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    SACRAMENTO, Calif. -- An Oregon-born gray wolf that thrilled biologists as it journeyed far south into California was found dead after apparently being struck by a vehicle, authorities said Wednesday.No foul play was suspected in the death of the male wolf known as OR93, the California Department of Fish and Wildlife said in a news release. Gray wolves are listed as endangered in California, where they were wiped out by the 1920s."Before his demise, he was documented traveling the farthest south in California since wolves returned to the state, which is historically wolf habitat. The last documented wolf that far south was captured in San Bernardino County in 1922," the department said.RELATED: Mountain lion hit by San Mateo police car on Highway 92A truck driver reported spotting the dead wolf on Nov. 10 near the Kern County town of Lebec, about 75 miles (120 kilometers) northwest of downtown Los Angeles.The carcass was located along a dirt trail near a frontage road running parallel to Interstate 5, and a warden who responded quickly identified the wolf as OR93 because of a...
    SACRAMENTO, Calif. -- An Oregon-born gray wolf that thrilled biologists as it journeyed far south into California was found dead after apparently being struck by a vehicle, authorities said Wednesday.No foul play was suspected in the death of the male wolf known as OR93, the California Department of Fish and Wildlife said in a news release. Gray wolves are listed as endangered in California, where they were wiped out by the 1920s."Before his demise, he was documented traveling the farthest south in California since wolves returned to the state, which is historically wolf habitat. The last documented wolf that far south was captured in San Bernardino County in 1922," the department said.A truck driver reported spotting the dead wolf on Nov. 10 near the Kern County town of Lebec, about 75 miles northwest of downtown Los Angeles.The carcass was located along a dirt trail near a frontage road running parallel to Interstate 5, and a warden who responded quickly identified the wolf as OR93 because of a radio tracking collar it wore, the department said.A necropsy performed at Wildlife Health...
    SACRAMENTO (AP) — An Oregon-born gray wolf that thrilled biologists as it journeyed far south into California was found dead after apparently being struck by a vehicle, authorities said Wednesday. No foul play was suspected in the death of the male wolf known as OR93, the California Department of Fish and Wildlife said in a news release. Gray wolves are listed as endangered in California, where they were wiped out by the 1920s. READ MORE: Charities, Community Groups Serve Up Warm Thanksgiving Meals For The Needy“Before his demise, he was documented traveling the farthest south in California since wolves returned to the state, which is historically wolf habitat. The last documented wolf that far south was captured in San Bernardino County in 1922,” the department said. A truck driver reported spotting the dead wolf on Nov. 10 near the Kern County town of Lebec, about 75 miles (120 kilometers) northwest of downtown Los Angeles. The carcass was located along a dirt trail near a frontage road running parallel to Interstate 5, and a warden who responded quickly identified the wolf...
    Wolf advocates across the nation were brooding over the bad news this week: The epic journey of a lone gray wolf that ventured from Oregon to the very edge of Southern California’s crowded suburbs in search of territory and female mates had ended in a vehicle collision near Interstate 5 in the Kern County town of Lebec. “OR-93’s relentless wandering gave us hope, inspiration and a brief glimpse at what it would be like to see wolves running free across California again,” said Amaroq Weiss, a spokeswoman for the Center for Biological Diversity. “I only wish we could have offered him a safer world.” California’s most adventurous wolf was found dead on the afternoon of Nov. 10 by a truck driver who noticed the carcass on a dirt trail near a frontage road running parallel to Interstate 5, officials said. A state game warden collected the remains, which were transported to the Wildlife Health Laboratory in Rancho Cordova, Calif., where the necropsy was performed. A necropsy conducted on the carcass, which was found roughly 50 miles north of Los Angeles,...
    SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — An Oregon-born gray wolf that thrilled biologists as it journeyed far south into California was found dead after apparently being struck by a vehicle, authorities said Wednesday. No foul play was suspected in the death of the male wolf known as OR93, the California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDWF) said in a news release. Gray wolves are listed as endangered in California, where they were wiped out by the 1920s. READ MORE: Police: Homeless Man Stabbed At Turlock Park Was Possibly Targeted Because Of His RaceBack in February, the CDFW said the gray wolf had moved deeper into California than any collared wolf before likely in search of a new pack or mate. “Before his demise, he was documented traveling the farthest south in California since wolves returned to the state, which is historically wolf habitat. The last documented wolf that far south was captured in San Bernardino County in 1922,” the department said. A truck driver reported spotting the dead wolf on Nov. 10 near the Kern County town of Lebec, about 75 miles...
    SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — An Oregon-born gray wolf that thrilled biologists as it journeyed far south into California was found dead after apparently being struck by a vehicle, authorities said Wednesday. No foul play was suspected in the death of the male wolf known as OR93, the California Department of Fish and Wildlife said in a news release. Gray wolves are listed as endangered in California, where they were wiped out by the 1920s. “Before his demise, he was documented traveling the farthest south in California since wolves returned to the state, which is historically wolf habitat. The last documented wolf that far south was captured in San Bernardino County in 1922,” the department said. A truck driver reported spotting the dead wolf on Nov. 10 near the Kern County town of Lebec, about 75 miles (120 kilometers) northwest of downtown Los Angeles. The carcass was located along a dirt trail near a frontage road running parallel to Interstate 5, and a warden who responded quickly identified the wolf as OR93 because of a radio tracking collar it wore, the...
    LEBEC (CBSLA) — A gray wolf born in Oregon who traveled all the way to Southern California has been found dead in Kern County, apparently after being struck by a car. (credit: California Department Of Fish & Wildlife) READ MORE: Father, Son And Neighbor Found Guilty Of Murdering Ahmaud ArberyOR-93, a male gray wolf born in 2019, was found dead on Nov. 10 along Interstate 5 near the Lebec. According the California Department of Fish & Wildlife, a truck driver had seen the dead wolf along a dirt trail near frontage road running alongside the I-5 and called it in to the Oregon Fish & Wildlife officials. A CDFW warden went to the scene to collect the wolf’s remains and quickly identified it as OR-93 because of his distinctive purple collar. READ MORE: Silver Alert Issued For Missing Elderly Man In HollywoodA complete necropsy performed on OR-93 at the Wildlife Health Laboratory in Rancho Cordova found the wolf “had significant tissue trauma to the left rear leg and a dislocated knee as well as soft tissue trauma to the...
    The protection (and un-protection) of Gray Wolves is a rollercoaster of a story. After people nearly hunted these wolves to extinction in the lower 48 states, the United States granted them federal protections in the 1960s.  In 1974, the U.S Fish and Wildlife Service listed gray wolves as endangered under the Endangered Species Act (ESA).  But beginning around 2003, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) made a number of attempts to strip these protections.  Then in 2020, almost two decades of legal battles culminated when former President Donald Trump delisted Gray Wolves from the endangered species list. Without federal protection, states are approving high kill quotas for Gray Wolves and many are being slaughtered.  On May 26, the Center for Biological Diversity and the Humane Society of the United States filed an emergency petition with the FWS to re-list Gray Wolves as endangered.  In response, the agency recognized in a report that the wolves may warrant protection.  Now is the time to publicly comment and push on the FWS to reverse course.  Sign this petition telling the Fish...
    SUMMIT COUNTY, Colo. (CBS4) – While a final plan for wolf restoration is still years away, the Keystone Policy Center recently concluded a major study and engagement process over the summer which will play a role in how the plan moves forward. “This report qualitatively details the various perspectives gathered during our summer public engagement effort,” said Julie Shapiro, director of the Natural Resources Program for Keystone Policy Center. “The report does not attempt to draw conclusions regarding which specific restoration and management strategies were favored by participants in the process, but instead details the underlying rationales, interests and values expressed of those who participated.” READ MORE: Honor Guard Group Needs Help To Carry On Tradition At Fort Logan National Cemetery (credit: CBS) The policy center, which is a non-advocacy group based in Summit County, was brought on to assist CPW in the planning process this year and engaged with more than 3,400 stakeholders. Engagement content and questions detailed in the report are structured around four major planning topics: Wolf Restoration: Restoration logistics, including source populations of wolves...
    ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — Federal wildlife officials are proposing to change the way Mexican gray wolves are managed in the American Southwest, saying removing population limits and setting goals for genetic diversity will help the endangered species recover. The proposal also would allow more wolves to be released into the wild in New Mexico and Arizona, and place restrictions on permits issued to ranchers or state wildlife agencies that allow the killing of wolves if they prey on livestock, elk or deer. Management of the predators has spurred numerous legal challenges over the decades by both ranchers and environmentalists. The latest proposal follows one of those court fights. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service said the proposed changes would better align with revisions made to the species’ recovery plan. The Mexican gray wolf, the rarest subspecies of the gray wolf in North America, has seen its population nearly double over the last five years. A survey done earlier this year showed at least 186 Mexican gray wolves in New Mexico and Arizona. Ranchers and rural residents have argued that’s...
    Check out our must-buy plant-based cookbooks! Learn more The northern gray wolf has been basically hunted to the brink of extinction in the U.S. These wolves have many important roles in their ecosystems: they keep prey populations like deer in check and redistribute nutrients through hunting and movement patterns. Luckily, the population of northern gray wolves has been increasing, they are nowhere near stable and still require a great deal of support from scientists, conservationists, and activists. On July 27th, was murdered after the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) put out a lethal removal order for one wolf in the pack. The catalyst for this order was another occurrence of wolves from the pack reportedly attacked livestock in the Kettle Range area. However, there are so many other ways to deal with wolf-livestock interactions. There have been many similar wolf-livestock interactions in the same area. Killing wolves has not improved the situation. In fact, it might even make it worse, since killing wolves decreases pack size, making hunting in wilder areas more difficult. Plus, wolves’ natural habitats...
    MOFFAT COUNTY, Colo. (AP) — On a hazy July afternoon, wolf expert Karin Vardaman returned to a spring-fed pond in Colorado’s northwestern-most corner. Enough rain had fallen to wet the ground around the watering hole. She tiptoed across the soft earth — careful not to disturb any impressions left by cattle and pronghorn antelope — until one track filled her with an almost overwhelming feeling of relief. There, sunken into the mud near the Wyoming and Utah borders, was a broad wolf print. “Maybe there’s one,” she said. “It gives hope.” (credit: Defenders of Wildlife) For nearly two years, Vardaman has visited the Moffat County rangeland every few months to track wolves for Working Circle, a nonprofit she founded to help ranchers live with the predators. The patchwork of public and private land is already a riot of animal life. Forested mountains overlook broad valleys, where elk and cattle scare badgers from their dens beneath the sagebrush. In the winter of 2020, Colorado Parks and Wildlife announced the area also appeared to be home to the state’s first wolf pack...
    MOFFAT COUNTY, Colo. (AP) — On a hazy July afternoon, wolf expert Karin Vardaman returned to a spring-fed pond in Colorado’s northwestern-most corner. Enough rain had fallen to wet the ground around the watering hole. She tiptoed across the soft earth — careful not to disturb any impressions left by cattle and pronghorn antelope — until one track filled her with an almost overwhelming feeling of relief. There, sunken into the mud near the Wyoming and Utah borders, was a broad wolf print. READ MORE: 100 MPH Wind Gusts Hit Colorado's Sangre de Cristo Mountains Early Saturday“Maybe there’s one,” she said. “It gives hope.” (credit: Defenders of Wildlife) For nearly two years, Vardaman has visited the Moffat County rangeland every few months to track wolves for Working Circle, a nonprofit she founded to help ranchers live with the predators. The patchwork of public and private land is already a riot of animal life. Forested mountains overlook broad valleys, where elk and cattle scare badgers from their dens beneath the sagebrush. In the winter of 2020, Colorado Parks and...
    Check out our must-buy plant-based cookbooks! Learn more The Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources officials drastically scaled back the quota for wolves that could be killed this fall season going against the board’s decision on how many wolves could be legally hunted and killed. The quota was originally 130, but the board decided to bump that number up to 300, with very little consideration of how this could affect the state’s entire wolf population. However, the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources moved the quota back to 130 wolves to preserve the population. The annual fall wolf hunt has become a bone of contention between officials and the population in Wisconsin. The state is legally required to hold the hunt when wolves are not on the endangered list. However, the hunt often significantly alters the wolf population, putting them yet again at risk of endangerment. One constellation is that the Chippewa tribes in Wisconsin are legally able to claim half of the wolf quota, even though they consider the animal to be sacred and do not kill them. Thus,...
    Check out our must-buy plant-based cookbooks! Learn more Unfortunately, the world is not a very peaceful or safe place for many individuals. From conflict to abuse to exploitation, there is so much cruelty inflicted on both humans and animals. While this can get disheartening and difficult to hear about, petitions are a great way to use your voice for good. Just by signing one, you are a part of helping those who are not treated fairly. You can even share them with your friends and acquaintances to increase your impact. Through petitions, we can reach those in power and demand justice for others. They are valuable tools for making positive changes in the world. If you are looking for a way to help animals and humans, here are 10 petitions you should sign this week, including: Ban the Slaughter of Downed Animals, Relist the Gray Wolf as an Endangered Species, and Limit Solitary Confinement for Prisoners. We want to thank you for being the change you wish to see in the world and giving a voice to the...
    (CNN)Six Native American tribes are suing the state of Wisconsin, claiming that the state's planned wolf hunts go against their treaty-protected rights.The lawsuit, filed Tuesday by six Ojibwe tribes, comes months after the state's first legal wolf hunt in decades in February, considered a disaster by critics. That hunt occurred following the removal of wolves from the federal list of endangered species in January, with a hunting quota of 200 wolves. Because of treaty rights assigned to the Ojibwe tribes, the quota was divided between the state and the tribes, with 119 wolves allocated to Wisconsin for hunting, and 81 wolves to the tribes. But those numbers were quickly abandoned, after hunters who weren't affiliated with the tribes killed 218 wolves over the course of three days -- almost 100 more than allowed. The hunt was initially supposed to last a full week.Now, the state is gearing up for its second wolf hunt of the year in November. And though the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources recommended a quota of just 130 wolves, the state's Natural Resources Board approved a...
    AB Photography/Getty Fight disinformation. Get a daily recap of the facts that matter. Sign up for the free Mother Jones newsletter.This story was originally published by Huffpost and is reproduced here as part of the Climate Desk collaboration. New laws liberalizing the hunting and trapping of gray wolves in the Northern Rockies might warrant putting the animals back under the protection of the Endangered Species Act, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service said this past Wednesday. Backed by the ranching industry, which views wolves as a growing liability in states with extensive cattle and sheep grazing, both Idaho and Montana enacted laws earlier this year making it easier to hunt and trap wolves, legalizing tactics previously reserved for far more numerous animals, such as wild pigs, raccoons and coyotes. But that strategy now looks like it might backfire. Conservation and wildlife advocacy groups, including the Center for Biological Diversity, filed a pair of petitions requesting that the agency re-list gray wolves as threatened or endangered in light of new laws passed in Idaho and Montana to drastically reduce wolf populations....
    The Biden administration announced Wednesday that it would review the status of the American gray wolf under the Endangered Species Act after former President Donald Trump's administration removed the animal from the endangered list. The Department of the Interior's review comes in the wake of two petitions sent to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service asking for the animal to be relisted. The petitions "present substantial, credible information indicating that a listing action may be warranted," the FWS said. ENDANGERED SPECIES RECOVERY REQUIRES FLEXIBILITY, NOT STRICT REGULATIONS The petition's authors noted a threat to the "geographical populations" of the species and cited gray wolves in the northern Rocky Mountains as an example. "The Service finds the petitioners present substantial information that potential increases in human-caused mortality may pose a threat to the gray wolf in the western U.S.," the FWS said. "The Service also finds that new regulatory mechanisms in Idaho and Montana may be inadequate to address this threat. Therefore, the Service finds that gray wolves in the western U.S. may warrant listing."...
    Video has been released of a gray wolf in Kern County, the farthest south the species has traveled since its reintroduction in California. The wolf, wearing a collar, was recorded May 15 by a trail camera as it drank from a water trough on private property. The California Department of Fish and Wildlife received the video last week said in a statement Saturday. It is possible the wolf is OR-93, a young male who entered California from Oregon in January 2021. The animal was known to be in San Luis Obispo County on April 5. Then the collar that he had been wearing since June 2020 stopped transmitting. In two months, he had traveled from Modoc County to San Luis Obispo County — a meandering journey of almost 1,000 miles. From February through late March, he passed through the counties of Lassen, Plumas, Sierra, Nevada, Placer, El Dorado, Amador, Calaveras, Alpine, Mono, Tuolumne and Fresno. He then crossed Highway 99 and Interstate 5 and traveled through San Benito and Monterey counties before his last collar transmission in early April....
    A new report shows that for the first time in a century, California has at least two packs of wolves, reported World Animal News. Two of California’s existing wolf families have given birth to 12 pups.  Amaroq Weiss, senior West Coast wolf advocate at the Center for Biological Diversity, said, “We’re over the moon knowing that for the first time in more than 100 years, California has at least two wolf packs with pups. This is a red-letter moment in wolf recovery for the Golden State. These little ones are here because of legal protections that are crucial to their survival and made it possible for wolves to return.” In January federal protection was removed from wolves in 48 states, including California. However, they are still protected under the California Endangered Species Act. One of the wolf packs in California regularly produces pups every year out, b this is the first time in over a century that two packs of wolves have birthed pups. Each pack has six new pups, which come to twelve wolf pups altogether. Weiss said,...
    The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife ordered the killing of two gray wolves Thursday after multiple recent attacks on cattle in the northeastern area of the state.  Wolves from the Togo pack in Ferry County have killed one calf and injured three others since June 24, the department said.  The attacks continued despite nonlethal efforts, such as transporting sick and injured cattle out of the Togo pack's territory, practicing carcass transportation, and deploying a radio-activated guard box to deter wolves.  The killing of one or two wolves from the Togo pack's territory "is not expected to harm the wolf population's ability to reach the statewide or local recovery objective," the Department of Fish and Wildlife said, adding that they have recorded three known wolf mortalities this year and usually documents 12-21 mortalities per year.  ENDANGERED WHALES HAVING A BABY BOOM OFF EAST COAST A group of scientists urged the Biden administration Thursday, May 13, 2021, to restore legal protections for gray wolves, saying their removal earlier in the year was premature and states were allowing too many...
    Last year, the Trump administration announced that the gray wolf would be removed from the list of animals protected by the Endangered Species Act. Before grey wolves were protected by the act, the species was considered near extinction after a combination of hunting, trapping, and loss of habitat decimated its numbers.   The Biden administration is now moving to uphold that decision, according to court documents filed Friday, despite concern from conservationists that it could jeopardize the recovery of the species. Attorneys for the administration requested that a federal judge throw out a lawsuit from wildlife advocates that aims to restore Endangered Species Act protections for the animals, arguing that Trump's 2020 rule, implemented by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, "follows the law and is supported by the administrative record."  "The Service possesses substantial expertise on gray wolves and ESA implementation, and it made a reasoned determination that the best scientific and commercial data available in 2020 established that gray wolves no longer met the definition of a threatened or endangered species," the government argued.  Under the Endangered Species...
    By Matthew Brown and John Flesher | Associated Press FARIBAULT, Minn. — President Joe Biden’s administration is sticking by the decision under former President Donald Trump to lift protections for gray wolves across most of the U.S. But a top federal wildlife official on Friday told The Associated Press there is growing concern over aggressive wolf hunting seasons adopted for the predators in the western Great Lakes and northern Rocky Mountains. Wolves under federal protection made a remarkable rebound in parts of the U.S. over the past several decades, after being driven from the landscape by excessive hunting and trapping in the early 1900s. States took over wolf management last decade in the Northern Rockies and in January for the remainder of the Lower 48 states, including the Great Lakes and Pacific Northwest. The removal of protections had been in the works for years and was the right thing to do when finalized in Trump’s last days, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Assistant Director for Ecological Services Gary Frazer told AP. On Friday, attorneys for the administration asked a federal...
    BOISE, Idaho (AP) — Wildlife advocates on Thursday petitioned federal officials to restore federal protections for gray wolves throughout the U.S. West after Idaho and Montana passed laws intended to drastically cut their numbers. Western Watersheds Project, WildEarth Guardians and others sent the petition to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. The agency is supposed to respond within 90 days on whether there is enough information for a potential listing under the Endangered Species Act. The groups cite unregulated hunting, poaching and genetic problems involving small wolf populations. “Wolves remain completely absent from suitable habitats or perilously close to extinction in many western states, and the handful of states surrounding Yellowstone National Park are now driving the larger populations toward extinction — endangered species listing — by ramping up wolf killing and stripping away hunting and trapping regulations in Montana, Idaho, and Wyoming,” said Erik Molvar, executive director of Western Watersheds Project. In May, Idaho Republican Gov. Brad Little signed a measure lawmakers said could lead to killing 90% of the state’s 1,500 wolves through expanded trapping and hunting. It...
    MEXICO CITY (AP) — Five gray wolf pups born at Mexico City’s Chapultepec Zoo are giving a boost to efforts to broaden the endangered species’ genetic diversity amid continuing efforts to reintroduce the animals to the wild decades after they were reduced to captive populations. The pups’ father, Rhi, alerts them every midday to the delivery of breakfast, in the form of chicken and quail meat brought by zookeeper Jorge Gutiérrez, 58. Gutiérrez has cared for Rhi since he was born, and is now proud to see he has formed a pack with the pups’ mother, Seje. “It’s marvelous. What I am experiencing is something unique,” says Gutiérrez. He watches as the five wolf pups stumble out of their den to eat. The three males and two females were born in early April. They are part of a four-decade, binational program between the United States and Mexico to breed the gray wolves in captivity and release them back into the wild. Even the “endangered” classification is progress for the Mexican wolf; two years ago, given the...
    SAN FRANCISCO -- A new pack of gray wolves has been identified in Northern California, becoming the third pack to establish itself in the state in the last century, state wildlife officials and conservationists said.Three wolves in the Beckworth pack were first spotted in May on a trail camera in Plumas County near the California-Nevada state line, after the tracks of two wolves were detected earlier this year in the same area, the California Department of Fish and Wildlife said.For conservationists, the discovery marks a milestone in the state's efforts to revive its population of wild wolves, SFGate reported. Gray wolves are native to California, but disappeared in the 1920s. Most were likely killed through hunting or to control predation on other animals."This is such wonderful news," said Amaroq Weiss, senior West Coast wolf advocate with the Center for Biological Diversity.MORE | Rare gray wolf moves farther south into Central CAEMBED More News Videos The most recent collar reading showed the wolf dubbed OR-93 was in agricultural areas in central Fresno County. The species is protected under the California Endangered...
    SAN FRANCISCO  — A new pack of gray wolves has been identified in Northern California, becoming the third pack to establish itself in the state in the last century, state wildlife officials and conservationists said. Three wolves in the Beckworth pack were first spotted in May on a trail camera in Plumas County near the California-Nevada state line, after the tracks of two wolves were detected earlier this year in the same area, the California Department of Fish and Wildlife said. For conservationists, the discovery marks a milestone in the state’s efforts to revive its population of wild wolves, SFGate reported. Gray wolves are native to California, but disappeared in the 1920s. Most were likely killed through hunting or to control predation on other animals. “This is such wonderful news,” said Amaroq Weiss, senior West Coast wolf advocate with the Center for Biological Diversity. The species is protected under the California Endangered Species Act. Killing a wolf is a potential crime subject to serious penalties, including prison time. Ranchers in the area are less enthusiastic about the growing wolf population....
    PLUMAS COUNTY (AP) — A new pack of gray wolves has been identified in Northern California, becoming the third pack to establish itself in the state in the last century, state wildlife officials and conservationists said. Three wolves in the Beckworth pack were first spotted in May on a trail camera in Plumas County near the California-Nevada state line, after the tracks of two wolves were detected earlier this year in the same area, the California Department of Fish and Wildlife said. READ MORE: Broiler Fire Breaks Out Near Redwood Valley In Mendocino County, At Least 50 Acres Burned For conservationists, the discovery marks a milestone in the state’s efforts to revive its population of wild wolves, SFGate reported. Gray wolves are native to California, but disappeared in the 1920s. Most were likely killed through hunting or to control predation on other animals. “This is such wonderful news,” said Amaroq Weiss, senior West Coast wolf advocate with the Center for Biological Diversity. The species is protected under the California Endangered Species Act. Killing a wolf is a potential crime subject to...
    PLUMAS COUNTY (AP) — A new pack of gray wolves has been identified in Northern California, becoming the third pack to establish itself in the state in the last century, state wildlife officials and conservationists said. Three wolves in the Beckworth pack were first spotted in May on a trail camera in Plumas County near the California-Nevada state line, after the tracks of two wolves were detected earlier this year in the same area, the California Department of Fish and Wildlife said. READ MORE: Missing Man, 70, Found Dead In Grass Valley With His Loyal Dog Still Near Him For conservationists, the discovery marks a milestone in the state’s efforts to revive its population of wild wolves, SFGate reported. Gray wolves are native to California, but disappeared in the 1920s. Most were likely killed through hunting or to control predation on other animals. “This is such wonderful news,” said Amaroq Weiss, senior West Coast wolf advocate with the Center for Biological Diversity. The species is protected under the California Endangered Species Act. Killing a wolf is a potential crime subject...
    The gray wolf population in Wisconsin fell by nearly a third after they were removed from the Endangered Species Act days before the 2020 US presidential election - with illegal hunting partly to blame for the drop. Researchers discovered that 218 wolves were killed by licensed hunters and approximately 100 additional wolves died in a number of different ways, the majority of which may be from 'cryptic poaching,' which hides illegal killings. It's now estimated that Wisconsin is home to anywhere between 695 and 751 wolves, down from 1,034 last year.  The gray wolf population in Wisconsin fell by nearly a third after they were removed from the Endangered Species Act days before the 2020 US presidential election, partly because of illegal killings, according to a new study 218 wolves were killed by licensed hunters and approximately 100 additional wolves died in a number of different ways, the majority of which may be from 'cryptic poaching,' which hides illegal killings. It's now estimated that Wisconsin is home to anywhere between 695 and 751 wolves, down from 1,034 last...
    TRAVERSE CITY, Mich. (AP) — As many as one-third of Wisconsin’s gray wolves likely died at the hands of humans in the months after the federal government announced it was ending legal protections, according to a study released Monday. Poaching and a February hunt that far exceeded kill quotas were largely responsible for the drop-off, University of Wisconsin scientists said, though some other scientists say more direct evidence is needed for some of the calculations. READ MORE: Human Remains Found In Mississippi River In Minneapolis Near Xcel Energy Water Power Park Adrian Treves, an environmental studies professor, said his team’s findings should raise doubts about having another hunting season this fall and serve notice to wildlife managers in other states with wolves. Removing federal protections “opens the door for antagonists to kill large numbers in short periods, legally and illegally,” Treves and two colleagues said in a paper published by the journal JPeer. “The history of political scapegoating of wolves may repeat itself.” The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service dropped gray wolves in the Lower 48 states from its list...
    DENVER (CBS4) – Colorado Parks and Wildlife continues to research the reintroduction of gray wolves into the state. Wildlife officials announced a new partnership with Colorado State University on Thursday. (credit: CBS) While CSU is known for its agriculture and animal studies, this time the university is helping with public engagement. Together, CPW and CSU will analyze the public and stakeholder engagement process associated with the wolf reintroduction. The research will be funded by a RAPID National Science Foundation grant. The effort by the CPW Commission to reintroduce gray wolves is unprecedented in the U.S. Colorado voters approved Proposition 114 last November, which directs the commission to restore and manage the gray wolf population by the end of 2023. “Research suggests that stakeholder engagement can enhance decision-making about impassioned natural resource management issues,” said CPW’s Human Dimensions Specialist and Researcher Dr. Mike Quartuch, who is a co-principal investigator for this project. “Our agency sees great value in listening to public feedback as we work to shape the wolf management plan for Colorado, and we want to examine if our processes...
    Colorado wildlife officials shared that biologists have seen gray wolf pups in the state. There have been three separate, but similar sightings in the state, according to a release. Three wolf pups have been seen and it’s unclear if these pups are part of a litter. 4-6 pups are usually born per litter. Scientists believe the parents of the pups are “John” and “Jane,” collared wolves that are monitored by the agency. “We are continuing to actively monitor this den site while exercising extreme caution so as not to inadvertently jeopardize the potential survival of these pups,” said Libbie Miller, CPW wildlife biologist. “Our hope is that we will eventually have photos to document this momentous occasion in Colorado’s incredible and diverse wildlife history, but not bothering them remains a paramount concern.” We are exercising extreme caution as we continue to actively monitor the site so as not to inadvertently jeopardize the potential survival of these pups. pic.twitter.com/vwnDMPKWgL — Colorado Parks and Wildlife (@COParksWildlife) June 9, 2021 Wolves are endangered in the state and killing a wolf in Colorado...
    A now-infamous trophy hunt that took place last February in Wisconsin is being criticized again by animal rights activists, the Humane Society of the United States (HSUS) reports. HSUS can now report that the hunt was the second deadliest in the state’s history, with 218 wolves recorded dead. The state issued 2,380 wolf hunting permits and only 119 wolves were supposed to be killed during that time. The season had to be shut down because the hunt went over quota so quickly. In three days, over 200 wolves had been killed. “This is a deeply sad and shameful week for Wisconsin,” Megan Nicholson, director of the Wisconsin chapter of the Humane Society of the United States, said in a statement at the time of the hunt. “This week’s hunt proves that now, more than ever, gray wolves need federal protections restored to protect them from short-sighted and lethal state management.” HSUS reports that the organization believes that the state has lost one-third of its wolf population since they were delisted from the federal Endangered Species Act protections. HSUS’s report...
    (CNN)Spotting cute pups is worth celebrating any day, but in Colorado it's historic. For the first time since the 1940s, a litter of gray wolves has been seen in Colorado. Officials began tracking two adult wolves named "John" and "Jane" earlier this year. Fast-forward a few months, Colorado Parks and Wildlife staff saw "John" and "Jane" with three pups in Jackson County, about 150 miles northwest of Denver. The gray wolves were eradicated by hunting and poisoning in the 1940s, but a ballot initiative to reintroduce the wolves onto the Western Slope of Colorado passed late last year. The measure requires the state to restore and manage gray wolves in the state by the end of 2023.Colorado Gov. Jared Polis emphasized the importance of the initiative to help the gray wolf population in the state. Read More"We welcome this historic den and the new wolf family to Colorado," Polis said Wednesday. "With voter passage last year of the initiative to require re-introduction of the wolf by the end of 2023, these pups will have plenty of potential mates when they...
    (CBS4) – A heavily debated topic in our state is now taking its own course of action. Colorado has its first wolf pups born in the wild since the 1940s. This comes ahead of the state’s re-introduction of gray wolves. The endangered gray wolf pups have been spotted in Jackson County. READ MORE: Boil Water Advisory Issued Following Water Pump Failure In Castle Pines “A typical wolf litter will range from 4 to 6 pups, so we can’t confirm there are only three pups at this time, but we certainly can confirm that we’ve seen three,” says CPW’s Rebecca Ferrell. CPW says collared wolf F1084, also known as “Jane”, migrated from Wyoming to Colorado in 2019, and met M2101, or “John.” “She spent approximately 18 months living on her own down before M2101 began to make an appearance,” Ferrell said. “It’s fantastic to see that wolves are able to naturally migrate, especially coming through Wyoming, there’s challenging weather conditions, wolves are able to be hunted in Wyoming. It’s tremendous that they make it here at all, and the fact that...
    KEYSTONE, Colo. (CBS4) – Colorado Parks and Wildlife will host its third educational session in June, focusing on livestock depredation, compensation for livestock loss and how wolf reintroduction will impact ungulate populations. It’s the third in a series of CPW conversations on wolf reintroduction, and it’s only the beginning. (credit: CBS) “We do have a hard deadline. We will have wolves on the ground by the end of 2023,” said Rebecca Ferrell, CPW Branding and Communications Manager. “Some people think that should move a lot faster, but Prop 114 not only asks us to implement that reintroduction, but also to have a robust public engagement process.” As these conversations take place, gray wolves are already in Colorado. “Interestingly enough, we had a gray wolf that was first spotted in Jackson County in 2019, who was collared up in Wyoming, in Teton National Park. And so the information we had from that wolf’s collar was that it was a male. It was known as M1084,” Ferrell said. (credit: CPW) The sex of the wolf turned out to be a data error,...
    SAN LUIS OBISPO (AP) — An adventurous young gray wolf that crossed into California from Oregon has not been documented since early April, spurring speculation that he may be dead. Wildlife officials who track OR-93 through his radio collar said he stopped emitting “pings” April 5 in San Luis Obispo County, which is roughly midway between San Francisco and Los Angeles. But officials also have not picked up a “mortality signal” from the 2-year-old’s collar, which indicates when a wolf has not moved for at least eight hours, the Los Angeles Times reported over the weekend. READ MORE: ATM Service Technician Accused Of Embezzling Nearly $200K From Machines In Redwood City, San Mateo The wolf’s radio collar could be broken or malfunctioning due to dead batteries, said Jordan Traverso, a spokeswoman for the California Department of Fish and Wildlife. He may be dead or running wild with a Central Coast pack that no one knew existed, she said. OR-93 the wolf. (CDFW) “We’re trying to keep hope alive,” she told the news publication. Biologists in Oregon fitted OR-93 with a GPS tracking...
    TRAVERSE CITY, Mich. (AP) — A group of scientists urged the Biden administration Thursday to restore legal protections for gray wolves, saying their removal earlier this year was premature and that states are allowing too many of the animals to be killed. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service dropped wolves in most of the lower 48 states from the endangered species list in January. The decision was among more than 100 Trump administration actions related to the environment that President Joe Biden ordered reviewed after taking office. READ MORE: Federal Judge Rejects New Arguments By Foes Of Twin Metals Mine The move didn’t affect Idaho, Montana and Wyoming, where federal protections had been lifted years earlier and hunting is allowed. But it removed them elsewhere in the lower 48 states, including in the western Great Lakes and the Pacific Northwest that have wolf populations, and others where experts say the predators could migrate if shielded from human harassment. The decision was premature because the species hasn’t fully recovered, 115 scientists argued in a letter to Interior Secretary Deb Haaland and...
    A young male gray wolf crossed into far Northern California early this month — joining another wolf that trekked into the state in late January and made an epic journey south. The latest wolf to arrive in California — called OR-103 — was outfitted with a GPS collar in Deschutes County, Ore. He entered northeastern Siskiyou County on May 4, according to the California Department of Fish and Wildlife. It’s not clear exactly where OR-103 came from. There isn’t a pack of wolves in the area where he was collared, so it’s believed the roughly 1- to 2-year-old wolf was in the process of dispersing — striking out from his pack in search of new territory and a mate, said Roblyn Brown, wolf program coordinator for the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife With Oregon’s wolf population expanding, “there will be more wolves dispersing to California,” Brown said. “It just shows that there’s a healthy population growth of the wolves.” There were at least 173 wolves in Oregon at the end of 2020, a 9.5% increase over the previous...
    A deputy in Vladamir Putin’s United Russia party mocked a dying wolf on camera. The man allegedly ran over the animal with a snowmobile. The ethics commission received a notice about the 2020 incident recently. The “United Russia” political party’s ethics commission said that Denis Khakhalov, deputy of the Russian Kurgan Regional Duma, will likely be expelled for his behavior. Source: News Таm – Тam/YouTube Images and footage show Khakhalov sneering and laughing at the wolf while blood gushes from its face. The ethics committee responded to the killing, saying, “We have come to the conclusion that Denis Khakhalov has lost his humanity by mocking and torturing a wounded animal. Khakhalov has violated not only the parties ethical norms but also the more general universal human norm.” Alexander Khinshtein, Deputy Secretary of the General Council of “United Russia” shared that an investigation into the incident would be opened. Related Content: Trump Administration Strips Protections from Endangered Gray Wolves Montana Governor Kills Wolf 9 Bills That Will Destroy Montana’s Wildlife U.S. Fish and Wildlife Refuses Executive Order to...
    SAN FRANCISCO (CBS SF) — Garcia, the 15-year-old Mexican gray wolf that’s resided at the San Francisco Zoo since 2016, died Tuesday of old age. Zoo officials said that the wolf recently experienced a decline in quality of life. On average, Mexican gray wolves live between 13 and 15 years. READ MORE: Berkeley Police Arrest Woman On Hate Crime Charge For 2nd Time This Year “We are saddened by the loss of Garcia whose arrival here represented a turning point in the conservation of Mexican gray wolves,” said Tanya M. Peterson, CEO and Executive Director of San Francisco Zoological Society. Garcia, a Mexican gray wolf, in its habitat at the San Francisco Zoo this year. (Marianne Hale/SF Zoo) Garcia and two other 11-year-old male siblings, Bowie and Prince, came to the San Francisco Zoo as part of a collaboration between the Association of Zoo & Aquarium and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. READ MORE: Asian American Attacks: San Francisco Police Identify Suspect in Market Street Stabbing of 2 Women Mexican gray wolves were nearly wiped out by the 1970s. After...
    The Guardian Idaho bill seeks to kill more than 1,000 wolves Since Trump administration removed protections for gray wolves in January, groups and states have moved to open up hunting A Mexican gray wolf. Idaho’s gray wolf population was recently estimated at 1,556 wolves. Photograph: Jeff Roberson/AP Lawmakers in Idaho are pushing to drastically reduce wolf numbers in the state, perhaps by as much as over 90%, complementing other US efforts to shrink their population. Idaho’s gray wolf population was recently estimated at 1,556, but sponsors of a bill approved in the state senate last week say that the preferred number of wolf packs in the state is 15. Because a wolf pack in the region averages 10 wolves, this means the bill could lead to hunters killing well over 1,000 wolves. The bill will see a vote in the state house of representatives today, where Republicans, who generally support the measure, hold a 58-12 majority. If successful, the bill will land on the desk of the governor for his signature soon after. Recent months have seen a dramatic reversal...
    A state Senate committee in Idaho recently approved private contractors to kill about 90% of the wolves in the state, AP reported. Source: KTVB/YouTube Without Democratic support, Republicans in the Senate’s Resources and Environmental Committee voted to approve a bill with proposed changes that would cut the wolf population down from 1,500 to 150. Amanda Wight, program manager of wildlife protection for the Humane Society of the United States released the following emailed statement, “This bill doesn’t just cross an ethical line; it sprints right past it. It is an embarrassment to the state of Idaho, and there is absolutely no scientific or ethical justification for this deeply misguided and dangerous legislation. In a race to slaughter one of America’s most treasured animals, this bill allows fear and hate to win. Idaho’s wolves deserve better; the environment deserves better. This bill must be vetoed by Governor Little if it comes to his desk.” Backed by the agriculture industry, bill supporters argue that wolves are attacking cattle, sheep, and wildlife, as well as reducing the elk and deer available...
    According to the Mountain West News Bureau, Montana Gov. Greg Gianforte trapped and killed an adult black wolf near Yellowstone National Park on February 15. The wolf, number 1155, was tracked by radio-collar and lives in Yellowstone. He trapped the wolf on a private ranch after it wandered off federal lands. While it is legal to hunt and kill wolves in Montana, it’s not legal to kill them inside federal lands like Yellowstone. Source: The Humane Society of the United States/YouTube Gianforte allegedly killed the wolf before completing a state-mandated wolf trapping certification course. Reports shared that he took the course after being made aware of the fact. John Sullivan, Montana chapter chair for the sportsmen’s group Backcountry Hunters and Anglers, said that Gianforte should have been aware of the requirements. “He has been hunting and trapping for a long time and I would be surprised to learn that he didn’t know better than to complete that education,” Sullivan said. “We hope that he apologizes to the citizens of the state for circumventing the process that we all...
    FRESNO (CBS / AP) — A gray wolf born in Oregon has been tracked farther south in California than any previous wolf equipped with a GPS collar, the California Department of Fish and Wildlife said. The most recent collar reading showed the wolf dubbed OR-93 was in agricultural areas in central Fresno County, the department said in a statement Monday. READ MORE: Oakland To Provide Give $500 A Month In Universal Basic Income To 600 BIPOC Families The young male wolf dispersed from Oregon’s White River pack southeast of Mount Hood and was fitted with the tracking collar in June 2020. OR-93 the wolf. (CDFW) California authorities reported he was in Modoc County in February and in the past few weeks has moved through Tuolumne, Mariposa, Merced and Madera counties. Gray wolves were eradicated in California early in the last century because of their perceived threat to livestock. They were not confirmed to have returned until 2011 when a wolf from Oregon crossed into the Golden State. READ MORE: Asian American Attacks: US Army Veteran Attacked In San Francisco; Suspect...
    In the latest sign that gray wolves — one of the iconic species of the American West — are continuing to expand their presence back into California, state wildlife officials are reporting that a two-year old male wolf from Oregon who first entered Northern California two months ago has made it all the way south to rural Fresno County. The 500-mile journey, by a radio-collared wolf known as OR-93, is the farthest south any wolf has been confirmed in California in 99 years, since a wild gray wolf was killed in a leghold trap in 1922 in San Bernardino County. About a dozen gray wolves now live in California, roaming through Lassen, Modoc, Siskiyou and Plumas counties and back and forth over the Oregon border after re-entering the state in 2011. But the fact that OR-93 has traveled across 15 counties — from Modoc, through the Sierra Nevada and to the San Joaquin Valley — has stunned biologists, environmentalists and agricultural leaders. “It’s a great ecological story,” said Jordan Traverso, deputy director of the California Department of Fish and Wildlife....
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