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    HEWLETT, Long Island (WABC) -- Forget making lists - more than 100 kids got to pick their own presents Saturday on Long Island.They did it with help from 'Project Thank a Cop.'Organizers paired each kid with a police officer. They had $100 to spend on themselves and $50 to shop for young patients at Cohen Children's Medical Center.The event began last year as a one-time thing, but it was such a hit that organizers brought it back.ALSO READ | 2 New Jersey fire departments give holiday parade spectators a chance to 'Be Kind' with toy donationEMBED More News Videos Two fire departments in New Jersey delighted onlookers with their annual holiday parade on Saturday night and gave spectators a chance to 'Be Kind.' ----------* More Long Island news* Send us a news tip* Download the abc7NY app for breaking news alerts * Follow us on YouTube Submit a News Tip
    SAN FRANCISCO (KGO) -- The CEO of Planned Parenthood Northern California says they are already seeing an increase in patients from Texas.It comes as the Supreme Court discusses abortion rights.Planned Parenthood expects to see a surge in women coming across state lines to have procedures done if they are banned in their home states.RELATED: Supreme Court Justices signal they may toss Roe v. Wade, allow new abortion limitsCEO Gilda Gonzales says this could put a strain on the state's clinics and make it more difficult for Californians to get services."If the Supreme Court does damage to Roe, we estimate that 26 other states will begin to deteriorate abortion access for their residents in their states. And it is estimated that California could see a 3,000 percent increase in patients coming to us," said Gonzales.Governor Gavin Newsom says the state is standing by the help provide additional funding and support.
    THE NHS has apologised after a shocked paramedic revealed 22 ambulances were stuck outside a hospital for six hours. The student paramedic shared footage of the ambulances backed up outside Torbay Hospital in Devon - and claimed the queue didn't move for six hours. 1The student paramedic shared footage of the ambulances stacked up outside Torbay HospitalCredit: BPM Media According to Devon Live, the fed-up medic said: "Currently at the back of a 22 ambulance queue. No movement in 6 hours. Staff are broken, the hospital is full. This is not sustainable. "Patients are being affected and so are staff. The NHS in south Devon just broke. There was time to fix this, I don’t think so anymore." A member of the public said he had counted up to 26 ambulances in the queue. In a statement, the hospital said its emergency department has been under "sustained pressure" for several months now and apologised to anyone waiting for treatment. The hospital staff are facing huge pressures with reports of people waiting for up to 13 hours in A&E. Staff are also reeling...
    SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — South Korea again broke its daily records for coronavirus infections and deaths and confirmed three more cases of the new omicron variant as officials scramble to tighten social distancing and border controls. The 5,352 new cases reported by the Korea Disease Control and Prevention Agency on Saturday marked the third time this week the daily tally exceeded 5,000. The country’s death toll was at 3,809 after a record 70 virus patients died in the past 24 hours, while the 752 patients in serious or critical conditions were also an all-time high. As the delta-driven surge threatens to overwhelm hospital systems, there is also concern about the local spread of the omicron variant, which is seen as potentially more infectious than previous strains of the virus. The country’s omicron caseload is now at nine after KDCA confirmed three more cases. The new cases include the wife, mother-in-law and a friend of a man who caught omicron from a couple he drove home from the airport after they arrived from Nigeria on Nov. 24. The couple’s...
    TALLAHASSEE (CBSMiami/NSF) – Florida hospitals had 1,319 patients with COVID-19, including 239 in intensive-care units, according to data posted Thursday by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The 1,319 inpatients were up from a total of 1,228 on Monday — though the numbers remained far below hospitalization totals during the summer when the delta variant of the coronavirus swept across the state. READ MORE: Miami Weather: Another Cool Morning, Slight Warm Up Over The WeekendThe 239 intensive-care unit patients was the same number reported Monday by the federal agency. READ MORE: Taste Of The Town: Casa Mariano In Doral Delights With A Blend Of Mediterranean and South American FlavorsAfter the summer surge in COVID-19, cases and hospitalizations dropped in September, October and November. MORE NEWS: Overnight Fire in Fort Lauderdale Condo Leaves One Dead, Another Hospitalized(©2021 CBS Local Media. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. The News Service of Florida contributed to this report.)
    (CBS DETROIT) – Gov. Gretchen Whitmer’s request for additional staffing from the federal government was granted for a third Michigan hospital amid the COVID-19 surge. The Michigan Department of Health and Human Services announced that a 22-person medical team to Covenant HealthCare in Saginaw under the agreement. READ MORE: Striking Kellogg's Workers Receiving 3% Raises In New Contract“I’m grateful to our federal partners for delivering much-needed relief to Michigan’s hospitals and healthcare personnel who have been on the frontlines of the COVID-19 pandemic for over 18 months,” said Governor Whitmer. “We know that the vast majority of their patients are unvaccinated or have not yet received a booster dose. We can all do our part to help reduce the strain on our hospital systems by getting vaccinated, making an appointment to get a booster dose, and continuing to take precautions to keep ourselves and loved ones safe. We are in this together.” The staffing team being sent to assist Covenant Healthcare will include nurses, doctors, and respiratory therapists. They will begin working in Saginaw on Dec. 12 and assist for...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — An experimental COVID-19 drug that could soon become the first U.S.-authorized pill to treat the coronavirus faces one final hurdle Tuesday: A panel of government experts will scrutinize data on the medication from drugmaker Merck. The Food and Drug Administration is asking its outside experts whether the agency should authorize the pill, weighing new information that it is less effective than first reported and may cause birth defects. The panel’s recommendations aren’t binding but often guide FDA decisions. Tuesday’s meeting comes as U.S. infections are rising again and health authorities worldwide scramble to size up the threat posed by the new omicron variant. If authorized, Merck’s pill would be the first that U.S. patients could take at home to ease symptoms and speed recovery, a major step toward reducing hospital case loads and deaths. The drug, molnupiravir, is already authorized for emergency use in the U.K. Given the ongoing threat of the pandemic the FDA is widely expected to approve emergency use of Merck’s pill. But new data released last week paint a less compelling picture...
    David Lauritzen is an 8-year-old kid who wants to help kids with cancer by giving them toys and help ease their difficult journey."I had cancer and I knew that they wouldn't feel good," said David.David and his parents are behind the non-profit David's Toy Project Inc., which buys toys for pediatric cancer patients. It all started a couple of years ago, when David's mother asked him if he would like to do anything to commemorate Childhood Cancer Awareness Month.
    WUAKESHA, Ill. (WLS) -- Another child is out of the hospital after being hurt when a driver plowed through a parade in Waukesha last weekend.Children's Wisconsin said eight patients injured in the Christmas parade crash in suburban Milwaukee are still being treated at the hospital.RELATED: Child hit in Wisconsin parade now recovering at home for ThanksgivingThe facility originally received 16 patients after the driver of a red SUV roared through the parade in Waukesha, killing six people and injuring more than 60.One Children's Wisconsin patient was released on Friday and another was able to come home for Thanksgiving. Out of the eight remaining patients, four are in serious condition, two are in fair condition and two are in good condition.RELATED: 'I was grabbing my children': Waukesha, Wisconsin parade survivor describes 'screams and chaos'Waukesha's mayor and the city council will hold a moment of silence Sunday at 4:39 p.m., exactly one week after the incident, to honor the victims of the parade tragedy. Six people were killed and more than 60 injured after a driver plowed an SUV into a Christmas...
     The South African doctor who first identified the Omicron variant of the coronavirus is speaking out and emphasizing that more time is necessary to truly understand it. Dr. Angelique Coetzee, chairwoman of the South African Medical Association, spoke to multiple media outlets over the weekend about the unusual symptoms she spotted in patients diagnosed with the Omicron variant. In describing the symptoms that were exhibited in lieu of more common ones like loss of taste or smell, Coetzee categorized the effects as “mild” to The Telegraph, and stressed that “currently there’s no reason for panicking as we don’t see severely ill patients.” Coetzee elaborated that the symptoms of Omicron patients appear to be fatigue, body aches, and a recurring dry cough. She said many of the patients managed to recover on their own, though she had concerns about how the variant might affect the elderly or people with underlying health issues. “What we have to worry about now is that when older, unvaccinated people are infected with the new variant, and if they are not vaccinated, we are going...
    CHICAGO (CBS) — The University of Chicago Medicine performed two heart transplants this Thanksgiving Day – bringing the total for the year to a record 55. The U of C said both patients were doing well following the transplants. READ MORE: Chicago Reaches Goal Of 77% First-Dose COVID-19 Vaccine Coverage A Month EarlyIn a news release, the U of C also noted that the latest biannual data from the Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients show that its heart transplant program is the best-performing in the country – based on key benchmarks for survival and how quickly patients can receive transplants. The U of C had the best one-year survival ratio, the best transplant rate, and the shortest time to transplant for patients in need of a new heart. READ MORE: Woman Carjacked In Parking Lot Of Mercy Hospital & Medical Center“When you have the best survival and shortest wait time, you’re the best program,” Dr. Valluvan Jeevanandam, Director of the UChicago Medicine Heart and Vascular Center, said in a news release. “It’s a proud moment for everyone who’s made this...
    BECKLEY, W.Va. (AP) — West Virginia Health officials are urging some patients at Mountain State Vascular clinic in Beckley to get blood tests checking for Hepatitis B, Hepatitis C and HIV after possible exposure. A letter that went out to patients said the clinic reported that single-use syringes were used on more than one patient during invasive procedures at the facility, news outlets reported this week. State health officials are investigating. READ MORE: Gov. Tom Wolf Signals Readiness For Congressional District Map DiscussionsThe West Virginia Department of Health and Human Resources said in a statement that no infections have been confirmed, but certain patients who visited the practice between Oct. 27, 2020 and July 7, 2021 should get tested. It said infections can last for years with no experience symptoms, “so it is important to get tested even if you do not feel ill.” READ MORE: Wildlife Cam Installed To Monitor Bald Eagles' Nest In West MifflinMountain State Vascular Medical Director Dr. Brian Whyte told The Register-Herald that he reported the issue to state health officials after discovering an employee...
    Ignacio Montoya pauses, gathers strength, takes a step. Then another, and another. With the assistance of a walker, an exoskeleton suit and robotic legs that are attached to his own and help propel him forward, Montoya is making his way up and down the promenade along the water’s edge at the Marina del Rey boat basin, next to the Trader Joe’s. “Christopher Reeve would be amazed,” says UCLA scientist Reggie Edgerton, who worked with the late actor and is now watching Montoya’s every move. Walking without assistance isn’t likely anytime soon, if ever, for those with severe spinal injuries. But some improvements in function, thought impossible until recent years, are now being realized. Montoya was nearly killed in 2012 when a minivan crossed into his path while he was on his motorcycle. At the time, Montoya was studying simultaneously at Georgia State University and Georgia Tech — as well as working at a bank and training in the Air Force ROTC program. In the violent collision, nerves in Montoya’s neck were shredded. His lungs collapsed. His back was broken. A...
    THE HAGUE, Netherlands (AP) — Social distancing became mandatory again across the Netherlands on Wednesday as coronavirus infections soared and the country’s leading intensive care physician called for even tougher measures to rein in the pandemic. The Netherlands is in the midst of a surge that has seen a string of new daily records for numbers of coronavirus infections in recent weeks. The country’s public health institute last week recorded a 39% spike in infections and said hospital and intensive care unit admissions also rose. The head of the national association of intensive care units, Diederik Gommers, appealed Tuesday night for a tough lockdown, including closing schools, something the government has been keen to avoid. He told a committee of lawmakers that the country’s hospitals are 10 days away from being so overburdened with COVID-19 patients that intensive care doctors will have to start making choices about which critically ill patients get care. There are currently around 500 COVID-19 patients in Dutch ICUs, which have an overall capacity of 1,066, according to an organization that distributes patients between hospitals....
    It's not just Texas women The Supreme Court issued one ruling Monday, a unanimous decision in an interstate groundwater dispute, and nothing else. That means one more week will pass in which pregnant Texans are denied their constitutional right to a safe, legal medical procedure. The Court is still leaving SB8, the Texas law that bans the procedure after six weeks of gestation for all but the most limited of cases—a medical emergency, in place. Another week will pass in which desperate Texans will have to figure out how to scrape up the resources and time to travel out of state to get an abortion and have to figure out where to go. Some have the resources and the help, and it’s still a gut-wrenching experience. Like the woman who wrote an open letter, as yet unpublished, “To the Male Politicians Controlling My Uterus.” The 30-year old Texan talked about her ordeal to the Austin American-Statesman, about finding out the fetus she was carrying and wanted had an aggressive case of a rare chromosomal disorder, Turner’s Syndrome. Fluid was filling its vital organs,...
    This content is sponsored by MedStar Washington Hospital Center. Atrial fibrillation, or AFib, is the most common type of irregular heartbeat with at least 2.7 million Americans affected, according to the American Heart Association. Two MedStar Health hospitals are offering the first FDA-approved treatment that helps give patients with persistent AFib the best outcomes. AFib is an irregular heartbeat that occurs when a heart has lost its healthy rhythm. The abnormal firing of electrical impulses causes the atria (the top chambers in the heart) to quiver (or fibrillate), the American Heart Association explains. If not properly treated, AFib can lead to blood clots, stroke or other heart-related complications. It can also lead to sudden death. The most common symptom of AFib is a quivering or fluttering heartbeat. Sometimes people with AFib have no symptoms and it’s only detectable during a physical examination. Others people may experience symptoms such as: fatigue, dizziness, shortness of breath and anxiety, weakness, sweating or chest pain. Long-standing, persistent atrial fibrillation, also known as LSPAF, is a particularly challenging form of this condition to treat, said...
    The United States government announced plans to purchase sotrovimab, an investigational monoclonal antibody used for the early treatment of COVID-19, according to a press release from the drugmakers, GlaxoSmithKline (GSK) plc and Vir Biotechnology, Inc. The contracts total approximately one billion dollars, according to the news release. "Given the large number of patients who continue to become ill with COVID-19 across many regions in the US, there is an ongoing need for access to effective treatments. We are proud to work with the US government to help make sotrovimab available for these patients.", Dr Hal Barron, Chief Scientific Officer and President R&D, GSK, said in a news release. Nurse Mary Ezzat prepares to administer a Pfizer COVID-19 booster shot to Jessica M., Thursday, Aug. 19, 2021, at UCI Medical Center in Orange, Calif. Jessica M. is a healthcare worker who is also immunocompromised. California Gov. Gavin Newsom, along with Colorado Gov. Jared Polis and New Mexico Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham have taken steps to expand the use of booster shots to quell the recent surge in COVID-19 infections. (Jeff...
    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration authorized a new virtual reality (VR) treatment for chronic lower back pain on Tuesday, which uses breathing exercise to ease suffering. The prescription treatment, called EaseVRx, comes as a VR headset, controller and a 'Breathing Amplifier' that directs the user's breath toward a microphone on the headset for deep breathing exercises. The headset utilizes cognitive behavioral therapy and other behavioral methods to help with relaxation, attention-shifting and other therapies to alleviate pain. The platform, which as developed by AppliedVR,  includes 56 sessions that range from two to 16 minutes long, which are to be done each day for eight weeks - and the treatment can be conducted while at home. The US Food and Drug Administration authorized a new virtual reality (VR) treatment for chronic lower back pain on Tuesday, which uses breathing exercise to ease suffering. The prescription treatment is called  EaseVRx and was developed by AppliedVR Christopher M. Loftus, MD, acting director of the Office of Neurological and Physical Medicine Devices in the FDA's Center for Devices and Radiological Health, said in a statement:...
    NEW YORK (CBSNewYork) — Losing your hair can be a traumatic experience. Some people have serious conditions, losing all their hair, including their eyelashes and eyebrows. READ MORE: Hope For Women Suffering Hair Loss May Come In The Form Of A Drug Used To Cure EczemaBut as CBS2’s Dr. Max Gomez reported Monday, there is now hope in the form of an approved asthma and psoriasis drug that’s growing hair back. “I felt myself withdrawing socially. I didn’t really want to go out and mix and mingle with people. I really didn’t want to have to explain what was going on,” hair loss patient Beth Goldstein said. Goldstein, a retired attorney, described what it felt like losing her hair to an autoimmune disease called alopecia areata. “I have lost basically, I have little stubble, but hair all around here. So it’s from like the middle of my head down over my ears,” Goldstein said. Goldstein makes it sound like she still had some hair, but she virtually had no hair at all. READ MORE: Drug Used To Treat Blood, Marrow...
    HOUSTON (AP) — A Houston hospital has temporarily suspended a doctor for spreading false information about COVID-19 to her patients and on social media. Dr. Mary Talley Bowden, an ear, nose and throat specialist who runs a private practice in River Oaks, had been granted provisional privileges at Houston Methodist Hospital within the last year. The hospital revoked Bowden’s hospital privileges on Friday citing “unprofessional behavior,” including vulgar language on social media, as the main reason for suspension, the Houston Chronicle reported. On her Twitter account, Bowden repeatedly decried vaccine mandates and promoted the unproven benefits of ivermectin, the anti-parasitic drug that federal health officials advise against using to treat the virus. In emails obtained by the Chronicle, Bowden was urging against vaccinations for children and telling her patients that data she has collected “suggests that the vaccine is not working.” “Dr. Mary Bowden, who recently joined the medical staff at Houston Methodist Hospital, is using her social media accounts to express her personal and political opinions about the COVID-19 vaccine and treatments,” Houston Methodist said in a statement. ...
    ALZHEIMER'S could one day be reversed and prevented with a vaccine that has shown huge promise in mice. British researchers used an approach to tackling the memory-wiping disease that’s never been tried before. 1Scientists have created a new way to tackle the development of Alzheimer'sCredit: PA They are “hugely excited” by the findings and the potential of a vaccine costing just £15 per dose to make, the Daily Mail reports. Experts say although the new dementia treatment is only on the horizon, if proven in humans it could be "transformative". Alzheimer's disease, the most common form of dementia, is thought to be caused by the abnormal build-up of proteins in and around brain cells. One of the proteins involved is called amyloid. Amyloid naturally exist as highly flexible, string-like molecules. In Alzhimer’s, a high number of these molecules become shortened and join together to form plaques around brain cells, killing them. Scientists now believe the key to stopping this process is to create something that sticks to the shortened molecules, preventing them clumping together.  Researchers, including from University of Leicester,...
    CHICAGO (WLS) -- New testing is available aimed toward helping men improve infertility problems.The Reproductive Medicine Institute is a Chicago-based fertility clinic, and is one of the first in the country to offer non-invasive solution testing called Protex.It allows men to collect their specimens at home using a newly designed technology to improve the quality of the sample by reducing anxiety and stress.Diana Peninger, the CEO at Reproductive Solutions Inc., joined ABC7 to talk about the at-home treatment. She spoke about how the treatment works and the results patients are seeing.Dr. Elena Trukhacheva, president of Reproductive Medicine Institute, based in Chicago, joined ABC7 to talk about why she decided to adopt the at-home collection method for local clinics. She also spoke about patients' results and the benefits they have seen throughout the treatment process.RELATED: Gov. Pritzker expands same-sex infertility treatment coverage in LGBTQ legislationThe scientific research, engineering and design behind Protex has proven to increase motility and fertilization capability 55% and up to 89% higher than a standard specimen cup, slow the cooling rate to 0.3 C per minute, increase...
    MINNEAPOLIS (WCCO) — Itasca County says there are no open beds for critical patients and nowhere to send those who need one. “The community needs to know that this has never been more serious,” Itasca County Public Health spokesperson Kelly Chandler said. “We are at the crisis levels of 2020, but without the same levels of COVID precautions in place.” According to officials, there were more than 300 new COVID-19 infections in Itasca County last week. Ninety-one Itasca County residents have died from the virus. Officials are urging residents to be vigilant in protecting themselves and others against the virus. “For your own sakes, dig out your masks and limit your exposure to groups, especially indoors,” Chandler said. “Go back to social distancing. And definitely get your COVID vaccine and flu shot if you haven’t already — you are far less likely to need an ICU bed if you do.”   More On WCCO.com: Minnesota Weather: Clipper System Could Bring Up To 3 Inches Of Snow This Weekend Hit-And-Run Suspect Fatally Shot Man Who Tried To Stop Him; Carjacking...
    OAKLAND, Calif. (KGO) -- With the clock running down before a 3 a.m. deadline on Monday, pharmacists in the Bay Area say they're ready to go on strike if a deal isn't reached with Kaiser Permanente."We just want a fair contract," said John Lee.Lee is the president of the Guild for Professional Pharmacists- the labor group leading the negotiations.He says that while Kaiser has said active talks have been taking place, before Saturday night, he hasn't heard from them in weeks.RELATED: Kaiser Permanente workers to go on strike demanding higher pay, better working conditions"Negotiations and bargaining with the guild which is a bold face lie. That didn't happen," Lee said.The potential strike could impact patients all over the Bay Area.At the Kaiser pharmacy in Oakland, Kevin Lee says he waited in line for hours to get his prescription filled."I got here about 2:30 p.m. today, and maybe a couple of hours now. And it was a nightmare," he said.RELATED: Bay Area Kaiser nurses picket over patient home care program, but it's not a strike EMBED More News Videos Bay Area...
              more   The University of Wisconsin (UW) Health is now requiring that candidates for transplants must be vaccinated against COVID. Wisc News reported that the rule “requires patients on the transplant waiting list to get a first dose of vaccine by Dec. 15 and a second dose, if needed, by Jan. 14.” People who are not yet on the waiting list must be vaccinated before being added to the list, UW Health said. According to a statement from UW Health, “Patients on the waitlist will be changed to an ‘inactive status’ on Jan. 14, 2022, if documentation of vaccination is not received. While inactive, patients will not receive organ offers and will not be candidates to proceed to living donor transplant, even if a living donor has been identified.” “This new policy reflects our commitment to patient safety and our respect for the donors and families who’ve made the selfless decision to give others the gift of life,” said Dr. Dixon Kaufman, the medical director of the UW Health Transplant Center. “It is unfortunate that transplant recipients — because of...
    Thirty-two-year-old Dr. K remembers the first time the Taliban terrorist group took over Afghanistan in 1995, according to NPR. She was seven years old when girls were banned from attending school. “Inspired by her mother, who worked as a gynecologist, she enrolled to study medicine after the fall of the Taliban in 2001. By 2016, she had become a surgical resident at the country’s only burn center, in the western province of Herat,” the outlet continued: In her five years of practice, Dr. K has treated hundreds of women whose husbands set them on fire or thrown acid on them – as well as women suffering from domestic violence who chose to end their lives to escape the abuse, often opting for self-immolation. Now she says her life is in danger because of her work. Because the Taliban retook power, Dr. K requested she be identified with the initial of her last name. “She reports that she has been threatened by Taliban commanders acting on the wishes of an ex-husband of one of her jailed patients, now released, as well as...
    DALLAS (Nov. 12, 2021) – Scottish Rite Hospital in Dallas has joined Cook Children’s in making a plea for donations of new or gently used crutches in any size (youth and adult). The current, ongoing supply chain disruption across the U.S. is impacting the number of crutches available. READ MORE: The Colony High Student Arrested After Making Alleged Threats“We are feeling the impact of the nation-wide shortage of aluminum crutches, especially in the most commonly issued pediatric size of 5-foot-2 to 5-foot-10,” says Scottish Rite for Children therapy services manager Mickey Hensley, O.T.R. “Similar to other hospitals, our need is on the rise. With unfilled backorders and no delivery dates in sight, we are reaching out to our community for support.” Crutches are one of the most common pieces of hospital equipment provided to patients, according to the hospital. It is crucial for children with healing lower extremities to refrain from walking or bearing weight. Teams at Scottish Rite said they issue an average of 20+ pairs of crutches a week. Donated crutches will go through the same safety inspection and...
    TOKYO (AP) — The Japanese government’s preparations for the next virus surge include adding thousands more hospital beds to avoid a situation like last summer when COVID-19 patients were forced to stay home, even while dependent on oxygen deliveries. Even though Japan has a reasonable health insurance system and the world’s largest number of beds per capita, COVID-19 patients were admitted to only about one-fifth of the beds, mostly at public, university and major private hospitals. The government has provided subsidies to lure more hospitals to treat such patients, but progress is slow, triggering calls for tougher measures in an emergency. Small private hospitals have been reluctant to accept COVID-19 patients, citing insufficient expertise to handle infectious diseases, lack of staff or the cost. Some prefectures have set up systems where those hospitals would accept patients who are no longer infectious and rehabilitating from serious illness. Virus measures are key to Prime Minister Fumio Kishida’s weeks-old government maintaining its grip on power after public dissatisfaction with his predecessor’s response — criticized as too little and too slow — precipitated the...
    STROKE patients now wait 54 minutes for an ambulance because paramedics are so overwhelmed. The NHS target for Category 2 calls, which also include heart attacks, is 18 minutes. 1Ambulance staff are so stretched patients are waiting too long for treatmentCredit: PA But England’s average response time has more than doubled since May to a dangerous 53 minutes and 54 seconds. Dr Katherine Henderson, of the Royal College of Emergency Medicine, said: “This is the beginning of a gruelling winter and a crisis for the health service. Patient safety is at risk.” The long waits come as 999 calls hit a record 1,012,143 in October and crews went to 423,000 Cat 2 incidents. Even when ambulances get to a hospital they have to wait outside for hours because there are no beds free, meaning crews can’t get to their next jobs. Christina Smith-White, from Cheltenham, waited six hours for an ambulance with her grandmother, who had had a stroke – and then another three hours outside the hospital. She said: “I asked how long it was going to take for my...
    Singapore’s government — which currently provides free medical care to coronavirus patients — announced Monday it will no longer cover the costs of coronavirus-related medical bills for people who choose not to receive a Chinese coronavirus vaccine starting next month, Australia’s Seven News reported Wednesday. “[F]rom 8 December 2021, we will begin charging COVID-19 [Chinese coronavirus] patients who are unvaccinated by choice,” Singapore’s Ministry of Health said in a press release issued November 8. “This will apply to all unvaccinated COVID-19 patients admitted on or after 8 December 2021 to hospitals and CTFs,” the ministry clarified. “COVID-19,” or the Chinese coronavirus, is the name of the disease caused by SARS-CoV-2, which is a type of coronavirus. “CTF” stands for “Covid-19 Treatment Facility.” The sites provide “medical capabilities and resources, including oxygen supplementation, to safely manage patients who may be at risk of developing severe illness,” according to the Singapore-based Straits Times. Singapore’s Health Ministry said on November 8 it would continue to cover the full cost of “COVID-19 medical bills for those who are ineligible for vaccination … i.e. children under 12 years...
    AURORA, Colo. (CBS Denver) – Kathleen Combs has been in some of the most uncomfortable places of our times. She has now spent 19 months working in UCHealth Hospital’s COVID ICU. “My world is still fully COVID,” Combs told KCNC-TV in Denver. She has worked in ICUs for 18 years and been a nurse for more than 20. When the hospital asked for volunteers in March of 2020, when the understanding of COVID-19 was a fraction of what’s now known, with knowledge of pulmonary issues, she figured she was right for it. “I’m one of many. I’m not the only one,” she said. (credit: CBS) All over the country there are shortages of nurses. People doing some of the hardest work caring for the sick in the pandemic. They’ve been through shortages of PPE, and staff. Through hope when vaccines came out and now disappointment when people refuse to get them. “A lot of sadness, a lot of sick people, a lot of death. And unnecessarily so at this point,” she said. “It’s emotionally draining to me now.” Combs says...
    AURORA, Colo. (CBS4) – Kathleen Combs has been in some of the most uncomfortable places of our times. She has now spent 19 months working in UCHealth Hospital’s COVID ICU. “My world is still fully COVID,” said Combs. She has worked in ICUs for 18 years and been a nurse for more than 20. When the hospital asked for volunteers in March of 2020, when the understanding of COVID-19 was a fraction of what’s now known, with knowledge of pulmonary issues, she figured she was right for it. “I’m one of many. I’m not the only one,” she said. (credit: CBS) All over the country there are shortages of nurses. People doing some of the hardest work caring for the sick in the pandemic. They’ve been through shortages of PPE, and staff. Through hope when vaccines came out and now disappointment when people refuse to get them. “A lot of sadness, a lot of sick people, a lot of death. And unnecessarily so at this point,” she said. “It’s emotionally draining to me now.” Combs says a great percentage of...
    TRAVERSE CITY, Mich. (AP) — A major health care provider in northern Michigan said it is putting an emphasis on COVID-19 care and reducing other services after a spike in the region. Munson Healthcare, which is based in Traverse City, said it moved its pandemic response to a “red” stage in the northwestern Lower Peninsula. “It’s the first time in Munson Healthcare history that we made that decision,” chief medical officer Christine Nefcy said Tuesday. “Of course, this is the first pandemic we’ve all dealt with in 100 years as well.” Munson had a test positivity rate of 22 percent by Sunday. About 100 people with COVID-19 were in Munson hospitals, including 56 in Traverse City, the Record-Eagle reported. At least 24 people have died since Oct. 26, Nefcy said. Leland Public School district, 25 miles north of Traverse City, said schools would be closed Friday. It encouraged staff and students to get vaccinated. Superintendent Stephanie Long said the sudden decision to close before the weekend was necessary “given the recent uptick in positive cases affecting our school and local...
    TRAVERSE CITY, Mich. (AP) — A major health care provider in northern Michigan said it is putting an emphasis on COVID-19 care and reducing other services after a spike in the region. Munson Healthcare, which is based in Traverse City, said it moved its pandemic response to a “red” stage in the northwestern Lower Peninsula. “It’s the first time in Munson Healthcare history that we made that decision,” chief medical officer Christine Nefcy said Tuesday. “Of course, this is the first pandemic we’ve all dealt with in 100 years as well.” Munson had a test positivity rate of 22 percent by Sunday. About 100 people with COVID-19 were in Munson hospitals, including 56 in Traverse City, the Record-Eagle reported. At least 24 people have died since Oct. 26, Nefcy said. Leland Public School district, 25 miles north of Traverse City, said schools would be closed Friday. It encouraged staff and students to get vaccinated. Superintendent Stephanie Long said the sudden decision to close before the weekend was necessary “given the recent uptick in positive cases affecting our school and local...