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    DONALD Trump has vowed to campaign against "disloyal" GOP Sen Lisa Murkowski after she "struggled" to support him in the past. The former president said Murkowski - who has held her seat since 2002 - represents Alaska "badly" and he will not be endorsing her in her reelection bid next year. 4President Donald Trump pictured with Lisa Murkowski in June 2017Credit: Getty Images - Getty 4Murkowski voted to convict Trump in last month's impeachment trialCredit: Rex Features Murkowski has been a longtime critic of Trump and was one of seven Republican senators to vote to convict him in last month’s impeachment trial. But of those seven senators, she is the only one to face reelection in 2022. She also called on him to resign following the Capitol riots on January 6. Trump has criticized the senator for advancing the nomination of Rep. Deb Haaland to serve as interior secretary - saying it...
    Savannah Rychcik March 8, 2021 0 Comments Former President Donald Trump is making a promise to campaign against Sen. Lisa Murkowski (R-Alaska). “I will not be endorsing, under any circumstances, the failed candidate from the great State of Alaska, Lisa Murkowski. She represents her state badly and her country even worse,” Trump said in a statement over the weekend. He continued, “I do not know where other people will be next year, but I know where I will be – in Alaska campaigning against a disloyal and very bad Senator. Her vote to advance radical left Democrat Deb Haaland for Secretary of the Interior is yet another example of Murkowski not standing up for Alaska.” Read his statement below: Trump promises to campaign against Murkowski… pic.twitter.com/EjK4H50L21— Jim Acosta (@Acosta) March 6, 2021 Murkowski was one of the seven Republicans who voted to convict Trump on the charge of...
    A GOP senator who opposed both impeachments of former President TrumpDonald TrumpBiden to sign executive order aimed at increasing voting access Albany Times Union editorial board calls for Cuomo's resignation Advocates warn restrictive voting bills could end Georgia's record turnout MORE said Sunday that he believes impeachment-supporting Republicans including Rep. Liz CheneyElizabeth (Liz) Lynn CheneyMarjorie Taylor Greene's delay tactics frustrate GOP Paul Ryan to host fundraiser for Cheney amid GOP tensions Republicans, please save your party MORE (R-Wyo.) still have a place in the party. In an interview with Chuck ToddCharles (Chuck) David ToddBrown vows Democrats will 'find a way' to raise minimum wage Fauci lays out timeline for vaccinating teens, children Trudeau: Canadian, US border to remain closed 'for now' MORE on NBC's "Meet the Press," Sen. John BarrassoJohn Anthony BarrassoSunday shows preview: Manchin makes the rounds after pivotal role in coronavirus relief debate Murkowski votes with Senate panel to...
    Former House Speaker Paul Ryan will host a fundraising event for Wyoming Rep. Liz Cheney in late March as many in her orbit have turned their backs on her. Ryan's virtual event will take place March 25, and guests are encouraged to pay a $2,900 suggested donation for attendance, while guests can spend $5,800 for an opportunity to co-host, according to a copy of the invite obtained by Politico. Checks are payable to Cheney's Alexandria, Virginia, office. The Wyoming Republican has come under fire from colleagues and hometown political authorities alike after she joined nine other GOP lawmakers in voting to move forward with the impeachment trial of former President Donald Trump, who was accused of inciting the Jan. 6 Capitol insurrection that led to five deaths. On Jan. 19, the Carbon County Republican Party censured her after the group said her actions "concerned" the "entirety of the...
    Democratic Rep. Eric Swalwell is suing former President Donald Trump, his son Donald Trump Jr., Rudy Giuliani and Rep. Mo Brooks, claiming they incited the Jan. 6 Capitol riot and violated civil rights by attempting to block the peaceful transfer of presidential power. Swalwell, of California, filed the suit in federal court in Washington, D.C., Friday, weeks after Mississippi Rep. Bennie Thompson also sued Trump, claiming he launched a drawn-out attempt to overturn the election results that culminated with the Jan. 6 riot. In his suit, Swalwell alleges Trump and the other defendants violated local laws in the nation’s capital by inciting the mob to storm the Capitol as Vice President Mike Pence was in the Senate chamber to certify the 2020 presidential election. “As a direct and foreseeable consequence of the Defendants’ false and incendiary allegations of fraud and theft, and in direct response to the Defendants’ express...
    Loading the player... Rep. Eric Swalwell, who served as a House manager in Donald Trump’s last impeachment, filed a lawsuit Friday against the former president, his son, lawyer and a Republican congressman whose actions he charges led to January’s insurrection. The California Democrat’s suit was filed Friday in federal court in Washington. It alleges a conspiracy to violate civil rights, along with negligence, inciting a riot and inflicting emotional distress. It follows a similar suit filed by Rep. Bennie Thompson last month in an attempt to hold the former president accountable in some way for his actions Jan. 6, following his Senate acquittal. Read More: Proud Boys calling Rep. Bennie Thompson’s phone over Capitol riot lawsuit Swalwell charges that Trump, his son Donald Jr., along with former New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani and Republican Rep. Mo Brooks of Alabama, had made “false and incendiary allegations of fraud and theft,...
    Impeachment manager Rep. Eric Swalwell, D-Calif., is seen during a break on the third day of the impeachment trial of former President Donald Trump on Thursday, February 11, 2021.Tom Williams | CQ-Roll Call, Inc. | Getty Images Rep. Eric Swalwell, one of the House prosecutors during Donald Trump's second impeachment trial, filed a lawsuit Friday against the former president for inciting the Jan. 6 invasion of the U.S. Capitol. The civil lawsuit from Swalwell, D-Calif., also accuses Trump's oldest son, Donald Trump Jr., as well as Trump's personal attorney Rudy Giuliani and Rep. Mo Brooks, R-Ala., of being "wholly responsible for the injury and destruction" caused by the mob. Swalwell's 65-page lawsuit accuses the defendants of conspiring to block Biden's win, inciting the riot, aiding and abetting common-law assault, committing bias-related crimes, intentionally inflicting emotional distress and negligence. The congressman demands a trial by jury in U.S. District Court...
    By COLLEEN LONG and MICHAEL BALSAMO, Associated Press WASHINGTON (AP) — Rep. Eric Swalwell, who served as a House manager in Donald Trump’s last impeachment, filed a lawsuit Friday against the former president, his son, lawyer and a Republican congressman whose actions he charges led to January’s insurrection. The California Democrat’s suit was filed Friday in federal court in Washington. It alleges a conspiracy to violate civil rights, along with negligence, inciting a riot and inflicting emotional distress. It follows a similar suit filed by Rep. Bennie Thompson last month in an attempt to hold the former president accountable in some way for his actions Jan. 6, following his Senate acquittal. Swalwell charges that Trump, his son Donald Jr., along with former New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani and Republican Rep. Mo Brooks of Alabama, had made “false and incendiary allegations of fraud and theft, and in direct response to...
    The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) arrested an official of former President Donald Trump on Thursday for the assault on the Capitol on January 6, thus becoming the first arrested linked to the previous government, according to the Politico medium. Miami World – El Nuevo Herald This is Federico Klein, a 42-year-old man who during the Trump administration worked in the State Department as a political appointment. Specifically, the detainee was first assigned to the Office of Western Hemisphere Affairs, specifically in the department in charge of Brazil and the Southern Cone, and then transferred to the office that manages requests for access to federal information, known as FOIA. Klein, who was detained in Virginia, had previously worked for Trump’s 2016 presidential campaign as an analyst. Before becoming involved in politics alongside Trump, Klein served in the Marine Corps in Iraq. More than 300 people have been indicted in...
    Rep. Eric Swalwell, the California Democrat who helped lead impeachment arguments against Donald Trump, has sued the former president and some of his closest allies for their roles in the Capitol insurrection. More to follow...READ THIS LIST Covid-19 Cheat Sheet Politics Entertainment Media Royalist World Half Full U.S. News Scouted Travel Beast Inside Crossword Newsletters Podcasts About Contact Tips Jobs Advertise Help Privacy Code of Ethics & Standards Diversity Terms & Conditions Copyright & Trademark Sitemap Coupons © 2021 The Daily Beast Company LLC
    Washington (CNN)Former House impeachment manager Eric Swalwell has sued former President Donald Trump, his son Donald Trump Jr., Rudy Giuliani and Republican Rep. Mo Brooks in a second major lawsuit seeking to hold Trump and his allies accountable for inciting the insurrection at the US Capitol on January 6. The new lawsuit filed on Friday by Swalwell, a California Democrat who helped to lead impeachment arguments against Trump for inciting insurrection, follows a similar suit filed last month by Rep. Bennie Thompson against Trump, Giuliani and the extremist groups the Oath Keepers and Proud Boys. Swalwell's case makes some of the same claims as Thompson's -- citing a civil rights law meant to counter the Ku Klux Klan's intimidation of elected officials. But it also alleges Trump, Trump Jr., Giuliani and Brooks broke Washington, DC, laws, including an anti-terrorism act, by inciting the riot, and that they aided and abetted...
    Six weeks ago, Americans were assured that Donald Trump had left the presidency disgraced and forever ruined politically. Trump was the first president to be impeached twice, and first to be tried as a private citizen when out of office. He was the first to be impeached without the chief justice of the United States presiding over his trial. His nonstop complaining about a stolen “landslide” election was blamed by many as a distraction that lost two Republican Senate seats from Georgia. The current Democratic-majority Congress was the result. Americans were assured by Trump’s impeachment prosecutors and the media that the Jan. 6 Capitol assault was his fault alone. So Trump was condemned as a veritable murderer, responsible for five deaths at the Capitol. Many of his own advisers and Cabinet members had loudly resigned in disgust. Yet six weeks after leaving office, a Phoenix-like Trump brought a crowd at...
              COLUMBUS, Ohio – U.S. Senate candidate Jane Timken called for U.S. Representative Anthony Gonzalez (R-OH-16) to resign Monday. “It is clear Congressman Gonzalez’s wrongful decision to vote with Nancy Pelosi and Chuck Schumer to impeach President Trump has undermined his ability to effectively represent the people of the 16th District,” Timken wrote in her statement. It is clear Congressman Gonzalez’s wrongful decision to vote with Nancy Pelosi and Chuck Schumer to impeach President Trump has undermined his ability to effectively represent the people of the 16th district. Read my full statement: pic.twitter.com/3GuMRAqgCT — Jane Timken (@JaneyMurph) March 1, 2021 While Chairwoman of the Ohio Republican Party (ORP), Timken chastised other Republicans – calling despicable the legal move by Ohio lawmakers to introduce articles of impeachment against Governor Mike DeWine and urging former State Representative Candice Keller to resign. The demand for Gonzalez to...
    Nicolas Sarkozy leaves court after being found guilty of corruption and influence-peddling on March 01, 2021 in Paris, France. Former French President Nicolas Sarkozy was criminally convicted of corruption charges and sentenced on Monday. The case may or may not be a sign of things to come for former U.S. President Donald Trump. Either way, the legal development serves as proof that “First-World countries” can, do, and should punish their top leaders for wrongdoing—even after they have left office. Since the election of 2016, the word most often used to describe the Trump presidency was “unprecedented.” So much of what Trump is, what he did, and what others did in his name simply had no analogous predecessor. Ironically, it was ultimately this lack of precedent that procured Trump a second acquittal after impeachment. Despite the overwhelming evidence and obvious nature of Trump’s wrongdoing, the Senate shielded Trump from the natural consequences...
    By: KDKA-TV News Staff PITTSBURGH (KDKA) — Pennsylvania Republicans voted Monday to rebuke, not censure, Sen. Pat Toomey. READ MORE: Pine-Richland School Board Delays Vote On Return To Learning As Group Holds Rally Outside Meeting According to the Philadelphia Inquirer, the vote was 128 to 124 in favor to censure Sen. Toomey, with 13 abstentions. State Republicans talked about censuring the senator last week for his vote to convict former President Donald Trump of inciting the Capitol riot. READ MORE: Revolution Pipeline Back In Service Nearly 2.5 Years After Explosion In Beaver County Following his vote to convict, Toomey said in part of the former president that “His betrayal of the Constitution and his oath of office required conviction.” President Trump was acquitted of inciting the insurrection during the impeachment trial in the Senate. RELATED STORIES: Butler County Republican Committee Votes To Censure Sen. Pat Toomey Over Impeachment Vote...
    Republican Ohio Senate candidate Jane Timken called Monday for GOP Ohio Rep. Anthony GonzalezAnthony GonzalezTrump calls on Republicans to 'get rid' of Cheney, other GOP critics Trump Jr.: There are 'plenty' of GOP incumbents who should be challenged Trump endorses former aide against pro-impeachment Republican MORE to resign over his vote last month to impeach former President TrumpDonald TrumpSacha Baron Cohen calls out 'danger of lies, hate and conspiracies' in Golden Globes speech Sorkin uses Abbie Hoffman quote to condemn Capitol violence: Democracy is 'something you do' Ex-Trump aide Pierson planning run for Congress MORE for inciting the violent Jan. 6 insurrection at the Capitol.  In a statement, Timken, the former chair of the Ohio GOP, accused Gonzalez of siding with Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiTrump shows he holds stranglehold on GOP, media in CPAC barnburner Biden brings back bipartisan meetings at the White House McCarthy: 'I would bet my house' GOP...
    Former President TrumpDonald TrumpNoem touts South Dakota coronavirus response, knocks lockdowns in CPAC speech On The Trail: Cuomo and Newsom — a story of two embattled governors McCarthy: 'I would bet my house' GOP takes back lower chamber in 2022 MORE during his speech at the Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC) called out by name each of the 17 Republican lawmakers who voted to impeach or convict him and called on Republicans to "get rid" of them.  Trump on Sunday labeled the seven senators and 10 House members as “grandstanders” and concluded his list of disloyal lawmakers with House Republican Conference Chair Liz CheneyElizabeth (Liz) Lynn CheneyMcCarthy: 'I would bet my house' GOP takes back lower chamber in 2022 The Memo: CPAC fires starting gun on 2024 Trump Jr.: There are 'plenty' of GOP incumbents who should be challenged MORE (R-Wyo.), who he called a “warmonger” who “loves seeing our troops fighting.” The former president...
    Artist Tommy Zegan (R) and another man move Zegan's statue of former President Donald Trump during the Conservative Political Action Conference on February 27, 2021 in Orlando, Florida. Joe Raedle/Getty Images Let our journalists help you make sense of the noise: Subscribe to the Mother Jones Daily newsletter and get a recap of news that matters.Hours before former President Donald Trump reenters the public stage with a speech at CPAC, the country’s largest conservative political conference, Sen. Bill Cassidy (R-La.) warned fellow Republicans that the party will continue to lose if it continues to “idolize” the former president. Cassidy was one of seven GOP senators who voted to convict Trump at his impeachment trial earlier this month for inciting the violent insurrection on January 6. “Over the last four years, we lost the House of Representatives, the Senate, and the presidency,” Cassidy said Sunday on CNN’s State of the Union, adding...
              COLUMBUS, Ohio – Former President Donald Trump endorsed Max Miller Friday to represent Ohio Congressional District 16 in Washington, D.C. Miller is a former aide to the Trump White House and his campaign. Later, he became a senior advisor as the director of advance.  Miller announced his candidacy Friday. Im running for Congress to stand up for Northeast Ohioans. They overwhelmingly voted for the America First agenda. But their Congressman betrayed them when he voted to impeach President Trump. I wont back down. And Ill never betray them. Join me. https://t.co/s4r2WEpv43 — Max Miller (@MaxLMiller) February 26, 2021 In his announcement, Miller’s team wrote: Max saw first-hand the havoc wreaked on middle America’s middle-class by politicians who abandoned them in favor of cheap, exploitative foreign labor.  He watched the government enable big corporations to sell addictive drugs to struggling people who didn’t...
    Republican National Committee Chair Ronna McDanielRonna Romney McDanielSunday shows preview: 2024 hopefuls gather at CPAC; House passes coronavirus relief; vaccine effort continues Trump to attend private RNC donor retreat Juan Williams: The GOP is a party without ideas MORE said Sunday that the GOP remains united despite moves by state parties to censure Republicans who voted to impeach or convict former President TrumpDonald TrumpNoem touts South Dakota coronavirus response, knocks lockdowns in CPAC speech On The Trail: Cuomo and Newsom — a story of two embattled governors McCarthy: 'I would bet my house' GOP takes back lower chamber in 2022 MORE. "We can have division within our party...but overwhelmingly our party agrees with each other on more than we disagree with each other,” McDaniel said on CBS’ “Face the Nation.” Amid ongoing GOP censures against Republicans for insufficient loyalty, @GOPChairwoman tells @margbrennan: "We can have division within our party...but overwhelmingly...
    The Nebraska Republican Party officially rebuked Sen. Ben SasseBen SasseTrump at CPAC foments 2022 GOP primary wars Media circles wagons for conspiracy theorist Neera Tanden Republicans see Becerra as next target in confirmation wars MORE Saturday over his vote in favor of impeaching former President Trump earlier this month, CNN reports. The state GOP reportedly did not censure him, but made its disapproval over his actions clear, arguing that he wasn't representing his constituents' wishes. "The Nebraska Republican Party Central Committee expresses its deep disappointment and sadness with respect to the service of Senator Ben Sasse and calls for an immediate readjustment whereby he represents the people of Nebraska to Washington and not Washington to the people of Nebraska," the party's resolution reads, according to CNN. It went on to argue that Sasse's criticism of Trump and support the former president's impeachment trial worked to the advantage of Democrats, who used his comments "as justification for...
    (CNN)The Nebraska Republican Party rebuked Sen. Ben Sasse on Saturday for his vote to impeach former President Donald Trump, the latest Republican in Congress to face backlash from a state party. The Nebraska GOP's state central committee formally expressed its disappointment but stopped short of a formal censure, though the resolution said Sasse "stands rebuked" by the Nebraska GOP. The senator, who was reelected last fall with 63% of the vote, dismissed the decision in a statement on Saturday, saying, "Most Nebraskans don't think politics should be about the weird worship of one dude."A Nebraska GOP official confirmed the action to CNN on Saturday. The meeting was delayed earlier this month because of a winter storm. "Senator Sasse's condemnation of President Trump and his support for President Trump's impeachment have been liberally used multiple times by Democrats as justification for a truncated impeachment process that denied the President due process,"...
    More On: donald trump Paul Manafort can keep millions in real estate after pardon, judge rules Gold Trump statue on sale at CPAC for shocking amount Trump prepares to reassert dominance over Republicans at CPAC Bill Maher sounds off ahead of Trumps CPAC speech Former President Donald Trump has taken his first swipe at one of the Republican dissidents who voted to impeach him. Trump issued a warm endorsement Friday for Max Miller, 32, a former White House aide and campaign official who plans to primary two-term GOP Rep. Anthony Gonzalez of Ohio. Gonzalez was one of 10 GOP representatives who joined the Democrats’ second impeachment effort in January. “Current Rep. Anthony Gonzalez should not be representing the people of the 16th district because he does not represent their interest or their heart,” Trump wrote in an email blast to followers. The statement made good on Trump’s Feb. 16...
    Donald Trump is reportedly considering lashing out at House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy in his speech at the Conservative Political Action Conference in anger over GOP defections in his second impeachment. Trump, who will address CPAC in Orlando, Florida on Sunday, is still stewing over McCarthy's decision to keep Rep. Liz Cheney in the conference's number two position after she voted to impeach, three sources told Politico.  Last month, McCarthy flew to Mar-a-Lago in a bid to patch things up with Trump after saying that the former president 'bears responsibility' for the January 6 riot at the U.S. Capitol.  His effort to appease Trump continued this week, when McCarthy took a swipe at Cheney on Fox News, suggesting that she supports cancel culture. Donald Trump (seen Saturday) is reportedly considering lashing out at House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy in his speech at the Conservative Political Action Conference RELATED ARTICLES ...
    (CNN)Former President Donald Trump on Friday endorsed a primary challenger running against Ohio's Rep. Anthony Gonzalez, who voted to impeach Trump last month, in an early sign of the former President's plans to exert his influence on Republican primaries ahead of the 2022 midterm elections. "Max Miller is a wonderful person who did a great job at the White House and will be a fantastic Congressman," Trump said in a statement released by Save America, the former President's political action committee. "He is a Marine Veteran, a son of Ohio, and a true PATRIOT."Miller announced his campaign for Ohio's 16th District on Friday, writing on Twitter, "I'm running for Congress to stand up for Northeast Ohioans. They overwhelmingly voted for the America First agenda. But their Congressman betrayed them when he voted to impeach President Trump."Trump did not explicitly mention Gonzalez's vote to impeach him. "Current Rep. Anthony Gonzalez should...
    DONALD TRUMP endorsed his former aide Max Miller against Ohio Representative Anthony Gonzalez, who was one of 10 House Republicans to vote to impeach the former president for his role in the January 6 riots. "Max Miller is a wonderful person who did a great job at the White House and will be a fantastic Congressman," Trump said in a statement. "He is a Marine Veteran, a son of Ohio, and a true PATRIOT." 4Trump endorsed his former aide Max Miller, seen to his leftCredit: AP:Associated Press 4Miller is running against Ohio Rep. Anthony Gonzalez, who voted to impeach TrumpCredit: AP:Associated Press "Current Rep. Anthony Gonzalez should not be representing the people of the 16th district because he does not represent their interest or their heart," Trump added in the statement, which came from his Save America PAC. "Max Miller has my Complete and Total Endorsement!" The former president...
    Donald Trump on Friday endorsed his former aide, Max Miller, in his primary challenge of incumbent Republican Ohio Rep. Anthony Gonzalez in the state’s 16th district. The endorsement came weeks after Gonzalez was one of 10 House Republicans to vote to impeach the former president over his role in the Jan. 6 riot at the Capitol. Trump previously indicated that he would play an active role on the campaign trail during the midterm elections. "Max Miller is a wonderful person who did a great job at the White House and will be a fantastic Congressman," Trump said in a statement through his Save America PAC. "He is a Marine Veteran, a son of Ohio, and a true PATRIOT." "Current Rep. Anthony Gonzalez should not be representing the people of the 16th district because he does not represent their interest or their heart," Trump added. "Max Miller has my Complete and...
    Former President TrumpDonald TrumpDonald Trump Jr. calls Bruce Springsteen's dropped charges 'liberal privilege' Schiff sees challenges for intel committee, community in Trump's shadow McConnell says he'd back Trump as 2024 GOP nominee MORE has thrown his support behind an ex-White House official running to unseat a House Republican who voted for impeachment, the first GOP primary challenge Trump has backed since leaving office. Max Miller, a former aide to Trump, announced Friday that he is waging a primary challenge against Rep. Anthony GonzalezAnthony GonzalezThe Hill's Morning Report - Presented by The AIDS Institute - Tanden's odds plummet to lead OMB Republicans rally to keep Cheney in power Here are the GOP lawmakers censured by Republicans for impeaching Trump MORE (R-Ohio), a two-term congressman who was among 10 House Republicans to vote for impeachment. Miller, who hails from northeastern Ohio, worked on Trump’s 2016 and 2020 campaigns and served in the White House’s office...
    Former President Donald Trump is out with his first revenge endorsement of a primary challenger to a Republican who voted to impeach him. Max Miller, a 32-year-old former White House staff member adviser to Trump, began a campaign on Friday challenging incumbent Ohio Rep. Anthony Gonzalez, a former professional football player in his second term. "Max Miller is a wonderful person who did a great job at the White House and will be a fantastic Congressman. He is a Marine Veteran, a son of Ohio, and a true PATRIOT," Trump said in a statement on Friday. "Current Rep. Anthony Gonzalez should not be representing the people of the 16th district because he does not represent their interest or their heart. Max Miller has my Complete and Total Endorsement!" Gonzalez, 36, was one of 10 House Republicans who voted in favor of the "incitement of insurrection" article of...
    VANCOUVER, Wash. (AP) — Members of Washington's Clark County Republican party voted this week to formally censure Rep. Jaime Herrera Beutler, of Battle Ground, over her vote to impeach former President Donald Trump. In a rowdy gathering at a church in Tuesday, the Clark County Republican Party pledged to withhold funds from Herrera Beutler’s future campaigns unless she appears in person at the group's meeting in May to “explain her action,” The Columbian reported. The resolution passed by a wide margin. The resolution was introduced by precinct committee officer Carolyn Crain. Crain said she was the first volunteer to work for Herrera Beutler during the congresswoman’s first campaign in 2010. “She violated my trust and it broke my heart," Crain said. The censure criticized the impeachment process as lacking proper procedure. Herrera Beutler offered to testify during the Senate’s trial, though the body didn’t take her up on it. She...
    Loading the player... Donald Trump is back and will be making his first public appearance since the impeachment trial and Inauguration Day on Jan. 20, when he boarded his flight out of D.C. to his new residence in Florida. Trump will headline the Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC) in Orlando on Sunday, where he is expected to offer some of the same tones and themes of election fraud and the false claim that the 2020 presidential election was stolen from him. Read More: Manhattan prosecutor gets Trump tax records after long fight President Donald Trump acknowledges the crowd during the annual Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC) at Gaylord National Resort & Convention Center February 29, 2020 in National Harbor, Maryland. (Photo by Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images) Social media companies have silenced Trump and so have some of the nation’s news organizations, however, CPAC is giving Trump a so-called packed...
    A previous adviser for former President Donald Trump said that he wants to see the party rid itself of House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy. Peter Navarro, who served as Trump's trade adviser and was on the coronavirus task force, said Wednesday that McCarthy "has to go" as a result of how he handled the fallout from Rep. Liz Cheney's vote to impeach Trump. Cheney, who was the highest-ranking politician of the 10 House Republicans who voted in favor of impeachment, has repeatedly said that the former commander-in-chief should not be leading the party. LIZ CHENEY BECOMES LATEST GOP LAWMAKER WHO VOTED TO IMPEACH TRUMP TO GET CENSURED IN HOME STATE After Cheney voted to impeach Trump, the House GOP conducted a secret vote to determine whether she should retain her role as House Republican conference chairwoman, and Navarro blamed the overwhelming vote in her favor on McCarthy. "Here’s the problem...
    NEW YORK (WABC) -- For President Joe Biden's first 100 days in office, Eyewitness News will have a special election edition of "The Countdown" to get you caught up with all of the day's political and campaign news.You can watch it online, on the ABC7NY app or on our Connected TV apps for Fire, Roku, Apple TV and Android TV. Click here to learn more.Wednesday, Feb. 24Biden choice for budget chief faces new hurdles in CongressThe increasingly slim odds - and surprisingly thin outreach from the White House - for Neera Tanden's nomination as head of the Office of Management and Budget are raising growing questions about how long the president will stick with her, in an early test of how he will use his limited political capital.In the latest sign of trouble for Tanden, two Senate panels slated to take up her nomination, the Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs...
    By Nathan Layne (Reuters) - The Republican Party's state committee in Pennsylvania is expected to vote Wednesday night on whether to censure U.S. Senator Pat Toomey, highlighting divisions in the party over the impeachment of former President Donald Trump. Lawrence Tabas, chairman of the committee, has called a meeting for members from across the state to decide if Toomey should be censured for voting to convict Trump after this month's impeachment trial, three members told Reuters. Tabas and other officials in the party leadership did not respond to queries about the online meeting. Toomey declined to comment. Toomey was one of seven Republicans who voted to convict Trump on the charge of inciting last month's deadly riot at the U.S. Capitol. The Senate's vote of 57 to 43 fell short of the two-thirds of senators needed for conviction. While a symbolic measure with no legal bearing, the possible censure underscores...
    BATON ROUGE, La. (AP) — Trashed on social media and censured by Louisiana Republicans, U.S. Sen. Bill Cassidy described himself Wednesday as “at peace” with his vote to convict former President Donald Trump at his impeachment trial and dismissed the scorching GOP backlash he’s received. Louisiana’s senior Republican senator said he does not believe the criticism represents the feelings of many of his party’s voters. He said the censure he received from the leadership of the state Republican Party represented “a small group of people,” not the “broader Republican Party.” “I am such at peace with that vote. I say that knowing that I’m getting criticized, but I took an oath to support and defend the Constitution,” Cassidy said in a conference call with reporters on a variety of topics. Cassidy joined six other Senate Republicans in voting with Democrats on Feb. 13 to convict Trump of inciting the Jan....
    By MELINDA DESLATTE, Associated Press BATON ROUGE, La. (AP) — Trashed on social media and censured by Louisiana Republicans, U.S. Sen. Bill Cassidy described himself Wednesday as “at peace” with his vote to convict former President Donald Trump at his impeachment trial and dismissed the scorching GOP backlash he's received. Louisiana's senior Republican senator said he does not believe the criticism represents the feelings of many of his party's voters. He said the censure he received from the leadership of the state Republican Party represented “a small group of people,” not the “broader Republican Party.” “I am such at peace with that vote. I say that knowing that I’m getting criticized, but I took an oath to support and defend the Constitution,” Cassidy said in a conference call with reporters on a variety of topics. Cassidy joined six other Senate Republicans in voting with Democrats on Feb. 13 to convict...
    (CNN)The Pennsylvania Republican state committee is holding a meeting Wednesday night with the expectations that the issue of censuring Pennsylvania GOP Sen. Pat Toomey over his impeachment vote will be discussed. Several Republican county committees across the commonwealth have issued censure resolutions against Toomey for his vote to convict former President Donald Trump at the end of his second impeachment trial.Now, the state GOP committee is scheduled to meet virtually Wednesday evening to possibly formally censure Toomey for his guilty vote, according to three counties' chairs. CNN has reached out to the Pennsylvania Republican Party for comment. A formal rebuke from the state GOP party would be largely symbolic and come at little cost to Toomey, who had already announced he does not plan to run for reelection in 2022. But it would serve as the latest reminder of the enormous influence Trump continues to yield in the party, and...
    NEW YORK (WABC) -- For President Joe Biden's first 100 days in office, Eyewitness News will have a special election edition of "The Countdown" to get you caught up with all of the day's political and campaign news.You can watch it online, on the ABC7NY app or on our Connected TV apps for Fire, Roku, Apple TV and Android TV. Click here to learn more.Tuesday, Feb .23Capitol defenders cite missed intelligence for deadly breachOfficials who were in charge of Capitol security at the time of last month's riot have testified that missed intelligence was to blame for the failure to anticipate the violent mob. The invaders stormed the Capitol on Jan. 6, interrupting certification of Democrat Joe Biden's election victory over Republican Donald Trump.Then-president Trump had urged them to protest the certification at a rally minutes earlier. The former chief of the U.S. Capitol Police told lawmakers on Tuesday that...
    DONALD Trump trolled "Crazy Nancy" Pelosi over two "ridiculous impeachment attempts" in a statement he released over "continuing political persecution." The former President called the investigation a continuation of the "greatest political witch hunt in history" while hitting out at "election crimes". 6The former President released a statement today hitting out at 'election crimes'Credit: Reuters 6Donald Trump trolled Nancy Pelosi (pictured) in the statement calling her 'crazy'Credit: Alamy Live News 6In the statement, Trump called the investigation the 'greatest political Witch Hunt in the history of our Country'Credit: Twitter In the statement released today, Trump hit out at New York Governor Andrew Cuomo, who he referred to as "a heavily reported enemy of mine". He blamed Cuomo for the investigating done by "prestigious law and accounting firms" into "almost every transaction I've ever done". However, Trump continued that the "attacks by Democrats" won't stop him from continuing to "fight...
    HARRISBURG, Pa. (AP) — Republican Party committee members in Pennsylvania expect to meet Wednesday night to decide whether to censure U.S. Sen. Pat Toomey amid a GOP backlash over his vote to convict Donald Trump during the former president’s second impeachment trial, members said. The state party chairman, Lawrence Tabas, emailed committee members Monday to schedule the meeting. He emailed them on Feb. 13, moments after the Senate vote, telling them to expect a meeting. READ MORE: Sen. Pat Toomey, Who Once Unified Republicans, Now On The Outs Over Former President Trump A censure vote is a symbolic gesture that may have no real effect on Toomey since he isn’t seeking reelection next year. Toomey was one of seven Republicans who voted to convict Trump of “incitement of insurrection.” Ultimately, Trump was acquitted of the charge because the 57-43 vote fell short of the two-thirds majority needed for conviction. READ...
    NEW YORK (WABC) -- For President Joe Biden's first 100 days in office, Eyewitness News will have a special election edition of "The Countdown" to get you caught up with all of the day's political and campaign news.You can watch it online, on the ABC7NY app or on our Connected TV apps for Fire, Roku, Apple TV and Android TV. Click here to learn more.Monday, Feb. 22US COVID death toll tops 500,000, matching the toll of 3 warsThe COVID-19 death toll in the U.S. topped 500,000 Monday, a staggering number that all but matches the number of Americans killed in World War II, Korea and Vietnam combined. The lives lost, as recorded by Johns Hopkins University, are about equal to the population of Kansas City, Missouri, and greater than that of Miami; Raleigh, North Carolina; or Omaha, Nebraska. The U.S. recorded an estimated 405,000 deaths in World War II, 58,000...
    Madison Summers February 22, 2021 0 Comments Rep. Jamie Raskin (D-Md.), the lead House impeachment manager, is doubling down that there is potentially still a way to bar former President Donald Trump from holding public office again. During Monday’s interview on “The View,” Raskin declared that Trump violated his oath of office and “acted as the inciter-in-chief” on Jan. 6 when protesters stormed the U.S. Capitol. The Democratic lawmaker then doubled down that Trump could still be barred from holding public office in the future, “That is still something that Donald Trump may face.” He added that there will be a “tidal wave of litigation coming his way both from people who were injured or whose family members were killed in the insurrection he incited, as well as from criminal prosecutors.” He pointed to Section 3 of the 14th Amendment, which as he noted it “says anybody who...
    A new poll shows former President Trump is still popular among his supporters in the wake of the impeachment trial earlier this month that led to his second acquittal. A Suffolk University/ USA Today poll found that 46% of Trump supporters would abandon the Republican Party and join a Trump party should he decide to create one, versus 27% who would stay with the GOP. MCCONNELL SAYS HE WAS DEFENDING THE CONSTITUTION, NOT TRUMP, IN IMPEACHMENT ACQUITTAL VOTE Half of the individuals polled said the Republican Party should become "more loyal to Trump," even if it means losing support from establishment Republicans, versus 19% saying the party should become less loyal to Trump and more aligned with establishment Republicans.  The survey of 1,000 Trump voters, identified from 2020 polls, was taken by landline and cellphone last Monday through Friday. The margin of error is plus or minus 3.1 percentage points. VideoTrump was...
    Bradley Cortright February 21, 2021 0 Comments The Senate is preparing to hold a hearing to investigate how law enforcement officials were apparently caught off guard by the Jan. 6 riot at the U.S. Capitol and were not better prepared. However, Sen. Ron Johnson (R-Wisc.) notes that while there are reports that an FBI office was aware of the potential for violence, he believes that the riot was not predictable. During an interview with Fox News on Sunday, Johnson said, “There was really no suspected harmful activity.” “People really were caught by surprise. This was not predictable. This was not foreseeable as the House managers continue to talk about. I just don’t believe it was,” he added. During the Senate’s impeachment trial of former President Donald Trump, the Democratic House impeachment managers claimed that the violence was foreseeable.  As The New York Times reported, “The footage and the detailed chronology were intended...
    By MELINDA DESLATTE, Associated Press BATON ROUGE, La. (AP) — U.S. Sen. Bill Cassidy seems ready to move on from his vote to convict former President Donald Trump in the latest impeachment trial, but Trump supporters in the state are angry, loud and not interested in letting Cassidy forget about it. The Republican senator is sending out regular news releases and statements on a variety of topics that have nothing to do with Trump or impeachment, such as broadband internet access, student debt, coronavirus aid, hurricane recovery and the icy weather. Meanwhile, Cassidy's Facebook page is filled with rants trashing his conviction vote in a Senate trial that saw Trump acquitted of inciting the Jan. 6 riot at the U.S. Capitol. Critics are calling for GOP groups to ban Cassidy from their events, and local Republican organizations are continuing to condemn Cassidy. A popular Louisiana conservative talk radio host has...
    New York : President Trump could re-deliver one of his inflammatory speeches. Photo: Joe Raedle / . The ex-president Donald trump will return to public life after the impeachment he faced in the Senate and in the midst of the battle for control of the Republican Party and is expected to launch harsh criticism of the president’s immigration reform Joe biden. The former president will be one of the keynote speakers at the Conservative Political Action Conference in Orlando, Florida, a spokesperson for the organization confirmed to The New York Post. Former President Trump’s speech will be on February 28 and he plans to focus precisely on the future of his party and the “conservative movement.” “Also expect President 45 to confront President Biden’s disastrous border and amnesty policies.”said a source to Post. Refers to the immigration reform presented by the democrat, which seeks to...
    BRISTOL, R.I. (AP) — U.S. Sen. Sheldon Whitehouse and U.S. Rep. David Cicilline are scheduled to share their insiders' take on the second impeachment trial of former President Donald Trump. The Rhode Island Democrats will appear at an online program hosted by Roger Williams University School of Law on Tuesday evening titled “Incitement, Insurrection, and Impeachment: Inside the Second Trump Impeachment Trial.” The program also includes nationally recognized constitutional law expert Michael Gerhardt, special counsel to the impeachment trial’s presiding officer, Vermont Sen. Patrick Leahy. The program will feature commentary on the trial itself as well as a discussion of its ramifications for the future of the Senate, impeachment, the presidency, the Constitution and the rule of law in the United States. Roger Williams Law Dean Gregory Bowman will introduce and close the event. “The second impeachment trial will affect our country for generations to come,” Bowman said in a...
    We know how the story went: Trump was impeached for a second time. There is a trial. He is found not guilty because there are not enough votes needed to make it happen, despite the majority of the Senate voting against the former president. Lots of people have questions in regards to this process. Namely, what the hell? But also, why didn’t the Democrats forgo their right to call witnesses? Rep. Joe Neguse (D-CA) told co-host Molly Jong-Fast his perspective on things in this member-only bonus episode of The New Abnormal. “Whether it’s five witnesses or 5,000 witnesses, it would not have changed the ultimate outcome,” he says, echoing what Rep. Jamie Raskin has said on the issue. They did consider witnesses nonetheless, says Neguse, but to him, it came down to timing.READ THIS LIST Covid-19 Cheat Sheet Politics Entertainment Media Royalist World Half Full U.S. News Scouted Travel ...
    Medina, Ohio (CNN)To Shannon Burns, the betrayal that local Republicans felt when Ohio State wide receiver-turned-Republican-congressman Anthony Gonzalez voted to impeach then-President Donald Trump was analogous to only one other disloyalty: Suiting up for Michigan."This is like him playing for the Buckeyes again, getting down to the two-minute warning, running into the locker room, getting a Michigan jersey and running back out," said Burns, who runs the Strongsville GOP, a grassroots organization that once backed Gonzalez. "It's not that you turned your back or you did something that we didn't like. You did the unthinkable."Gonzalez's decision to join just nine other House Republicans and all House Democrats to impeach Trump in January has unearthed profound anger in his northeast Ohio district, kicking off a localized fight over the future of the Republican Party that pits the two-term congressman against irate constituents eager to expel any Republican who crosses the former...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — When Sen. Richard Burr stood and said “guilty” there were hushed gasps in the Senate chamber. But the North Carolina Republican’s vote to convict former President Donald Trump should not have come as a shock. In a way, he had been telegraphing it for several years. Months before Trump would begin falsely claiming that the November election had been stolen from him, the Senate Intelligence Committee led by Burr warned that sitting public officials should use the “absolute greatest amount of restraint and caution if they are considering publicly calling the validity of an upcoming election into question.” Such grave allegations, the committee said in February 2020, can have “significant” consequences for national security. Explaining his vote to convict Trump of inciting an insurrection at the Capitol on Jan. 6, Burr returned to that theme. He said Trump “promoted unfounded conspiracy theories to cast doubt on the...
    By MARY CLARE JALONICK, Associated Press WASHINGTON (AP) — When Sen. Richard Burr stood and said “guilty” there were hushed gasps in the Senate chamber. But the North Carolina Republican’s vote to convict former President Donald Trump should not have come as a shock. In a way, he had been telegraphing it for several years. Months before Trump would begin falsely claiming that the November election had been stolen from him, the Senate Intelligence Committee led by Burr warned that sitting public officials should use the “absolute greatest amount of restraint and caution if they are considering publicly calling the validity of an upcoming election into question.” Such grave allegations, the committee said in February 2020, can have “significant” consequences for national security. Explaining his vote to convict Trump of inciting an insurrection at the Capitol on Jan. 6, Burr returned to that theme. He said Trump “promoted unfounded conspiracy...
    Sen. Mike LeeMichael (Mike) Shumway LeeGOP senators demand probe into Cuomo's handling of nursing home deaths NYT podcast host says it's 'ironic' Rubio is against childcare allowance State parties seek to punish anti-Trump Republicans MORE (R-Utah) came to fellow Utah Sen. Mitt RomneyWillard (Mitt) Mitt RomneyTrump-McConnell rift divides GOP donors Romney explains impeachment vote, calls on senators to affirm Biden won On The Trail: Trump threatens a Tea Party redux MORE’s (R) defense as the latter catches flak over his vote this month to convict former President TrumpDonald TrumpThune: Trump allies partaking in 'cancel culture' by punishing senators who voted to convict Biden administration open to restarting nuclear talks with Iran Trump-McConnell rift divides GOP donors MORE in his impeachment trial.  In a statement released through his campaign, Lee suggested that intraparty disagreements overall make the GOP stronger, and that there is enough room for both supporters and opponents of Trump. ...
    NEW YORK (WABC) -- For President Joe Biden's first 100 days in office, Eyewitness News will have a special election edition of "The Countdown" to get you caught up with all of the day's political and campaign news.You can watch it online, on the ABC7NY app or on our Connected TV apps for Fire, Roku, Apple TV and Android TV. Click here to learn more.Friday, Feb. 19Biden tours Pfizer facilityPresident Biden toured a Pfizer facility on Friday as the drug maker announced positive developments on its vaccine. The company says the shots can be stored at standard freezer temperatures for up to two weeks and not just in special ultra-cold freezers. That means smaller pharmacies may be able to obtain, store and administer the shots.White House announces new timeline for vaccinating studentsThe White House is now saying that high school students may receive vaccines in the fall, but elementary school...
    (CNN)It was a busy week in Washington, with President Biden sharing key policy initiatives like his plans to reopen schools, push for a federal minimum wage and distribute more vaccines during a CNN town hall.Meanwhile, Texas and parts of the South faced devastating winter conditions, with millions going without power, water, or heat. The week ended in a rough 24 hours politically for Texas Sen. Ted Cruz, as he chose to leave his hard-hit state for Mexico.Monday Burr faces censure by North Carolina GOP for voting to convict Trump Gov. Cuomo facing impeachment calls over alleged Covid-19 coverup Pelosi announces plans for '9/11-type commission' to investigate Capitol attack TuesdayRead More NYT: House Republican shunned by family members over Trump criticism Trump rips McConnell in lengthy statement after being acquitted in impeachment trial Wednesday Biden continues to push $15 federal minimum wage White House says teacher vaccinations...
    WASHINGTON -- Former President Donald Trump's acquittal by the Senate in his impeachment trial may not be the end of the line for efforts to keep him from seeking the presidency again.If Trump chooses to run for the White House in 2024, opponents are likely to call on a constitutional provision adopted after the Civil War to try to stop him. The Supreme Court could have the final say.The Constitution's 14th Amendment disqualifies from future office any former elected officials and military officers who "shall have engaged in insurrection or rebellion" against the United States. Ratified in 1868, the language in Section 3 of the amendment was aimed at former Confederate civilian and military leaders.It could be applied to people who incited or took part in the Jan. 6 attack on the Capitol, legal scholars said, noting that a congressional commission to investigate the attack and lawsuits against Trump could...
    Many Republicans have been vocal in decrying “cancel culture,” and in a new interview one GOP senator said people within the party have been engaging in it as well. Senator John Thune spoke with the Associated Press about the backlash across the country from Republicans to members of Congress who backed impeaching and/or convicting Donald Trump. Multiple state Republican parties have censured people like Senators Bill Cassidy and Richard Burr, who voted for conviction. The Wyoming Republican party censured Congresswoman Liz Cheney for voting for impeachment. Thune defended Republicans who voted against Trump as he commented on GOP “cancel culture”: The Senate’s No. 2 Republican defended fellow Republicans who sided with Democrats on the “vote of conscience” and warned against shutting out dissenting voices in the party. “There was a strong case made,” Thune said of the Democrats’ impeachment presentation. “People could come to different conclusions. If we’re going...
    An attorney who represented President Trump during his second impeachment trial claims he has been 'cancelled' by a law school after they rescinded their offer to have him teach a class there.  David Schoen, 63, made the revelation during an interview on Newsmax Thursday night, but stopped short of naming the school.  'I had hoped to teach a law school class in the fall,' Schoen told network anchor Greg Kelly.  'I had been in talks with a law school about teaching a civil rights course. I've got 36 years of experience as a civil rights lawyer, working major cases. I love being around the students.' However, Schoen says he contacted the school prior to accepting President Trump's offer to work on his trial team and administrators told him they would no longer be interested in having him join the faculty.  'I was told it would be [an impediment]. Some faculty and...
    South Dakota Sen. John Thune on Thursday warned Republican allies of former President Donald Trump against engaging in "cancel culture," as several GOP lawmakers face censures for their votes in favor of convicting Trump during his recent impeachment trial. “There was a strong case made,” Thune said in reference to the impeachment case made by the Democratic House impeachment managers. “People could come to different conclusions. If we’re going to criticize the media and the Left for cancel culture, we can’t be doing that ourselves.” Thune is the second-ranking GOP leader in the Senate, serving as minority whip. Trump was impeached for a second time last month on a charge of incitement of insurrection in connection to the Jan. 6 Capitol riot, and he was acquitted by the Senate last week. Seven GOP senators joined with Democrats and independents in voting to convict him: North Carolina Sen. Richard Burr,...
    This week on the What’s In it For Us? podcast, our hosts Dr. Christina Greer and Elie Mystal discuss Trump’s second impeachment, the prison uprising in St. Louis, and indoor dining across America during a pandemic. It’s no doubt 2021 started out with a bang and continues to push the unpredictable dial forward. Amidst everything we don’t know and have yet to know, the question always on our minds is: what’s in it for us? Read More: ‘What’s In It For Us’ podcast talk Trump’s 2nd impeachment, congressional confrontation with Niambi Carter “The fact that this is a white supremacy insurrection started in the name of Donald Trump was a point that should have been made repeatedly during the trial,” Mystal to Dr. Greer. The acquittal of Trump is as unsurprising as it is political negligence. Both Mystal and Dr. Greer pointed out that similar to the first impeachment,...
    More On: cancel culture Media created Cuomo myth and other commentary NYC public school asks parents to ‘reflect’ on their ‘whiteness’ Hasbro hits disgraced ‘Mandalorian’ star with devastating blow over social media posts Not to be? William Shakespeare ditched by woke teachers David Schoen said representing former President Donald Trump at his second impeachment trial turned him into the latest victim of cancel culture. The veteran Alabama attorney claimed an offer to teach a civil rights class at a law school was rescinded after he took the job to defend Trump. “When this came up, I contacted the school to ask whether this would be an impediment,” Schoen told Newsmax on Thursday, “and was told yes, it would be — that some faculty and students would feel uncomfortable to have me on campus if I were getting involved with this case.” Schoen, who has 36 years of legal experience...
    Madison Summers February 19, 2021 0 Comments Sen. John Thune (R-S.D.) is taking aim at allies of former President Donald Trump for criticizing those in the party who voted to convict the former president on the charge of “incitement of insurrection.” Thune, who voted to acquit Trump in the Senate impeachment trial, is coming to the defense of his fellow Republican colleagues who chose to convict on “vote of conscience,” according to The Associated Press. The South Dakota lawmaker said “there was a strong case made” by the Democratic impeachment managers. “People could come to different conclusions,” he added. “If we’re going to criticize the media and the left for cancel culture, we can’t be doing that ourselves.” After Trump’s acquittal, Thune wrote in a statement: “My vote to acquit should not be viewed as exoneration for his conduct on January 6, 2021, or in the days and weeks...
    x Vimeo Video According to Mitch McConnell and other Republicans in the Senate, the Democratic impeachment managers proved the case that Donald Trump incited his mob to attack the Capitol in an insurrection with the goal of stopping the peaceful transfer of power in the U.S. presidential election. But, thanks to an imagined phrase in the Constitution, you can’t convict someone in an impeachment once they have left office. Whatever happened to the Republican Party’s strict textual reading of our nation’s founding document? Never mind, Senate Republicans only wanted a fig leaf — any fig leaf — to be able to let Trump off the hook for an attack on our democracy. McConnell went the even more craven route than just spouting constitutional nonsense to justify an acquittal. His speech taking Trump to task for his naughty actions made his vote to acquit look even more outrageous. It’s...
    On March 25, 2020, New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo sentenced tens of thousands of New York’s most vulnerable residents to die. The now-infamous directive, sent to nursing home administrators, directors of nursing, and hospital discharge planners, forced nursing homes to accept patients who had either contracted COVID-19 or had been exposed to others infected with the virus. Over the following months frustrated New Yorkers demanded answers about the circumstances that led to the deaths of their loved ones. This determined group of grieving families stood firm and vowed to do what politicians and their allies in the mainstream media refused to do—hold Cuomo accountable. One of these New Yorkers is Fox News’ Senior Meteorologist Janice Dean. Last spring, Dean lost both her mother- and father-in-law as a result of Cuomo’s incompetence and negligence. While Gov. Cuomo secured lucrative book deals, lavished in the praise of a sycophantic mainstream media, and even received an...
    Democrats had failed at yet another attempt at exposing former President Donald Trump and, ultimately, they were the ones exposed – despite glowing media reports to the contrary – according to constitutional legal expert Alan Dershowitz on Newsmax TV. "The Democrats have shot themselves in the foot," Dershowitz told Thursdays "Greg Kelly Reports." "They have kept Donald Trump in the news. He could have easily been cast to the sidelines and Mar-a-Lago and all that. "But they kept him center stage." Dershowitz, who was the professor of House impeachment manager Rep. Jamie Raskin, D-Md., blasted the Democrats legal team. "The lawyers on the Democratic side really screwed it up to a fare thee well," Dershowitz told host Greg Kelly. "They framed the article of impeachment very badly, even many on their own side acknowledge that." Dershowitz noted the first House Democrats impeachment attempt a year ago was also similarly botched. "They...
    House Republican Whip Steve Scalise (R-LA) met with former President Donald Trump this week, according to a report released Thursday. “He’s in Florida this week on political travel and had meetings at Mar-a-Lago on Tuesday and touched base with President Trump while he was there,” Lauren Fine, Scalise’s spokesperson, said in a statement. Scalise’s meeting with the 45th president comes after a rift has emerged between pro-Trump Republicans and more establishment GOP members. House Republican Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-CA) met with Trump at Mar-a-Lago recently. House GOP chair Liz Cheney’s (R-WY) vote to impeach Trump enraged many House conservatives, such as Reps. Matt Gaetz (R-FL), Andy Biggs (R-AZ), and Matt Rosendale (R-MT). Cheney survived her leadership challenge during a February House GOP Conference meeting; however, a January poll shows she remains unpopular in her home state. Sen. John Thune (R-SD), the second-ranking Senate Republican, said he could support a resolution to censure...
    NEW YORK (WABC) -- For President Joe Biden's first 100 days in office, Eyewitness News will have a special election edition of "The Countdown" to get you caught up with all of the day's political and campaign news.You can watch it online, on the ABC7NY app or on our Connected TV apps for Fire, Roku, Apple TV and Android TV. Click here to learn more.Thursday, Feb. 18Latest on Governor Cuomo nursing home controversyNew York City Mayor Bill de Blasio is sounding off on Governor Andrew Cuomo, who is involved in a dispute with another state Democrat who claims the governor threatened him over the reporting of COVID nursing home deaths.Cuomo has faced mounting challenges to his leadership on the coronavirus pandemic, as state lawmakers threatened to strip him of the power to issue emergency orders and federal investigators scrutinize his administration's handling of nursing home data.Texas Sen. Ted Cruz said...
    Bradley Cortright February 18, 2021 0 Comments Sen. Mitt Romney (R-Utah) is explaining his vote to convict former President Donald Trump on the impeachment charge of “incitement of insurrection.” In a statement on Thursday, Romney said he listened to the arguments by the House impeachment managers and Trump’s defense team during the trial.  “The conclusion I reached on the final verdict will not surprise anyone who read my reasoning in the first impeachment trial: I consider an attempt to corrupt an election to keep oneself in power one of the most reprehensible acts that can be taken by a sitting president,” Romney wrote. He noted Trump’s apparent effort to pressure state election officials to overturn the results of the presidential election as well as his decision to encourage his supporters to attend the rally on Jan. 6. “Despite the obvious and well-known threat of violence, he incited and directed thousands to descend upon...
    Sen. Mitt RomneyWillard (Mitt) Mitt RomneyOn The Trail: Trump threatens a Tea Party redux Romney's plan to help families and promote work NYT podcast host says it's 'ironic' Rubio is against childcare allowance MORE (R-Utah) released a statement Thursday explaining his vote to convict former President TrumpDonald TrumpFederal prosecutors investigated Proud Boys ties to Roger Stone in 2019 case: CNN Overnight Defense: One-third of service members decline coronavirus vaccine | Biden to take executive action in response to Solar Winds hack | US, Japan reach cost sharing agreement Trump 'won't say yet' if he's running in 2024 MORE for inciting the Jan. 6 riot at the Capitol and calling on his fellow senators to affirm that President BidenJoe BidenFeds investigating Cuomo's handling of nursing home outbreaks Overnight Defense: One-third of service members decline coronavirus vaccine | Biden to take executive action in response to Solar Winds hack | US, Japan reach cost...
    Organizers of the biggest annual gathering of conservatives say they have invited President Donald Trump to speak at their conference in Florida next week. The Conservative Political Action Conference is due to start next Thursday in Orlando and already features some of the biggest names from the Trump administration, including former Secretary of State Mike Pompeo and former White House spokeswoman Sarah Sanders. Chairman of the American Conservative Union Matt Schlapp said he had extended an invitation to Trump himself. “I’d love to see him come to CPAC next,” he told the Washington Examiner. TRUMP DESCRIBES RELATIONSHIP WITH LIMBAUGH Trump has begun reemerging into public life since being acquitted by the Senate last weekend of a House impeachment charge of “inciting insurrection." Although he remains deprived of his Twitter and Facebook platforms, he released a blistering attack by email on Senate Republican leader Mitch McConnell on Tuesday. A day later...
    Rep. David Valadao will face an attempt to censure him at the California GOP convention this weekend for his vote to impeach Donald Trump. He is the latest Republican elected official to draw criticism from a state party over disloyalty to the former president. Valadao, who represents the San Joaquin Valley, was one of 10 GOP members of the House of Representatives who voted last month to send the articles of impeachment that blamed Trump for inciting the Jan. 6 Capitol insurrection to the U.S. Senate. Erik Elness, a delegate who is a co-sponsor of the resolution, said that while the violence at the Capitol was unacceptable, he does not believe Trump’s words provoked it. “I was surprised to see we have a California Republican, Congressman David Valadao, vote for impeachment,” said Elness, a Brentwood resident. “I disagreed with the grounds for impeachment, and I felt that it was inappropriate...
    Reuters February 18, 2021 0 Comments The impeachment trial of Donald Trump took the U.S. government into new legal territory, highlighting unresolved questions about how to address allegations of misconduct by a president about to leave office. The House of Representatives voted to impeach Trump for inciting the deadly Jan. 6 attack at the U.S. Capitol by a pro-Trump mob, but the Senate acquitted him on Saturday by a 57-43 vote. Here are some of the questions raised by the trial: questions that still lack definitive answers because the U.S. Supreme Court has never had an occasion to weigh in. Is it legal to hold an impeachment trial for a former president? Trump’s trial opened with a debate about a crucial question: whether the U.S. Constitution allows a former president to face trial after he has left office. Trump’s lawyer argued that the text and purpose of the Constitution’s...
            by James D. Agresti  The New York Times has published a “fact check“ by Linda Qui declaring that Donald Trump’s lawyers “made a number of inaccurate or misleading claims” during the Senate impeachment trial. In reality, much of the article consists of flagrant falsehoods propagated by Qui and the Times. “Inciting Violence” With regard to Trump’s speech on the day of the Capitol Hill riot, Trump attorney Michael van der Veen said: “Far from promoting insurrection against the United States, the president’s remarks explicitly encouraged those in attendance to exercise their rights peacefully and patriotically.” That statement is demonstrably true, as the transcript of the speech shows that Trump asked his supporters to go “to the Capitol building to peacefully and patriotically make your voices heard.” Qui, however, alleges that his attorney’s statement “is exaggerated” because Trump “used the phrase ‘peacefully and patriotically’ once in...
    The Constitution is the supreme law of the land, thus, all government behavior must conform to it. It is, of course, notwithstanding its supremacy, an imperfect document. Its original iteration in 1789 -- and even after the addition of the Bill of Rights in 1791 -- implicitly recognized slavery, permitted the states to limit voters to adult white landowning men and did not require the states to protect personal liberty. Under the Constitution, impeachment -- a charge accusing a present or former federal officeholder of paramount wrongdoing -- can only be had if the charge is for a criminal act. The constitutional language -- "treason, bribery, or other high crimes and misdemeanors" -- means the criminal act must be grave and strike at the security of the republic. President Andrew Johnson was impeached in 1868 for firing his secretary of war, in defiance of a statute -- which was no...
    MSNBC was the most-watched network during coverage of the second impeachment trial of former President Donald Trump, averaging the most total viewers on each day of the five-day trial. CNN won in the key demographic of viewers age 25-54 during impeachment coverage. MSNBC averaged the most total viewers, with 3.18 million, and the second-most in the demo, with 517,000. CNN had the most in the demo, with 695,000 viewers age 25-54, and an average 2.98 million total viewers. Fox averaged 1.7 million total viewers, and 257,000 in the demo over the five days of impeachment trial coverage, according to data from Nielsen. From day one to day two of the trial, MSNBC and CNN saw ratings increases, while Fox’s viewership dropped. Viewership for all three networks declined on the third day of the trial, but on day four, as Trump’s attorneys made the case for acquittal, Fox...
    NEW YORK (WABC) -- For President Joe Biden's first 100 days in office, Eyewitness News will have a special election edition of "The Countdown" to get you caught up with all of the day's political and campaign news.You can watch it online, on the ABC7NY app or on our Connected TV apps for Fire, Roku, Apple TV and Android TV. Click here to learn more.Wednesday, Feb. 17COVID relief planHouse Democrats are ready to move on President Biden's COVID relief plan. On Wednesday, Biden said Republicans who don't support it are making a mistake.As lawmakers are putting together the final legislation, he says voters are on his side. The full House could pass the legislation as soon as next week, but it could face hurdles in the Senate.Biden says life may be back to normal by Christmas 2021President Joe Biden would only commit to a return to normal by next Christmas...
    Fox News has signed a deal with Tucker CarlsonTucker CarlsonGOP consultant calls Haley the party's 2024 front-runner Finally, a Republican leader declares war on Big Tech Journalist Zaid Jilani reacts to CNN anchor Brian Stelter's comments on Fox News and censorship MORE to increase his presence on its streaming service Fox Nation, the cable network announced Wednesday. Starting in April, Carlson will produce at least three video podcasts a week for Fox Nation, each one featuring an interview with newsmakers and a discussion of current national issues. In addition, he will produce long-form, in-depth, single-topic specials entitled “Tucker Carlson Originals.” These specials will be released monthly also starting in April. Fox News did not reveal the financial terms of the deal. Carlson was listed in a Fox News statement, along with names like Sean HannitySean Patrick HannityTrump mum as Senate debates his role in inciting Capitol mob Laura Ingraham rips...
    By Jan Wolfe (Reuters) - The impeachment trial of Donald Trump took the U.S. government into new legal territory, highlighting unresolved questions about how to address allegations of misconduct by a president about to leave office. The House of Representatives voted to impeach Trump for inciting the deadly Jan. 6 attack at the U.S. Capitol by a pro-Trump mob, but the Senate acquitted him on Saturday by a 57-43 vote. Here are some of the questions raised by the trial: questions that still lack definitive answers because the U.S. Supreme Court has never had an occasion to weigh in. Is it legal to hold an impeachment trial for a former president? Trump’s trial opened with a debate about a crucial question: whether the U.S. Constitution allows a former president to face trial after he has left office. Trump's lawyer argued that the text and purpose of the Constitution's impeachment clause...
    Del. Stacey Plaskett said she is filled with "glee" at the prospect of questioning House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy, R-Calif., regarding a phone call between him and former President Donald Trump during the Capitol riot in January.  The opportunity may come soon, with House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., announcing on Monday that Congress will establish an independent commission to investigate the causes of the Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol by right-wing extremists and supporters of Trump.  "The thought of cross-examining Kevin McCarthy just filled my heart with glee," Plaskett, a Democrat representing the Virgin Islands who served as a House impeachment manager during Trump's second trial, said in an interview on MSNBC Monday.  MCCARTHY, CALIFORNIA REPUBLICANS CALL OUT NEWSOM OVER VACCINE ROLLOUT: 'WE FEAR MORE CALIFORNIANS MAY DIE' Plaskett's comments come after the Senate voted to acquit Trump in his second impeachment trial without calling additional witnesses.  The decision was made after Trump's legal team agreed to...
    House Speaker Nancy Pelosi is forging ahead with legislation to create a probe of the MAGA riot modeled after the Sept. 11th commission within days – and it is likely to have subpoena power to probe the causes of the MAGA riot. Among the issues likely to be in its purview was a key piece of evidence introduced on the last day of President Donald Trump's impeachment trial regarding Trump's phone call with House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy.  That call while the riot raged appeared to show Trump siding with the rioters over McCarthy, according to a statement by Rep. Jamie Herrera Beutler. Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) has told colleagues there will be a 9/11 style commission on the Jan. 6 MAGA riot. Implementing legislation could come up this week The House Democratic impeachment managers elected not to call witnesses in the Trump impeachment trial, but...
    The latest taxpayer-funded, community theater production of “Get Trump” just concluded this winter’s episode with his acquittal on his second bogus impeachment trial. One more impeachment and he gets a free 6-inch Subway sandwich. The Democrats impeached someone who was no longer president, knowing full well they would not get a conviction. Devoid of workable ideas, they focus their power on using the blunt force of government’s police state to go after their enemies. It reminds us why we try not to elect them. Yet Trump still lives, not only in their heads but in the psyche of voters who know Washington is vindictive and broken, which was why they sent Trump there in the first place. Now Trump is running his “Office of the Former President” out of Florida, the closest he has come to a concession speech. Next the Dems will try to impeach him and remove him...
    Former President TrumpDonald TrumpBiden: 'I'm tired of talking about Trump' Hacker claims to have stolen files from law firm tied to Trump: WSJ Texas governor faces criticism over handling of winter storm fallout MORE reportedly demoted one of his defense lawyers in the midst of his second impeachment trial due to the attorney's performance on the Senate floor last week. The New York Times reports that one of Trump’s advisers, Justin Clark, told Bruce Castor last Wednesday that the former president did not want the attorney to again appear on television during the trial. Castor then reportedly stood up while shouting and arguing that Trump was wrong in demoting him. According to the Times, the argument became so heated that Castor eventually left the conference room, although he later apologized to Clark. The Times noted that a half-dozen members of Trump’s legal team relayed their accounts of the incident during a meeting in a conference room at...
     Jimmy Kimmel went after Sen. Mitch McConnell (R-KY) on Tuesday night, condemning him for delivering a scathing speech detailing how Donald Trump is responsible for “provoking the events” at the Capitol attack — on the same day he voted to acquit. “Mitch McConnell tried to have it both ways this weekend,” Kimmel said Tuesday night. “After voting to acquit, McConnell gave a blistering speech condemning Trump’s actions and inaction. Basically saying, ‘Donald Trump is guilty of all the things I just found him not guilty of.‘” Kimmel then played audio of McConnell’s speech while airing a video of a turtle struggling to eat a leaf while flailing on its back. “It was the tortoise versus the crazy yellow hare,” he quipped. The Trump-McConnell feud has escalated since the vicious speech — the former president hitting back at the minority leader with a fiery letter.  “The Republican Party can never again be respected or...
    WASHINGTON -- In the most caustic sign yet of deepening GOP divisions, former President Donald Trump blistered Mitch McConnell as a "political hack" on Tuesday, days after the Senate's top Republican denounced him as the inciter of U.S. Capitol attack."The Republican Party can never again be respected or strong with political 'leaders' like Sen. Mitch McConnell at its helm," Trump said in a statement released by his political action committee.He went on to write: "Mitch is a dour, sullen, and unsmiling political hack, and if Republican Senators are going to stay with him, they will not win again."A McConnell spokesperson did not immediately return requests for comment.EMBED More News Videos Former President Donald Trump reacted to his impeachment acquittal and hinted at his future in politics. The deeply personal attack follows McConnell's speech over the weekend saying that Trump was responsible for the deadly insurrection at the Capitol on Jan....
    On this week’s episode of The Brief, hosts Markos Moulitsas and Kerry Eleveld talked all things post-impeachment and the potential for the rise of a third major party in American politics. This episode’s featured guest was Elie Mystal, legal expert and writer at The Nation. Markos and Kerry opened the show by discussing Trump’s second impeachment trial and what the process has shown about his lasting influence on the Republican party. Markos noted that Trump has hurt the party substantially, as demonstrated by the most recent election cycle, when Democrats captured the trifecta of the U.S. House, Senate, and the presidency. Moreover, Trump is the only the third president in 100 years to lose reelection. Yet, Trump’s hold over a significant chunk of GOP voters remained clear from the way Republican leaders responded to his incitement of the insurrection. As Kerry added, “Mike Pence wouldn’t even stand up for himself and his family after it became...
    Juneau, Alaska — Alaska Republican U.S. Sen. Lisa Murkowski said Tuesday she knows her vote to convict former President Donald Trump during his recent Senate impeachment trial could have political consequences, "but I can't be afraid of that." If the people of Alaska decide that "because I did not support my party that I can no longer serve them in the United States Senate, then so be it," Murkowski told reporters during a visit to the state Capitol. She also said that if the state Republican Party decides to censure her for her vote, "they can make that statement. But I will make the statement, again, that my obligation is to support the Constitution that I have pledged to uphold, and I will do that, even if it means that I have to oppose the direction of my state party." The Alaska Republican Party State Central Committee earlier this...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — In the still shaken and heavily guarded U.S. Capitol, thousands of National Guard troops still wander the halls. Glass windows remain broken. Doors swing without handles. And in the grand marble hallways, which amplified the shouts of insurrectionists just over a month ago, there is an uncomfortable silence. The end of Donald Trump’s impeachment trial is only the beginning of Congress’ reckoning with the Jan. 6 attack, a violent ransacking of the Capitol that resulted in five deaths. While the Senate has spoken on Trump’s role in the violence, acquitting him of insurrection after a wrenching five days of impeachment testimony, lawmakers who fled the violent mob are still demanding answers. How, they ask, could security could have failed so catastrophically? And how can they ensure it doesn’t happen again? “This is not a moment where we pivot and move on,” Connecticut Sen. Chris Murphy said Saturday,...
      Wary of inflaming tensions within his own party, House Republican Leader Kevin McCarthyKevin McCarthyEx-Sen. Jeff Flake calls for Republican Party to leave Trump: 'We should have' convicted him Juan Williams: Bring sanity back to the GOP Some reflections on fissures at an impeachment exhibition MORE (Calif.) is staying silent about his frantic Jan. 6 call to then-President TrumpDonald TrumpBiden: 'I'm tired of talking about Trump' Hacker claims to have stolen files from law firm tied to Trump: WSJ Texas governor faces criticism over handling of winter storm fallout MORE as rioters raided the Capitol. But he may not have that luxury forever.  That heated phone call — which Democratic prosecutors made part of the official impeachment record — is almost certain to be investigated by the 9/11-style commission that Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiSpeaker Pelosi's change of heart on censure READ: Trump statement ripping into McConnell The Hill's 12:30 Report...
    Prospective 2024 Republican presidential candidates are starting to choose where they stand on former President Donald Trump going forward in the aftermath of his second impeachment, a key question they will all need to answer. Up first was Nikki Haley, who served as U.S. ambassador to the United Nations under Trump and is also a former governor of South Carolina. She distanced herself from her old boss in an interview last week, at a time when many Republican elected officials are facing censure or possible primary challenges for breaking with the man who has come to define the party for the last four years. “We need to acknowledge that he let us down,” Haley said. “He went down a path he shouldn’t have, and we shouldn’t have followed him, and we shouldn’t have listened to him. And we can’t let that ever happen again.” But that is not the bet...
    New York : Congressman Adam Kinzinger. Photo: Kevin Dietsch-Pool / . The Republican Congressman Adam kinzinger (Illinois) faces serious family problems for having risen up against the former president Donald trump. At least 11 relatives sent a letter to the congressman, accusing him of belonging to “the Devil’s army,” he revealed. The New York Times. “Oh, what a disappointment you are to us and to God!”says the letter whose authenticity was also confirmed by CNN. Family members say Kinzinger supported “horrible and gross accusations” against former President Trump, thereby disgracing the family. “Now we are extremely embarrassed that we are related to you”they wrote on January 8. Days earlier, Kinzinger asked to apply the 25th Amendment to remove Trump from office, but his firm decision was to have joined the Democrats and nine other Republicans to approve the impeachment against the former president. “You have...
    By MARY CLARE JALONICK, Associated Press WASHINGTON (AP) — In the still shaken and heavily guarded U.S. Capitol, thousands of National Guard troops still wander the halls. Glass windows remain broken. Doors swing without handles. And in the grand marble hallways, which amplified the shouts of insurrectionists just over a month ago, there is an uncomfortable silence. The end of Donald Trump’s impeachment trial is only the beginning of Congress' reckoning with the Jan. 6 attack, a violent ransacking of the Capitol that resulted in five deaths. While the Senate has spoken on Trump's role in the violence, acquitting him of insurrection after a wrenching five days of impeachment testimony, lawmakers who fled the violent mob are still demanding answers. How, they ask, could security could have failed so catastrophically? And how can they ensure it doesn't happen again? “This is not a moment where we pivot and move on,”...