Fabulous Las Vegas sign on the Las Vegas Strip to kick off the pro-mask wearing campaign "Mask Up for Nevada" put on by Experience Strategy Associates amid the spread of the coronavirus on June 25, 2020 in Las Vegas, Nevada. Somen “Steve” Banerjee died in jail after he pleaded guilty to charges involving the murder of former Chippendales Choreographer Nick de Noia. He had also been charged with plotting the murder of former dancer Read Scot and others. Authorities said at the time that Banerjee died by suicide before he was sentenced to prison. He was 47. Chippendales Associate Producer Candace Mayeron told Elle Magazine that tension had been building between de Noia and Banerjee, which reached its height after de Noia retained the touring rights to Chippendales and several former dancers left the troupe to launch Adonis, a competing all-male exotic dance crew. It took years for investigators to gather enough information to charge Banerjee. ABC...
    You’ve probably seen it without even registering what you were seeing. A flag of three vertical bands of color with sawtooth borders between, and some round fancy thing in the middle that’s indecipherable when you’re standing on the ground and the flag is flapping away 20 or 30 feet in the air. Among the three flags that were likely on that flagpole, this one was on the bottom. The top one, you’d recognize: Old Glory, inspired by the original revolutionary banner mythically miscredited to Betsy Ross but in fact the likely work of a very artistic New Jersey congressman. And below that, the California flag, a neatened-up version of the original Bear Flag of the Republic of California, which lasted a monumental 25 days, in 1846. It was daubed in red-brown paint on a length of unbleached cotton, with a single star and what was supposed to be a bear but looked in all honesty so much like a pig that when native Californians saw the cloth afloat atop a makeshift flagpole, they passed among themselves the word “coche”...
    The co-founder of Black Lives Matter Los Angeles was targeted in second "swatting" incident in a week on Wednesday after filing a lawsuit against the Los Angeles Police Department (LAPD) for a similar incident last year.  Melina Abdullah was not home during the latest incident and was alerted by her neighbors to a large police presence outside her home around 5:45 p.m., according to The Los Angeles Times. Police are investigating the incident as swatting, or reports of a false emergency in an effort to attract a large police presence to a location, The Times said.  "NO ONE WILL EVER SCARE ME OUT OF THIS WORK,” Abdullah tweeted on Thursday. LAPD, white supremacists, and haters…NO ONE WILL EVER SCARE ME OUT OF THIS WORK. #BlackLivesMatter #SacredDuty #WeKeepUsSafe #RevolutionaryButGangster #FunkOrDie ✊ https://t.co/xn2Ebi4bB8— Melina Abdullah (@DocMellyMel) September 30, 2021 According to The Times, six police units and a supervisor were sent to the scene because of the "serious nature" of the crime reported and the caller's alleged intention kidnap Abdullah at gunpoint.  Police left the scene after determining that no one was in danger.  "It is the...
    Los Angeles officials are set to consider Wednesday a sweeping law that would require adults to show proof of full coronavirus vaccination to enter indoor public places in the city, the Los Angeles Times reported. Businesses such as restaurants, coffee shops, gyms, shopping centers, museums, movie theaters, and personal care establishments would all be under the new mandate, one of the city's strictest yet. Patrons would also be required by Nov. 4 to show proof of vaccination or a negative COVID-19 test if they attend an outdoor event with 5,000 or more attendees, according to the Times.  Angelenos can be exempt from following the new law in accordance with their religious beliefs or medical conditions but will still have to show a note on their exemption and provide a recent negative COVID-19 test result to enter a business.  People who don’t show proof of vaccination can still enter a business's outdoor areas and can still be able to pick up takeout orders and use the business’s restroom, the Times reported.  The move comes as the latest surge of COVID-19 infections and hospitalizations caused by the highly contagious delta variant have...
    NFL Week 4 2021 schedule: How and where to watch every game. The action is starting to pick up heading into Week 4 of the NFL season. Five teams remain undefeated with a 3-0 record, but at least one of those impressive streaks will be dampened by a loss as the Arizona Cardinals face the Los Angeles Rams in a matchup of the unbeaten. Back to back No. 1 picks Joe Burrow and Trevor Lawrence will kick off Week 4 play on Thursday at 8:20 pm ET with a battle in Cincinnati between the 2-1 Bengals and the 0-3 Jacksonville Jaguars. Of the nine early games on Sunday, the 1-2 Kansas City Chiefs’ trip to Philadelphia might be the biggest story line to watch with the potential debut of Josh Gordon in a Chiefs uniform. Sunday night primetime will feature Tom Brady’s return to New England as the 2-1 Tampa Bay Buccaneers look to hand the 1-2 New England Patriots their third loss of the season. Week 4 will wrap up on Monday night when the undefeated Los Angeles Chargers...
    For a Southern California reader to see that a Southern California writer is writing about the Santa Ana winds is like, well, learning that Dan Brown is writing about secret religious conspiracies, or that John Grisham’s new book goes on and on about a brilliant young lawyer tested by opportunity and ethics: OK, OK, we get it. The Santa Anas are a toll that our putative paradise makes us pay. They blow hot. They even blow cold. They may or may not incline us to murder, or migraines, or at least a seasonal snappishness. They scour the sky until it’s so high-res that you think you can make out individual pines on the ridgeline at Mt. Wilson, which looks no farther away than the end of the street. What else do you need to know? Even more, I would suggest. Like a little fact-finding and a little myth-busting as the Santa Ana season begins. At its outermost sprawl, it runs from Labor Day to Lent, but it does its worst in September and October. Like earthquakes, these winds have built...
    THE world's most expensive house has finally gone on sale as developers set a staggering $500million price tag for an LA Super Pad. Nicknamed "The One," the property sprawls over 100,000 sq ft and boasts 21 bedrooms, four pools, a bowling alley and 360 degree views over Southern California from its prime location in Bel-Air. 12The One is now America's most expensive home - with a $500m asking priceCredit: Los Angeles Times / Polaris 12The sleek house is equipped with all the amenities that one could wish forCredit: Los Angeles Times / Polaris 12It's views overlook views of Southern California from its prime location in Bel-AirCredit: Los Angeles Times / Polaris Other features are said to include a beauty salon and a 45-seat IMAX cinema, equipped with a garage with space for 30 cars. Thirteen of the 20 bedrooms are in the main house, including a vast 5,500ft master suite that on its own is twice as big as the average US house. There are also a running track and at least four swimming pools, not counting the moat and...
    Search for Brian Laundrie resumes in Florida reserve a day after authorities called it off Pumpkin patches and Halloween parties: Experts weigh in on COVID-19 risks at fall gatherings Jo Lasorda, the widow of longtime Los Angeles Dodgers manager Tommy Lasorda, died Monday at her home in Fullerton, Calif., the team announced. She was 91. Jo's death comes nine months after her husband died of cardiac arrest at the age of 93 following years of heart issues. The couple had been married for 70 years. The Los Angeles Dodgers family were saddened to learn of the passing of Jo Lasorda, widow of Dodgers’ Hall of Famer Tommy Lasorda. Jo, 91, passed away Monday evening at 8:59 p.m. at her Fullerton home. We send our deepest condolences to the Lasorda family at this time.— Los Angeles Dodgers (@Dodgers) September 21, 2021 Tommy and Jo met in 1949 when he was a minor league player for the Single-A Greenville Spinners in South Carolina. He would marry Jo, a Greenville native, a year later. From the Greenville News: "I stole a young...
    Victor Aguirre and his wife, Claudia, named warehouse owner Steve Sungho Lee and the owners of Green Buddha and Smoke Tokes, the two smoke shops housed in Lee's East 3rd Street building where the explosion that injured 12 firefighters took place A Los Angeles fire captain is suing two vape shops and their landlord after an explosion in May of 2020, caused by an excess of nitrous oxide and butane containers in the shops, left him with 'catastrophic injuries' and without fingers.  Victor Aguirre and his wife, Claudia, named warehouse owner Steve Sungho Lee and the owners of Green Buddha and Smoke Tokes, the two smoke shops housed in Lee's East 3rd Street building where the explosion that injured 12 firefighters took place.  Aguirre accused the three parties of 'hazardous activity, premise liability and negligence,' according to the Los Angeles Times.  Attorney Patrick Gunning wrote in the complaint Lee and business owners Raheel Lakhany and Shafaq Sattar are 'to blame for the horrific injuries Mr. Aguirre and the other 11 firefighters suffered.'  Gunning alleges in the lawsuit that responding...
    The Los Angeles City Council voted on Tuesday to crack down on protests that occur outside people's homes. The council voted 12 to 2 to approve an ordinance that bans picketing within 300 feet of a targeted residence. The previous law forbade such actions to occur within 100 feet, according to the Los Angeles Times. The ordinance also permits anyone who is “aggrieved” by the picketing to seek as much as $1,000 for each infraction, the Times reported. Those parties can reportedly file claims against any individuals who violated, conspired to violate or suggested violating the regulation. The law was reportedly passed without discussion. It will now face a second, procedural vote from the council. Sari Zureiqat, an attorney for the American Civil Liberties Union of Southern California, said the new ordinance will make it more difficult for protesters to voice their messages to those who need to hear it most. “The city is saying, ‘if you want to target someone’s home, you have to be a football field away from either side,’” Zureiqat said, according to the Times. “This...
    The Los Angeles Times reported Saturday that conservatives have pointed out the double standard in the media’s response to a violent racist attack on Larry Elder (R), the leading rival to Gov. Gavin Newsom (D) in the Sept. 14 recall. The Times noted that “conservatives have jumped in” with “accusations of a double standard” after Elder was hit in the head with an egg by a white woman wearing a gorilla mask on Wednesday — an attack that certainly would have been interpreted as racist had Elder been a Democrat. Not surprisingly, the Times failed to tell readers that the Times itself was a primary offender, attempting last week to portray Elder and his campaign as the aggressors, rather than the victims. In a tweet, the Times showed Elder with his hands near a white woman’s face, as if striking her. The linked article described the attack as follows: “LAPD is investigating altercation involving Larry Elder at Venice homeless encampment.” It was only the latest effort by the Times to appeal to racism and racial stereotypes in its coverage of the recall campaign, in what has...
    The Los Angeles Times is under fire for a pair of misleading tweets about Republican California gubernatorial candidate Larry Elder, who had an egg thrown at him by a person in a gorilla mask while walking in Los Angeles on Wednesday.  First the liberal newspaper tweeted, "Larry Elder cuts short Venice homeless encampment tour after hostile reception," without mentioning that the Black Republican was attacked by a White person in a gorilla mask.  The Los Angeles Times is under fire for a pair of misleading tweets about Republican California gubernatorial candidate Larry Elder. The L.A. paper is aware that ape characterizations "have been used as a racist trope for centuries," because its mentioned in the accompanying report, but the headline and tweet simply chalked the incident up to a "hostile reception."  LARRY ELDER ATTACKED BY EGG-THROWING AGITATORS IN LOS ANGELES The L.A. Times then followed up with another shocking tweet when reporting that the Los Angeles Police Department is now investigating the attack on Elder.  "LAPD is investigating altercation involving Larry Elder at Venice homeless encampment," the Times tweet alongside a photo...
    Los Angeles County Sheriff Alex Villanueva called an egg-throwing attack this week on Black Republican recall candidate Larry Elder by a White woman wearing a gorilla mask a hate crime and blamed "woke privilege" for liberal silence on the issue. "QUESTION: How is this not a hate crime? ANSWER: Because "woke privilege" means a white woman can wear a gorilla mask and attack a black man without fear of being called a racist. Where is the outrage from our politicians?" Villanueva tweeted on Thursday.  Villanueva said he plans to investigate the attack as a hate crime because the woman wore a gorilla mask, the Washington Examiner reported.  Elder, the Republican frontrunner in the election that could remove Democratic Gov. Gavin Newsom from office next week, was hurried out of the Venice area of Los Angeles on Wednesday when the campaign stop turned confrontational near a homeless encampment. He was heckled and the gorilla-masked woman on a bicycle just missed his head. Elder said some of the hecklers yelled racial epithets. VENICE, CA. September 8, 2021:Republican gubernatorial candidate Larry Elder is escorted...
    Getty Sarah Paulson is opening up about her decision to wear 'padding' while playing the role of Linda Tripp. In the upcoming FX series, “Impeachment: American Crime Story,” actress Sarah Paulson wears a costume that has been a source of controversy in recent weeks. According to the Los Angeles Times, Paulson gained 30 pounds for the role and wore an added 4.5 pounds of padding. That decision has sparked backlash from people who believe the role should have gone to a plus-sized actress. In an August 26 interview with the Los Angeles Times, Paulson opened up about what it was like to play Tripp, the woman who came forward about Bill Clinton’s relationship with Monica Lewinsky. Sarah Paulson Ridiculously Dragged for Playing Linda Tripp in Fat Suit https://t.co/cx9tqGaji8 pic.twitter.com/xQRqn5qRHQ — DJ Deeze ???????? YNT (@iamdjdeeze) August 29, 2021 In the words of Entertainment Tonight, Tripp worked with Lewinsky at the Pentagon, and eventually started recording her conversations their conversations before turning them over to the FBI “when she found herself in the crosshairs of Jones’ lawsuit.” In their...
    United Teachers Los Angeles (UTLA) President Cecily Myart-Cruz told Los Angeles Magazine (LAmag) children did not experience “learning loss” during the pandemic school closures, because they learned the words “insurrection” and “coup.” In an interview published Thursday, Jason McGahan wrote the controversial Myart-Cruz began her discussion by “issuing a series of incendiary statements that almost seem aerodynamically designed to grab headlines and infuriate critics.” Exclusive: Cecily Myart-Cruz’s Hostile Takeover of L.A.’s Public Schools https://t.co/K2dAFWkuMy pic.twitter.com/g8JrNghTgi — Los Angeles Magazine (@LAmag) August 29, 2021 “Like this one,” he continued: “There is no such thing as learning loss,” she responds when asked how her insistence on keeping L.A.’s schools mostly locked down over the last year and a half may have impacted the city’s 600,000 kindergarten through 12th-grade students. “Our kids didn’t lose anything. It’s OK that our babies may not have learned all their times tables. They learned resilience. They learned survival. They learned critical-thinking skills. They know the difference between a riot and a protest. They know the words insurrection and coup.” She even went so far as to suggest darkly that “learning...
    Once upon a time... Los Angeles came this close to having a socialist mayor. In 1911, Job Harriman, a labor lawyer and onetime minister who had run for vice president on the socialist ticket in 1900, won L.A.’s mayoral primary. That was extraordinary in itself, but practically miraculous in a city that was a bloodied battleground between workers and labor organizers, and the anti-labor ferocity of L.A. businessmen in general and one in particular — Harrison Gray Otis, publisher of the L.A. Times, which was known to put “Labor Day” in quotes, and to headline an 1890 Labor Day account, “Immense parades … but no outbreaks or disturbance in any place.” Otis fulminated and crusaded so venomously and brutally against labor unions that a fellow Republican — the good-government governor Hiram Johnson — said that in Southern California, anything that was “disgraceful, depraved, corrupt, crooked and putrescent: that is Harrison Gray Otis.” Otis returned fire. The governor, he said, was a “born mob leader,” and union leaders were “corpse defacers.” Years of a constant churn of newcomers — Midwesterners along...
    “Impeachment: American Crime Story” Actress Sarah Paulson said she regrets wearing extra padding to play Linda Tripp in the FX drama, citing concerns about ‘fatphobia’ in Hollywood. In an Aug. 26 interview with the Los Angeles Times, Paulson talked about her role as Tripp, the White House intern who broke the Monica Lewinsky scandal. Paulson gained 30 pounds to look more like Tripp but was also fitted with several prosthetics, including several pounds of padding, which led to her being criticized online. “There’s a lot of controversy around actors and fat suits, and I think that controversy is a legitimate one,” said Paulson of the criticism, according to the Los Angeles Times. “I think fat phobia is real. I think to pretend otherwise causes further harm. And it is a very important conversation to be had.”(RELATED: ‘Yellowstone’ Releases Chilling New Season 4 Promo) However, Paulson reportedly defended herself, saying that considering characters based on physical appearance is limiting. Sarah Paulson has regrets about playing Linda Tripp. But she’s not ready to let her go https://t.co/OZGjoulXax — Los Angeles Times (@latimes)...
    Doug Smith A 5-year-old boy was being treated Saturday for wounds suffered when he was mauled in his front yard by a juvenile mountain lion roaming the Monte Nido neighborhood in the Santa Monica Mountains. With two other cougars lurking nearby, presumed to be the mother and a sibling, the boy’s mother fought off the attacking animal and, with her husband, drove the child to a nearby hospital, authorities said. He was then transferred to Children’s Hospital in Los Angeles. State wildlife agents responding to the attack fatally shot the cougar. DNA testing confirmed that the dead animal was the one that attacked the boy, Patrick Foy, a spokesman for the California Department of Fish and Wildlife said Saturday. Agents tracked down and tranquilized the other juvenile and subsequently released it after determining it was not involved in the attack, he said. The boy’s name and information about his injuries were not released. The agency completed its investigation of the Thursday morning attack after a rabies test came back negative, he said. Related Articles What is my rat...
    Listen to this episode of The Times: Apple Podcasts Spotify Stitcher Google Podcasts Welcome, new listeners! Here’s one of our favorite episodes from this year, with a brand-new segment at the end. It’s been quite the year for the Los Angeles Public Library — and the COVID-19 pandemic is only part of the story. Inauguration Day cast a national spotlight on Amanda Gorman, who got her start reading poetry via the L.A. Public Library’s youth program. And teen punk group the Linda Lindas gained worldwide fame after a concert at the Cypress Park branch of one of America’s largest public library systems. Today, we talk to L.A. librarian Kevin Awakuni about how the city’s system has become an incubator for making libraries hip. We also get L.A. Times columnist Patt Morrison to explain how a city long dismissed as an intellectual wasteland learned to treasure its libraries in the wake of a devastating fire. After that, an all-new segment: Team USA wheelchair rugby player Chuck Aoki tells us about his road to this year’s Paralympic Games. ...
    LOS ANGELES (CBSLA) — A CDC study of Los Angeles County’s summer surge found that people who were not vaccinated against COVID-19 were nearly 29 times more likely to require hospitalization than people who were fully vaccinated. TORRANCE, CA – JULY 30: Courtney Herron, RN speaks with covid positive patient Jorge Hernandez, 64, an incentive spirometer in the covid unit inside Little Company of Mary Medical Center Friday, July 30, 2021 in Torrance, CA. Today the hospital has 20 covid positive patients. In June they had none. The majority of their covid positive cases are non vaccinated patients. (Francine Orr / Los Angeles Times via Getty Images) The study released this week took a closer look at the more than 43,000 infections reported in Los Angeles County between May 1 and July 25. Of those infections, the vast majority were people who were unvaccinated – 30,801, or 71.4% — particularly among those under the age of 50. More than 25% of those infected were fully vaccinated, and 3% were partially vaccinated. READ MORE: Torrance All-Stars In Must-Win Situation in Little...
    Two Los Angeles County sheriff's deputies are facing a felony charge of falsifying a police report, allegedly to cover up an on-duty assault, the Los Angeles Times reported on Wednesday. Prosecutors say the charges come from a September 2018 incident in East Los Angeles where deputies Woodrow Kim and Jonathan Miramontes responded to a call about multiple suspects in a black BMW threatening someone with a firearm. A car chase ensued with one of the passengers fleeing the vehicle on foot after the pursuit ended at Ruben Salazar Park, according to the Times. Prosecutors said that Kim used the door of his patrol car to knock the fleeing suspect to the ground.  While Kim and Miramontes focused their attention on that passenger, another of the suspects got out of the driver’s side of the BMW and began to open fire on other officers at the scene, according to police records. A shoutout ensued that left the suspect and another passenger in the vehicle dead and two deputies along with a law enforcement technician wounded, the Times reported.  Kim, 39, and Miramontes, 30, are accused of lying in...