Wednesday, Dec 01, 2021 - 04:04:53
231 results - (0.003 seconds)

the supply chain:

latest news at page 1:
    The expansion of the 126-year-old Howard Street Tunnel is beginning. (Courtesy MDOT MPA) Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan said a new project that broke ground in Baltimore on Monday will be “an absolute game-changer” for the entire region. Hogan joined officials at the mouth of the 126-year-old Howard Street tunnel in Baltimore to break ground on a $466 million project that will allow trains to double-stack containers heading to and from the Port of Baltimore. Hogan said the project would provide “a more cost-effective way to transport more freight by rail rather than by trucks.” He predicted the project would also “reduce fuel consumption by 137 million gallons, and it will help reduce congestion and emissions all along the I-95 corridor.” Maryland Transportation Secretary Greg Slater emphasized the importance of the extra capacity that the tunnel project creates, and how double-stacked containers would remove the shipping bottleneck at the aging tunnel. More Maryland News More Local News “This is supply chain. This is big infrastructure. This is what everyone’s talking about,” Slater said. The project faced a number of...
    New York (CNN Business)Here we go again. Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell is set to testify Tuesday that the Omicron variant threatens America's economic recovery.Much remains unknown about Omicron. Yet if it prolongs the pandemic, it could keep prices rising, hurt job growth and make the supply chain crisis worse."The recent rise in Covid-19 cases and the emergence of the Omicron variant pose downside risks to employment and economic activity and increased uncertainty for inflation," Powell wrote in prepared testimony he's set to deliver Tuesday to the Senate Committee on Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs. Wall Street sold off stocks and oil Friday after learning about the potentially highly infectious and more immunity-resistant variant. But the market regained much of its lost ground Monday after investors took a breath and sensed a buying opportunity.Stocks similarly sold off when Wall Street first heard about the Delta variant, but it soon rebounded and surged to new records as vaccine availability spread and health officials learned how to better manage the pandemic.Read MoreJerome Powell Fast FactsIn his prepared testimony, Powell noted the economy...
    New York (CNN Business)The supply chain crisis means last-minute gift buyers may have little choice but to go shopping the old-fashioned way this holiday season.High demand, combined with supply chain delays, materials' shortages and troubles hiring workers, are shrinking the availability of items both online and at stores. As customers get closer to the last minute, physical stores will become a more appealing option for shoppers than waiting around for delivery, analysts expect. Even if customers can't find exactly what they're looking for at a store, it's usually easier to browse around for an alternative in person — and they can try it on."Brick and mortar may be more attractive for consumers later in the season," Rod Sides, a vice chairman at Deloitte and leader of its US retail and distribution practice, said in an email. "Shoppers can leave with goods in hand, versus waiting on promised dates from shippers." Need to buy a last-minute gift? Zipping over to the store may be a smarter bet to get what you need right away than ordering online and risking your...
    A customer's groceries are rung up at a store in San Francisco, California, U.S., on Thursday, Nov. 11, 2021.David Paul Morris | Bloomberg | Getty Images Critical supply chains are choked off. Demand soars. Prices surge and everyone starts freaking out about inflation and wonder how long it will last. Is it 1945? 1916? 1974? The answer, of course, is all of the above, and you can throw 2021 in there as well. Inflation is not something new for the U.S. as the nation has weathered seven such episodes of lasting price surges since World War II including the current run, which is the strongest in 30 years. Getting out of the pandemic shock has been a difficult exercise for the world's largest economy, and inflation has been a painful side effect. But trying to find a historical parallel – and, thus, perhaps a way out – isn't easy. Virtually every cycle bears at least some similarities to others, but each is unique in its own way. The most common comparison to these days is the stagflation – low growth,...
    Toys are seen at a Target store on October 25, 2021 in Houston, Texas.Brandon Bell | Getty Images Despite high sales expectations for Black Friday, Small Business Saturday, and Cyber Monday, just over half of American consumers don't plan to shop on some of the biggest days for deals during the holiday season. Fifty-two percent of Americans said they won't go shopping on Black Friday, Small Business Saturday, or Cyber Monday, while 59% said they are not excited to go shopping on any of the three days, according to a CNBC/Momentive Small Business Survey for Small Business Saturday. The survey was conductive by Momentive from Nov. 10 to Nov. 12 and included 2,744 respondents. An estimated 158.3 million people will shop from Thanksgiving Day through Cyber Monday this year, an increase of 2 million people compared to 2020, according to the National Retail Federation. However, that would be down 4.2% compared to the number of people that shopped over that period in 2019. Amid a holiday shopping season noticeably different than previous years impacted by pandemic trends and new habits like curbside pickup,...
    Two New Jersey wine and spirits store owners joined 'Fox News Live' on Thanksgiving Thursday warning that the supply chain crisis may hamper the holiday season.  "Champagne is our biggest issue," said Andrea Maranca, a co-owner of Tewksbury Fine Wine & Spirits. "Shortages are crazy and so we’re buying as much champagne as we can so that we can continue to fill our shelves." Elisabeth Maranca said she often tells customers upfront about the issue facing the shop, citing shortages of glass and tequila as "quite the challenge." LIQUOR SHORTAGES PUT A DAMPER ON UPCOMING THANKSGIVING, CHRISTMAS HOLIDAYS She added that particular wines from New Zealand used to take eight weeks to arrive. The trucking shortage, however, has extended that time frame to as long as four to five months.  "It has been a bit of a struggle but we’re tasting a lot of wines and we’re trying to find things we think that the customer's really going to love," said Elisabeth.  Shipping containers are seen at the container terminal of the port of Oakland, California, U.S., October 28,...
    (CNN)Almost 60,000 pounds of roasted turkeys, over 38,000 pounds of sweet potatoes and over 68,000 pies and cakes were shipped around the world by the Department of Defense's Logistics Agency to make sure American service members stationed in the US and across the globe will have a Thanksgiving meal.The Defense Logistics Agency Troop Support team starts working on coordinating the annual Thanksgiving meal for the troops in March, a release from the Department of Defense said. This year, the team faced the same global supply chain issues the rest of the world is dealing with because of the Covid-19 pandemic, but they still managed to get key Thanksgiving foods to bases around the world."We have been working with our vendors well in advance of the holiday to reduce chances that the necessary items won't be available on the big day," Robin Whaley, DLA Troop Support's Subsistence chief of customer operations for the continental United States, said in a statement.Because of their hard work and planning, an estimated 5,706 whole turkeys, 59,666 pounds of roasted turkeys, 38,400 pounds of sweet potatoes,...
    Spear warned that vaccine mandates "will have vast unintended consequences." "The U.S. is already facing unprecedented supply chain disruptions and delays due to many factors, including significant labor shortages, production shutdowns, a shortage of raw materials, and pent-up consumer demand," Spear continued, adding, "Our data shows that a vaccine mandate may very well further cripple the supply chain throughout the country by forcing up to 13% of drivers to leave the industry entirely." Trucking group Owner-Operator Independent Drivers Association also went after the administration over vaccine mandates. The organization's spokeswoman, Norita Taylor, called the jab requirement an example of "how unnecessary government mandates can force experienced owner-operators and independent truckers out of business" and warned that the mandate would "send safe drivers off the road," the AP said. Canadian truckers aren't happy about it either. In a story from the Toronto Star headlined, "A trucking nightmare: Supply chain horrors feared as thousands of unvaccinated drivers won't be allowed to cross U.S.-Canada border," Canadian Trucking Alliance President Stephen Laskowski said, "This is making a bad situation a lot worse....
    Hong Kong (CNN Business)Ships in Chinese waters are disappearing from global trackers, creating yet another headache for the global supply chain. China's growing isolation from the rest of the world — along with a deepening mistrust of foreign influence — may be to blame.Analysts say they started noticing the drop-off in shipping traffic toward the end of October, as China prepared to enact legislation governing data privacy. Usually, shipping data companies are able to track ships worldwide because they are fitted with an Automatic Identification System, or AIS, transceiver. This system allows ships to send information — such as position, speed, course and name — to stations that are based along coastlines using high-frequency radio. If a ship is out of range of those stations, the information can be exchanged via satellite.But that's not happening in the world's second-largest economy, a critical player in global trade. In the past three weeks, the number of vessels sending signals from the country has plunged by nearly 90%, according to data from the global shipping data provider VesselsValue.Read More"We are currently seeing an...
    Sen. Elizabeth Warren demanded an investigation into the cost of Thanksgiving turkeys on Tuesday, accusing poultry farmers of using monopoly power to jack up prices. Last week the American Farm Bureau Federation said the average cost of this year's turkey feast had jumped by 14 percent. With consumers already facing record gas prices, Warren called on the Department of Justice to act on a 24 percent hike in turkey prices. She called out four big producers - JBS Foods, Tyson, Perdue, and Sanderson - which she said controlled more than half the market. 'Lack of competition in the poultry industry is allowing these massive companies to squeeze both American consumers and farmers to fuel record corporate profits and payouts to shareholders,' she wrote in a letter to the DOJ. 'When companies have monopoly power as massive suppliers, they can jack up prices of the goods they sell.  'And when those same companies have complete or substantial market power as large employers or buyers of inputs, also known as monopsony power, they can suppress their own costs for those inputs, including workers'...
    Elsewhere, he conceded that "expectations of continued volatility and uncertainty related to the COVID-19 pandemic, inflation, and other macroeconomic factors" drove the decision. It's obvious to most that America's rapidly changing economic landscape under the Biden administration was a factor in the decision. Even NPR acknowledged that soaring inflation likely played a major role. "Each year, the value of a dollar is eroded by inflation, making a dollar price commitment more difficult to maintain," the news agency remarked, noting, "Last month, inflation reached the highest rate since 1990." "Dollar Tree's rivals have been veering away from strict $1 prices — or even $5, in the case of Five Below" for quite some time, it added. "Now, the final stickler is conceding." For the last three decades, the discount chain battled through various periods of rising inflation, but the economic struggles currently hitting corporate America under President Biden proved to be the final straw for the one-dollar holdout. Earlier this month, the Bureau of Labor Statistics reported that the Consumer Price Index for October recorded a 6.2% increase over the last...
    SHOPPERS have hopefully already picked up enough supplies for Thanksgiving – because some grocery stores are restricting how much you can buy. This includes grocery chain story Publix, which announced Tuesday that it would now limit turkey purchases to one per shopper. 1The grocery store chain has limited turkey purchases to one purchase per shopper The new move by Publix comes after it limited purchases to two on multiple Thanksgiving items including jarred gravy, canned cranberry sauce, canned pie filling, as well as canola, and vegetable oil. It also has limits on everyday essentials including disposable plates, knives, cups, napkins, and toilet paper.   This is because of supply chain issues that multiple stores have been dealing with this year. Simply put: the supply isn’t meeting the demand – and the situation won’t improve when everyone each year goes on a shopping spree ahead of Thanksgiving. Another grocery chain Winn-Dixie has joined Publix in limiting turkey purchases to one. Both grocery chains are based in Florida.   Most read in MoneyCASHING IN Families eligible for ‘surprise’ $8,000 payment after 'Thanksgiving' cash issuedPRETTY PENNY Lincoln pennies from...
    PHILADELPHIA (CBS) — The holiday season is here, starting with Thanksgiving just days away. As people plan to travel, shop, and eat, here are the things you need to know in the Tri-state area. TRAVEL The Philadelphia International Airport is asking travelers to not park their cars at the airport due to the holiday rush. Travelers who are flying with food or ingredients should check the TSA’s list of items that should go into checked baggage. For that list, click here.SUPPLY CHAIN SHORTAGESREAD MORE: Body Found Amid Search For Gregory Kelemen Accused Of Violently Beating, Killing Daughter With Baseball Bat, Seriously Injuring Wife In VoorheesGlobal supply chain shortages are hitting consumers at a local level across the country. CBS3 talked to an expert who had tips on how to combat supply chain shortages in the Philadelphia area.SHOPPING HOURSREAD MORE: GOP Candidate For Pennsylvania Commonwealth Court Seat Concedes To Philadelphia Democrat Lori Dumas After RecountBlack Friday kicks off the Christmas shopping season, with many malls opening the night of Thanksgiving or at midnight Friday. CBS3 compiled a list of hours for...
    New York (CNN Business)President Biden and Federal Reserve chair Jerome Powell are committed to fighting inflation. But the two may face an uphill battle bringing consumer prices down due to a factor that many experts may not be pricing into the economic picture: the rise of ESG investing. Investors have increasingly been looking to back companies that support sustainable environmental, social and governance practices. But some may be ignoring the impact the so-called "greenification" of the global economy is having on inflation, according to a recent report by Seema Shah, chief global strategist at Principal Global Investors, an asset management firm. She called the phenomenon "en-flation."Shah said that the increased focus by big businesses and governments on cleaner environmental policies could be inflationary in the short-term. "I can't see a reason why the Fed will not acknowledge the 'E' in its inflation outlook for much longer," Shah said in an interview with CNN Business. "We will see more central banks consider climate change, and I suspect the Fed will do so, too. The green movement is not going away."So what...
    U.S. Army service members serve meals to soldiers who attended Thanksgiving lunch at Fort McCoy dining facility.Department of Defense WASHINGTON – Ahead of the Thanksgiving holiday and amid a backdrop of global supply chain woes, the Pentagon sent nearly 60,000 pounds of roasted turkey to American troops stationed on U.S. military installations around the world. Last year, in order to mitigate the spread of the coronavirus, holiday meals were switched to a grab-and-go takeout style instead of large group gatherings in dining facilities. The Pentagon does not expect delays or disruptions to this year's Thanksgiving dinner despite supply chain problems. "The holiday meal should look more normal this year, with in-person dining returning in many locations," said Defense Logistics Agency troop support commander Army Brig. Gen. Eric Shirley. The Defense Logistics Agency, or DLA, coordinates the Pentagon's colossal combat supply chain. In addition, DLA oversees the delivery of traditional holiday meals to U.S. troops. Shirley said logistics to deliver the holiday meals start in March. In all, the DLA delivered more than 390,000 pounds of traditional Thanksgiving food,...
    Employers in the U.S. are experiencing an unprecedented labor shortage. Supply chains are facing slowdowns. Politicians are looking at every opportunity to keep the economy moving, and one option is the U.S. military.The National Guard has filled in the gaps to help with Covid testing, health care and distribution of personal protective equipment. Some states, such as Massachusetts, have also used the guard to help with bus driving for schools, and states such as Texas have been deploying soldiers to the border to help with immigration enforcement. "We also do see other senior guard leaders pushing back on some of these second-order pandemic-linked missions that are coming up," said Davis Winkie, a reporter for Army Times. "Like school bus driving, or, you know, filing unemployment claims or filling in for poll workers, the food bank support — the list of second-order Covid-effects missions keeps growing."One mission the guard could be asked to take on is supporting port operations and general logistics to try to ease the supply chain issues facing the nation."They might do a little bit around the edges,...
    NEW YORK (CBSNewYork) — Shopping for the holidays has an extra sense of urgency this year with the ongoing container ship backups impacting the supply chain, but there are some gift ideas that are guaranteed to make it under your tree before it’s too late. Ron Menin is gearing up for the holiday season. As he stocks his shelves and packages his bottles, the New York native who owns Hell’s Kitchen Hot Sauce knows business might be different this year. READ MORE: Early Black Friday Deals On The Hottest Toys And Toy Brands Of 2021“There’s been trouble with, like, supply chain,” he said. But that trouble is giving Menin and some of the 170 other small retail owners at Bank of America Winter Village at Bryant Park an advantage because many of them don’t have to rely on products coming from overseas. It’s one of the reasons experts say shoppers should look local. READ MORE: Feds Sound Alarm On Non-Reputable Online Sites, Sellers Pushing Counterfeit Goods During Holiday Shopping Season “I make everything myself, 60-80 case micro-batches in an FDA-approved...
    This 2021 holiday season, there’s no shortage of warnings about, well, shortages. With several links in the supply chain compromised, consumers are advised by CEOs on down to shop early for Christmas and the winter holidays — the better, it is said, to avoid being shut out of everything from tech to turkey. But what specifically should you be on the lookout for? Here’s an overview of 10 products and categories that are said to be feeling the effects of the domestic labor shortage, the overseas factory slowdowns and more. These are all items that may prove difficult to get off of your gift lists, and into wrapped boxes for loved ones. (And, yes, sorry, that was another warning.)Gaming consolesREAD MORE: 19-Year-Old Shot, Killed In San Francisco Bayview District PHIL BARKER/FUTURE PUBLISHING/GETTY IMAGES This one’s less of a red alert, and more of a reminder: Sony’s PlayStation 5 and Microsoft’s Xbox Series X are hard to find. Still. And probably for months more to come — and into 2023. (File under: Supply chain issues, microchip shortage division.) If you’re intent on scoring one of these before 2021’s done, then, sure,...
    NEW YORK (CBSNewYork) — Charitable organizations need help now more than ever. The rising cost of items due to the supply chain delays are really putting a squeeze on how much good they can do in the community, CBS2’s Aundrea Cline-Thomas reported Monday. READ MORE: Supply Chain Issues: How Are Global Shortages Affecting Local Consumers?The line for New York Common Pantry circled around the block in both directions, just shy over overlapping. There were regular pantry offerings on one side and the Thanksgiving distribution on the other. Hundreds of families are relying on groceries to help make ends meet. “We see many of the food items that we usually purchase in short supply. When we can purchase them, more expensive,” said Stephen Grimaldi, executive director of New York Common Pantry. Lower inventory, labor shortages and supply chain disruptions have made it hard to buy nutritious food for its clients. All this as food donations have been cut in half. “Now, we’re finding because we can’t get food locally that we have to go further and further away. The further you...
    NEW YORK (CBSNewYork) — Mom-and-pop retailers say it seems almost everything is in short supply right now except headaches and frustration. Supply chain issues mean lower selection and higher prices. READ MORE: Supply Chain Issues: How Are Global Shortages Affecting Local Consumers?A grocery in New Rochelle, a toy store in Greenwich and a clothing store in Brooklyn are all sharing the same problem. “It’s really been topsy-turvy,” New Rochelle Farms owner Jose Filipe said. “Huge delays from a lot of our vendors,” toy store owner Heather Rounds said. “We’re definitely feeling the crunch,” Brooklyn businesswoman Galit Winer said. “Soon as we see it in the computer, it’s available, I’ll buy as much as I can,” Filipe said. Retailers say there are many broken links in the supply chain — ships stuck at sea and containers stuck in port. “We don’t have our coats. We don’t have all our dresses,” Winer said. Winer is waiting for thousands of pieces for her chain of ten clothing stores. “Once the containers get here, they’re not being unloaded, and once they’re unloaded, there’s no...
    Share this: Consumer prices soared in October 2021 and are now up 6.2% from a year earlier – higher than most economists’ estimates and the fastest increase in more than three decades. At this point, that may be no surprise to most Americans, who are seeing higher prices while shopping for shoes and steaks, dining at restaurants and pumping fuel in their cars. One of the big debates going on right now among economists, government officials like Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen and other observers is whether these soaring costs are transitory or permanent. The Federal Reserve, which would be responsible for fighting inflation if it stays too high for too long, insisted again on Nov. 3, 2021, that it’ll be temporary, in large part because it’s tied to the supply chain mess bedeviling economies, companies and consumers.
    "Very happy to see the overseas cargo ships with milk made it through," the Washington Examiner's Becket Adams mocked. "I don't know where in this area Stelter lives but my DC supermarket also hasn't experienced empty shelves during this round of supply chain issues. Except I happen to feel very fortunate over it, not glibly dismissive because I can't fathom that not everyone has my experience," Noam Blum said. "Just another elitist mocking the people who are paying more for basic supplies than they were a month ago. If you have plenty of expendable income, inflation doesn't matter. If you are living on a budget, every dollar counts," Daily Wire editor Ian Haworth pointed out. "Yes, keep mocking the very real concerns of working parents across the country because your Wegman's is well-stocked, Brian. Great job," another person said. "That the corporate press keeps reporting on inflation and supply chain issues as things that simply do not worry people like them is telling on themselves," journalist Drew Holden said. "That Wegman's, where last year you could buy a gallon...
    Joe Biden's top economic adviser signaled that the White House is finally putting soaring inflation into focus in the president's agenda on Sunday - though he was vague when asked about an immediate action plan to alleviate the pain in Americans' pocketbooks. Rising prices coupled with worsening supply chain issues ahead of the holiday season are the latest crises plaguing the Biden administration. 'Do you believe that just at the end of the day, everything you've done is everything that can be done with inflation? Or are there more tools in the toolbox that you might use if you think it's getting worse?' Meet the Press host Chuck Todd asked National Economic Council Director Brian Deese.  Deese echoed other Biden officials' line that it was the pandemic that's responsible for what's plaguing the US economy - and that the administration is working to fix it. 'We can address this issue in the short-term and the medium-term. In the short term, we're focused on executing a strategy to finish the task on COVID. Those are immediate steps that we know actually will...
    DENVER (CBS4) – A long time nonprofit isn’t letting supply chain issues get in the way of the spirit of giving this year. Denver Feed-A-Family, run by the Epworth Foundation, has been a tradition for nearly 60 years. The annual giveaway of Thanksgiving food baskets is in honor of Daddy Bruce Randolph, a Denver restaurant owner and philanthropist who gave out meals to those in need for the holiday.  READ MORE: Volunteers Donate Time To Protect Drivers From Catalytic Converter Theft (credit: CBS) “I’ve always considered it our Super Bowl to be able to put this on every year and to be able to reach so many people in one day,” said Rev. Ronald Wooding, executive director of the Daddy Bruce Legacy Foundation.  This year, organizers will reach Denverites in an entirely new way. According to Wooding, shortages and supply chain issues affected the ability of several stores to donate food, so this year they’re giving families the same $35 worth of help in a Walmart gift card.   “We didn’t want the tradition to stop, and we know that people are in need and for...
              more   Live from Music Row Friday morning on The Tennessee Star Report with Michael Patrick Leahy – broadcast on Nashville’s Talk Radio 98.3 and 1510 WLAC weekdays from 5:00 a.m. to 8:00 a.m. – host Leahy welcomed the original all-star panelist Crom Carmichael to the studio for another edition of Crom’s Commentary where he addresses the Biden administration’s lack of concern for real wages, inflation, supply chain, and oil shortages. Leahy: Are you ready for today’s commentary? Crom? Do you think you are? Carmichel: Yes. Leahy: It’s a high standard now. Ladies and gentlemen, today’s commentary by Crom Carmichael. Carmichael: Michael, as I have been looking at what’s been going on the last couple of days, actually, since I was here last, you look at the inflation numbers and you look at the wages and look at people’s wages. And I’ve got a chart here in front of me this January through October. Real wages are up two of those months. Real wages are down, and they’re down significantly more in the down months than the up months eight times. That’s how...
    Most Americans do not believe the Biden Administration is doing enough to address the supply chain crisis, a Rasmussen Reports survey released Friday found. The survey asked respondents if the Biden administration is “doing enough to fix problems with the U.S. supply chain.” A majority, 59 percent, said no, followed by 27 percent who said yes and 14 percent who remain unsure. A majority of Republicans and independents, 84 percent and 63 percent, respectively, do not believe the Biden administration is doing enough. One-third of Democrats share that sentiment.  Across the board, 82 percent are concerned that the supply chain crisis could lead to shortages of “food and other basic supplies.” Of those, 49 percent are “very” concerned. There is no true partisan divide on that, as a majority of Republicans (93 percent), Democrats (73 percent), and independents (80 percent) are concerned. The survey, taken November 10-11, 2021, among 1,000 likely voters, has a margin of error of +/- 3 percent.  The survey follows news this week of a record number of cargo ships, 164, waiting off the coast of California...
    New York (CNN Business)Surging prices, a labor shortage and a gummed-up supply chain are making Americans uneasy.The consumer sentiment index fell to a decade low over the past month, according to the University of Michigan. The culprit: pandemic-era inflation and worry that no policies are in place to rein it in. Consumers had also expected the supply chain crisis and labor shortage crunch to be resolved by now.The negative sentiment about the challenges to the US economy outweighed many of the positive factors, including surging job growth and growing paychecks.This is a developing story. It will be updated.
    25-year-old Embark CEO and co-founder Alex Rodrigues The congestion at U.S. ports, the trucker shortage, and the rise of e-commerce have created a unique opportunity for autonomous trucking, according to Alex Rodrigues, CEO of Embark Trucks, which has completed its SPAC merger and will begin trading Thursday on the Nasdaq under ticker EMBK. "What we've heard from investors is people are really understanding the need here and there is a huge amount of excitement about the potential to revolutionize the way logistics works," Rodrigues told CNBC. "We are really at an inflection point now, where it's really starting to effect everyday people and you know when people can't get their Christmas present, the need for a solution become a lot more urgent." Embark, founded in 2016 by 20-somethings Rodrigues and Brandon Moak, focuses on the software and supporting tech for autonomous trucking. Embark can convert current truck fleets into autonomous fleets and works with carriers and truck manufacturers, instead of developing its own vehicles. According to Embark's website, the company's autonomous tech can improve fuel efficiency by 10%, reduce delivery...
    President Joe Biden admitted consumer prices were too high on Wednesday as he toured the Port of Baltimore and set out how his massive spending plans would help drive down inflation. 'Everything from a gallon of gas a loaf of bread costs more and it's worrisome even though wages are going up,' he said. 'We still face challenges, we have to tackle them.'  Hours earlier, a new economic report revealed inflation had hit 6.2 percent - its highest level in 30 years. Some economists have warned that Biden's $1.2 trillion infrastructure bill and an even bigger social spending plan could overheat the economy.  But in a speech delivered as the sun set over the water of the port, he had good news for shoppers saying he had secured agreements from major retailers to keep shelves full over the holiday season.  And he sought to sell his infrastructure plans as a way to ease supply bottlenecks and keep prices down. 'I'm here to talk about one of the most pressing economic concerns of the American people,' he said. 'And it's real. ...
    President Joe Biden’s soaring food costs are impacting the hungry at local food banks across the nation. Food banks, which run off the generosity of American workers in local communities, are having difficulty feeding the hungry due to increased food prices since Biden became president and took over the levers of the supply chain. Breitbart News reported Tuesday that food costs increased almost one percent last month and 5.3 percent in the last year. The rising food costs have exacerbated local panties’ ability to feed hungry Americans who rely on private charity to eat. For instance, an organization that helps support local food banks, Feeding America, said their partners are distributing 31 percent more food to the hungry in 2021 than in 2020. President Joe Biden speaks about the bipartisan infrastructure bill in the State Dining Room of the White House, on Nov. 6, 2021, in Washington. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon) A food bank in Oakland told the Associated Press the cost of basic canned foods has drastically increased. Canned green beans and peaches are more costly by 9 percent, canned...
    MEDIA WINNER: The Five CNN’s Jake Tapper beat MSNBC’s Nicolle Wallace in the advertiser-coveted 25-54 age demographic on Monday. Wallace still doubled Tapper in total viewers but it was a notable jostling. But the big winner in the middle of that time slot, and overall, was Fox News Channel’s The Five. Fox’s Neil Cavuto, too, handily topped the rival networks. The Five, as Green Room has reported previously, has had a string of big ratings wins. The show is killing. Even the AP made note on Tuesday, reporting that last month the afternoon ensemble program “eclipsed every show on cable news in popularity for the first time ever, the Nielsen company said.” “That’s highly unusual for a program that airs at 5 p.m. Eastern and in the midafternoon on the West Coast; the number of people watching television typically increases in prime time after the workday is done,” the AP writes. That trend is continuing November, and Monday’s ratings show it, with The Five pulling nearly 3.5 million in total viewers, vs. Tapper’s second hour at 643k and, for a comparison you might have missed, a mere 225k for...
    On Friday, November 5, the U.S. Department of Labor released its latest economic figures — reporting that unemployment in the United States fell to 4.6% in October and that wages had increased by 4.9% from what they were a year ago. Liberal economist Paul Krugman, who has often praised President Joe Biden's economic policies and his Build Back Better agenda, is bullish and optimistic about the state of the U.S. economy in his November 9 column for the New York Times. But Krugman also points out that many Americans are feeling "pessimistic" about the economy and addresses the reasons for their concerns. "By the usual measures," Krugman observes, "the U.S. economy has been booming this year. Employment has risen by more than five million since January. A record number of Americans say this is a good time to find a quality job — a sentiment reflected in the willingness of an unprecedented number of workers to quit. Yes, high quit rates are a good sign. Yet Americans are, or say they are, pessimistic about the economic situation." Krugman goes on...
    President Joe Biden will visit the Port of Baltimore on Wednesday to sell his $1.2 trillion infrastructure package as the United States continues to deal with crushing supply chain problems. Ahead of Biden's visit, the Labor Department announced inflation picked up to 0.9 per cent last month from September, faster than the prior month’s increase of 0.4 per cent and above expectations.  Additionally, overall prices of goods and services have climbed by 6.2 per cent over the past 12 months, the fastest pace since 1990 - all of which is troubling news for the Biden administration. And the energy index rose 4.8 per cent in October compared to the month before, as the gasoline index increased 6.1 per cent.  The combo of rising gas prices and food prices - along with the lower buying power of wages - is tough news for the administration as the country heads into the holidays.   President Joe Biden will visit the Port of Baltimore to sell his $1.2 trillion infrastructure package The Port of Baltimore, the 14th busiest port in the U.S. in 2019 in...