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    SAN FRANCISCO (CBS SF) — A Michigan-based meat producer is recalling more than 230,000 pounds of fully cooked ham and pepperoni products distributed nationwide because they may be contaminated with listeria. Alexander & Hornung said it was cooperating with the US Department of Agriculture to voluntarily recall the processed meat products including boneless cooked ham and spiral sliced honey ham under its own brand and a number of other private labels. READ MORE: Air District: Weather, Wood Smoke To Bring Moderate Air Quality In Bay Area This WeekThe USDA’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) said the problem was discovered when the company notified FSIS that product sampling reported positive Listeria monocytogenes results. The company said while there have been no illnesses or complaints associated with the products and no conclusive evidence of contamination at the time of shipment, the voluntary recall is being initiated out of an abundance of caution. The products subject to the recall have establishment number “EST. M10125” inside the USDA mark of inspection on the labels. A full listing of the products can be found here....
    By: KDKA-TV News Staff PITTSBURGH (KDKA) — Alexander & Hornung is recalling more than 240,000 pounds of ham and pepperoni products because of possible listeria contamination. The affected meats were sold nationwide under a variety of brand names, including Wellshire and Butcher Boy. The items are all fully cooked and have the establishment code M10125 stamped inside the USDA’s inspection mark. The meat should be thrown out or returned to the store. For a full list of affected products, click here.
    An Israeli startup has accomplished amazing feet by creating 3D cuts of meat to look startlingly similar to real cuts of meat. The Israeli startup has made its 3D cuts of meat available to restaurants in Europe and Israel for the first time. Redefined Meat first started making their special products in 2018, using a 3D process to create realistic vegan meat. The 3D cuts are thick and fibrous, meant to imitate real meat in the look and texture. The meat itself is made from a combination of soy protein, pea protein, chickpeas, beetroot, yeast, and coconut fat. Redefined Meats has been a huge hit in the vegan meat market as it has accomplished the holy grail of vegan products. Being able to create the structure and texture of whole pieces of meat. Its 3D pieces of meat are set to spread across the world to make appearances on restaurant menus in many different locations, from the UK to Germany to other parts of Europe. Eshchar Ben-Shitrit, chief executive and co-founder of Redefine Meat, said, “Most of the...
    Plant-based sausages, meatballs and other alternatives to meat are often excessively high in salt, according to research.  Vegan and vegetarian products are seen as having a ‘health halo’, but their salt levels breached government guidelines, a study found. More than 75 per cent of the products analysed failed to meet the Government’s salt reduction targets.  Researchers from Queen Mary University of London compared 207 plant-based meat products with 226 meat products. M&S Food Plant Kitchen No Chicken Kievs had one of the highest salt levels in the study at 1.78g per 100g, with a total salt portion of 2.49g Researchers from Queen Mary University analysed just how much salt was in vegetarian processed food They found plant-based meat to have fewer calories, total and saturated fat and more fibre than meat equivalents, the research backed by Action on Salt said.  But their salt content was significantly higher than meat in five out of six product categories.  RELATED ARTICLES Previous 1 Next Crisp shortage leaves couple desperately searching for sea... Mr Kipling makes exceedingly good break:...
    WASHINGTON -- Before you head out the door, be sure to check your freezer.According to the USDA's Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS), two chicken products sold at Trader Joe's have been recalled after customers reported finding pieces of bone in the meat.The items are Trader Joe's Chile Lime Chicken Burgers and Spinach Feta Chicken Sliders.Innovative Solutions, Inc. - the company who made the products - recalled approximately 97,887 pounds of the chicken patty products. They were shipped to retailers nationwide, primarily Trader Joe's.The recalled products were produced from Aug. 16 - Sept. 29.The USDA said there have been no confirmed reports of adverse reactions due to consumption of these products.Anyone concerned about an injury or illness should contact a healthcare provider.
    NEW YORK (CBSNewYork) — Butterball is recalling some of its ground turkey. The company says small pieces of hard blue plastic may have ended up in some of the products. The recall affects more than 14,000 pounds of ground turkey sold in BJ’s and Kroger grocery stores. It includes 2.5-pound trays of Farm-to-Family Ground Turkey with a sell-by date of Oct. 18 and 3-pound trays of Kroger Ground Turkey with a sell-by date of Oct. 17. For more information, click here.
    New York (CNN)Companies like Beyond Meat Inc (BYND) and Impossible Foods are seeing strong sales. Earlier this year, Target launched its own line of 30 vegan food options. Even giant Tyson Foods Inc (TSN) is getting in on the act with its recent introduction of vegan bratwurst and burger patties.Plant-based meat sales are soaring, but is there a similar appetite for plant-based seafood?A host of small companies certainly hope so, and they're crowding into the alternative seafood space. Sales in the sector grew 23% from 2019 to 2020, according to data from The Good Food Institute, a nonprofit whose mission is "to accelerate alternative protein innovation internationally," according to its website. In the first half of 2021, the institute said, $116 million has been invested in the seafood space, exceeding 2020's total of $90 million.Plant-based seafood could help alleviate the demand for fresh-caught fish, curbing overfishing that can decrease fish populations, reduce biodiversity in the ocean and harm habitats, according to the Natural Resources Defense Council. About 5 billion pounds of seafood are consumed every year in the United States,...
    Frozen pizza fans with soy allergies should steer clear of DiGiorno's after its parent company, Nestlé, recalled nearly 14 tons of its 'Crispy Pan Crust' product because the contents of their pies were mislabeled on the packaging.   Nestlé admitted that the pepperoni pizza boxes mistakenly contained three-meat pies - contain textured soy protein, a known allergen - that wasn't declared on the packaging.  The error was first spotted by a consumer who notified the company, according to a US Department of Agriculture's Food Safety and Inspection Service press release issued on Sunday, leading the product to be recalled nationwide.  The snack giant realized on Saturday that boxes of DiGiorno's 'Crispy Pan Crust' pepperoni pizza mistakenly contained three-meat pies - which contains textured soy protein - that wasn't declared on the switched-up packaging 'FSIS is concerned that some product may be in consumers’ freezers,' wrote the agency. 'Consumers who have purchased these products are urged not to consume them' The recalled pizzas bear a USDA sticker with the establishment number 'EST. 1682A'  'FSIS is concerned that some product may be in...
    Did you know that over 80% of grass-fed beef sold online and in major grocery stores is imported from overseas? Since the COOL Law (Country of Origin law) was revoked in 2016, the law has allowed retailers to label their products “Made in USA,” even the imported goods, as long as it’s processed in a US plant. This has forced around 100,000 independent American ranchers to close their businesses. The few remaining are holding on to the hope of the reinstatement of the COOL policy. As they wait, the support by companies like Good Ranchers, who continue to source 100% American beef, keeps them going. Good Ranchers is a meat subscription delivery box service best known for its premium quality, affordable price, and top-of-the-line USDA graded meat. Sourcing all their meat locally, they ensure all the animals are pasture-raised and treated according to their standards of excellence. They sell beef, chicken, pork, and seafood. The team at Good Ranchers explains that it is essential to know how the cattle were raised and what they have been fed. Guided by their...
    In this article PEPRamon Laguarta, chief executive officer of PepsiCo Inc., stands for a photograph before a closing bell ceremony at a Nasdaq Inc. remote location in Atlanta, Georgia, on Friday, Feb. 1, 2019.Elijah Nouvelage | Bloomberg | Getty ImagesPepsiCo is hoping to release new plant-based snacks and drinks made through its joint venture with Beyond Meat by early 2022. "This is only the beginning of what I think is going to be a game-changing JV," Pepsi CEO Ramon Laguarta told CNBC's Sara Eisen. Pepsi and Beyond announced the joint venture, called The PLANeT Partnership, in January. The partnership gives Beyond, a relative newcomer to the food world, a chance to leverage Pepsi's production and marketing expertise for new products. For its part, Pepsi can deepen its investment in plant-based categories, which are growing increasingly crowded, while working with one of the top creators of meat substitutes. It also helps Pepsi work toward its sustainability and health goals for its portfolio. Earlier on Wednesday, Pepsi announced a new initiative called "Pep+" that is meant to change the company's operations, with...
    Check out our must-buy plant-based cookbooks! Learn more The USDA’s Food Safety and Inspection Service are asking the public whether or not lab-grown meat should be labeled as meat. The agency published a notice asking for the public’s opinion on how lab-grown meat should be labeled to buyers, specifically on meat that has been grown from the cells of meat and poultry. USDA Deputy Under Secretary for Food Safety, Sandra Eskin, said, “This ANPR is an important step forward in ensuring the appropriate labeling of meat and poultry products made using animal cell culture technology. We want to hear from stakeholders and will consider their comments as we work on a proposed regulation for labeling these products.” Lab-grown meat uses animal cells to grow meat. Thus, it is not “fake” or “imitation.” It is meat, just without the slaughter. Lab-grown meat is referred to by the public as ‘clean meat’ since it is still meat, but does not require the killing of animals. Plus, it is more eco-friendly as livestock does not have to be raised and...
    U.S. border authorities confiscated 350 pounds of meat from a man attempting to smuggle the goods over the Texas border last week.  Customs and Border Protection (CBP) Agriculture Specialists discovered the haul at around 6:00 a.m. on Aug. 26. The man, a 20-year-old United States citizen, was carrying 320 pounds of pork bologna and 30 pounds of turkey ham in the backseat of a 2012 Honda Odyssey. Border agents confiscated 350 pounds of meat (combined pork and turkey) on Aug. 26.  (Customs and Border Protection) A border agent ordered a secondary inspection due to the driver’s negative declaration for carrying food, as the agent believed he could see the poorly hidden meat products, a CBP press release said.  ALLEGED NEW JERSEY KILLER'S INCRIMINATING FACEBOOK PHOTO MAY BE HIS DOWNFALL A subsequent search of the vehicle found the meat, which was bundled in 31 rolls of bologna and 2 rolls of ham under blankets under the seats and inside a duffel bag.  The driver admitted that he intended to resell the meat in the U.S., which incurred a $1,000...
    More than 52,000 pounds of chicken salad and dip products are being recalled because they might be contaminated with hard white plastic. The United States Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service has announced that the following products by Willow Tree Poultry Farms are being recalled: 5-lb container of “Willow Tree Premium White Meat Caesar Chicken Dip” with sell-by dates of 09/03/2021 and 09/06/2021. 5-lb and 12-oz containers of “Willow Tree Premium White Meat Buffalo Chicken Dip” with sell-by dates of 09/03/2021 and 09/05/2021. 5-lb container of “Willow Tree Premium White Meat Buffalo Chicken Salad” with a sell-by date of 09/07/2021. 15-oz container of “Willow Tree Premium White Meat Buffalo Chicken Salad” with sell-by dates of 09/07/2021 and 09/09/2021. 15-oz container of “Willow Tree Premium White Meat Cranberry Walnut Chicken Salad” with a sell-by date of 09/08/2021. 15-oz container of “Willow Tree Premium White Meat Classic Chicken Salad” with sell-by dates of 09/07/2021, 09/08/2021, 09/09/2021, 09/10/2021. 7.5-oz container of “Willow Tree Premium White Meat Classic Chicken Salad” with sell-by dates of 09/07/2021 and 09/09/2021. 10-lb container of “Willow Tree Premium...
    In this article BYNDBeyond Meat "Beyond Burger" patties made from plant-based substitutes for meat products sit on a shelf for sale in New York City.Angela Weiss | AFP | Getty ImagesThe popularity of plant-based meat products from companies like Beyond Meat and Impossible Foods has skyrocketed in recent years, aided by availability everywhere from supermarkets to restaurants to Burger King and Starbucks. "You look at the plant-based category, and millennials and Gen X are attracted to it for health reasons and sustainability reasons," Rupesh Parikh, a senior analyst of food, grocery and consumer products at Oppenheimer & Company. That has helped the plant-based meat industry boom. Grocery sales of plant-based foods that directly replace animal products have grown 27% in the past year, now exceeding $7 billion in sales, according to the Global Food Institute. In total, the global market for meat substitutes is set to grow to $23.4 billion by 2024, according to market research company Euromonitor. However, one of the biggest deal breakers for potential consumers of plant-based meat is the higher price compared to actual meat. At...
    Check out our must-buy plant-based cookbooks! Learn more Amazing news! Miyoko’s, the popular vegan cheese brand, won a lawsuit concerning their usage of terms like “butter” and “dairy” on their packaging! In 2020, Miyoko’s sued the California Department of Food and Agriculture for infringing upon the company’s right to free speech after the Department attempted to ban Miyoko’s from using certain words and images on their products. This included, “lactose-free,” “cruelty-free,” “butter,” and the company’s mission statement of “Revolutionizing Dairy with Plants.” They even wanted Miyoko’s to take down a photo on their website of a woman hugging a cow. The Department argued that the phrases violated FDA labeling rules. However, on August 11, 2021, the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California ruled in favor of Miyoko’s, agreeing that the Department’s demands were unconstitutional. After the ruling, Miyoko Schinner, founder of Miyoko’s, stated, “Using words such as ‘butter’ and ‘milk’ in the context of even products made from plants and not from animals is common parlance among consumers in the modern world.” She continued,...
    A MEAT processor has issued an urgent warning to consumers over nearly 300,000 pounds of raw beef products that may be contaminated with E. coli. The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service announced Greater Omaha Packing’s recall on Thursday. 3Greater Omaha Packing has issued a recall of nearly 300,000 pounds of beefCredit: Alamy 3The products bear establishment number 'EST. 960A' inside the USDA mark of inspectionCredit: Getty Packages of the meat are understood to have been distributed in Illinois, Indiana, Minnesota and Nebraska. The beef products were intended to be used in packages of ground beef. They were produced on July 13 and bear establishment number “EST. 960A” inside the USDA mark of inspection. The contamination was discovered when FSIS collected a routine product sample that confirmed positive for the presence of E. coli, officials said. Officials have said it is a "Class I" recall. Most read in NewsHORROR DEATH Suspect, 42, arrested after woman BEHEADED and 'bloody body' dumped on street'GENTLE AND HUMBLE' Breaking Bad and Lone Ranger actor Saginaw Grant dies at age 85DEADLY...
    Table of Contents Chevron icon It indicates an expandable section or menu, or sometimes previous / next navigation options. How I tested The best veggie burger The best vegan chicken The best vegan fish The best vegan ground beef The best vegan bacon The best vegan deli meats The best vegan chicken nuggets The best vegan hotdog The best vegan sausage The best vegan meatballs The best vegan breakfast sausage The best vegan tuna The best vegan crab What else we considered What to look for in vegan protein products Why eating vegan is healthy, even if you're not full vegan How I tested The best veggie burger The best vegan chicken The best vegan fish The best vegan ground beef The best vegan bacon The best vegan deli meats ...
    More On: vegetarian Food for thought: Plant-based eaters have an advantage when it comes to COVID, study says Nathan’s Famous is adding vegan hot dogs to its menu Try a fake ‘shrimp’ taco this Cinco de Mayo Major beef: Nebraska declares pro-meat day on Colorado meatless day NotCo, a Jeff Bezos-backed, fake meat and dairy company, has just joined the unicorn club. The Chilean-based company, which uses an artificial intelligence program called Giuseppe to make plant-based milk and meat products, said Monday it has raised another $235 million in a funding round that values the company at $1.5 billion. NotCo said its latest round is being led by Tiger Global. Tennis great Roger Federer, race car driver Lewis Hamilton and DJ Questlove are becoming investors as well. Bezos invested $30 million in the company in 2019 when it launched mayonnaise that is made primarily from chickpeas. NotCo, which launched five years ago in Latin America, introduced its its NotMilk products seven months ago to the US, where NotCo has five US patents for its technology, according to the company....
    According to Bloomberg, Future Meat Technologies Ltd. and Nestle SA have teamed together to bring alternative meat to the mass market. Environmental and health concerns attached to traditional animal meat have prompted more consumers to stray from eating “conventional animal products.” Now, Nestle has stepped into the plant protein game as a response.  By entering the plant-based market, it’s estimated that the company “gain a foothold in an industry that may reach 35% of the $1.8-trillion meat market by 2040.”  Israeli startup Future Meat Technologies’s cell-based technology will be combined with Nestle’s plant-based products under its Garden Gourmet brand.  The product will blend lab-developed meat cells with plant ingredients to improve texture and reduce costs. According to Bloomberg, “Cell-based meat startups incorporate plant-based ingredients at various stages of product development.” Future Meat Technologies has already seen success in lowering costs.  It is expected that products will be sold in the US by the end of 2022. Related Content: Shut the Front Door! If We Ate Less Meat, This Is What Would Happen to the Planet  10 Reasons July...
    VIDEO1:5801:58Fishless fish could be the next big thingThe News with Shepard Smith Faux fish is angling to be the next big thing in alternative protein. Alt-meat has skyrocketed in popularity in recent years as consumers have started to change what they eat for a variety of reasons, ranging from concerns over climate change and sustainability to animal welfare and personal health benefits. That has led to a proliferation of products from companies like Impossible Foods and Beyond Meat across grocery stores and restaurants while traditional meat companies like Tyson Foods, Perdue Farms and Hormel are launching new entrants in the category. U.S. retail sales of plant-based foods grew 27% in 2020, bringing the total market to roughly $7 billion, according to data from the Plant-Based Foods Association (PBFA) and the Good Food Institute (GFI). The global market is forecasted to grow to $450 billion by 2040, according to consulting firm Kearney, which would represent roughly a quarter of the broader $1.8 trillion meat market. The market for plant-based products has largely been driven by faux milk and meat, which make...
    Originally Published by: Ritz leaves internet speechless after explaining cracker shape Washington Post riter says calling food exotic reinforces racism Man takes dog dying of cancer for one last walk up mountain in wheelbarrow Plant-based meat alternatives may look and cook like real meat, but scientists say that the nutritional components may not be the same. Researchers at Duke University compared 36 food samples — 18 of widely known plant-based meat alternatives to 18 grass-fed ground beef options from a ranch in Idaho. For each sample, they measured the number of metabolites, small molecules that make up the nutrients in foods.  The study, published in the journal Scientific Reports, discovered the beef contained 22 metabolites that the plant-based substitutes did not have. The plant-based meat, meanwhile, contained 31 metabolites that meat did not include. Researchers found the largest disparities were in vitamins, amino acids and types of saturated and unsaturated fatty acids found in both food products among other variables.  Alternative meat makers mimic the look, taste and texture of meat with iron-carrying...
    We know our Brightbulb fans absolutely LOVE kitchen products, so we’ve done the research and found some of the best deals we think our readers will adore. From reusable water bottles to pots and pans, we’ve got you covered. Be sure to check them out below: #1 Best Seller: Iron Flask Sports Water Bottle (Photo Via Amazon) This double-walled insulated water bottle keeps your drinks hot or cold for hours at a time. You might be thinking that your water bottle now does exactly this. But wait. This set comes with three different types of lids: a straw lid (with two straws included), a flip lid, and a stainless steel all-purpose lid. Whether you’re drinking coffee on the way to work or water at soccer practice, this water bottle can do it all. Plus, it comes in many different colors and sizes for your convenience. Get it here for only $16.20! McCook Knife Set (Photo Via Amazon) Do you want a knife set that is sleek, modern, and reliable? Look no further than the McCook knife set. With your purchase,...
    We know our Brightbulb fans absolutely LOVE kitchen products, so we’ve done the research and found some of the best deals we think our readers will adore. From reusable water bottles to pots and pans, we’ve got you covered. Be sure to check them out below: #1 Best Seller: Iron Flask Sports Water Bottle (Photo Via Amazon) This double-walled insulated water bottle keeps your drinks hot or cold for hours at a time. You might be thinking that your water bottle now does exactly this. But wait. This set comes with three different types of lids: a straw lid (with two straws included), a flip lid, and a stainless steel all-purpose lid. Whether you’re drinking coffee on the way to work or water at soccer practice, this water bottle can do it all. Plus, it comes in many different colors and sizes for your convenience. Get it here for only $16.20! ThermoPro TP20 Wireless Digital Meat Thermometer (Photo Via Amazon) Cooking meat without the proper thermometer can be disastrous. Overcooked meat is the ultimate kitchen faux-pas. Luckily, this best seller...
    Unearthed by co-founder Mark Kozubal as a microbe from volcanic hot springs in Yellowstone National Park, Fy is the fermented, versatile, protein-rich source that Nature's Fynd and its CEO Thomas Jonas are hoping becomes the next big thing in alternative meat and dairy.Nature's Fynd As consumers become increasingly comfortable eating faux-meat burgers that look, cook and taste like the real thing, a food-tech start-up backed by Jeff Bezos and Bill Gates is using fungus as the primary ingredient to create alt-meat foods. Nature's Fynd, based in Chicago, has raised $158 million in funding from investors including Bezos, Gates, and Al Gore. The company's meatless breakfast patties and hamburgers, dairy-free cream cheese and yogurt, and chicken-less nuggets are scheduled to hit grocers' shelves later this year. The alternative foods sector skyrocketed in 2020, growing U.S. retail sales 27%, and bringing the total market value to $7 billion, according to the Plant-Based Foods Association (PBFA), a trade group comprising more than 200 member companies. Meanwhile, shipments of alt-protein products from food service distributors to commercial restaurants rose 60% year-over-year in April, according to...
    Wisconsin is a step closer to drawing a line between milk from a cow and juice from an almond. The Wisconsin Assembly on Tuesday passed a series of truth in labeling proposals. The first would declare that milk comes only from cows or other animals. “If it is not from a cow, or a goat, or a hoofed mammal it is not milk, therefore it is not dairy,” Rep. Travis Tranel, R-Cuba City told The Center Square. Tranel, who is a dairy farmer, led the push to clarify the labeling rules for milk, cheese, ice cream, yogurt, and other dairy products. “Farmers themselves, through check-offs, have invested hundreds of millions of dollars through the years developing these markets,” Tranel said. “To make sure that consumers know the nutritious health benefits to these products.” Tranel said new plant-based products are looking to “piggyback” on those efforts to sell their version of milk, cheese and other dairy-derived products. “I think they’re going to have to label it what it is,” Rep. Clint Moses, R-Menomonie, said Tuesday. “Maybe veggie-byproduct, or in the case...
    A new poll conducted by Plant Based News found that 88% of respondents are against a ban in Australia on plant-based meat labels. Australian politicians are pushing for food labeling laws that don’t use “meat” and similar words when referring to plant-based proteins, 7News reported. Alternative proteins are at odds with the government in Australia who has brought up discussion over the use of words like “milk,” “meat,” and “seafood” when labeling plant-based products. But a significant portion of consumers does not find the labels confusing or misleading. “If you prefer tofu over T-bone, then you go for it but forget the ethics of eating animal products, this is about protecting a highly valuable industry and also providing a clear distinction between the real thing and the alternatives so consumers know exactly what they’re getting,” Senator Susan McDonald, who launched the inquiry, said. A similar bill passed in Texas last month. In the bill, food products and foods that do not contain meat cannot use the words “beef” or “meat” on the labels. Based on the numbers, it seems like...
    Did you know that the type of shampoo you buy can impact endangered species? As crazy as it may sound, everyday choices we make when buying products like snack food and cosmetics can actually have a very real impact on animals across the world. The reason you have probably never noticed a receipt reading “your purchase helped fund deforestation in Indonesia” is because companies work very hard to distance themselves from their destructive supply chains. After all, if you knew your body lotion contributed to the extinction of the Sumatran orangutan would you buy it? Deforestation and habitat degradation are the driving factors behind the endangerment of the world’s most delicate species population. While it might be difficult to convince companies to completely alter their business to prevent environmental harm (though that may be the end goal!), it is VERY easy to change your individual consumption habits to make certain that the products you buy are not funding the endangerment of species thousands of miles away from you. 1. Eat Smart Industrial meat production is a leading cause of...
    As the nation continues to face the novel coronavirus pandemic, Republican lawmakers in Texas have established a truly baffling set of priorities. As Daily Kos continues to cover, for example, Texans are facing an onslaught of anti-trans bills at the state level, including girls’ sports and gender-affirming health care. In a different, though also head-scratching, direction, Texas state lawmakers approved House Bill 316, which would bar plant-based foods from bearing labels like “meat,” “pork,” “poultry,” or “beef,” as reported by the Dallas Morning News.   Interestingly, the word “burger” is not off-limits. This point is probably a relief to companies including Beyond Meat and Impossible Burgers, both of which use the word “burger” in many of their products. Unsurprisingly, both of these companies, as well as the Plant Based Foods Association and Alliance for Plant Based Inclusion opposed the bill. But who supported it, and why? Let’s look at the logic, and the bigger picture issues. And for support? Also surprising no one, a number of livestock companies, as well as the Texas & Southwestern Cattle Raisers Association, Texas Pork Producers Association, and...
    The Texas House of Representatives passed a bill banning the labeling of “plant-based foods,” as meat, The Hill reported. Food products and foods that do not contain meat cannot use the words “beef” or “meat” on the labels. House Bill 316 was approved and is intended to prevent companies from misleading consumers, the Dallas News reported. “This is for those who choose to eat meat, but it’s also for those who choose to not eat meat,” said Texas state Rep. Brad Buckley (R), who also introduced the bill, according to the Austin American-Statesman. Republican state lawmaker Rep. Kyle Biedermann said he supported the bill but was concerned about state overreach. “There shouldn’t be a need to have to legislate more regulation of these other companies when it seems their packaging is pretty clear,” Biedermann said in the Dallas News. Based on the numbers, it seems like the meat industry is spooked by the astounding growth of meatless products. The growth of meatless products is hard to ignore. Investor predictions put the market for meatless products at $35 billion. When Beyond...
    Plant-based and additional meatless products are accused of misleading buyers under a bill the Texas House approved Monday. “Texas is the latest state to debate measures that would prohibit foods that don’t contain animal products from using words like ‘meat’ or ‘beef’ in their name,” the Dallas Morning News reported. The bill was approved following a debate but needs one additional vote in the House to move on to the Texas Senate. According to Rep. Brad Buckley, his bill would help protect consumers, including vegetarians and vegans, from purchasing a product by mistake. “This is for those who choose to eat meat, but it’s also for those who choose to not eat meat,” explained Buckley, a Killeen Republican who helps manage a small cattle operation. The News article continued: House Bill 316 would prohibit products derived from insects, plants or cell cultures — which come from in vitro animal cells harvested in the lab and not slaughtered animals — from using the terms “meat,” “pork,” “poultry product” and “beef” in their names. Using these words could result in a company...
    The Texas House approved a bill Monday that would prohibit plant-based foods from using "meat" or "beef" on labels because it could be misleading to some consumers. South Dakota passed a similar bill in 2019 that was an effort to protect the state's livestock industry and effectively allows the term "meat" to be used only for protein harvested from animal carcasses. The Texas House Bill 316 would prohibit products derived from insects, plants, or cell structures from using the term "meat," "poultry product," "pork," and "beef" in their labels. If a company uses these labels on anything but the standard designation, it could be accused of misleading consumers. Some terms would still be allowed on plant-based products, such as the word "burger." COURT UPHOLDS FDA RULE ALLOWING COMPANY TO USE COLOR ADDITIVE IN FAUX BEEF PRODUCTS The bill will likely be debated once again after it passed to engrossment Monday. The author of the bill is Republican state Rep. Brad Buckley, who argued the measure is to protect consumers of meat, vegetarians, and vegans from buying something by mistake. State...
    Billie Eilish has been vegan for 7 years. Daniele Venturelli/WireImage Billie Eilish has followed a vegan diet for seven years.  She said learning about the meat industry and dairy industry led her to eliminate animal products.  "Once you know that kind of thing and you see it, it's really hard to go back," she said.  Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. Billie Eilish discussed her commitment to following a vegan diet during an interview for British Vogue's June issue.  In the video, 23 famous fans asked the 19-year-old singer a wide range of questions about her career, personal life, and aspirations. Orlando Bloom, who met Eilish backstage at Coachella, was one of them. The "Pirates of the Caribbean" actor described himself as "90% plant-based" and said he was curious to know why Eilish avoids consuming animal products, including meat, seafood, milk, eggs, and cheese. "I am vegan. I've been vegan for, damn, seven years," Eilish began.  Educating herself about the ethics of the meat industry and the dairy industry guided her decision, the singer explained.   "Once you...
    A San Francisco federal appeals court upheld a decision by the Food and Drug Administration to allow Impossible Foods to use “heme,” the additive the company says makes its products “taste like meat.” Had Impossible Foods lost this legal battle, it could have dealt a heavy blow to the company. Genetically engineered heme is what sets its products apart from other competitors like Beyond Meat that don’t use the ingredient. Heme is what sets its products apart from other competitors The FDA used a weaker legal standard than it should have to approve the use of heme, the nonprofit Center for Food Safety argued in a lawsuit it filed last year. It said the FDA made its decision based on safety standards for food additives rather than on standards for color additives, which stipulate that there needs to be “convincing evidence” that the color additive causes no harm. Heme is a red ingredient that makes Impossible Foods’ products appear to “bleed.” The appeals court ruling said that the FDA had “substantial evidence” to deem heme in Impossible Foods safe...
    Tips To Get Your Mortgage Payments as Low as Possible Fully Electric 2021 Ford Mustang Mach-E: Review Find remote work solutions with Surface Ad Microsoft Full screen 1/5 SLIDES © Provided by Best Life The USDA Just Issued a Salmonella Warning for This Popular Meat If you're looking for leaner meat, there's a good chance you use ground turkey to prepare everything from homemade burgers to chilis and stews. But before you go to cook up your next meal, make sure to check your freezer: The government has just issued a salmonella warning for ground turkey products. Read on for more information on the important advisory, and for more items you need to toss right into the trash, check out If You Have These Supplements at Home, the FDA Says "Destroy Them." According to the Department of Agriculture's Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS), about 211,406 pounds of raw ground turkey products made by Pennsylvania company Plainville Brands were affected by the public health alert. Since...
    Enrique Díaz / 7cero/Getty Images If you choose to go vegan, experts say choose your plants wisely. Vegans are more likely to have hip fractures than omnivores, according to research. Experts say vegans should eat chickpeas, seeds, and quinoa for bone health.  Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. Although a vegan diet is hailed for its many health benefits, there may be some downsides to ditching animal products.  A small study found that veganism is linked to weaker bones and higher odds of bone fractures compared to those who eat animal products, otherwise known as omnivores.  The study, conducted by researchers at the German Federal Institute for Risk Assessment, also found that vegans had less calcium — an important nutrient for bone health — than omnivores. Some of the other nutrients the vegans lacked were vitamin A, vitamin B2, lysine, zinc, and omega-3 fatty acids.  But Bonnie Taub-Dix, a registered dietitian nutritionist and author of Read It Before You Eat It — Taking You from Label to Table, who was not involved in the study, said there...
    New York : Plant-based diets have become very popular in recent years thanks to its popularity increasing for ethical, environmental, spiritual and health reasons, as Insider indicates. This type of diet includes several food sources that help to generate a diverse and quite healthy menu for the diner. Below we detail about plant-based diets, and the benefits they can bring. What is a plant-based diet? As its name suggests, a plant-based diet is a type of diet that consists mostly of meals made up of plant-based food sources, such as fruits, vegetables, whole grains, legumes, seeds, nuts, and oils. The transition from a conventional diet to a plant-based one must be done consciously to avoid negative effects. Source: Shutterstock Certain plant-based diets can contain foods of animal origin, although in a small percentage. This makes such diets of a mixed nature. Among the types of plant-based diets can be found: Lacto-vegetarian diet: Diet that excludes red and white meat, fish, eggs, and flour, but allows dairy. Ovo-vegetarian diet: Excludes red and white meats, fish, flour, and...
    New York (CNN Business)Beyond Meat is selling more products at Walmart, the latest in a wave of expansion for the brand. Starting this week, over 400 Walmart stores are adding Beyond Sausage Hot Italian, a plant-based sausage, to their portfolio of Beyond Meat products, which already includes the Beyond burger and Beyond breakfast patties. Roughly 500 Walmart stores are also adding the Cookout Classic value-pack, which includes plant-based burger patties, as a permanent item. The cookout pack was first sold at Walmart last summer as a limited-time offering. Beyond Meat, which makes plant-based alternatives to meat that are designed to look, taste and cook like animal protein, has been rapidly growing its reach at a time when the appetite for plant-based protein is high. More Beyond Meat products will be available at Walmart this week. Walmart (WMT) started selling Beyond Meat in 2015. As of September of last year, Beyond products were available in about 800 stores. Now they're available at about 2,400 nationwide. Altogether, Beyond products can be found in about 28,000 retail outlets across the country, according...
    EL SEGUNDO, Calif. (AP) — Plant-based food company Beyond Meat will be partnering with several major fast food chains in the coming years to expand offerings that could eventually include plant-based burgers, chalupas or toppings on a stuffed-crust pizza. Beyond Meat on Thursday announced distribution agreements with McDonald’s as well as with Yum Brands, the parent company of KFC, Taco Bell and Pizza Hut. The company based in El Segundo, California, said it will develop plant-based products for all the restaurants, with exclusive menu items for each brand. Beyond Meat had limited partnerships with McDonald’s and Yum Brands before, testing its products in limited geographies or with only an item or two. The companies are now expanding those ties. Chicago-based McDonald’s will use the Beyond Meat partnership to roll out what it is calling the “McPlant” burger, as well as eventually plant-based pork, egg and chicken products. Yum will use Beyond Meat to expand its “Beyond Fried Chicken” products, as well as pizza toppings at Pizza Hut. Yum, which is based in Louisville, Kentucky, did not...
    This article was medically reviewed by Kailey Proctor, MPH, RDN, CSO, a board-certified oncology dietitian at the Leonard Clinical Cancer Institute with Mission Hospital.  Medically Reviewed Reviewed By Check Mark Icon A check mark. It indicates that the relevant content has been reviewed and verified by an expert Our stories are reviewed by medical professionals to ensure you get the most accurate and useful information about your health and wellness. For more information, visit our medical review board. Eating a whole-foods, plant-based diet reduces your risk of heart disease, diabetes, and obesity. Westend61/Getty Images A plant-based diet consists mostly of foods like fruits, vegetables, legumes, and whole grains. If you choose a plant-based diet, you should avoid or limit meat, dairy, eggs, and seafood.  A plant-based diet may reduce your risk of diabetes, heart disease, and obesity.   Visit Insider's Health Reference library for more advice. Whether for health, ethical, environmental, or spiritual reasons, plant-based diets continue to grow in popularity, with nearly 10 million Americans adopting one. Here's what you need to know about plant-based diets and their...
    AUGUSTA, Maine (AP) — Senators from Maine and South Dakota are reintroducing a proposal to allow meat and poultry products inspected through state programs to be sold across state lines. Independent Sen. Angus King of Maine and Republican Sen. Mike Rounds of South Dakota have characterized the law change as a way to help smaller, local meat producers be more competitive. King said farmers who have demonstrated the quality of their meat through state programs “should not have to jump through extra hoops to expand into new markets,” which he called “the textbook definition of redundancy.” The senators said there are 27 states with inspection programs certified by the Food Safety Inspection Service, which also oversees inspections for meat and poultry intended for interstate sale. Yet even though these state programs often exceed federal guidelines, certified products cannot be sold across state lines. Copyright 2021 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed. Tags: Maine, Associated Press
    A customer picks up a package of Impossible Burger plant based meat during the Impossible Foods Inc. grocery store product launch at Gelson's Markets in Los Angeles, California, U.S., on Friday, Sept. 20, 2019.Patrick T. Fallon | Bloomberg | Getty Images Impossible Foods is slashing the suggested prices for U.S. grocery stores by 20%, pushing it closer to achieving price parity with the meat it's trying to replace. The recommended retail prices for Impossible's meat-free burgers is now $5.49 for patties and $6.99 for a 12-ounce package. The price cuts make the meat alternatives cheaper than ever, but consumers will still be paying more than double for the Impossible Burger, based on the U.S. Department of Agriculture's national beef retail report for the week ending Feb. 4. Outside of the United States, double-digit price cuts for Impossible products are also being rolled out in grocery stores. This marks the first time that the privately held start-up has lowered its retail prices, but the third time in the last year that the company has permanently discounted products. Restaurant distributors received price...
    Renovations To Make — and Skip — Before Selling Your Home NBC Sports Network Is Shutting Down Best & Worst Refinance Mortgage Companies of 2021 Ad Microsoft Full screen 1/5 SLIDES © Provided by Best Life If You Have This Meat in Your Fridge, Throw It Away Now, USDA Says If you love red meat, you might want to check that the food you've got in your fridge is safe to eat this week. The United States Department of Agriculture's Food Safety Inspection Service (FSIS) just announced a massive recall on a popular type of sausage, so read on to discover if you have the affected products in your fridge. And while you're cleaning out your kitchen, If You Have These Chips at Home, the FDA Says Check Them Immediately. On Jan. 21, the FSIS announced the recall of approximately 4,200 pounds of Bob Evans Italian Sausage due to potential contamination with thin pieces of blue rubber. The recalled pork sausage, which was sold at stores in...
    This article was medically reviewed by Samantha Cassetty, MS, RD, a nutrition and wellness expert with a private practice based in New York City. Medically Reviewed Reviewed By Check Mark Icon A check mark. It indicates that the relevant content has been reviewed and verified by an expert Our stories are reviewed by medical professionals to ensure you get the most accurate and useful information about your health and wellness. For more information, visit our medical review board. Flexitarians usually only eat red meat around once or twice a week and focus more of their meals on fruits and vegetables. wenyi liu/Getty Images The flexitarian diet is a more flexible take on going vegetarian, allowing meat, seafood, dairy, and eggs in your meal plan in moderation. There are no strict guidelines to the flexitarian diet, but experts generally recommend centering most meals around plant-based foods, while treating meat and dairy as an accent rather than the main dish. Some of the health benefits of including more plant-based foods in your diet may include improved digestion, stronger immune system, and improved cholesterol and...
    Dutch customs officers have reportedly been confiscating sandwiches from drivers arriving from the United Kingdom as required by post-Brexit rules that ban personal imports of meat and dairy products in the European Union. Videos posted online show officials explaining to bewildered drivers at the Hook of Holland ferry terminal that since Brexit “you are no longer allowed to bring certain foods to Europe, like meat, fruit, vegetables, fish, that kind of stuff,” according to The Guardian. For one driver, the new rules meant he had to give up several sandwiches that were wrapped in tinfoil. When the man asked if he could take the meat off and keep the bread, the customs officer told him “No, everything will be confiscated. Welcome to the Brexit, sir, I’m sorry,” according to the report. Nothing says ‘taking back control’ than having your sandwiches confiscated at the Dutch border. #torybrexit Britain pic.twitter.com/EIZ6VqswVP — Simon Gosden. Esq. #fbpe 3.5% ????????????????????????‍☠️???????? (@g_gosden) January 11, 2021 The ban on imports began Jan. 1, with the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra) saying travelers should...
    Dutch police officers have been filmed laughing at a British truck driver as the officials confiscated the man's ham sandwiches in line with post-Brexit import rules. 'Welcome to the Brexit, sir,' one of the officers says mockingly in the video of the incident, as the driver pleads: 'Can you take the meat and leave me the bread?' Footage from Dutch TV showed the border officials confiscating sandwiches and other foodstuffs from drivers entering the Netherlands from the UK.  The EU does not allow for meat, meat products, milk or dairy products to be brought in from countries outside the union for 'personal consumption'.  With Britain having left the EU on January 1, the rules now apply to people crossing the Channel. These rules do not apply to animal products being transported between EU members states, while Andorra, Iceland, Liechtenstein, Norway, San Marino or Switzerland are also exempt. Pictured: A still from footage showing Dutch police officers confiscating food from a British lorry driver. Holding up the man's ham sandwiches wrapped in foul, they are seen telling him that the...
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