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    With Michigan’s Covid-19 case and hospitalization numbers hovering near all-time highs, the federal government will send doctors, nurses and others to support certain hospitals, the state health department said Wednesday. Gov. Gretchen Whitmer had asked for help, and the federal government agreed to “send two medical teams to local hospitals to relieve doctors and nurses as they treat Covid-19 and other patients,” Michigan’s health department said. The 44 medical personnel — including doctors, nurses and respiratory therapists — will be split between Dearborn’s Beaumont Hospital outside Detroit, and the Spectrum Health system in Grand Rapids, the state health department said. The teams will arrive next week “and begin treating patients immediately, providing support for the next 30 days,” the department said. “I’m grateful that the federal government has granted our request to provide much-needed relief to the health care personnel who have remained on the front lines of this pandemic,” Whitmer said Wednesday. Michigan is reporting more new cases per capita than any state Though Covid-19 cases and hospitalizations in the United States dropped off at the tail end of...
    A federal judge has granted a preliminary injunction that will allow New York health care workers to apply for religious exemptions to the state COVID-19 vaccine mandate. US District Judge David Hurd made the ruling on Tuesday after 17 Catholic and Baptist health care workers sued the state last month, saying they objected to being forced to take a vaccine that used 'fetal cell lines' from 'procured abortions'. The order prohibits the New York State Department of Health from interfering with religious exemptions or taking disciplinary action against workers who have sought or obtained them.  Gov. Kathy Hochul, responding to the order, said she backs the vaccine mandate, whose original deadline was September 27, with the state's 450,000 medical and care staff expected to have received at least one vaccine dose by that date.  'My responsibility as Governor is to protect the people of this state, and requiring health care workers to get vaccinated accomplishes that. I stand behind this mandate, and I will fight this decision in court to keep New Yorkers safe,' she wrote in a statement. US...
    A hospital in Missouri is getting 400 panic buttons for nurses and staff, due to assaults on their employees tripling amid the pandemic. The Chief Nursing Officer at Cox Medical Center, Lynne Yaggy, told CNN’s Erin Burnett that “nurses are now making decisions about where they’re going to work based on their safety.” “So we are looking for whatever tools we can find to make sure we can prevent that harm to them because they’re our most valuable resource,” Yaggy said. “All of our health care workers are.” At Cox Medical Center, 123 assaults against hospital staff were reported last year — up from 40 in 2019. Injuries related to the assaults also increased from 17 to 78. Yaggy went on to say that “everyone is escalated” amid the pandemic and “the frontline staff are the ones usually taking the brunt of that.” Burnett then referenced a chief nursing executive’s comments in the Texas Tribune, where she said, “Our staff has been cursed at, screamed at, threatened with bodily harm and even had knives pulled on them.” “I’m not sure it’s...
    A man with Covid-19 has filmed himself hurling abuse at doctors and nurses while demanding to be discharged from hospital because he's too cold.  The clip, which went viral on TikTok, begins with the man claiming to have told hospital staff to turn the air conditioning in his ward down 15 times.   'I told youse to turn off the aircon, I'm freezing,' the man says.  'My Covid is getting worse in there. The aircon is making me get worse. I know these little tricks. Trust me, my cousin's a doctor.'  A woman who identifies herself as the manager of the ward then asks the man to stop arguing.  'I'm not arguing,' the man responds. 'If you want to call the police go call the police, I'm not staying here.' The man then says he will quarantine at home and wants to be discharged. A doctor then addresses the man, telling him his blood test results show his white cell count is 'getting a little bit worse'. The doctor suggests he can go home 'later today'. 'I want to go home...
    A prisoner at the Bolivar County Correctional Facility receives a Covid-19 vaccination administered by medical workers with Delta Health Center on April 28, 2021 in Cleveland, Mississippi.Spencer Platt | Getty Images Mississippi Gov. Tate Reeves pleaded Friday with residents to get vaccinated as the state scrambles to hire hundreds of temporary doctors, nurses and EMTs. He's also requested ventilators from the National Stockpile as the spread of the delta variant fills hospitals in the state with mostly unvaccinated patients. The state even asked federal officials to send a medical U.S. Navy ship, but was turned down, he said. "When you look across the country, to a certain extent, this current wave is the pandemic of the unvaccinated," Reeves said at a press conference, adding that the state was headed toward a new peak of the Covid-19 pandemic. "We continue to see more and more data and the data is becoming more and more clear. Those who received the vaccine are significantly less likely to contract the virus." For the few breakthrough cases in fully vaccinated people the...
    The conspiracy theories promoted by anti-vaccine activists reached a fevered pitch during a Saturday rally. Conspiracy theorist Kate Shemirani suggested there could be Nuremberg-like trials where doctors and nurses would be hanged for administering the coronavirus vaccines, which promoted one British doctor to alert London's Metropolitan Police Service. Conspiracy theorist, anti-vaxxer and struck-off nurse Kate Shemirani is here literally threatening NHS doctors with… https://t.co/DDBZRVUX5z — Rachel Clarke (@Rachel Clarke) 1627149046.0 Shayan Sardarizadeh, who covers online disinformation, conspiracy theories and extremism for the BBC, posted a thread documenting the rally: Speaking at today's anti-vaccine, anti-lockdown rally in London's Trafalgar Square, former nurse Kate Shemirani - w… https://t.co/WUdxDTsKAe — Shayan Sardarizadeh (@Shayan Sardarizadeh) 1627130866.0 German lawyer Reiner Fuellmich says "these vaccinations are experimental gene therapies without any scientific stud… https://t.co/ydV24RUVpu — Shayan Sardarizadeh (@Shayan Sardarizadeh) 1627133924.0 Kate Shemirani says "5G is a direct energy weapon". "In your injections, the hydrogel is a conduit, it has an anten… https://t.co/Qp6X24pfrT — Shayan Sardarizadeh (@Shayan Sardarizadeh) 1627134916.0 Mark Steele says 5G is a "directional weapon system". He says "the street...
    “The system is collapsed, if in the next two weeks we continue like this, it will collapse.” Natividad Gil García does not hide his despair over the emergency that Primary Care is experiencing in Madrid, the main focus of Covid-19 in Spain with about 175,000 infections since the start of the pandemic and almost 9,000 deaths, of which 115 only in the last week. Gil works as a pediatrician at the Monóvar health center, in a neighborhood of the capital where the cumulative incidence of coronavirus is above four hundred cases per 100,000 inhabitants. Although other areas of the city practically double that figure, the health service warns of the rapid worsening of the situation: “Normally, in September and October I used to have between 20 and 30 children a day, but this year I am already 55 and still the return to school has not finished. What is going to happen when all the students join and the contagions increase? ”, He asks himself at the doors of his workplace, under a banner with a green heart that has...
    New York City will hold a massive ticker-tape parade in Lower Manhattan on July 7 to thank the city’s doctors and nurses along with other "hometown heroes" who helped get the Big Apple through the pandemic, Mayor Bill de Blasio announced Monday. "It’s going to be example of the great tradition of ticker-tape parades, a ticker-tape parade up the Canyon of Heroes," said the mayor. OHIO POLICE RESCUE MISSING 4-YEAR-OLD CHILD FOUND UNRESPONSIVE, FLOATING IN POND The parade route has seen Charles Lindbergh, Winston Churchill, the Apollo 11 astronauts, Pope John Paul II as well as the Mets, Yankees, Rangers and Giants championship teams lauded with ticker tape or its replacement, shredded office paper, streaming from the towers lining it. "It’s time for the parade to celebrate our hometown heroes. We’re always going to remember the pain and the tragedy of COVID. No one is going to ever forget those we lost and what families are still going through, but we need a day to celebrate the heroism of everyday New Yorkers," de Blasio said during his daily press conference....
    New York : A bipartisan project in Senate seeks to grant 40,000 unused visas to physicians, in an effort to reduce the demand for specialists in the United States. The Health Workforce Resilience Act would grant permanent status to 25,000 foreign nursesyes, 15,000 doctors and their relatives, reported Law360. The senator Dick durbin (Illinois), one of the sponsors of the project, explained that one sixth of the health workers in the country come from abroad. “It is unacceptable that thousands of doctors currently working in the United States on temporary visas are trapped in the backlog of the green card”Durbin lamented. The Democrat indicated that doctors have worked in the country on the front line during the COVID-19 pandemic. Republican Senator Susan collins (Maine) is another sponsor of a plan that activists from different organizations have promoted. “By issuing unused employment-based visas to immigrant medical professionals, This bipartisan legislation would help strengthen our healthcare workforce and preserve access to care, particularly in rural and underserved communities in Maine and across our country, ”said Collins. The initiative targets doctors and...
    U.S. hospitals say they have been operating in 'survival mode' for the majority of the coronavirus pandemic. According to a new report released by the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) inspector general on Wednesday, medical centers said that staffing shortages have impacted patient care.  What's more, the exhaustion of long shifts and dealing with multiple sick people - as well as the trauma of seeing patients die - has taken a toll on staff members' mental health.  Hospital administrators say they have experienced challenges while distributing vaccines, including hesitancy among employees and members of the surrounding communities.  They are calling on the federal government for support including helping to fill in staffing gaps; sending financial, especially rural hospitals; and continuing to educate the public on how to prevent and treat COVID-19.  A report released Wednesday by the Department of Health and Human Services found U.S. hospitals had been 'significantly strained' by the COVID pandemic. Pictured: Medical staff put on protective gear as they attend to patients with COVID-19 at UW Health in Madison, Wisconsin, November 2020 ...
    According to a study led by researchers from the Open University of Catalonia (UOC) and published in the open access journal Vaccines, it shows that, although the majority of health personnel were in favor of vaccination during the second wave of the pandemic, two out of ten doctors and three out of ten nurses were reticent to her. What the nursing staff was especially reluctant to be vaccinated is, according to the authors of the study, especially worrisome, because “they are the ones who are closest to the patients and, therefore, are more likely to influence their opinion, as occurs in vaccination campaigns against influenza.” The main causes pointed out by the reticent were the potential side effects of the vaccine and mistrust that it was safe because of record time in which the vaccines had been developed. The researchers, with Hans Eguia, doctoral student in the UOC’s Health and Psychology doctoral program, at the helm, recruited 1,002 Twitter volunteers between September 10 and November 23, 2020, the majority of whom were healthcare personnel The study authors argue that...
    (KHN)Opening another front in the nation's response to the pandemic, medical centers and other health organizations have begun sending doctors and nurses to apartment buildings and private homes to vaccinate homebound seniors.Boston Medical Center, which runs the oldest in-home medical service in the country, started doing this Feb. 1. Wake Forest Baptist Health, a North Carolina health system, followed a week later.In Miami Beach, Florida, fire department paramedics are delivering vaccines to frail seniors in their own homes. In East St. Louis, Missouri, a visiting nurse service is offering at-home vaccines to low-income, sick older adults who receive food from Meals on Wheels.In central and northern Pennsylvania, Geisinger Health, a large health system, has identified 500 older homebound adults and is bringing vaccines to them. Nationally, the Department of Veterans Affairs has provided more than 11,000 vaccines to veterans who receive primary medical care at home.Grocery store workers have been on the front lines for a year, but theyre struggling to get the Covid vaccineThese efforts and others like them recognize a compelling need: Between 2 million and 4.4 million...
    WORRIED doctors last night urged Britain’s ethnic minorities to ignore Covid vaccine lies — as it emerged 91 per cent of jabs so far have been administered to white people. Just five per cent of the UK’s jabs have been given to Asian people, two per cent to black people and less than one per cent to people of mixed race. ???? Read our coronavirus live blog for the latest news & updates 5 5Doctors have urged ethnic minority Brits to ignore fake news about the vaccineCredit: News Group Newspapers Ltd White people, who make up 80 per cent of the population, are more than twice as likely to have accepted a vaccine than black people and three times as likely as people from a mixed background. Data suggests ethnic minorities — up to twice as likely to die from Covid — are staying away from vaccination centres due to misinformation. Yesterday, a junior doctor told how some ethnic minority nurses are refusing the vaccine. Dr Michael Dawes, of the Royal Shrewsbury Hospital, said: “It really shocked me when...
    Let our journalists help you make sense of the noise: Subscribe to the Mother Jones Daily newsletter and get a recap of news that matters. The 7-year-old whose homemade bracelets raised $30,000 and counting for a hospital has been on a roll. Her fundraising is growing worldwide. While all hospitals should be fully funded without any kindhearted kid’s efforts, in the world as it is and misaligned structures as they stand, this really is a moving story. Leave it to a second grader’s artistic thinking to shore up adults’ and institutions’ insufficiencies. Join me, one and all, near and far, for a round of raised apple juice in honor of 7-year-old Hayley in Chicago. Proceeds from her bracelets, created from colorful rubber bands, are supplying a children’s hospital with PPE and supporting telehealth services, diagnostic test development, and coronavirus research. She’s teaching bracelet making to friends over Zoom and FaceTime. The bracelets, she says in a video with her mom at her side, “represent hope during a really hard time.” If you have childhood art of your own stashed away...
    A protestor is pictured in Martin Place on February 03, 2021 in Sydney, Australia. The protesters have gathered to demonstrate against Myanmar's military, after they seized power on Monday in a coup against Aung San Suu Kyi's democratically elected government. Photo by Brook Mitchell/Getty Images Medical professionals from 70 hospitals across Myanmar pledged to stop work in protest of a military coup. The Myanmar military staged a coup against the country's National League of Democracy on Monday. Activists there are encouraging acts of civil disobedience. Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. Medical professionals across Myanmar are taking part in a countrywide act of civil disobedience and have pledged to stop working in protest of Monday's military coup. In a statement addressed to the international medical community, the group said Myanmar was already facing limited resources and infrastructure issues in fighting COVID-19 prior to the coup. "Now Myanmar military has ruthlessly staged a coup d'etat and installed themselves as a military government, putting their own interests above our vulnerable population, who have been facing medical, economic and social...
    SAN FRANCISCO -- After California's statewide stay-at-home order was lifted on Monday, nurses, medical professionals, and some lawmakers are questioning the decision, saying it's coming too early."The pandemic is still here, it is still real, we have a lot of patients that are very very sick!" said Zenei Triunfo-Cortez, a registered nurse at Kaiser Permanente in South San Francisco, who is president of the California Nurses Association. She is calling the decision to lift the stay-at-home order premature.RELATED: California lifts regional stay at home order"I have been a nurse for 40 years and I have never seen so many patients die in my career," says Triunfo-Cortez, whose thoughts are even echoed by some democratic lawmakers like State Senator Steven Glazer."It's a glimmer of positive news but I think the actions are premature," says Glazer, who went on to say, "I think the governor, with all the best of intentions, has moved too fast."RELATED: Outdoor dining, hair salons among businesses allowed to reopen in SFDr. Dean Winslow, who is an infectious disease physician at Stanford Health Care, also questions the decision,...
    Pennsylvania is now allowing smokers to be at the front of the line for COVID-19 vaccinations alongside nurses, doctors and nursing home residents. Smokers became eligible to receive the doses first in the state after the Pennsylvania Department of Health added those with 'high-risk medical conditions' to the first phase of the vaccine rollout.  Smoking is among the conditions deemed to be high risk. The state is currently still in its first phase of the rollout, which includes Health care personnel, those aged over 65 and those aged between 16-64 with high-risk conditions. So far, Pennsylvania has given out 643,000 of its 1.3 million doses. Pennsylvania is now allowing smokers to be at the front of the line for COVID-19 vaccinations alongside nurses, doctors and nursing home residents Among the other high risk conditions are cancer, chronic kidney disease, Down Syndrome, heart conditions, obesity and pregnancy.  Under the changes, smokers are now eligible to receive the vaccine ahead of first responders, correctional officers, teachers, grocery store workers and public transit workers.  So far, Pennsylvania has given out 643,000 of its 1.3 million doses. ...
    At a hospital near South Los Angeles, doctors debate whether an elderly patient should be hooked to one of the few remaining ventilators. Meanwhile, nurses at Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center in Westwood fear they are treating too many patients to provide them all with the best care. And for emergency medical technicians, racing the sick to hospitals has become an obstacle course, with not enough beds for the hundreds of patients in need. Once an ambulance that has responded to a 911 call finds a hospital, it can take up to 17 hours to offload the patient. These are dark days for Los Angeles County doctors, nurses and EMTs, marked by levels of death once unimaginable in the United States, despite tireless efforts to treat patients. “It’s a war zone,” said one doctor at an L.A. County public hospital. “The way most people leave is by dying.” But amid the exhaustion and anguish of the last several weeks is something worse: fear that the next few weeks will be even more dire. Another COVID-19 surge, fueled by the recent...
    LOS ANGELES (CBSLA) — With Christmas and New Year’s Eve celebrations over, healthcare workers in Los Angeles and Orange County are worried a surge of patients will pour into already packed hospitals over the next few weeks. “My concern is really resources, are we going to have the resources to take care of our community?” said Dr. Jim Kearny, an emergency physician at Mission Hospital in Mission Viejo. California recorded 585 new coronavirus deaths on New Year’s Day, a record, according to the latest numbers released Friday. It’s the highest daily death toll since the beginning of the pandemic. All regular intensive-care beds are full in Southern California with zero percent capacity. “Earlier in our surge back in July when we were at our highest, we are more than double that census now,” said Jenny Carrillo, Charge Nurse of Holy Cross Hospital in Los Angeles. Hospitals in L.A. and Orange County are facing increasingly difficult decisions about which services to postpone amid the crushing load of coronavirus patients. This week, hospitals have been notified they should prepare for crisis care,...
    More On: Coronavirus ‘Vigilante’ jailed for stabbing boy after thinking teen was breaking Coronavirus rules See how ‘Jailed Romeo’ jet-skied across Irish Sea to girlfriend during lockdown Consumer relief: COVID bill to end ‘surprise’ medical bills American Airlines to bring back workers after COVID relief bill passes SAN FRANCISCO — Since the coronavirus pandemic took hold in the U.S., Sara Houze has been on the road — going from one hospital to another to care for COVID-19 patients on the brink of death. A cardiac intensive care nurse from Washington, D.C., with expertise in heart rhythm, airway and pain management, her skills are in great demand as infections and hospitalizations skyrocket nationwide. Houze is among more than 500 nurses, doctors and other medical staff California has deployed to hospitals that are running out of capacity to treat the most severe COVID-19 cases. Her six-week assignment started Monday in San Bernardino, about 60 miles (97 kilometers) east of Los Angeles, and she anticipates working 14-hour shifts with a higher-than-usual caseload. San Bernardino County has 1,545 people in hospitals and more...
    SAN FRANCISCO (CBS SF/AP) — Nurse Sara Houze took to the road after the COVID-19 pandemic began and since then she’s been rolling along from hospital to hospital, keeping patients alive. A cardiac intensive care nurse from Washington, D.C., with expertise in heart rhythm, airway and pain management, her skills are in great demand as infections and hospitalizations skyrocket nationwide. Houze is among more than 500 nurses, doctors and other medical staff California has deployed to hospitals that are running out of capacity to treat the most severe COVID-19 cases. Her six-week assignment started Monday in San Bernardino, about 60 miles (97 kilometers) east of Los Angeles, and she anticipates working 14-hour shifts with a higher-than-usual caseload. San Bernardino County has 1,545 people in hospitals and more than 125 are in makeshift “surge” beds, which are being used because regular hospital space isn’t available. “I expect patients to die. That’s been my experience: They die, I put them in body bags, the room gets cleaned and then another patient comes,” Houze said. The staffing shortage comes as shipments of...
    SAN FRANCISCO (AP) – Since the coronavirus pandemic took hold in the U.S., Sara Houze has been on the road – going from one hospital to another to care for COVID-19 patients on the brink of death. A cardiac intensive care nurse from Washington, D.C., with expertise in heart rhythm, airway and pain management, her skills are in great demand as infections and hospitalizations skyrocket nationwide. Houze is among more than 500 nurses, doctors and other medical staff California has deployed to hospitals that are running out of capacity to treat the most severe COVID-19 cases. Her six-week assignment started Monday in San Bernardino, about 60 miles (97 kilometers) east of Los Angeles, and she anticipates working 14-hour shifts with a higher-than-usual caseload. San Bernardino County has 1,545 people in hospitals and more than 125 are in makeshift “surge” beds, which are being used because regular hospital space isn’t available. California COVID-19, By The Numbers: ???? Confirmed cases to date: 1,892,348???? Note: Numbers may not represent true day-over-day change as reporting of test results can be delayed More information at...
    By DAISY NGUYEN | The Associated Press SAN FRANCISCO  — Since the coronavirus pandemic took hold in the U.S., Sara Houze has been on the road — going from one hospital to another to care for COVID-19 patients on the brink of death. A cardiac intensive care nurse from Washington, D.C., with expertise in heart rhythm, airway and pain management, her skills are in great demand as infections and hospitalizations skyrocket nationwide. Houze is among more than 500 nurses, doctors and other medical staff California has brought in and deployed to hospitals that are running out of capacity to treat the most severe COVID-19 cases. Her six-week assignment started Monday in San Bernardino, about 60 miles (97 kilometers) east of Los Angeles, and she anticipates working 14-hour shifts with a higher-than-usual caseload. San Bernardino County has 1,545 people in hospitals and more than 125 are in makeshift “surge” beds, which are being used because regular hospital space isn’t available. “I expect patients to die. That’s been my experience: they die, I put them in body bags, the room gets cleaned...
    By DAISY NGUYEN, Associated Press SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Since the coronavirus pandemic took hold in the U.S., Sara Houze has been on the road — going from one hospital to another to care for COVID-19 patients on the brink of death. A cardiac intensive care nurse from Washington, D.C., with expertise in heart rhythm, airway and pain management, her skills are in great demand as infections and hospitalizations skyrocket nationwide. Houze is among more than 500 nurses, doctors and other medical staff California has brought in and deployed to hospitals that are running out of capacity to treat the most severe COVID-19 cases. Her six-week assignment started Monday in San Bernardino, about 60 miles (97 kilometers) east of Los Angeles, and she anticipates working 14-hour shifts with a higher-than-usual caseload. San Bernardino County has 1,545 people in hospitals and more than 125 are in makeshift “surge" beds, which are being used because regular hospital space isn't available. “I expect patients to die. That’s been my experience: they die, I put them in body bags, the room gets cleaned and...
    It has been a tough year, full of loss and hardship, social distancing and zoom calls. But doctors and nurses some are spreading holiday cheer with Christmas trees decorated with personal protective equipment. Katrina Green, and emergency physician in Nashville, Tennessee, decided to make a pandemic-themed Christmas tree after a long year of battling the coronavirus on the frontlines. “I needed a laugh after a tough year,” Green told CNN. “Laughter is the best medicine. If (I) didn’t laugh about the situation, I’d either scream or cry.” In true 2020 fashion, her tree ornaments used toilet paper rolls, face masks, and a disinfecting wipes bottle for tree topper. Green even paid tribute to the late Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg with a wooden ornament with a black dissenting collar as an added touch. Brian Johnson, a nurse practitioner and father to four young daughters in Boston, Massachusetts, decorated a “Covid tree” with his family after his oldest daughter thought it would be a fun idea to use their collection of masks as ornaments. “The kids have been so brave...
    (CNN)The first Pfizer and BioNTech Covid-19 vaccines are here, but it's not just doctors and nurses who are getting them first. At the Virginia Bedford Healthcare System, Andrew Miller -- a housekeeper in the Environmental Management Service -- was the first employee to receive the vaccine on Monday afternoon, the hospital reported.And Miller isn't the only one. As hospitals around the US receive the first shipments of the vaccine, some housekeepers are finding themselves at the top of the list.At Baptist Health Lexington, in Lexington, Kentucky, a member of the housekeeping staff -- along with an intensivist, an ICU nurse, and an emergency room nursing assistant -- were among the first to receive the vaccine's first dose on Monday, according to CNN affiliate WTVQ. At Mercy Hospital South in St. Louis, members of the housekeeping staff were also among the first to receive the vaccine, reported CNN affiliate KMOV. Read MoreOn Saturday, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices voted to recommend the vaccine for people ages 16 and older. That came after the US...
    (CNN)Earlier this year, medical facilities in California were tested by the emerging coronavirus pandemic -- but now things are different, a top hospital official told CNN on Monday.Doctors and nurses back then were working on improving treatments and overcoming shortages of personal protective equipment (PPE).Now the staff at hospitals are worn down. Finding fresh beds is one matter; having fresh staff is another."One of the most important things to remember is when we talk about ICU capacity, it's not just about beds and mattresses and pillows," said Carmela Coyle, president and CEO of the California Hospital Association."The limiting factor, the most important factor in caring for people who have the Covid-19 disease are the nurses, the staff. That's what's short, and that's what's different this time around than it was during our summer surge."Read MoreCovid-19 hospitalizations are up a daunting 72% and ICU admissions are up 69% over the past 14 days, Gov. Gavin Newsom announced Monday. He said officials have asked for 815 extra health care workers from staffing agencies, and other reinforcements have been requested from the federal...
    U.S. hospitals slammed with COVID-19 patients are trying to lure nurses and doctors out of retirement, recruiting students and new graduates who have yet to earn their licenses and offering eye-popping salaries in a desperate bid to ease staffing shortages. With the virus surging from coast to coast, the number of patients in the hospital with the virus has more than doubled over the past month to a record high of nearly 100,000, pushing medical centers and health care workers to the breaking point. Nurses are increasingly burned out and getting sick on the job, and the stress on the nation's medical system has `prompted a dire warning from the head of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. "The reality is December and January and February are going to be rough times. I actually believe they are going to be the most difficult time in the public health history of this nation," Dr. Robert Redfield said. Get Breaking News Delivered to Your Inbox Governors in hard-hit states like Wisconsin and Nebraska are making it easier for retired nurses...
    As a Black man and a nurse practitioner working at the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs hospital in Long Beach, Walter Perez hears a lot of cringeworthy stuff from his Black patients. Like how the forthcoming COVID-19 vaccines won’t be safe because Big Pharma is cutting corners to make more money. Or how the medical establishment wants to use Black people as guinea pigs to test those vaccines. Or how the vaccines could actually prove more harmful than getting COVID-19. The list goes on. “The only way I can describe it is there’s a paranoia,” Perez said. “A lot of people are just really paranoid about it.” Indeed, across the U.S., only 32% of Black adults say they would definitely or probably take a COVID-19 vaccine, according to the Pew Research Center. Another study by the COVID Collaborative and the NAACP found that most Black people don’t believe a vaccine will be safe or effective, and don’t plan to get it. In California, it’s even worse, with fewer than 30% of Black people saying they would probably or definitely...
    Blackburn, England (CNN)As a matron in a hectic ICU, Linda Gregson felt the coronavirus pandemic had stretched her idea of what was possible to its limits. Then came the video call. It had been set up so one of her critically ill Covid-19 patients could see their loved ones. But instead of the usual smiling face, or couple of waving children at the other end of the line, this time there were 45 relatives, all crammed into one room."On several occasions we have had to stop Zoom calls because there have been numerous relatives in the room not social distancing," said Gregson. In the heavily-burdened ICU in Blackburn, northwestern England, where she works -- and where eight patients died over the past weekend alone -- abuse of the rules is not the only problem she and the other medical staff face. Why deaths arent rising as fast in Covid-19s second wave, despite big spikes in new infections"There are nurses withdrawing treatment from a patient and doing end of life [procedures] on a patient with a relative on a Zoom call...
    Karthik Sivakumar better known as Karthi by his fans has been blessed with a baby boy. Yes, it’s celebration time for the South star. The actor took to his social media handle and updated fans with this good news. Karthi is married to Ranjani Chinnaswamy. The Kaithi actor in the announcement post thanked the doctors and nurses who helped him and his betterhalf deliver a child. He mentioned how it has been a life-changing experience and urged everyone to bless the newborn. Well, this is indeed a good news and just like us even his fans rejoiced and congratualted the star online. Happy Birthday, Karthi! A Look At The 5 Finest Roles Played By The Kollywood Actor.  “Dear friends and family, we are blessed with a boy baby. We can’t thank enough our doctors and nurses who took us through this life changing experience. Need all your blessings for the little one. Thank you god!,” he wrote. Even Karthi’s younger brother Suriya Sivakumar thanked the doctor on social media. Congratulations to the couple! Thambi First Look: Karthi and Jyothika’s Film With...
    Southern star Tamannaah Bhatia on Saturday expressed words of gratitude for the doctors, nurses and staff at the hospital where she underwent Covid treatment. The actress, who has now recovered and is working to boost her stamina, tweeted her thanks along with photographs of her doctors, nurses and the hospital staff. Tamannaah Bhatia Gets Discharged From Hospital; Actress Optimistic About Recovering Soon From COVID-19 (View Post) “Words cannot describe how grateful I am to the doctors, nurses, and the staff at @Continental_hyd. I was so sick, weak and scared but the you made sure that I was comfortable and treated in the best possible way. The kindness, sincere caring, and concern made everything better!” the actress captioned the image. Tamannaah Bhatia Reportedly Admitted to Hospital After Testing Positive for COVID-19 Check Out Tamannaah Bhatia’s Instagram Post Below: Earlier this week, Tamannaah had shared a workout video on her verified Instagram account. “#BackToFitness – Day 1 It’s time to take baby steps and get back my stamina. This is an extremely important step after recovering from coronavirus. Keep...
    MISSION, Kan. (AP) — Treating the sick and dying isn’t even the toughest part for nurse Amelia Montgomery as the coronavirus surges in her corner of red America. It’s dealing with patients and relatives who don’t believe the virus is real, refuse to wear masks and demand treatments like hydroxychloroquine, which President Donald Trump has championed even though experts say it is not effective against the scourge that has killed over 210,000 in the U.S. Montgomery finds herself, like so many other doctors and nurses, in a world where the politics of the crisis are complicating treatment efforts, with some people even resisting getting tested. It’s unclear how Trump’s bout with the virus will affect the situation, but some doctors aren’t optimistic. After a few days of treatment at a military hospital, the president tweeted Monday, “Don’t be afraid of Covid. Don’t let it dominate your life. … I feel better than I did 20 years ago!” After one tough shift in the coronavirus unit at Cox South Hospital in Springfield, Missouri, Montgomery went onto Facebook to vent her frustrations...
    By HEATHER HOLLINGSWORTH, Associated Press MISSION, Kan. (AP) — Treating the sick and dying isn't even the toughest part for nurse Amelia Montgomery as the coronavirus surges in her corner of red America. It's dealing with patients and relatives who don't believe the virus is real, refuse to wear masks and demand treatments like hydroxychloroquine, which President Donald Trump has championed even though experts say it is not effective against the scourge that has killed over 210,000 in the U.S. Montgomery finds herself, like so many other doctors and nurses, in a world where the politics of the crisis are complicating treatment efforts, with some people even resisting getting tested. It's unclear how Trump’s bout with the virus will affect the situation, but some doctors aren't optimistic. After a few days of treatment at a military hospital, the president tweeted Monday, “Don’t be afraid of Covid. Don’t let it dominate your life. ... I feel better than I did 20 years ago!” After one tough shift on the coronavirus unit at Cox South Hospital in Springfield, Montgomery went onto Facebook...
    MISSION, Kan. – Treating the sick and dying isn't even the toughest part for nurse Amelia Montgomery as the coronavirus surges in her corner of red America. It's dealing with patients and relatives who don't believe the virus is real, refuse to wear masks and demand treatments like hydroxychloroquine, which President Donald Trump has championed even though experts say it is not effective against the scourge that has killed over 210,000 in the U.S. Montgomery finds herself, like so many other doctors and nurses, in a world where the politics of the crisis are complicating treatment efforts, with some people even resisting getting tested. It's unclear how Trump’s bout with the virus will affect the situation, but some doctors aren't optimistic. After a few days of treatment at a military hospital, the president tweeted Monday, “Don’t be afraid of Covid. Don’t let it dominate your life. ... I feel better than I did 20 years ago!” After one tough shift on the coronavirus unit at Cox South Hospital in Springfield, Montgomery went onto Facebook to vent her frustrations about...
    MISSION, Kan. (AP) — Treating the sick and dying isn’t even the toughest part for nurse Amelia Montgomery as the coronavirus surges in her corner of red America. It’s dealing with patients and relatives who don’t believe the virus is real, refuse to wear masks and demand treatments like hydroxychloroquine, which President Donald Trump has championed even though experts say it is not effective against the scourge that has killed over 210,000 in the U.S. Montgomery finds herself, like so many other doctors and nurses, in a world where the politics of the crisis are complicating treatment efforts, with some people even resisting getting tested. It’s unclear how Trump’s bout with the virus will affect the situation, but some doctors aren’t optimistic. After a few days of treatment at a military hospital, the president tweeted Monday, “Don’t be afraid of Covid. Don’t let it dominate your life. ... I feel better than I did 20 years ago!” After one tough shift on the coronavirus unit at Cox South Hospital in Springfield, Montgomery went onto Facebook to vent her frustrations...
    When Christina Kim joined TikTok, she was looking for a new form of entertainment. Like many people during quarantine, she scrolled through the platform aimlessly, liking funny dance videos and posting clips about being a mom and nurse practitioner during the pandemic. But after a while, she noticed a concerning trend: videos and comments filled with false information about Covid-19. “It was a huge eye opener,” she says. “I was so shocked to be exposed to this world of people—people who didn’t believe in science.” On a whim in July, she posted a video from work with text that read, “Wearing a mask will NOT affect your oxygenation or cause ‘carbon dioxide poisoning.’” Over Valentino Khan & Wuki’s song “Better,” she puts on a surgical mask while hooked up to a pulse oximeter, which estimates the percentage of your blood that is saturated with oxygen. The oximeter reads 98 percent (within the normal range). She then puts on a thicker surgical mask, then an N95 mask, and finally all three together. Her oxygen level never drops below 98 percent. The...
    LOS ANGELES, Calif. (KABC) -- Seeing a need for protective eyewear for doctors and nurses on the frontlines, Fitz Frames, a 3D-printed eyewear company switched gears and stepped up to help."When Covid hit, we just wanted to do whatever we could to help," said Gabe Schlumberger, CEO of Fitz Frames. "We were actually approached by a bunch of doctors and nurses who said there's no good solution for prescription protective eyewear.""At this time, protection is paramount," said Los Angeles-based ophthalmologist Vicki Chan, M.D. "They were able to take their technology and then custom fit goggles."Fitz Frames, which specializes in custom-fitted glasses for kids, created a line of frames they called Fitz Protect, designed for enhanced safety in the fight against COVID-19."We have an app that scans your face. You do a virtual try-on, and then we take your measurements," said Schlumberger. "Then we 3D print custom glasses that fit just your face."The company also donates frames to healthcare workers who sign up on their waitlist.For more information, visit:https://www.fitzframes.com/fitz-protect
    Veteran Bollywood actor Amitabh Bachchan has been receiving treatment for COVID-19 at Mumbai’s Nanavati hospital since July 14. The actor confirmed the news of testing positive for the novel virus earlier this month via social media. Apart from the actor, his son Abhishek Bachchan along with other family members such as Aishwarya Rai Bachchan and Aradhya Bachchan had also reported being positive although, recently it was stated that Aishwarya and Aaradhya have now been discharged from the hospital and will be quarantined at home. Abhishek Bachchan Confirms Aishwarya Rai Bachchan and Daughter Aaradhya Have Been Discharged From the Hospital After Testing Negative for COVID-19. As Mr Bachchan, he has been at the hospital’s isolation ward and is keeping his fans updated on his condition and other things through his tweets. Recently, the actor took to Twitter to laud the work of medical professionals such as doctors and nurses as he called them ‘God’s own angels in PPE kits’. Taking to Twitter, he wrote, “hey work in extreme conditions, so our conditions are safe .. the Gods own angels in white PPE...
    Priti Patel Doctors and nurses from overseas will be eligible for fast-track entry to the UK and exempt from paying an NHS health surcharge under a new visa scheme set out by the Home Office on Monday.  Under the new Health and Care visa, those eligible will also pay less in application fees and will be able to access “dedicated support” in filling out their forms.  The exemptions will also apply to their families and dependents, according to the written ministerial statement. The list of professions eligible include doctors, nurses, midwives and social workers, although the document acknowledges that this will be expanded in the near future. However, in a move likely to provoke a backlash among some MPs, Downing Street confirmed that social care workers would not be able to take advantage of the new NHS visa. Speaking to reporters this morning, the Prime Minister’s official spokesman said: “We want employers to invest more in training and development for care workers in this country. “On care workers specifically, our independent migration advisers have said that immigration is not the sole answer here, which is why...
    A group of medical providers gathering at the Gallup Indian Medical CenterSource: Nate Teismann Dr. Jeanne Noble has worked all over the world as an emergency medicine physician. So when the hospital where she works, UC San Francisco, asked if anyone was willing to fly out to the Navajo Nation and help with an escalating Covid-19 outbreak, she eagerly volunteered.  The Navajo Nation, which reported its first Covid-19 case in mid-March, has seen infection rates per capita among the highest in the country. Thus far, there have been 8,000 cases and more than 300 deaths. The reservation, which is home to more than 170,000 people, is spread out across the varied desert landscape of Utah, Arizona and New Mexico. The people refer to themselves as the Diné.  Noble went to work at the Navajo Nation's hospital -- Gallup Indian Medical Center in New Mexico -- as part of the second group that made the trip out from UCSF. The first group arrived in April after responding to a call from Navajo Nation President Jonathan Nez for health worker reinforcements. Around that same...
    Health care workers fear another shortage in personal protective equipment (PPE) as some states see a new surge of coronavirus cases and hospitalizations, and the U.S. government issued new guidance to reuse face masks, gowns and other equipment. Vice President Mike Pence made the announcement on Wednesday at the White House Coronavirus Task Force briefing, saying that PPE supplies remain “very strong,” but the Trump administration will be encouraging health care workers “to use some of the best practices” to “preserve and reuse” face masks and other protective equipment. A nonprofit group called #GetUsPPE was established in March by physicians to help distribute donated protective gear. The group said they have seen a surge in requests in the last two weeks of June for more gear from health facilities that are not hospitals. ‘EMERGING EVIDENCE’ OF CORONAVIRUS AIRBORNE TRANSMISSION INDICATED BY WHO
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