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    A Florida English teacher who was recently named a "teacher of the year" has been arrested and charged with child abuse against a student.  Caroline Melanie Lee, 60, an instructor at Darnell-Cookman Middle/High in Florida's Duval County Public Schools district, was arrested on Friday. A student claimed Lee asked to speak with her privately and caused her to have a bloody nose after Lee struck the student's face, according to the Florida Times-Union.  "What is alleged should never occur—ever—especially in a school setting," Duval Schools Superintendent Diana Greene said, per the Times-Union. "I have no tolerance for adults who harm children, especially adults in a position of trust. We will cooperate with all investigations, and pending those results, we will take the actions necessary to stand up for and protect our students." The student involved in the incident was not in any of Lee's classes this year and alleged that the teacher struck her several times. Lee claimed she wanted to speak with the student after seeing a message on Instagram that she perceived was "a threat to kill her." Lee added that she was...
    Jay Leno says he's removed all political bits from his act and that comedians must now 'adapt to the circumstances' of cancel culture, which has cost some performers their careers and others lucrative endorsement deals.  Leno is now open to apologizing to those he offends, like he did after actress Gabrielle Union criticized him for joking about Asians eating dogs while he guest-judged America's Got Talent in 2019.  He made similar jokes at least nine times while hosting the Tonight Show between between 2002 and 2012, according to Reuters. The 71-year-old comic, one of the most successful of the past few decades, also said he's open to changing his material depending on the audience in a recent interview with the Los Angeles Times. Jay Leno, 71, appeared to accept cancel culture in a recent interview promoting his new game show, saying 'you either change with the times or you die.' 'When I do a gig in Utah and they'll go, 'Look, we don't want any drug jokes, we don't want any sex jokes,' I go, 'OK, I'll take those out'...
    Myart-Cruz also claimed that requesting "police-free schools" is "not radical." "It is not radical to ask for ethnic studies," she said, according Los Angeles Magazine. "It is not radical to ask for childcare. It's not radical to ask for police-free schools so that students don't feel criminalized. That is not radical; that's just fact." During the last school year, Myart-Cruz condemned a plan that offered financial incentives for schools that fulfilled specific criteria related to offering in-person education. "If you condition funding on the reopening of schools, that money will only go to white and wealthier and healthier school communities that do not have the transmission rates that low-income Black and Brown communities do," Myart-Cruz said in a statement in March. "This is a recipe for propagating structural racism and it is deeply unfair to the students we serve." The magazine quoted Garry Joseph, an individual who taught in a room next to Myart-Cruz back when she worked at Emerson Middle School. "Kids complained about her because she was strict," Joseph recalled. "But at the end of the...
    In her first public statement since accusing Governor Andrew Cuomo of groping, the governor's former aide told "CBS This Morning" and "The Times Union" that "What he did to me was a crime. He broke the law."  The woman, who has not been identified, is one of 11 accusing Cuomo of sexual harassment. Days after a blistering report from the New York state attorney general's office backed the women's claims, she became the first to file a criminal complaint against the governor.  Her full interview will air on "CBS This Morning" on Monday.  According to the report released by the New York state attorney general, the assistant claimed in 2019 and 2020 that the governor "engaged in close and intimate hugs" on multiple occasions, including one incident when he "reached under her blouse and grabbed her breast." During another incident, while the assistant snapped a selfie, she said Cuomo "put his hand on and then rubbed and grabbed her butt."  Investigators said "the Governor engaged in a pattern of inappropriate conduct with (the) executive assistant," which, in addition to...
    New York Times correspondent Walter Duranty denied the Holodomor as it unfolded The committee that awards the Pulitzer Prize is facing fresh calls to revoke the top honor in American journalism from New York Times correspondent Walter Duranty over his false reporting from the Soviet Union in the 1930s. The petition launched by the U.S. Committee on Ukrainian Holodomor-Genocide Awareness calls on the Pulitzer board to rescind Duranty's 1932 prize for correspondence.  At issue is Duranty's minimization and denials of the forced famine in Soviet Ukraine that led to the deaths of millions in the early 1930s, and his fawning coverage of communist dictator Joseph Stalin. Known as the Holodomor, meaning to kill by starvation, the famine followed Stalin's collectivization and grain seizure policies, and the Ukrainian government alleges that it was an intentional genocide intended to subdue an independence movement. A representative for the Pulitzer Prizes did not immediately respond to an inquiry from DailyMail.com on Wednesday morning. A British-born socialite, Duranty moved to Moscow following the Bolshevik victory in the Russian Civil War, and served as the Times' Moscow bureau...
    Edward D. Mullins is the president of the 13,000 member NEW York City Sergeants Benevolent Association. He has been a member of the New York City Police Department since 1982 and president of the SBA since 2002.  Early in his career he was assigned to the 13th Precinct on Manhattan's East Side and nearly ten years later was promoted to detective, assigned to the 10th Precinct in Manhattan's Chelsea area.  Promoted to Sergeant in 1993, he was assigned to the 19th Precinct on Manhattan's Upper East Side and later the Detective Bureau in Brooklyn South, where he served in the 67th Precinct Detective Squad, Special Victims Squad, and the Kings County District Attorney's Office. Mullins, 59, was raised in Greenwich Village.  The weekend shooting of three people in New York City's Times Square tells you all you must know about life in the Big Apple under the stewardship of Mayor Bill de Blasio and the legions of feckless elected officials and enablers dangerously masquerading as leaders. Police officer Alyssa Vogel heard reports of shots fired at West 45th Street and...
    Let's get one thing out of the way first. President Biden’s speech to a Joint Session of Congress is not a State of the Union speech. It’s not unheard of for people to colloquially refer to a president’s initial speech before a joint session of Congress early in their first term as "State of the Union." But technically it’s not a "State of the Union." That’s because the newly-inaugurated president has only been on the job a short time. However, President Biden has been more than "on the job" for a while now. The president's initial address to Congress comes 98 days after he was sworn in. Most recent presidents have given their first speech to Congress about a month after taking office, usually in mid-to-late February. President Reagan spoke to Congress on Feb. 18, 1981, just 29 days into his first term. President Trump spoke to Congress on Feb. 28, 2017, 39 days after taking office. One can blame the delay for Biden’s address on a host of reasons. The pandemic still looms large. Capitol security is the other problem. WHY BIDEN'S...
    Tech workers at The New York Times have formed a union under the NewsGuild of New York, and they are demanding voluntary recognition from the paper’s management. The new union, called the Tech Times Guild, represents more than 650 workers from the digital side of the company, including software engineers, designers, and data analysts. Those employees are not included in the editorial union of The New York Times, which represents more than 3,000 reporters and media professionals at the newspaper and is also organized under NewsGuild. The editorial union has historically excluded employees on the digital side of the paper, even as the company has expanded into more ambitious data and digital work. As a result, the Tech Times Guild is seeking a separate bargaining unit, which would negotiate separately with the Times management. “As of now, we face a number of challenges,” the Tech Times Guild said in a statement on Twitter , “including sudden or unexplained termination, opaque promotion processes, unpaid overtime, and underinvestment in diverse representation. Without a union, we lack the data or bargaining rights...
    A woman claiming to be a former staff member to New York Governor Andrew Cuomo has levied more allegations of sexual harassment against the governor, calling the advances “calculated.” The Times Union published an interview with the woman on Wednesday, who spoke on the condition of anonymity, detailing her experiences with the governor in his mansion. The woman told the Times Union that the governor had groomed her while in his mansion in what she described as a “pattern” of behavior that ranged from “tight hugs” to “kisses on the cheek.” The staffer recalled how in November, @NYGovCuomo called her from the Capitol to the executive mansion. She said that when she arrived in Cuomo’s office, he rose from his desk and hugged her in a way that “wasn’t just a hug.”https://t.co/3VP1qWxvDr — Washington Examiner (@dcexaminer) April 7, 2021 “Sometimes he would pull my whole body close to him. I remember purposely, like, taking my pelvis and pulling away. … I knew what he was doing.” The anonymous woman said during the interview. The woman stated that the governor...
    A female aide alleges New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo aggressively groped her in a sexual manner after she was summoned to the governor’s mansion last year, a person familiar with the woman’s claims told the Times-Union. The staff member had reportedly been called to the mansion to help Cuomo with phone troubles. They were alone in his private residence, and he shut the door, reached under her blouse and groped her, according to the source.  The Times-Union first reported details of the woman's accusation. Her identity has not been released.
    Major media outlets are often accused of downplaying atrocities of socialist regimes, and nowhere is that clearer than with the treatment of former USSR (Union of Soviet Socialist Republics) by The New York Times and others, say those with personal experience in the former federation. Fox News took a look at some of the most over-the-top examples: 1) “There is No Famine” in the Soviet Union In 1931, New York Times Moscow correspondent Walter Duranty reported that “there is no famine... nor is there likely to be” in Soviet-occupied Ukraine. In 1932, he was awarded the coveted Pulitzer Prize for his reporting on the Soviet Union.  But, on the ground, reporters discovered a tragically different picture. “Millions are dying of hunger,” freelance journalist Gareth Jones reported in 1933 after making a trip to Ukrainian villages, where a government-created food shortage was unfolding. “Everywhere was the cry, ‘There is no bread. We are dying,’” Jones reported in several major outlets. Within days, Duranty wrote a news story in the Times slamming Jones’ reporting as “a big scare story.” Duranty’s rebuttal was titled: “Russians Hungry, But...
    Don Emmert/AFP/Getty Images The New York Times Guild apologized on Sunday after denouncing an article from New York Times columnist Bret Stephens. On Friday, Stephen’s criticized the New York Times’ controversial, but Pulitzer Prize-winning “1619 Project” helmed by Nikole Hannah-Jones — calling it an ambitious project which in “some ways” succeeded, but criticizing its errors of fact and attempt to have the “last word” on history. Stephens concluded: “the 1619 Project has failed.” The Twitter account for the New York Times union soon responded, blasting the paper and Stephen’s for the piece. “It says a lot about an organization when it breaks it’s [sic] own rules and goes after one of it’s [sic] own. The act, like the article, reeks,” the union declared. The post quickly came under fire on social media — where users also noted that the union for the most prestigious newspaper in America misused “it’s” twice in one sentence — and from the Intercept’s Glenn Greenwald, who wrote that the Guild’s “denunciation was marred by humiliating typos and even more so by creepy and authoritarian censorship demands...
    Media watch: The Times Knows Tax Avoidance A New York Times “investigation” described how President Trump found ways to avoid taxes — and the Times “ought to know,” snarks Ira Stoll at The New York Sun, because the Gray Lady and “the Ochs-Sulzberger family that control it have done the same thing.” Trump, for ­instance, used losses in some years to lower his taxes in others. Likewise, in 2008, the Times lost $58 million and then cited a net income-tax “benefit” of nearly $6 million. The paper “complains” of Trump’s foreign investments and payments to his kids to avoid the gift tax. Yet the Times also has foreign business and has paid multiple family members six-figure salaries. The paper is painting “Trump as somehow corrupt for doing things that the Ochs-Sulzberger family has itself been doing for years.” Iconoclast: Supreme Tit-For-Tat After Justice Antonin Scalia’s death, Benjamin Wittes and Miguel Estrada wrote that “the only rule that governs the confirmation process is the law of the jungle: There are no rules,” and The Volokh Conspiracy’s Jonathan H. Adler agrees. He’d...
    Student activists as Skidmore College in Saratoga Springs, New York, are demanding that an art professor at the school be fired after he and his wife decided to simply observe a pro-police rally in town. What are the details?David Peterson, 61, who has been teaching at the school for 31 years, told the Times-Union last week that it was "civic interest and curiosity" that led him to attend a "Back the Blue" event in Congress Park in late July. The rally was advertised on Facebook as a peaceful protest intended to show "law enforcement that they are valued, loved, respected and appreciated." The Times-Union reported that "the Petersons arrived at a little after 7 p.m., watched from the edge of the crowd as 'Back the Blue' supporters and counter-protesters traded barbs, then departed to get dinner after about 20 minutes." Perhaps most importantly, they left before a small clash between police and Black Lives Matter protesters resulted. "Neither [Peterson nor his wife] thought much of it," the report added. Nevertheless, some students at the school were incensed....
    (CNN)Nearly a week since the police shooting of Jacob Blake in Wisconsin, Blake's uncle said the police union's version of events is "garbage" and "insulting."Justin Blake says his nephew didn't have a weapon and "didn't deserve to be shot seven times in his back.""We're not going to allow them to come back a week later and talk about some type of weapon being involved after they temporarily paralyzed my nephew," Blake said. "As his uncle, that's insulting."Blake, a 29-year-old Black man, was shot while leaning into his vehicle by a White Kenosha officer. A family attorney said Blake's three children were in the car.His uncle's fiery response came after the union representing the officer released what they called the "actual and undisputed" facts of what led to the shooting --- details they say even state investigators omitted or left incomplete. Read MoreFamily attorney says Blake never posed 'imminent threat'In a Friday statement, the Kenosha Professional Police Association say police attempted to Tase Blake and when that failed, Blake then forcefully fought with the officers and put one of them in...
    The New York Times Guild announced Friday that it met with leadership at the newspaper to cultivate “a more diverse and equitable” workplace, and one suggestion is to implement pre-publication “sensitivity reads.” The union announced multiple suggestions it made during a meeting earlier in July. The guild wrote that it believes the NYT needs “a top-to-bottom resetting of priorities to improve the working conditions of our colleagues of color.” “Get it right from the beginning: Sensitivity reads should happen at the beginning of the publication process, with compensation for those who do them,” reads one of the tweets laying out suggestions given. Get it right from the beginning: sensitivity reads should happen at the beginning of the publication process, with compensation for those who do them. (6/8) — NYTimesGuild (@NYTimesGuild) July 31, 2020 This NYT union suggestion comes after a “civil war” at the company broke out on social media in June. The public dispute was over an op-ed written by Republican Arkansas Sen. Tom Cotton, who suggested the U.S. military should possibly be deployed as backup in an effort...
    Arkansas Senator Tom Cotton sparked outrage by calling the enslavement of millions of African people in the early years of the United States a 'necessary evil'.   Cotton, an outspoken Republican, made the jarring remark in an interview with the Arkansas Democrat-Gazette on Sunday as he promoted a new bill that would defund schools that teach the New York Times' controversial 1619 Project about slavery in the US.   The senator argued that slavery is a critical piece of American history, saying: 'As the founding fathers said, it was the necessary evil upon which the union was built, but the union was built in a way, as Lincoln said, to put slavery on the course to its ultimate extinction.' Cotton later defended his comment by insisting that he was merely citing the founding fathers in a tweet reposted by President Donald Trump, and his office stated that the senator does not personally believe slavery was a 'necessary evil'.   Arkansas Senator Tom Cotton (pictured on July 1) called the enslavement of millions of African people in the early years of the United States...
    Washington (CNN)As European Union nations continue to ease coronavirus restrictions, the EU is considering recommending that member states block American visitors from visiting their countries due to the surge of coronavirus cases in the US, according to two EU diplomats."The criteria will be focused on circulation of the virus," said one EU diplomat, adding that Brussels is looking to keep out travelers from countries "where the virus is circulating most actively."No final decisions have been made and it is ultimately up to individual members to decide who can enter each country.The New York Times was first to report on the possibility. The EU diplomats had not seen the draft lists of acceptable travelers the Times reported on, but they said they are aware that discussions are ongoing.CNN has asked the State Department for comment.Read MoreThis story is breaking and will be updated.
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