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    The Biden administration is again trying to put an end to former President Donald Trump's so-called 'Remain in Mexico' policy combatting illegal immigration after a federal judge ruled last month that the move to end the program was unlawful. The Department of Homeland Security released a statement Wednesday announcing its intent to issue a memorandum terminating the Migrant Protection Protocols (MPP), also known as the 'Remain in Mexico' program. The order, according to the statement, will come in the next few weeks. 'A new memorandum terminating MPP will not take effect until the current injunction is lifted by court order,' the DHS press release reads. 'In issuing a new memorandum terminating MPP, the Department intends to address the concerns raised by the courts with respect to the prior memorandum.' In June 2021, DHS issued a memorandum terminating the MPP that a Texas district court ruled in August violated the law and issued an order requiring the agency to restart the Trump-era program. In another blow to the Biden administration's attempt to shut down the program, the Supreme Court in August...
    Taliban fighters 'were creating as much problems as they could' to prevent Americans, Afghan-Americans and Afghan allies from leaving Afghanistan before the U.S.'s August 31 pull-out.  The Washington Examiner interviewed evacuees who had reached out to Congressional offices to get help fleeing the country, including one Afghan-American citizen who had sought help from the office of Rep. Don Bacon, a Nebraska Republican.   That citizen had been told by the State Department to go to the Interior Ministry for help, only to encounter a Taliban guard who told him, 'Go and tell the State Department to f*** themselves.'    Afghans walk past a Taliban military checkpoint in Kabul, Afghanistan on Thursday. More anecdotes are coming out about how the Taliban 'were creating as much problems as they could' to prevent Americans, Afghan-Americans and Afghan allies from departing the country A group of Taliban fighters patrol in front of the Hamid Karzai International Airport in Kabul on Thursday. Citizens trying to leave the country told Congressional offices that they were fired at and beaten by Taliban fighters  The citizen, his wife and four small...
    A Florida data scientists who claimed that she was fired for refusing to manipulate the state's COVID-19 data never actually had access to the raw information, according to a new report. Rebekah Jones, 31, became the darling of liberal media over the summer when she accused Florida's Republican governor, Ron DeSantis, of attempting to cover up the true scale of the pandemic, and was a frequent face in magazines and on cable news. Jones was fired in May 2020, and described herself as a whistleblower, and set up her own website to rival the Florida Department of Health's - although the two use the same data. On Thursday, however, journalist Charles C.W. Cooke claimed in The National Review that Jones never had access to the raw data that she was allegedly told to manipulate. He said she was simply uploading the information to the website. Jones called Cooke's report part of 'a smear campaign' against her. Rebekah Jones, 31, was fired in mid May 2020 from her job at Florida's Department of Health Jones called The National Review's...
    President Joe Biden said he was not given a head's up that federal agents were going to carry out a raid on Rudy Giuliani's apartment and office in New York City and that he learned about it at the same time as the public.  'I give you my word, I was not,' Biden said told NBC's Craig Melvin at the White House Thursday morning in an interview that will air Friday on the 'Today Show.' 'I made a pledge,' Biden continued. 'I would not interfere in any way — order or try to stop any investigation the Justice Department had in their way. I learned about that last night when the rest of the world learned about it.'  Federal prosecutors have been looking at Giuliani and his work in the Ukraine for nearly 1-1/2 years. Wednesday's morning raid - where Giuliani's electronics were seized - came after prosecutors stepped up their investigation into the former New York City mayor after it was put on hold last summer out of concerns it was too close to the election. And Giuliani's son Andrew...
    Derek Chauvin is placed in handcuffs after being found guilty of murdering George Floyd Court TV via AP, Pool Fall River Police apologized after sharing a response to Derek Chauvin's guilty verdict on Tuesday. "Chauvin immediately stood and calmly placed his hands behind his back," the post read in part. "Imagine if George Floyd had done the same," it continued. Police said that was shared erroneously. Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. A Massachusetts police department apologized after sharing a post on its Facebook page that read: "Derek Chauvin immediately stood and calmly placed his hands behind his back. Imagine where we'd be if George had done the same." The now-deleted Facebook post was shared by the Fall River Police Department in Massachusetts on Tuesday after Chauvin was found guilty of second-degree murder, third-degree murder, and manslaughter in the death of George Floyd. Facebook Icon The letter F. Follow Insider on Facebook The post reshared a screenshot of a tweet reading: "Chauvin immediately stood and calmly placed his hands behind his back. Imagine where we'd be if...
    A Minneapolis police officer monitoring a protest. Stephen Maturen/Getty Images Insider spoke to a former Minneapolis police officer who quit days before Derek Chauvin's trial. He said he believes there will be rioting at the close of the trial, and he feared getting killed. Chauvin's trial over George Floyd's death began March 29, and witnesses have been testifying. Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. A former Minneapolis police officer who quit the department days before the start of Derek Chauvin's trial said he did so fearing there will be riots in the city, no matter the outcome. The officer, a former sergeant, spoke on the condition that he not be named in the article, but his identity is known to Insider. The former officer said he was up for retirement soon, and worried about his safety in what he predicts will be "riots and more destruction" when the jury reaches a verdict, which could happen before the end of the month. Chauvin's trial in Minneapolis began March 29. "If Minnesota had the death penalty and Chauvin got it,...
    President Joe Biden’s nominee to serve in a top State Department post said “fuck the EU” in a leaked 2014 call, causing a diplomatic row at the time with German Chancellor Angela Merkel. Biden’s nominee for undersecretary of state for political affairs, Victoria Nuland, was serving as former President Barack Obama’s assistant secretary for Europe when she used the undiplomatic language during a private phone call with then-U.S. Ambassador to Ukraine Geoffrey Pyatt. Nuland was expressing exasperation that her European counterparts were not doing enough to support Ukraine as it was on the brink of revolution against its former Russian-backed president, Viktor Yanukovych. “So that would be great, I think, to help glue this thing and to have the UN help glue it and, you know, fuck the EU,” Nuland told Pyatt on the call. “No, exactly,” Pyatt responded. “And I think we’ve got to do something to make it stick together because you can be pretty sure that if it does start to gain altitude, that the Russians will be working behind the scenes to torpedo it.” Merkel condemned...
    (CNN)The Justice Department is appealing a court ruling that denied its move to substitute itself for President Donald Trump as the defendant in the defamation lawsuit brought by E Jean Carroll, the former magazine columnist who has accused the President of raping her.The appeal is a sign that the Justice Department is continuing to back Trump in court even after he lost the presidential election. Last month Judge Lewis Kaplan rejected the Justice Department's attempt to replace Trump in the lawsuit. The Justice Department sought to intervene in the case, which, if approved, would have likely led to the dismissal of the case because the government cannot be sued for defamation. Judge denies DOJ effort to end E. Jean Carroll defamation suit against TrumpCarroll sued Trump alleging he defamed her when he denied the rape, said she wasn't his type, and claimed she made the allegation to boost sales of her new book. In his opinion, Kaplan rejected the Justice Department's argument that Trump's statements regarding Carroll were made within the scope of his employment, writing, "while commenting on the...
    Vatican report on disgraced ex U.S. cardinal McCarrick expected this month: sources British grocer Sainsburys is cutting 3,500 jobs and closing more than 80% of Argos stores The Justice Department said armed federal officers can be sent to investigate fraud in state ballot counting, sending a potentially chilling message © Rebecca Cook/Reuters Poll challengers chant "stop the count" outside the door of a ballot counting room in Detroit, Michigan, November 4, 2020. Rebecca Cook/Reuters A Justice Department official has said it is possible for armed federal officers to investigate potential fraud at ballot-counting stations after Election Day, The New York Times reported.  Armed federal officers are barred from being posted during an election, but a top official said this does not mean they cannot be posted after Election Day is over, The Times reported. The message came at a time of high tensions, just before President Donald Trump falsely claimed election victory and hours before his supporters began to gather in protest outside some vote count stations.  One expert told The Times it seemed like a "messaging tactic"...
    Charmaine McGuffey is the first woman to be elected sheriff in Hamilton County, Ohio. Charmaine McGuffey campaign ad A longtime sheriff's office employee in Hamilton County, Ohio, was fired in 2017 and said she believed it was because some didn't like that she was an openly gay woman and a whistleblower. She decided to run against the sheriff who fired her in the Democratic primary and won. Last night she was victorious in the general election, beating out her Republican opponent.  Charmaine McGuffey is now the first woman to be elected sheriff in the county.  Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. Charmaine McGuffey worked for more than three decades in the Hamilton County, Ohio, sheriff's office, eventually being named Major and placed in charge of the jail in 2013.  Four years later, the local Sheriff Jim Neil fired McGuffey following an investigation that alleged she created a "hostile work environment," the Cincinnati Enquirer reported.  McGuffey, though, said she lost her job for being a whistleblower exposing concerns about use of force in the department, and because some...
    An image of Rusten Sheskey shared by the Kenosha Police Department on Facebook in 2014. Facebook/Kenosha Police Department The police officer who shot Jacob Blake was named as Rusten Sheskey by the Wisconsin Department of Justice on Wednesday. Sheskey was made an officer with the Kenosha Police Department on April 1, 2013. Before that he worked as an officer at the University of Wisconsin-Parkside campus. On March 11, 2017, Sheskey was suspended one for one day without pay, after "violating department policies and procedures" to do with vehicles. In a 2019 local news interview, he said of being an officer "you're dealing with people on perhaps the worst day of their lives and you can try and help them... for the most part, people trust us to do that for them." Blake, who was shot seven times by Sheskey on Sunday, is paralyzed from the waist down, his family said. Sheskey has been placed on administrative leave while the investigation continues. Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. The Wisconsin Department of Justice on Wednesday named the police...
    The identity of a man who drowned in a Hudson Valley lake while out boating with friends has been released by police. Brooklyn resident Sydney Joseph, 46, was recovered on Monday, June 29, in Oscawana Lake, located in the town of Putnam Valley, said Putnam County Sheriff Robert L. Langley Jr.  The search for Joseph began around 3:35 p.m., Saturday, June 27, when sheriff's deputies responded to the lake for a report of a potential drowning, the sheriff's department said. When deputies arrived on the scene, members of the Putnam Valley Volunteer Fire Department reported that a man who was on a pontoon boat had entered the water around 3:30 p.m. and had not resurfaced. Earlier Story: Search Ends For Man Who Disappeared Underwater At Lake In Putnam County Members from the Putnam County Sheriff’s Department Marine Unit arrived on the lake and located the pontoon boat which had three men onboard. According to the department, 43-year-old Thomas Muscianisi, whose family had a summer home in Putnam Valley, was the owner of the boat. The other occupants included Queens resident Michael Toledo, 34, of Howard Beach, and...
    Beaches in Los Angeles County will be closed over July 4 weekend to prevent “dangerous crowding that results in the spread of deadly COVID-19,” the county’s public health department said in a Monday statement. Fireworks will also be prohibited, the county said.  The closure begins just after midnight on July 3, and ends July 6 at 5:00 a.m., the department said. It applies to all public beaches, piers, public beach parking lots, beach bike paths that cross sanded parts of the beach and beach access points.  The decision does not apply to nearby Long Beach, which has its own health department, the statement said.   The announcement comes as LA County reported more than 2,900 new cases of the coronavirus on Monday, “the single largest one-day case count since the pandemic began,” according to the department.  “Data show increases in people testing positive for the virus and increases in hospitalizations as a result,” the department said. “Projections by the Department of Health Services show a marked increase in hospitalizations in the coming weeks, which could cause a surge in our...
    VATICAN CITY (Reuters) - Vatican police on Tuesday raided the department in charge of maintenance and restoration at St. Peter's Basilica, seizing documents and computers for an investigation into suspected corruption. The raid was similar to one last October that involved another investigation into a separate department over the purchase of a building in a posh area of London. A statement from the Vatican press office said the material was seized from the technical and administrative offices of the Fabbrica di San Pietro. It traces its origins to the 15th century, even before construction of the current basilica began. Vatican magistrates ordered the raid following a tip from the office of the general auditor, the statement said, without giving details. It said Pope Francis appointed a commissioner to run the department temporarily. The commissioner was tasked with reorganising the department and updating its statutes in the wake of a June 1 papal document that introduced sweeping new rules for procurement and spending to reduce the risk of corruption in awarding contracts.. The statement specifically mentioned the new rules, which suggested...
    Beaches in Los Angeles County will be closed over July 4 weekend to prevent "dangerous crowding that results in the spread of deadly COVID-19," the county's public health department said in a Monday statement. Fireworks will also be prohibited, the county said.  The closure begins just after midnight on July 3, and ends July 6 at 5:00 a.m., the department said. It applies to all public beaches, piers, public beach parking lots, beach bike paths that cross sanded parts of the beach and beach access points.  The decision does not apply to nearby Long Beach, which has its own health department, the statement said.   Get Breaking News Delivered to Your Inbox The announcement comes as LA County reported more than 2,900 new cases of the coronavirus on Monday, "the single largest one-day case count since the pandemic began," according to the department.  "Data show increases in people testing positive for the virus and increases in hospitalizations as a result," the department said. "Projections by the Department of Health Services show a marked increase in hospitalizations in the coming...
    Los Angeles is shutting its beaches for the holiday weekend around Independence Day as the number of new coronavirus cases spikes, county officials said Monday.  Beaches will be closed to all recreational activities from July 3 through July 6 at 5 a.m. to prevent crowding that could spread coronavirus. The county is also prohibiting fireworks displays over the holiday weekend, officials said.  “Closing the beaches and prohibiting fireworks displays during this important summer holiday weekend was an incredibly difficult decision to make, but it’s the responsible decision to protect public health and protect our residents from a deadly virus,”  Barbara Ferrer, director of Public Health, said in the announcement. “The Fourth of July holiday weekend typically means large crowds and gatherings to celebrate, a recipe for increased transmission of COVID-19,” she added.  The Los Angeles County public health department announced more than 2,9000 new COVID-19 cases Monday, the largest single one-day case country since the start of the pandemic. The health department said its projections show a marked increase in hospitalizations in the coming weeks which could cause a surge...
    Connecticut firefighters had to rescue a man who was helping a friend move into a 177-year-old house and fell down an abandoned water well hidden under floorboards in one of the rooms. “Yup you read that correctly,” the Guilford police said on Facebook in reporting on the incident, which took place Sunday. “The house was built in 1843 and this well was most likely outside at the time. There was a renovation and addition in 1981. At some point this well was covered with simple wood flooring and no subfloor or well cap.” CONNECTICUT POLICE, WIFE SAVE MAN WHO FELL INTO WATER WHILE CRABBING AND ALMOST SWEPT INTO PIPE Connecticut firefighters rescued a man who had fallen down a 30-foot well that was underneath a sub floor in a house built in the late 1800’s. (Guilford Police Department) “While the new tenant was moving into the home today, a friend fell through the floor into the abyss of a 20-30 foot well, splashing into extremely cold water that was well over the victim’s head,” police said. The Guilford Police Department...
    HONOLULU (AP) — The Honolulu police chief does not agree with all of the proposed changes expected to pass in upcoming state Legislature police reform bills, she said. Chief Susan Ballard said she does not believe all the measures required to comply with a presidential executive order are necessary at the Honolulu Police Department, The Honolulu Star-Advertiser reported Sunday. President Donald Trump signed an executive order June 16 that he said would encourage better police practices. Trump’s order would establish a database tracking police officers with excessive use-of-force complaints in their records. Calls for police reform are “a knee-jerk reaction for things that are going on on the mainland,” Ballard said during a June 17 meeting with the Honolulu Police Commission. Ballard said she does not favor measures such as requiring the naming of officers who are suspended or terminated for misdeeds. “We’re not perfect, but when we realize our mistakes we’re going to take action," Ballard said. "The nation is behind, but can you at least leave the 50th state alone? We’re kind of doing OK here.” Ballard condemned...
    NORFOLK, Va. (AP) — Protestors are demanding a Virginia city’s police department release use-of-force reports from the past decade. Demonstrators in Norfolk are planning a sit-in set for Monday night at City Hall to protest the police department’s refusal to release the records, news outlets said. The protest comes after reports by The Virginian-Pilot that the city and the Norfolk Police Department have denied information requests about the reports. Under Virginia law, Norfolk police can choose whether to make the records public, WAVY-TV reported. Tyler Woodard, a protest organizer, told the newspaper that demonstrators are calling for greater transparency from the department. “We don’t particularly see a reason why you can’t tell people why force is being used, to what degree, how often and by who,” Woodard said. Nearly 50 people were planning to attend the demonstration scheduled to begin at 7 p.m. Woodard said organizers emailed police but did not receive a response. Copyright 2020 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed. Tags: Virginia
    Seattle police said Monday officers are investigating a shooting near the area protesters are calling the Capitol Hill Organized Protest, or CHOP. Two males suffering gunshot wounds arrived at Harborview Medical Center’s Emergency Department. They are both in critical condition, Susan Gregg, a hospital spokeswoman, told Fox News. The first male arrived at about 6:15 a.m. (ET) by private vehicle followed by the second male about 15 minutes later via Seattle Fire Department medics. The Seattle Police Department said officers were investigating a shooting near 12 Avenue and Pike Street, where two people were reported injured. That corner is about two blocks away from Cal Anderson Park, where protesters initially camped out in tents to occupy the area first referred to as the Capitol Hill Autonomous Zone. The encampment has become more difficult to manage, drawing violence and a large homeless population since the onset of the occupation three weeks ago. Organizers on Sunday said they’re seeking to move into the abandoned East Precinct, where most protest leadership have already taken up shelter, as part of an...
    An NYPD lieutenant who blew the whistle on police corruption is now running for city council — the first active-duty cop in recent history to vie for the elected position.   Lt. Edwin Raymond, 34, of Brooklyn North told The Post he hopes he can use his 12 years on the force to help the bridge the gap between lawmakers and cops when it comes to reform. “I understand the mentality and the psyche of police officers enough to tailor the message in a way that they’ll be receptive,” Raymond said. “Many cops are unable to separate themselves as individuals from the department as an entity. So when you criticize the department, they just feel personally attacked and they shut down, and they get defensive.” Raymond, who is running to replace term-limited Councilman Mathieu Eugene in Brooklyn’s 40th district and aims to make the changes to the force that he couldn’t as a cop. As a black Brooklyn native who has worked on the force, Raymond says he’s had a “front-row seat to all of the detriments.” The lieutenant and...
    DENVER (AP) — Police in Denver have apprehended three suspects in connection with an attempt to set fire to the pedestal of a Civil War statue that was toppled last week, authorities announced Sunday. About 75 protesters had been demonstrating peacefully around the Capitol late Saturday night when a small group broke off and went to the statue site, a Colorado State Patrol spokesperson told KUSA_TV. Just before 11 p.m. a fire was set atop the mostly concrete pedestal using wood and other materials. the spokesperson said. The Denver Fire Department extinguished the blaze within about 20 minutes, and the damage was minimal. Gov. Jared Polis said three suspects were later apprehended. They included a 22-year-old who was being held on suspicion of second-degree arson, according to the Denver Police Department. “We hope this also provides a breakthrough into other ongoing investigations regarding destruction of public property,” Polis said in a statement. “There is a right way and a wrong way to have an open and honest conversation about our history. Destruction and vandalism are not the answer.” The statue,...
    LOS ANGELES, California – An eight-month pregnant woman lost her baby in a two-vehicle accident in Santa Ana while the driver of the other vehicle fled the scene on foot, police said Saturday. A car speeding west on First Street hit another car going east on the same street and turned left on Lacy Street on Friday at approximately 9:46 p.m., the report said. Santa Ana Police Department. The driver of the high-speed vehicle left the scene on foot, before the arrival of the police. Authorities did not release a description of the vehicle or the suspect. Three people were transferred to an area hospital. “One of the injured passengers, who was eight months pregnant, underwent emergency surgery,” according to a press release. “During surgery, the fetus was declared dead as a result of the collision.” The conditions of the other two people were not immediately disclosed. Police said investigators are working to determine if alcohol played a role in the crash and believe speed was a factor in the collision. The Santa Ana Police Department Collision Investigation...
    Tehama County sheriff’s officials on Sunday identified the suspect in a shooting the day before at a Walmart distribution center in Red Bluff that killed one person and injured several others before the man was fatally shot by police. The suspect, Louis Lane, 31, of Redding, was a former employee of the distribution center who was fired in February 2019 after he failed to show up for a shift, according to the sheriff’s department, which is handling the investigation. Authorities said they are still investigating a possible motive for the shooting but said they believe Lane acted alone. Lane was killed after engaging Red Bluff police officers in a gun battle in the parking lot, officials said. The shooting unfolded within six chaotic minutes that began shortly after 3:30 p.m. Saturday at the Walmart distribution center on Highway 99, the sheriff’s department said in a news release. Lane allegedly circled the parking lot four times in a white SUV and then crashed his vehicle into the lobby of the building. As the SUV caught fire, he exited holding a semiautomatic...
    REHOBOTH BEACH, Del. (AP) — A police officer in Delaware has been fired for what the department called an “inappropriate, racially based” social media post. The Rehoboth Beach department announced the seasonal officer's firing in a news release Saturday night, The News Journal reported. Lt. Jaime Riddle, Rehoboth Beach police’s public information officer, said the department would not share the post’s image or text or the identity of the fired officer. In explaining the decision, Riddle said the department “will not amplify this type of unprofessional and discourteous behavior.” Police became aware of the post Saturday afternoon when alerted by “internal law enforcement resources," according to the news release. Copyright 2020 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed. Tags: Delaware, Maryland
    Charles Stotts and Kacey White, the owners of a historic restaurant in Minneapolis that was burned down by rioters, told “Fox & Friends Weekend” on Sunday that they are “not even close” to rebuilding their business. “We did not own the building, we were tenants of the building so we don't have a say of what gets rebuilt there and if the landlord that rebuilds wants another restaurant in there or not, but that area is, I would say, years out from being rebuilt,” White, the owner of Town Talk Diner & Gastropub, said on Sunday. “They have not begun demolition or removal of anything yet in that area,” she said. White made the comments two days after Minneapolis City Council members voted unanimously to amend the city's charter to remove the mandate for a police department – the first step toward disbanding it in the wake of George Floyd’s death. The amendment proposes the city replace the police department with a Department of Community Safety and Violence Prevention, “which will have responsibility for public safety services prioritizing a holistic, public health-oriented approach,” a draft of the amendment said. The proposal adds that...
    SPRINGFIELD, Ill. (AP) — Every baby newly born in Illinois will be tested for Spinal Muscular Atrophy starting Monday, state health officials said. The Illinois Department of Public Health said Spinal Muscular Atrophy, known as SMA, is a group of hereditary diseases that destroys motor neurons over time and leads to muscle weakness and atrophy. “It is the number one genetic cause of death for infants," said Dr. Ngozi Ezike, director of the department. “Early diagnosis of babies with SMA can lead to potentially life-saving interventions. By screening every baby born in Illinois, we hope to identify cases early so therapy can begin as soon as possible.” The department said SMA affects about 1 in 11,000 births. Officials said the early screening can let treatment begin before an infant begins to show symptoms. Federal authorities in 2018 added SMA to its list of recommended conditions that newborns be screened for. Illinois officials said it took some time to purchase new equipment, develop test methods and alter computer systems to provide laboratory results. Copyright 2020 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This...
    The Department of Homeland Security has warned that the United States could see a shortage of generic pharmaceutical drugs if the coronavirus outbreak continues.  According to the report, obtained by ABC News, the department said the country is already seeing shortages of more than 200 drugs and medical supplies due to strains caused by international shutdowns during the pandemic.    Officials concluded that if the outbreak forces another round of widespread shutdowns, many US-based pharmaceutical companies would be 'unable to quickly offset'. 'Chinese factories that produce raw ingredients for common antibiotics closed for weeks as of March and India's lockdown extended until the end of May,' the report said. The Department of Homeland Security has warned that the United States could see a shortage of generic pharmaceutical drugs if the coronavirus outbreak continues According to officials, 'France, Germany, and China have also considered re-imposing lockdown measures as COVID-19 cases have begun to re-emerge'. The report was released as US officials scramble to curb the virus in big states like Texas, Arizona and Florida, where thousands of new cases are reported...
    Three members of the Minneapolis City Council have been provided with a private security detail after receiving death threats for supporting proposals to defend the city’s police department in the wake of George Floyd’s killing. A city spokesperson said the private security details ordered for council members Andrea Jenkins, Phillipe Cunningham and Alondra Cano have cost taxpayers $63,000 over the past three weeks – a rate of $4,300 per day. News of the arrangement surfaced Friday, the same day the council voted 12-0 to abolish the Minneapolis Police Department, initiating steps toward establishing ‘peace officers’ and a new ‘holistic’ approach to public safety. The police force, which is largely white, has failed to regain the city’s trust after the death of Floyd. The new proposal would eliminate the existing police department and instead create a ‘department of community safety and violence prevention’. While the measures have been welcomed by those protesting in the city’s streets and calling for the department to be ‘defunded’, many of the council members said they have received death threats from ‘white nationalists’ for publicly backing...
    MINNEAPOLIS, MINNESOTA - The Minneapolis City Council on Friday unanimously advanced a proposal to change the city charter to allow the police department to be dismantled, following widespread criticism of law enforcement over the killing of George Floyd. The 12-0 vote is just the first step in a process that faces significant bureaucratic obstacles to make the November ballot, where the city’s voters would have the final say. It also comes amid a spate of recent shootings in Minnesota’s largest city that have heightened many citizens’ concerns about talk of dismantling the department. The proposed amendment, which would replace the police department with a new “Department of Community Safety and Violence Prevention” that has yet to be fully defined, next goes to a policy committee and to the city’s Charter Commission for a formal review, at which point citizens and city officials can weigh in. “I hope that the Charter Commission will recognize the moment that we are in and take our offer of support, however we can provide it, to expedite this process so that voters have a chance...
              MINNEAPOLIS, Minnesota (AP) — The Minneapolis City Council on Friday unanimously approved a proposal to change the city charter to allow the police department to be dismantled, following widespread criticism of law enforcement over the killing of George Floyd. The 12-0 vote is just the first step in a process that faces significant bureaucratic obstacles to make the November ballot, where the city’s voters would have the final say. And it came amid a spate of recent shootings in Minnesota’s largest city that have heightened many citizens’ concerns about talk of dismantling the department. The proposed amendment next goes to a policy committee and to the city’s Charter Commission for a formal review, at which point citizens and city officials can also weigh in. “I hope that the Charter Commission will recognize the moment that we are in and take our offer of support, however we can provide it, to expedite this process so that voters have a chance to have their voices heard on this important question and this important moment in...
    RICHMOND, Va. (AP) — The interim police chief in Richmond, Virginia, has resigned after 11 days on the job and a new chief has been named to fill his role. News outlets report Interim Richmond Police Chief William Blackwell announced his resignation in an email to Richmond police officers Friday. Richmond Mayor Levar Stoney’s office then said the mayor had appointed Deputy Chief Gerald Smith of the Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police Department in Charlotte, North Carolina, as the department’s new police chief. The mayor’s office said Blackwell has asked to return to his previous position as a major within the department. Copyright © 2020 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, written or redistributed.
    By SCOTT SONNER, Associated Press RENO, Nev. (AP) — Nevada ended a two-year legal battle Friday with the U.S. Energy Department over the secret shipment of weapons grade plutonium to a site near Las Vegas. Nevada said it would drop its lawsuit after the federal government agreed to remove the radioactive material already trucked there and abandon any future plans to send more. The settlement agreement was disclosed in court papers filed in U.S. District Court in Reno and signed by Nevada Attorney General Aaron Ford and lawyers for the U.S. Justice Department. Gov. Steve Sisolak said in a statement it was a significant victory in the effort to “keep weapons grade material out of our state.” Nevada said the shipment of one-half metric ton (600 pounds) of the plutonium over its objections from the Savannah River Site in South Carolina in 2018 amounted to a “secret plutonium smuggling operation.” The U.S. government argued secrecy was necessitated by national security concerns. Details of the settlement were not disclosed in the court filing. But the statement released by Sisolak and Ford...
    RENO, Nev. (AP) — Nevada ended a two-year legal battle Friday with the U.S. Energy Department over the secret shipment of weapons grade plutonium to a site near Las Vegas. Nevada said it would drop its lawsuit after the federal government agreed to remove the radioactive material already trucked there and abandon any future plans to send more. The settlement agreement was disclosed in court papers filed in U.S. District Court in Reno and signed by Nevada Attorney General Aaron Ford and lawyers for the U.S. Justice Department. Gov. Steve Sisolak said in a statement it was a significant victory in the effort to “keep weapons grade material out of our state.” Nevada said the shipment of one-half metric ton (600 pounds) of the plutonium over its objections from the Savannah River Site in South Carolina in 2018 amounted to a “secret plutonium smuggling operation.” The U.S. government argued secrecy was necessitated by national security concerns. Details of the settlement were not disclosed in the court filing. But the statement released by Sisolak and Ford said the Energy Department will...
    The mayor of Philadelphia and the city's police department have apologized to the public and announced they will ban the use of tear gas after cops were seen spraying dozens of peaceful protesters trapped on a highway during a demonstration earlier this month.   Mayor Jim Kenney spoke out against the city's response to the June 1 protest after video footage emerged showing law enforcement use gas, bean bags and pepper spray to disperse crowds on the Interstate 676.  'Members of the department made decisions on use-of-force that were completely unacceptable,' he said in a news conference on Thursday.  Police Commissioner Danielle Outlaw also admitted that initial statements supporting officers' actions were 'inaccurate.'   'I have now personally viewed video evidence that largely contradicts the material portions of those statements,' she said.  Video footage emerged showing law enforcement use gas, bean bags and pepper spray to disperse crowds on the Interstate 676 on June 1  Protesters became trapped by SWAT team officers on both sides, many unable to retreat to an on-ramp, clambering to get up a steep embankment then over...
    By MICHELLE LIU, Associated Press/Report for America COLUMBIA, S.C. (AP) — A Black man who was shot in the back of the head during a traffic stop in South Carolina last fall is suing the Columbia Police Department, the city and the officer. Attorneys for Sir Brandon Legette, 29, filed a complaint in federal court Friday morning alleging the officer, Sean Rollins, used unjustified force when he shot Legette near a grocery store parking lot during the early hours of Aug. 24. A 76-second clip of body camera footage released by attorneys shows Legette lying stomach-down against the center console of his car, with Rollins above him inside the vehicle. The video shows Rollins striking Legette twice in the head and then shooting Legette once. The police department previously said Legette ignored multiple commands to exit his Dodge SUV, and accelerated away with one officer partly inside the car. Authorities said the officer was being dragged and shot Legette while trying to get him to stop the vehicle. In stills from dashboard camera footage shown to reporters Friday, the officer...
    JACKSON, Miss. (AP) — The Mississippi Department of Health announced an additional 550 confirmed cases of the new coronavirus Friday, after record-high numbers reported the day before. Officials announced 1,092 new cases of coronavirus Thursday. State Health Officer Dr. Thomas Dobbs warned then of continuing days of increases if people do not take social distancing and mask-wearing seriously. “If we’re not careful, Mississippi is going to look like New York at the height of the pandemic,” Dobbs said at a press briefing. The Department of Health reported six confirmed deaths of coronavirus and 87 outbreaks in long-term care facilities Friday, based on numbers reported Thursday night. The Mississippi Health Department said Friday that Mississippi — with a population of about 3 million — has had at least 25,066 cases and 1,022 deaths from the coronavirus as of Thursday evening. The Health Department said at least 2,514 cases of the virus have been confirmed in long-term care facilities such as nursing homes, with at least 507 virus-related deaths in those facilities. For most people, the coronavirus causes mild or moderate symptoms,...
    COLUMBIA, S.C. (AP) — A Black man who was shot in the back of the head during a traffic stop in South Carolina last fall is suing the Columbia Police Department, the city and the officer. Attorneys for Sir Brandon Legette, 29, filed a complaint in federal court Friday morning alleging the officer, Sean Rollins, used unjustified force when he shot Legette near a grocery store parking lot during the early hours of Aug. 24. A 76-second clip of body camera footage released by attorneys shows Legette lying stomach-down against the center console of his car, with Rollins above him inside the vehicle. The video shows Rollins striking Legette twice in the head and then shooting Legette once. The police department previously said Legette ignored multiple commands to exit his Dodge SUV, and accelerated away with one officer partly inside the car. Authorities said the officer was being dragged and shot Legette while trying to get him to stop the vehicle. In stills from dashboard camera footage shown to reporters Friday, the officer appeared to be entirely inside the car...
    (CNN)The Minneapolis City Council on Friday officially moved to dismantle its police force and replace it with a department of community safety and violence prevention in the wake of the police killing of George Floyd. The unanimous vote approving a proposed charter amendment represents a first step in a complicated process that includes a review by a public commission before the measure could ultimately end up in the hands of voters at the November ballot. "No singular action is going to undo longstanding systemic oppression, racial oppression," said council member Jeremiah Ellison. Four weeks after George Floyds death, an embattled police union finally speaks out"This is one action of many that we need to take on the road to a more equitable and just system that keeps people safe."The proposed change to the charter also faces a review by a council policy and oversight committee next month. The charter commission has at least 60 days to review and make a recommendation to the council. Read MoreThe statutory deadline for submitting questions on the November 3 ballot is August 21,...
    THE terrorism threat from white supremacist groups is "on the rise" after a year of high-profile attacks across the globe, the State Department has warned. The threat of "racially or ethnically motivated terrorism, particularly white supremacist terrorism" remains a challenge globally, according to the department's 2019 report on terrorism. 1 The State Department said the threat of white supremacy terrorism is "on the rise"Credit: Getty Images - Getty The department said the high-profile 2019 attacks - including the shooting at a mosque in Christchurch, New Zealand in March, the shooting in an El Paso, Texas, Walmart last summer, and a shooting in a synagogue in Halle, Germany last fall - continue a troubling trend that began in 2015. The counter terrorism bureau has increased its efforts to combat racially/ethnically motivated terrorism as violence seems to be both "on the rise and spreading geographically," it added. Targets of these white supremacist groups can include "immigrants; Jewish, Muslim, and other religious minorities; lesbian, gay bisexual, transgender and/or intersex (LGBTI) individuals; governments; and other perceived enemies," according to the department. "The CT Bureau...
    HARRISBURG, Pa. (AP) — Pennsylvania health officials are looking closely at areas where COVID-19 infection rates and deaths are ticking back up, threatening to turn back progress against the pandemic, the state’s health secretary said Friday. “We are doing quote-unquote a deep dive into all of the counties that have had increases,” Dr. Rachel Levine said, warning that “community spread” is occurring in some parts of the state. The rise may be attributable to the gradual reopening that has been taking place in Pennsylvania, as well as more extensive testing, Levine said. Cases are on the rise in Allegheny County, which reported 61 new confirmed infections Friday, its second-highest total. Meanwhile, Gov. Tom Wolf’s administration will allow Lebanon County, the 67th and final county, to move from the yellow phase to the less-restrictive green phase in one week, Levine said. In Lebanon County, the commissioners voted 2-1 to reopen without the governor’s OK, and the heavily agricultural area in south-central Pennsylvania was held back when other hard-hit areas were allowed this week to move to green, the least restrictive phase...
    TRENTON, N.J. (CBSNewYork/AP) – New Jersey’s Department of Corrections has taken steps to remove an officer seen on video with a group of people apparently mocking George Floyd protesters in Franklin Township. The department said it filed removal proceedings against the officer Thursday. Cellphone video captured a group of men yelling at protesters as they marched in the street earlier this month. One man was seen kneeling on another man’s neck. One of the counter-protesters was later identified as a corrections officer, and he was suspended without pay. On Thursday, the DOC tweeted that the officer “was placed on non-pay status pending a due process hearing as part of the regular procedure for government unionized employees.” Update: Removal charges have been served on the DOC officer involved in the video mocking the killing of George Floyd. The Officer was placed on non-pay status pending a due process hearing as part of the regular procedure for government unionized employees. https://t.co/wcESQscFzA — NJ Department of Corrections (@NJ_DOC) June 23, 2020 The union identified the officer as Joseph DeMarco and said he...
    By STEVE KARNOWSKI and AMY FORLITI MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — The Minneapolis City Council on Friday unanimously approved a proposal to change the city charter to allow the police department to be dismantled, following widespread criticism of law enforcement over the killing of George Floyd. The 12-0 vote is just the first step in a process that faces significant bureaucratic obstacles to make the November ballot, where the city’s voters would have the final say. And it came amid a spate of recent shootings in Minnesota’s largest city that have heightened many citizens’ concerns about talk of dismantling the department. The proposed amendment next goes to a policy committee and to the city’s Charter Commission for a formal review, at which point citizens and city officials can also weigh in. “I hope that the Charter Commission will recognize the moment that we are in and take our offer of support, however we can provide it, to expedite this process so that voters have a chance to have their voices heard on this important question and this important moment in our city’s...
    Minneapolis City Council members voted unanimously to amend the city's charter Friday to remove the mandate for a police department-- the first step toward disbanding it in the wake of George Floyd's death. The amendment proposes the city replace the police department with a Department of Community Safety and Violence Prevention, “which will have responsibility for public safety services prioritizing a holistic, public health-oriented approach,” a draft of the amendment said. MINNEAPOLIS NEIGHBORHOOD THAT VOWED NOT TO CALL POLICE IN WAKE OF FLOYD DEATH IS ALREADY BEING TESTED BY 300-STRONG HOMELESS ENCAMPMENT The proposal adds that the director of the new agency would have “non-law-enforcement experience in community safety services, including but not limited to public health and/or restorative justice approaches.” It also suggests setting up a division of licensed peace officers, who would answer to the department's director. Although the amendment received a 12-0 vote from council members, it faces an uphill battle as it makes its way past a policy committee and to the city’s Charter Commission for a formal review, at which point citizens and city officials can...
    A Russian ransomware group whose leaders were indicted by the Justice Department in December is retaliating against the U.S. government, many of America’s largest companies and a major news organization, identifying employees working from home during the pandemic and attempting to get inside their networks with malware intended to cripple their operations. Sophisticated new attacks by the hacking group — which the Treasury Department claims has at times worked for Russian intelligence — were identified in recent days by Symantec Corp., a division of Broadcom, one of the many firms that monitors corporate and government networks. In an urgent warning issued Thursday night, the company reported that Russian hackers had exploited the sudden change in American work habits to inject code into corporate networks with a speed and breadth not previously witnessed. Ransomware allows the hackers to demand that companies pay millions to have access to their own data restored. While ransomware has long been a concern for U.S. officials, after devastating attacks on the cities of Atlanta and Baltimore and towns across Texas and Florida, it has taken on...
    William Barr believes certain social media companies are “censoring” conservative voices and in a recent interview, the attorney general said he’s looking at ways to bring antitrust charges against those firms. Harry Litman of the Los Angeles Times reported on Thursday that Barr sat down for an interview on Fox News where he talked about a number of goals he has for his Justice Department. Among those goals was to find a way to take down Internet companies that he feels have an anti-Republican bias. Litman said Barr is picking up the “bitter but unsubstantiated” criticism by President Donald Trump of companies like Facebook and Twitter. The reporter said the attorney general is determined to “rattle the saber” of the department’s antitrust division at Silicon Valley in general. In particular, Google is another company that Barr is reportedly taking aim at. Litman reported that various news agencies are hearing the Department of Justice is already drafting an antitrust complaint against Google. It’s also interviewing lawyers to try the case after just a year of investigation. The writer said in the...
    By Diane Bartz and Paresh Dave WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The U.S. Justice Department is seeking the final documents to complete an antitrust investigation of Alphabet Inc's Google , said three sources familiar with the probe, which is expected to end with a lawsuit this summer. State attorneys general have separate probes into Google, and the U.S. House of Representatives Judiciary Committee has ongoing investigations into Google, Amazon.com Inc , Facebook Inc and Apple Inc . The department has requested information by the end of June from companies concerned about Google's abuse of its advertising clout, as well as those with data that could be used to support a complaint against Google, the sources said, noting that the deadline could be extended. They did not say what the complaint would allege. Justice Department officials and some state attorneys general will hold a virtual meeting on Friday to discuss the probe, a person briefed on the matter said. Google, which provides free web searches, email and other services, makes money through advertising. Google controls a third of the world's online...