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    PHILADELPHIA (AP) — Prosecutors ask US Supreme Court to revive case against Bill Cosby, months after his conviction was overturned. Copyright © 2021 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, written or redistributed.
    An ex-con out on parole after being convicted on weapons charges - and out on bail after another illegal firearm rap - was arrested after allegedly shooting a 13-year-old boy in the neck as the teen walked to catch a train to school in the Bronx. The shooting occurred around 7:30 am  on Tuesday near 928 East 233rd Street and Bronxwood Avenue in Wakefield, and left police officials fuming over the revolving-door justice system in the crime-plagued city.       The boy miraculously is expected to recover after a quick-thinking neighbor had heard the gunshot and immediately called 911, according to FOX5 New York. 'One inch to the side & this is a very different story,' NYPD Commissioner Dermot Shea tweeted about Tuesday morning's incident.    The alleged gunman, 36-year-old Hubert Wiggs, was on parole for a 2010 firearms and illegal drug conviction as well as being out on bail for possession of an illegal firearm charge he received in 2019.    'So this individual today is on the street while on parole for a firearm, while out on bail for another firearm,' NYPD Assistant...
    A judge has thrown out a Staten Island man's 2018 conviction after his lawyers argued that body camera video appears to show an NYPD officer planting marijuana in a vehicle where the defendant was a passenger.  Staten Island Criminal Court Judge Tamiko Amaker on Friday vacated Jason Serrano's guilty plea, citing the potentially incriminating video and the arresting officers' disciplinary records.  Serrano was riding in a friend's SUV in March 2018 when the vehicle was pulled over by officers Kyle Erickson and Elmer Pastran.  During the traffic stop, the officers claimed to have found marijuana inside the vehicle. Serrano, who at the time was recovering from a stab wound, was charged with drug possession, resisting arrest, and obstructing governmental administration. A Staten Island judge on Friday threw out Jason Serrano's guilty plea to a charge of resisting arrest stemming from a March 2018 traffic stop that was caught on body camera video  Serrano was driving as a passenger in a friend's car after undergoing surgery for a stab wound (pictured) when two NYPD officers pulled them over for having a...
    Derek Chauvin, the disgraced Minneapolis cop convicted of murdering George Floyd, may regain his freedom sooner than expected, after another officer from the same department had a homicide conviction scrapped last month. Former Minneapolis officer Mohamed Noor, 36, was initially convicted of third-degree murder and manslaughter in the 2017 shooting of Justine Ruszczyk Damond, an unarmed, dual U.S.-Australian citizen and yoga teacher who was engaged to be married, and was sentenced to 12 years in prison in 2019.  She was shot dead after running up to Noor after calling 911 to report what she feared was a rape happening nearby, with the cop later convicted of her killing.  However, that sentence was tossed in September of this year, after Noor's lawyers argued that the third-degree murder charge did not fit the then officer's crime, citing a technicality concerning the specific wording of Noor's murder charge. Legal experts now fear that precedent could be used to challenge Chauvin's April 2021 conviction for the second-degree murder of Floyd in May 2020.   Minneapolis cops Derek Chauvin, 45, and Mohammed Noor, 36, were both convicted of murder...
    Alan Turing's nephew has claimed the idea that his code-breaker uncle was 'hounded to death by the state' and took his own life because he was convicted for being gay is all part of a long-standing myth.  Dermot Turing also suggested that he was not a 'great codebreaker' who was essential to Bletchley Park, as portrayed in the hit 2014 film The Imitation Game starring Benedict Cumberbatch and Keira Knightley.  In the film, Turing was struggling to cope mentally following his conviction for 'homosexual offences' in 1952 before killing himself two years later.   But his nephew says that evidence shows his 'mood had lifted' in the two years after his trial as he completed projects with enthusiasm. The Imitation Game also show Turing desperately battling to crack codes at Bletchley Park during much of World War Two, while in reality he had left the famous code-cracking HQ by 1939, at the beginning of the war.   These two defining features of the movie, among others, have come under fire from his nephew who said such portrayals only help to perpetuate myths and that...
    Camp Lejeune, North Carolina (CNN)A Marine who was found guilty after posting a series of videos on social media criticizing top military leaders' handling of the US withdrawal from Afghanistan received a sentence of one month forfeiture of $5,000 in pay and a direction to receive a letter of reprimand from a military judge on Friday. Marine Corps Judge Col. Glen Hines said he was considering giving Lt. Col. Stuart Scheller two months of docked pay but decided to limit it to one month because Scheller spent nine days in pre-trial confinement, known as the brig, at Camp Lejeune in North Carolina.The judge handed down the sentence from a military courtroom at Camp Lejeune.On Thursday, Hines found Scheller guilty after he entered guilty pleas to all five charges he faced -- including "contempt towards officials," "disrespect toward superior commissioned officers" and "failure to obey order or regulation" -- after videos of Scheller criticizing military leaders about their handling of the withdrawal went viral.Scheller appeared relaxed in the military courtroom on Friday morning. He was chatting with his attorneys and his...
    BALTIMORE, Md. (AP) — Kirk Bloodsworth, who was exonerated nearly three decades ago after serving almost nine years in prison in Maryland, including two on death row, was awarded a little more than $400,000 by the state Board of Public Works on Wednesday as part of a new system to compensate those who are wrongly convicted and imprisoned. Bloodsworth, 60, who was convicted of rape and murder in 1985 and exonerated through DNA evidence nine years later, is the first to receive payment from the state under a new law, enacted in July, that allows an administrative law judge to decide whether an exoneree is eligible to receive compensation. The legislation stipulates that payments should equal the state’s annual median income, averaged over five years, for each year someone was wrongly incarcerated. The measure also includes a provision that allows exonerees, like Bloodsworth, who received compensation on or before July 1, 2005, to ask for additional compensation from the state. The legislation was one of several bills passed this year in which lawmakers examined the state’s criminal justice system with...
    If Dog The Bounty Hunter were to find fugitive Brian Laundrie, he wouldn't be able to arrest or detain him or he'd run the risk of being charged with kidnapping, DailyMail.com can reveal.  That's because Dog, whose real name is Duane Chapman, is not actually licensed as a bounty hunter or private investigator in Florida - or anywhere else that DailyMail.com has found - making his hunt for Laundrie potentially dicey as he's legally banned from arresting or holding anyone against their will. According to professional Florida bounty hunters, there is no legal difference between Dog or any citizen who decides to join the search for Laundrie, whose girlfriend Gabby Petito was found murdered on September 19 in a secluded part of Teton County, Wyoming. And making a citizen's arrest is verboten - unless you catch the offender in the act of committing a crime.  Dog The Bounty Hunter joined the manhunt for Brian Laundrie last month and has mainly been searching a Florida camp site. DailyMail.com can reveal that Dog, real name Duane Chapman, cannot arrest or hold anyone against...
    It was an unusual plea for leniency. The once-prominent civil rights lawyer Steve Yagman did not deserve prison, his numerous supporters told a federal court judge — even as they recited his manifest flaws: self-righteousness, arrogance and a messianic adherence to ideals others were too weak to live by. “He alienated, possibly intentionally, all those that he thought were not making their way in life according to his beliefs,” wrote one backer, a former FBI agent who summed up the supplicant’s character as “abrasive, argumentative and obnoxious.” Who was this lawyer whose prime virtue — a selfless dedication to the defenseless and downtrodden — could best be seen through a screen of negatives? Yagman had tormented public officials for three decades with legal attacks on police abuse and government overreach. Column One A showcase for compelling storytelling from the Los Angeles Times. More stories Over a career that made headlines for landmark victories such as a six-figure judgment, later reversed, against LAPD Chief Daryl Gates, Yagman also became notorious for intemperance, most pointedly evidenced by his brutal characterization of...
    One of the producers behind "Surviving R. Kelly" has spoken out about the disgraced R&B singer's sex trafficking conviction. R. Kelly was found guilty on all nine counts in his racketeering and sex trafficking case on Monday. The U.S. Attorney for the Eastern District of New York confirmed the 54-year-old was found guilty on "all counts" on Twitter. Kelly's criminal charges were covered in the docuseries and it's been credited for making his case stand out amid the #MeToo era. Executive producer Dream Hampton reflected on the impact the series had on Kelly's fate in an interview with Gayle King on CBS Mornings on Tuesday. Unlike King, whose televised 2019 interview with Kelly went viral for his on-air dramatics toward the host, Hampton reminded viewers documentarians reached out multiple times to Kelly, who denied to contribute to the film. "We, of course, couldn't get him for our cameras although we invited him several times. I thought about your interview because, I'm still thinking about Joy Savage, who of course, defended him during your interview and who still hasn't returned to...
    Originally published Sept. 23, 2021 MINNEAPOLIS (WCCO) — Derek Chauvin, the former Minneapolis police officer convicted of murdering George Floyd, filed his own 11th-hour appeal Thursday. Chauvin was convicted in April of second-degree unintentional murder, third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter in Floyd’s death on Memorial Day of 2020. He was sentenced to 22-and-a-half years in prison. In the filing, Chauvin states he is out of money and “unrepresented by legal counsel in connection with the appeal.” He said he was denied representation by a public defender, and is asking the Minnesota Supreme Court to review that decision. He also said the Police Officers Federation of Minneapolis no longer represents him now that he was convicted. Eric Nelson represented Chauvin in state court and is currently listed as his counsel for the federal civil rights case, in which Chauvin has pleaded not guilty. Late Thursday, Judge Peter Cahill, who presided over Chauvin’s trial, considered Chauvin “pauper status,” which would mean he would be exempt from having to pay court costs and filing fees. However, on Friday that order was denied. Attorney...
    A former Minneapolis police officer - who had his third-degree murder conviction overturned in court after killing an Australian yoga instructor - may lead to a similar charge against Derek Chauvin getting thrown out. Disgraced cop Mohamed Noor was found guilty of murder and manslaughter after accidentally shooting Justine Ruszczyk Damond when she called 911 about a sexual assault in her neighborhood in July 2017. The Minnesota Supreme Court ruled that Noor did not intentionally mean to murder Damond in the shooting and the third-degree murder charge was dismissed last Wednesday.  The decision means Noor will serve just four of his original 12-and-a-half-year sentence, which he started in June 2019. The ruling not only shortens Noor’s sentence by eight years, it could lead to the reversal of the third-degree murder charge against Chauvin, a legal expert said. 'Chauvin will likely have his decision reversed because it is legally incompatible to say that someone is guilty of intentionally doing something and at the same time they’re guilty of unintentionally doing something,' Andrew Wilson, a partner at Wilson Criminal Defense in Minneapolis, told...
    Andrea Constand is opening up for the first time on television since Bill Cosby’s release from prison after a sexual assault conviction was overturned by Pennsylvania’s highest court in June. The former Temple University employee was among the first to accuse Cosby of sexual assault – an allegation she said occurred in 2004 and ultimately led to the disgraced actor’s conviction in 2018. Constand has previously said she took pills Cosby offered one night in January 2004, presuming they were herbal products, but she soon found her body going numb. Constand gave steady, unemotional testimony at both his first trial in 2017, which ended in a deadlock, and a second trial in 2018, when the jury convicted Cosby of drugging and violating her. About 60 women have accused Cosby of sex crimes ranging from misconduct to battery to assault and beyond. BILL COSBY'S ACCUSERS CARLA FERRIGNO, JANICE DICKINSON AND MORE REACT TO HIS PRISON RELEASE: 'I’M ANGRY' VideoNow, in Constand’s first interview, the former professional basketball player told NBC that it was "disgusting" watching Cosby and his team lauding his...
    Andrea Constand, one of the dozens of women who accused comedian Bill Cosby of rape, said in an interview with NBC that it felt "disgusting" to see Cosby walk free after his conviction was overturned. Speaking with NBC's Kate Snow, Constand was asked how she felt seeing Cosby walk free in June. "Disgusting," she replied. "Didn't surprise me, given the level of ... arrogance and having no remorse during the time he was incarcerated, absolutely zero remorse for what he did to me." A Pennsylvania appeals court overturned his rape conviction on procedural grounds, with Cosby having been promised by former district attorney Bruce Castor that he would never be charged if he agreed to testify in the civil suit brought forth by Constand. Constand questioned how such an agreement could be honored, saying, "How can you give any credibility to that?" Snow asked if seeing his conviction being overturned made Constand regret going through the ordeal of coming forward publicly with her accusations. "I've come way too far to go back to that place, to wonder whether it's all worth it...
    A man who spent decades in prison has reached a multi-million dollar settlement with officials on Long Island. Suffolk County Executive Steve Bellone announced that Keith Bush, now 64 years old, has reached a $16 million settlement after he was convicted for the 1975 murder of 14-year-old Sherese Watson in North Bellport. Bush spent 33 years behind bars before he was exonerated, making it the longest-running murder case to be overturned in New York State history. In 2019, Bush filed a lawsuit against Suffolk County after a judge dropped all charges and cleared his status as a registered level three sex offender. At the time of the murder, Bush was a 17-year-old junior at Bellport High School. The case was overturned following a nine-month investigation and review by the Suffolk County Conviction Integrity Bureau, which determined Bush’s innocence. According to reports, the judge ruled the conviction to be tainted because at the time he was convicted, prosecutors failed to disclose that another suspect - who has since died - had been interviewed during the investigation. As a result of...
    The court refused his arguments and said the lawsuit could continue. West Virginia Judge John Copenhaver, a Gerald Ford appointee, said in his decision that Trump Jr.'s tweet showed that he knew his accusation against Blankenship was a false one. "Based on this article that Trump, Jr. himself cites within his own quote tweet," Copenhaver wrote, "there is a plausible inference that he had knowledge of the plaintiff's conviction history in association with the mine explosion, and in particular that the conviction was a misdemeanor, not a felony." Trump Jr. also argued that his tweet had been an "exaggeration" offering "colorful rhetoric," and that this kind of speech was protected by the First Amendment. Copenhaver disagreed with that argument as well. The lawsuit can now proceed to trial.
    Three former Philadelphia police officers whose testimony in the trial of a black man accused of the 1991 rape and murder of a 77-year-old woman was found to be false  could now face a trial of their own. A Philadelphia grand jury has recommended criminal charges against Martin Devlin, Manuel Santiago and Frank Jastrzembski, who all worked for the police department for more than 25 years each before retiring. The allegations concern the retrial of Anthony Wright in 2016. who had already spent 25 years in prison, but the three officers also played a significant role in the original 1993 conviction. They repeated their 'false' statements during the retrial. Had the verdict not been overturned and Wright exonerated thanks to DNA evidence, the statements made by the three officers could have sent Wright back to jail for the rest of his life.  Wright (pictured center walking out of prison with his attorneys) was serving a term of life without parole when new DNA testing showed another man had raped neighbor Louise Talley 'After hearing testimony from key witnesses and...
    A Texas appeals court on Thursday upheld the murder conviction of a former Dallas police officer who was sentenced to prison for fatally shooting her neighbor in his home. A panel of three state judges ruled that a Dallas County jury had sufficient evidence to convict Amber Guyger of murder in the 2018 shooting of Botham Jean. The decision by the 5th Texas Court of Appeals in Dallas means Guyger, who turns 33 on Monday, will continue to serve her 10-year prison sentence  and largely dashes her hopes of having the 2019 conviction overturned. She will become eligible for parole in 2024, under her current sentence. The ruling comes in a case that drew national attention because of the strange circumstances and because it was one in a string of shootings of Black men by white police officers. The appeals court justices did not dispute the basic facts of the case. Guyger, returning home from a long shift, mistook Jean's apartment for her own, which was on the floor directly below his. Finding the door...
    DALLAS (AP) — Texas appeals court upholds murder conviction of former Dallas officer who shot her neighbor in his home. Copyright © 2021 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, written or redistributed.
    A New York man who was wrongfully convicted of murder has been exonerated after he spent 23 years in prison fighting to clear his name. Grant Williams appeared in court on Thursday in Staten Island where his conviction was overturned for shooting dead another man in 1996. It came after 13 people provided new testimony that he could not have been the gunman, with one of those providing an alibi for Williams.  After his exoneration, Williams was photographed outside hugging his now-30-year-old son, Antoine Morton, who was only a toddler when he was sentenced to life. 'I used to tell everyone in prison, 'I'm innocent,'' Williams said outside court, according to the New York Daily News.  'They'd say, 'Aw Williams, everybody says that.' I'd say, 'I'm telling you the truth. One day you're gonna see me on the news, and you're gonna see that I was innocent.'  Williams is the first person to ever win a wrongful conviction suit in Staten Island.  On July 22, Staten Island judge exonerated Grant Williams of New York, 50 (center) of the murder of Shdell...
    BILL Cosby's wife Camille was not wearing her wedding ring as she was seen for the first time since her husband's shocking release from prison after a judge overturned his sexual assault conviction. Camille Cosby, 77, was caught ring-less as she headed into the couple's luxury New York apartment by herself on Friday in exclusive pictures obtained by The Sun. 8Camille Cosby was spotted without her wedding ringCredit: Splash 8It was the first time she was seen not wearing the ringCredit: Splash 8She was spotted returning to the couple's luxury New York apartmentCredit: Splash Camille, who has been married to Bill for 57 years, stood by her husband throughout the infamous trial and sexual assault conviction. This is the first time that the TV producer was seen without the wedding band. It comes after Cosby was suddenly released from prison and had his sexual assault conviction overturned earlier this month after serving three years out of his 10 year sentence. Cosby insisted after the shock decision from Pennsylvania's Supreme Court that "I have never changed my stance nor my...
    Bill Cosby has said that he believes he is entitled to 'millions and millions of dollars' for the more than two years he spent in jail. A representative for Cosby did not state how much specifically the 84-year-old should receive nor where the funds should come from. 'Mr. Cosby was given an unwanted two-year and ten-month vacation that he never ask for. His constitutional rights were abolished, his due process was stripped away from him,' Andrew Wyatt, Cosby's representative, told NewsNation Now,  'He's due millions and millions of dollars. As Mr. Cosby said to me today, "I feel that this district attorney and Judge Steven O'Neill and Kevin Steele (Montgomery County district attorney) should resign effective immediately."'  Bill Cosby's publicist, pictured with his publicist, Andrew Wyatt, right has said he will seek compensation for his prison time  Bill Cosby is pictured in handcuffs at Montgomery County jail in Pennsylvania in September 2018 following his three-to-10-year sentencing Cosby served more than two years of a three-to-10-year sentence at a Philadelphia-area state prison, but he had vowed to serve all ten...
    Bill Cosby shared a message to his supporters to celebrate his 84th birthday on July 12. Cosby’s 2018 sexual assault conviction was overturned by Pennsylvania’s Supreme Court last week after it found that an agreement with a previous prosecutor prevented him from being charged in the case. The disgraced actor had served more than two years of a three- to 10-year sentence at a state prison near Philadelphia. He had vowed to serve all 10 years rather than acknowledge any remorse over the 2004 encounter with accuser Andrea Constand. To celebrate his birthday, Cosby, who continues to deny any wrongdoing, issued a statement to his supporters thanking them for "fighting" for his freedom and allowing him to spend his 84th birthday out of prison.  "On my Birthday — I whole heartedly thank you for your support, thank you for fighting for my freedom and thank you for staying grounded and on the case. The Revolution Is In The Home," the comedian shared in a statement provided to Fox News. HOW DID BILL COSBY'S CONVICTION OVERTURN HAPPEN? LEGAL EXPERTS WEIGH IN...
     Bill Cosby's spokesman has said he hopes to recoup damages for wrongful incarceration from the state of Pennsylvania, and accused attorneys for Cosby's accusers of having 'an ax to grind against black men.' Cosby was released from prison on June 30 after serving two years behind bars, when the Pennsylvania Supreme Court vacated his 2018 conviction for sexual assault, citing violations of his due process rights. Now, his publicist Andrew Wyatt says that Cosby hopes to win 'a couple hundred grand' in compensation for the time he spend behind bars on the now-vacated conviction. 'We are looking at what recourse, what legal recourse we can take against the state of Pennsylvania,' Wyatt told The Domenick Nati Show in an interview on Friday. 'We are looking at all legal angles for those things right now.' Publicist Andrew Wyatt (right) says that Cosby hopes to win 'a couple hundred grand' in compensation for the time he spend behind bars on the now-vacated conviction Bill Cosby stands next to his spokesman Andrew Wyatt and lawyer Jennifer Bonjean outside Cosby's home after Pennsylvania's highest...
    BILL Cosby denied ever drugging or having non-consensual sex with women days after a court overturned his sexual assault conviction. Cosby fired off a series of tweets on Thursday accusing the "mainstream media" of "irresponsibly" misleading the public about him. 5Cosby was released from prison on June 30Credit: Splash 5Cosby fired off a series of tweets denying the charges against him 5The Twitter rampage concluded with a quote from Malcolm XCredit: Twitter/Bill Cosby "In response to the rhetoric that the media keeps pushing, Bill Cosby never admitted in his deposition testimony, or anywhere else, to non-consensual sexual contact with any woman and/or the drugging of anyone," the tweets read. "He has never admitted to spiking drinks, as the media would like you to believe. He has steadfastly maintained his innocence, before and after being falsely convicted of aggravated indecent assault. "Mainstream media has irresponsibly, egregiously and inexcusably misled the public with out-of-context coverage regarding Bill Cosby's deposition testimony.  "This shall serve as a grave reminder of the consequences that come with lying to the American people to satisfy an agenda." The comedian, 83, was freed from prison less than three...
    Outraged students have called for Bill Cosby's former co-star to be ousted from her position as dean at a top university for tweeting her support to him. The hashtag 'ByePhilicia' began trending after Phylicia Rashad - who played Cosby's wife Clair Huxtable in The Cosby Show between 1984 and 1992 - tweeted: 'FINALLY! A terrible wrong is being righted - a miscarriage of justice is corrected.' Rashad, 73, also shared her thoughts on Instagram, after Cosby was freed three years into a 10 year sentence when his conviction for indecent assault was overturned. Her support prompted outrage among students and alumni at Howard University in Washington DC, where Rashad has worked as its dean of College of Fine Arts since May. Former student, Andrew Addison, said Rashad's words showed she was unfit for her position, and called on Howard to 'do the right thing and rectify the situation.' Another alumnus, Nylah Burton shared Rashad's tweet, and wrote: 'So proud to be from Howard University! Look at our role models! Defending serial rapists, warms the heart, it really does.' Phylicia...
    Bill Cosby has given an interview after his sexual assault conviction was thrown out this week. Michael Abbott/Getty Images Bill Cosby gave his first radio interview after being released from prison, in which he celebrated his sexual assault conviction being overturned. Cosby, 83, called his release a "win" for people who are "imprisoned wrongfully" as he spoke to Detroit radio host Frankie Darcell on Mix 92.3. "This is for all the people who have been imprisoned wrongfully, regardless of race, color or creed, because I met them in there — people who talked about what happened and what they did," he said. "And I know there are many liars out there, but these people can't get lawyers." This story is developing. Please check back for updates.
    BILL Cosby may sue over the trial that led to his now overturned conviction, reports say, as it’s revealed he was asleep in his prison cell when he learned he would be released.  Cosby, 83, was huddled with his legal team in his mansion in Pennsylvania on Thursday before leaving for a long-awaited reunion with his wife of more than 50 years, Camille.  Read our Bill Cosby live blog for the latest news and updates... 7Cosby has been in a huddle with his legal team since his releaseCredit: Splash 7Cosby's 2018 conviction was dropped on Wednesday (pictured in 2016)Credit: Getty Images - Getty The disgraced TV star was reportedly making plans as he and Camille consider taking a lawsuit against Montgomery County angered by the three years he spent incarcerated for the now-void sentence. According to TMZ, the legal team is thinking of suing for abuse of process over the aggravated indecent assault conviction.  Abuse of process refers to the improper use of a civil or criminal legal process for unintended, malicious, or perverse reasons.  Cosby and his team could...
    Bill Cosby accuser Janice Dickinson was spotted for the first time since the 83-year-old's sexual assault conviction was overturned.   Dickinson, who was accompanied by her husband Robert Gerner, was recently seen outside of her Los Angeles home. The 66-year-old wore a black blazer paired with a white top and sunglasses. She had a somber expression. The former model previously revealed she found out about the news of Cosby’s prison release when she got out of bed Wednesday.   "My friend, Stephen Lenehan, gave me a telephone call and he told me, he said, 'I have some bad news.' And I was bracing for a hurricane or something, and he was like, 'Cosby is out of prison.'...First of all, [I felt] so angry. So angry. Second, I felt like I was kicked in the stomach, in my abdomen, by some psychic blow," Dickinson recalled to Entertainment Tonight.  Janice Dickinson is seen for the first time since news broke that convicted sexual predator Bill Cosby had been released early from prison. The former model was dressed in black and had the support...
    More On: bill cosby Bill Cosby on the move to reunite with ‘out of state’ wife Camille BBC reporter mixes up Bill Cosby, Bill Clinton on air Bill Cosby celebrating freedom with pizza, plans to get back on stage Bill Cosby’s prison release a ‘beautiful day’ for women, rep says Bill Cosby had been asleep in his cell at a prison near Philadelphia when he was awoken with the news that the state’s highest court threw out his sexual assault conviction — and he could walk free, his rep said Thursday. The 83-year-old disgraced comedian was initially confused when he received word of the bombshell ruling on Wednesday, Cosby’s spokesman Andrew Wyatt said. “When he found out he was asleep and the door just opened, an officer came in and said, ‘You’re free,'” Wyatt told reporters. Cosby responded, “What are you talking about?” to which the officer replied, “You’re going home,” according to Wyatt. Wyatt said the unexpected ruling was celebrated by the other inmates — and even senior prison staff had “tears in their eyes” because “they thought he...
    LOS ANGELES (CBSLA) –  The Pennsylvania Supreme Court Wednesday agreed 83-year-old Bill Cosby wasn’t given a fair trial because of a deal that was made with a former prosecutor that promised the iconic comedian wouldn’t face criminal charges and is now a free man. “It brings tears to my eyes because he did such awful things,” Helen Hayes, who claims Cosby stalked and groped her in the ’70s, said. “I though he was just going to die in there blood and water. I didn’t care…” READ MORE: 16 Injured, 3 Critically, After Planned Detonation Of Seized Illegal Fireworks Ends In Explosion Attorney’s for many of the 60 women who came forward to accuse Cosby of sexual assault were outraged by the high court’s decision to overturn the sexual assault conviction. Lisa Bloom said the three accusers she represents were disgusted. “The victims have been ignored in the process as if all of the years and effort going in and testifying…having their lives drudged up as if that doesn’t matter,” she said. Cosby was serving three years of his three to...
    Bill Cosby found out he was being freed from inmates in jail and celebrated his return home with pizza and will now 'tell his story' on tour, it has been reported. Cosby, 83, returned home Wednesday after the Pennsylvania Supreme Court overturned his sexual assault conviction three years into his three- to ten-year sentence for drugging and sexually assaulting Andrea Constand. His publicist Andrew Wyatt told the New York Post that the disgraced comedian heard about the ruling from other inmates at the state prison in Montgomery County where he was housed and that he is 'excited' about the turn of events. 'I just heard the inmates knocking on the walls and the cell and said "Bill, you're free Bill! You're free, Bill",' Cosby said, according to Wyatt. 'I didn't know what was going on.' Bill Cosby, pictured, found out he was being freed from inmates in jail and celebrated his return home with pizza and will now 'tell his story' on tour Cosby was welcomed outside his home after Pennsylvania's highest court overturned his sexual assault conviction and ordered him...
    Bill Cosby's sudden and speedy release from prison has elicited reactions from many, including those who accused him of sexual misconduct. The 83-year-old has been accused by about 60 women of sex crimes ranging from misconduct to battery to assault and beyond. On Wednesday, the Pennsylvania Supreme Court surprised many by overturning the star's criminal conviction after he served more than two years of his three to 10-year sentence. While Hollywood stars were quick to react to the news, some of the disgraced actor's accusers voiced their opinions on the matter as well. BILL COSBY ACCUSER ANDREA CONSTAND SPEAKS OUT AFTER HIS CONVICTION IS TOSSED: ‘DISAPPOINTING’ "Looking at my newborn granddaughter it’s tragic to think that after all these decades of women’s empowerment the system would allow a rapist like Bill Cosby to roam free," Carla Ferrigno told Fox News in a statement. "He doesn’t deserve to be out and have these poor women suffer heartbreak from the lack of accountability and knowing they, and their trauma, aren’t valued in the eyes of the law." Bill Cosby was released...
    ALIQUIPPA, Pa. (KDKA) – KDKA Investigates has uncovered more problems surrounding the Sheldon Jeter murder conviction and concerns about the possible bias of one juror in particular. KDKA Investigator Andy Sheehan first revealed the juror is a next door neighbor of Rachael DelTondo’s family. On Wednesday, he uncovers more potential conflicts. READ MORE: Alternate Juror In Bill Cosbys 2017 Trial Reflects On Pennsylvania Supreme Court Overturning 2018 Conviction KDKA has obtained transcripts of the court’s questioning of the juror which revealed that she was actually married to — and apparently divorcing — a relative of Sheldon Jeter. The defense believes these conflicts may pave the way for a mistrial. Prosecutors knew they had a strong case against Sheldon Jeter in the shooting death of his one-time friend Tyric Pugh: video of Jeter’s car coming and going from the area and the suspected murder weapon found underneath Jeter’s mattress. But his defense says one of the jurors who delivered the guilty verdict is tainted. First, because the court was unaware she is the actual next door neighbor of Rachel DelTondo’s family,...
    Andrew Wyatt and actor Bill Cosby arrive at Montgomery County Courthouse as Bill Cosby's trial continues on June 17, 2017 in Norristown, Pennsylvania. Gilbert Carrasquillo/WireImage) Disgraced comedian Bill Cosby celebrated his overturned rape conviction and prison release Wednesday. "I have never changed my stance nor my story," Cosby said. "I have always maintained my innocence." Cosby, 83, was released after the Pennsylvania Supreme Court overturned his sexual assault conviction. Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. Disgraced comedian Bill Cosby celebrated his rape conviction being thrown out on Wednesday, saying he has "always maintained my innocence." "I have never changed my stance nor my story. I have always maintained my innocence," Cosby said in a statement posted to Twitter. "Thank you to all my fans, supporters and friends who stood by me through this ordeal. Special thanks to the Pennsylvania Supreme Court for upholding the rule of law." The 83-year-old Cosby was released from State Correctional Institution at Phoenix on Wednesday after the court's bombshell decision to throw out his sexual assault conviction. Cosby had served more than...
    (CNN)News of Bill Cosby's release from prison shocked many across the United States, especially his accusers. Cosby was released after Pennsylvania's highest court overturned his sexual assault conviction, saying his due process rights were violated in the first major case of the #MeToo era.The reaction from accusers and their attorneys to Wednesday's announcement is in stark contrast to the elation many of them felt in 2018 when the comedian was found guilty of three counts of aggravated indecent assault for drugging and sexually assaulting Andrea Constand at his home in a Philadelphia suburb in 2004.Here's what the women, along with their attorneys, had to say: Lisa Bloom, attorney for Cosby accusersLisa Bloom Read MoreLisa Bloom told CNN's Ana Cabrera she is "disgusted and shocked" by the ruling. "The jury heard all of the evidence, considered everything, convicted him, and now that this day has come I just think it's a slap in the face for all the victims," said Bloom, one of the attorneys. "I'm glad he got some time served," she said, but it was only "a tiny, tiny...
    PHILADELPHIA - Pennsylvania's highest court threw out Bill Cosby's sexual assault conviction and released him from prison Wednesday in a stunning reversal of fortune for the comedian once known as "America's Dad," ruling that the prosecutor who brought the case was bound by his predecessor's agreement not to charge Cosby. Cosby, 83, flashed the V-for-victory sign to a helicopter overhead as he trudged into his suburban Philadelphia home after serving nearly three years of a three- to 10-year sentence for drugging and violating Temple University sports administrator Andrea Constand in 2004. The former "Cosby Show" star — the first celebrity tried and convicted in the #MeToo era — had no immediate comment. Cosby was arrested in 2015, when a district attorney armed with newly unsealed evidence — the comic's damaging deposition in a lawsuit filed by Constand — brought charges against him just days before the 12-year statute of limitations was about to run out. But the Pennsylvania Supreme Court said Wednesday that District Attorney Kevin Steele, who made the decision to arrest Cosby, was obligated to stand by his...
    Oil ends higher after fall in U.S. inventories, attention turns to OPEC+ Stock Market Today With Jim Cramer: Constellations Stars Align The decision of the Pennsylvania Supreme Court Wednesday to overturn Bill Cosby's sexual assault conviction and immediately spring him from prison hinged on an agreement Cosby made with a Pennsylvania prosecutor in 2005.  © Provided by People Matt Slocum/AP Bill Cosby That year, Andrea Constand told Bruce Castor, then the district attorney in Montgomery County, Pa., that Cosby, now 83, had drugged and sexually assaulted her in his mansion the year before. At the time, Castor declined to prosecute Cosby, stating there was not enough evidence to get a conviction.   Instead, Castor suggested to Constand, a former Temple University athletics administrator who had once considered Cosby a mentor, that she pursue a civil case against Cosby. Castor came to an agreement with Cosby that if he sat for a deposition in Constand's civil case, he'd be immune from criminal prosecution in the case. (Cosby ultimately settled the suit with Constant for $3.38 million.) But a subsequent Montgomery County...
    Bill Cosby departs the Montgomery County Courthouse on the first day of sentencing in his sexual assault trial on September 24, 2018 in Norristown, Pennsylvania. Mark Makela/Getty Images Bill Cosby was released from prison on Wednesday following a vote to overturn his sexual assult conviction. Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. Bill Cosby was released from the Pennsylvania prison system on Wednesday after the Pennsylvania Supreme Court threw out his conviction earlier in the day, the Pennsylvania prison system told the Associated Press. Cosby, 83, was serving a decade-long sentence for aggravated indecent assault after being convicted in the 2004 sexual assault of Andrea Constand. This story is developing. Check back for updates.
    The leading parents on The Cosby Show are celebrating the Pennsylvania Supreme Court's decision to vacate Bill Cosby's sexual assault conviction. Cosby's sentence was vacated by the state's highest court on Wednesday after it ruled a previous agreement between Cosby and the then-district attorney prevented the subsequent district attorney from proceeding with criminal charges. He had been in year two of serving a three-to-10-year sentence after being found guilty of sexually assaulting Andrea Constand in 2004. "FINALLY!!!! A terrible wrong is being righted- a miscarriage of justice is corrected!" said Phylicia Rashad, who played Clair Huxtable, Cosby's wife on The Cosby Show. BILL COSBY SEXUAL ASSAULT CONVICTION VACATED BY PENNSYLVANIA SUPREME COURT At the time Constand reported the alleged incident in 2005, then-Montgomery County District Attorney Bruce Castor agreed not to charge him so the accuser could file a civil lawsuit against him, which could force Cosby to testify, under penalty of perjury, without the benefit of being allowed to invoke his Fifth Amendment right against self-incrimination. He provided four sworn depositions in which he "made several incriminating statements" but...
    HARVEY Weinstein put his head in his hands as a judge ruled that he can be transferred to Los Angeles to face more sex assault charges. The infamous producer will be sent to the West Coast within the first two weeks of July, an Erie County court judge ruled on Tuesday. 1Weinstein will be transferred to Los AngelesCredit: AP:Associated Press Judge Kenneth Case rejected arguments by Weinstein's lawyer that the paperwork to move Weinstein was not in order, and that Weinstein should stay in New York to get appropriate medical care. Reacting to the news, Weinstein leant back in his chair and threw his head back, before buying his head in his hands. He was wearing a red long sleeved shirt and a white coronavirus face mask, with his walker to his right. Weinstein is serving a 23-year prison term following his February 2020 conviction in Manhattan for sexually assaulting a production assistant in 2006, and third-degree rape of an aspiring actress in 2013. Weinstein is appealing his conviction and sentence, and has denied having non-consensual sex with anyone. His...
    Hunter Biden and a former FBI director were hired by a Romanian tycoon later convicted of bribery - and represented him in meetings with top U.S. officials - emails from Hunter's laptop show. Romanian real estate tycoon Gabriel Popoviciu was convicted in his home country in 2016 of bribing a university official to buy a 550-acre plot of government-owned land for a drastically reduced price. Popoviciu hired Hunter earlier that year as part of an influence campaign to persuade anti-corruption prosecutors to cut a deal or drop the case. The hiring was revealed in 2019, but DailyMail.com can now reveal the extensive propaganda and persuasion campaign planned by Hunter for the Romanian criminal, all while Hunter's father was Vice President. Emails on Hunter's abandoned laptop reveal how Joe Biden's son and his colleagues leveraged their US government connections and plotted a propaganda campaign for the grafting Romanian tycoon. Hunter Biden was hired by a Romanian tycoon later convicted of bribery - and represented him in meetings with top U.S. officials – emails from Hunter's laptop show Romanian real...
    An Ohio man convicted of assaulting and robbing an 82-year-old man attempted to flee from his sentencing hearing by jumping over a balcony outside the courtroom - only to end up with a broken leg, smashed face and more prison time. Donald Mullins, 44, was convicted thanks to DNA he left at the scene, when munching an Oreo cookie. On May 20 he was at the Franklin County Government Center in Columbus, Ohio, for sentencing on charges of aggravated burglary, robbery and theft. Judge Mark Serrott gave him four to six years in prison. Mullins then asked for a few days off before going to prison to have surgery for health issues. Donald Mullins, 44, was sentenced to between four and six years in prison on May 20 for assault and robbery of an 82-year-old man. But immediately after the judge in Columbus, Ohio, read out his sentence, Mullins bolted from the courtroom out in to the lobby Mullins threw himself over the balcony railing of the sixth floor, and landed on the fifth floor beneath him. Shocked...
    (CNN)Lawyers for the White nationalist who killed nine people at a historically Black church in Charleston, South Carolina, will make their case Tuesday that his conviction and death sentence can't stand because he was too "disconnected from reality" to represent himself.That's the chief contention laid out in a sprawling 321-page motion filed last year in the 4th US Circuit Court of Appeals, attacking numerous elements of the federal trial and conviction stemming from the June 17, 2015, massacre."When Dylann Roof represented himself at his capital trial, he was a 22-year-old, ninth-grade dropout diagnosed with schizophrenia-spectrum disorder, autism, anxiety, and depression, who believed his sentence didn't matter because white nationalists would free him from prison after an impending race war," the filing says.JUST WATCHEDChilling moments from Dylann Roof's trialReplayMore Videos ...MUST WATCHChilling moments from Dylann Roof's trial 01:20Roof was sentenced to death after jurors returned guilty verdicts on 33 federal charges. Following his federal conviction, Roof pleaded guilty in April 2017 to state murder and attempted murder charges and received nine consecutive life sentences and three consecutive 30-year sentences on those...
    Justin Ross Harris is currently serving a life sentence for the murder of his son, Cooper, after he left him in a hot car for seven hours. His attorneys are arguing for a retrial arguing that his murder trial had been improperly joined with one in which he solicited pictures from underage girls A Georgia man convicted of murder for intentionally leaving his one-year-old son in a hot car so he could meet up with an underage girl has been denied a new trial.   Justin Ross Harris, 40, was sentenced to life in prison without parole in 2016 after his son Cooper died after spending seven hours in a hot car.   Cobb County Superior Court Judge Mary Staley Clark, who presided over the original trial, denied Harris' bid for a new trial last Thursday.  His lawyers had argued that the murder case against their client had been improperly joined with another involving his soliciting pictures from underage girls, according to the Atlanta Journal-Constitution.   Granting a retrial would have forced Judge Clark to admit errors on her part in overseeing...
    Derek Chauvin is handcuffed after a jury found him guilty of murder. Pool cameras Derek Chauvin likely will appeal his conviction, but legal experts don't think he'll have success. His lawyers will make arguments they already previewed in their motions at trial, experts predict.  For a successful appeal, experts say Chauvin's lawyers have to prove the jury was compromised. Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. Derek Chauvin's murder trial offered a preview of the arguments his defense attorneys are likely to make in an appeal, but legal experts say they're unlikely to overturn the fired Minneapolis officer's murder conviction. "There is no question that Chauvin will appeal," Somil Trivedi, senior staff attorney at the American Civil Liberties Union, told Insider. "He has every statutory right to and his lawyer would be sort of wrong not to, as a matter of defense ethics and things of that nature. But from what I saw in the trial, I don't see anything there." Facebook Icon The letter F. Follow Insider on Facebook Mike Lawlor, associate professor at the University of...
    Derek Chauvin is pictured on the left. Minnesota Attorney General Keith Ellison is pictured on the right, in an interview with "60 Minutes." Getty/CBS News Minnesota Attorney General Keith Ellison spoke to "60 Minutes" about the Derek Chauvin trial. Ellison led the prosecution, but said he felt "a little bad for" Chauvin after the guilty verdict. "I think he deserved to be convicted, but he's a human being," Ellison said.  Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. Days after Derek Chauvin was found guilty of the murder of George Floyd, the lead prosecutor in the case told CBS's "60 Minutes" that he "felt a little bad" for the former Minneapolis police officer.  Minnesota Attorney General Keith Ellison was chosen by the governor to argue the state's case against Chauvin, who knelt on Floyd's neck for several minutes during an arrest last May, killing him.  Facebook Icon The letter F. Follow Insider on Facebook When asked how he felt when the jury read out their verdict  — guilty on all charges — Ellison said his initial emotions were "gratitude"...
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