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    Aztec dancers join other Indigenous groups on Alcatraz Island for the annual Unthanksgiving Day ceremony honoring Native Americans. For more than a century and a half, the U.S. has observed Thanksgiving Day as a federal holiday. Its roots date back more than 400 years and consistently intersect with violence against Native Americans. In 1637, Massachusetts Colony Gov. John Winthrop established a Thanksgiving celebration to honor colonial volunteer soldiers who massacred 700 Pequot tribe members. In 1676, colonists celebrated the brutal killing of Wampanoag Sachem Massasoit, whose head was placed on a pike and displayed for 25 years. The slaying took place during King Philip’s War, which led to the deaths of thousands of Native Americans. In an effort to highlight the true history of Thanksgiving and the genocide perpetrated against Native Americans, tribes have established ceremonies like the National Day of Mourning honoring the many Indigenous lives lost to genocide and advocating for Native American rights. First held in 1970 by the United American Indians of New England (UAINE), the National Day of Mourning occurs every third Thursday in November at Cole’s Hill in Plymouth, Massachusetts....
    Native Americans not only survived an ancient climate disaster nearly 1,500 years ago, but they thrived when the crisis ended, according to a new study. In 536AD, a massive volcano erupted in Iceland that sent a thick cloud of smoke and debris across the Pacific and into the southwestern US, which dimmed the sun, lowered temperatures and killed crops. When the climate catastrophe came to an end, decades later, ancient Puebloan farmers moved out of their small settlements and into communal villages where they began to prosper like never before.  Researchers from the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) and Colorado State University found the civilizations experienced a population boom, which also sparked new ideas that led to new technologies in construction, culinary and hunting.   In 536AD, a massive volcano erupted in Iceland that sent a thick cloud of smoke and debris across the Pacific and into the southwestern US, which dimmed the sun, lowered temperatures and killed crops R. J. Sinensky from UCLA, lead author of the research, said in a statement: 'Human societies are capable of reorganization to...
    But Ross declared, as the left has repeatedly attempted to convince fellow Americans, the "truth of Thanksgiving" is way, way, way different. After noting, accurately, that the "Pilgrims did not bring turkey, sweet potato pie, or cranberries to Thanksgiving. They could not. They were broke," (which, as most Americans understand, is precisely why they were offering thanks to God for His provision), Ross went on to explain what the Pilgrims actually brought to Thanksgiving. "Instead of bringing stuffing and biscuits, those settlers brought genocide and violence," he said. "That genocide and violence is still on the menu as state-sponsored violence against native and black Americans is commonplace, and violent, private white supremacy is celebrated and subsidized." Ross went on to list minorities who have been "murdered by those paid to protect us." "White Americans are still killing native and black Americans with no fear of reprisal," he said. Not only that, whites are still conducting "chattel slavery" of native and black people, according to Ross, "through the prison industrial...
    (CNN)A San Francisco law school named for a man who orchestrated a massacre of Native Americans is moving to change its name. The University of California Hastings College of the Law does not have the power to change the name, which is written in state law. But the board of directors voted unanimously Tuesday to allow the dean to work with the Legislature and Gov. Gavin Newsom to introduce legislation required to do so. "We never shied away from that history, or I never did, and I wanted to confront it," Faigman said. "And then the question was, 'What to do about it?' And that went to the recommendations to identify initiatives to reconcile and restore justice with the descendants who feel the historical trauma and pain of what their ancestors suffered." The college -- the state's first law school, which boasts notable alumni including Vice President Kamala Harris -- was founded by and named after Serranus Hastings, the first chief justice of California. Vice President Kamala Harris graduates from law school in 1989. Hastings, with the support of the...
    The perspective on the history of the discovery of the Malvinas Islands (or the Falkland Islands) is reversed. A new study calls into question the traditional situation of an archipelago that was not explored before the arrival of Europeans based on circumstantial evidence, and suggests its prehistoric discovery by the marine inhabitants of the southern diarra del Fuego. Located 400 km from South America, the Falklands were officially discovered by Europeans in the 16th century without a trace of human activity, and then colonized from 1764 onwards. The Yagans, a seafaring people south of Tyra del Fuego (the southernmost archipelago of the South American continent), migrated to the Falklands before the Europeans on one or more occasions in the 1400s. This is the latest study published on Wednesday in the journal Thunder Results Scientific advances. In the wake of the renaissance of this theory, there are traces of a new circumstance in the direction of prehistoric human existence on the shores of this archipelago on the surface of the Île-de-France, which dates back to the 19th century. Two main islands...
    Scientists have made an astonishing discovery about the first citizens of the United States by analyzing teeth. Descriptions. The origins of the first Americans have always been the subject of debate in the scientific community. Some experts argue that the ancestors of the first citizens of the continent were Japanese. This theory refers to the Zaman people who occupied the American mainland 15,000 years ago. See also A recent analysis published in the scientific journal PaleoAmerica calls into question this hypothesis. The new research was commissioned by anthropologist G.S. Richard Scott carried on. The latter and his team of scientists studied 10,000 years old teeth. The mineralized bodies belong to Native Americans, Jemon individuals and ancient peoples from East, Southeast Asia and the Pacific. In fact, teeth and their roots have revealed some interesting information. In fact, hundreds of teeth present important differences between the early Americans and the Jemon people: ” Jemon is very different from a dental point of view The Native Americans », G. Richard Scott pointed out in a press release. The teeth of Native American...
    During the first year of the COVID-19 pandemic, Americans of color were far more likely to be hospitalized or die of the disease than white Americans, a new study from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) finds.  Researchers analyzed hospitalization data from 99 U.S. counties, including more than 140,000 patients who caught Covid between March 2020 and February 2021. Non-white Americans were up to four times more likely to be hospitalized with Covid and up to seven times more likely to die of the disease. Native Americans faced the highest risk with 233 Covid deaths for every 100,000 people - 7.2 times higher than the death rate for white Americans, who had 32 deaths for every 100,000 people. This higher risk may be tied to people of color working essential jobs, living in low-income urban areas, and relying on public transportation - along with other factors, the researchers said.  'Equitable access to Covid preventive measures, including vaccination, is needed to minimize the gap in racial and ethnic disparities of severe Covid,' the researchers wrote. Minorities face dramatically higher...
    Fox News host Rachel Campos-Duffy asserted on Wednesday night that Native Americans’ struggles have “everything to do with government dependency” and “alcoholism.” Her colleague Jesse Watters, meanwhile, groused that liberals are just trying to “make them out to be victims” and will attempt to “send more slush funds to the reservations.” Appearing on Fox News Primetime alongside her husband, Sean Duffy, a fellow cast member on MTV’s The Real World, Campos-Duffy initially took aim at Vice President Kamala Harris for saying America should face its “shameful past” while recognizing Indigenous Peoples’ Day. The vice president also said European explorers such as Christopher Columbus “ushered in a wave of devastation for tribal nations, perpetrating violence, stealing land, and spreading disease.” “Christopher Columbus, by the way, is the first victim of cancel culture,” Campos-Duffy grumbled, adding that Native Americans “were just as brutal” as Columbus and other European colonizers. “We know they actually had slaves, including African-American slaves, they conquered tribes after Columbus,” the conservative Fox News personality continued. “If we are going to apply modern-day standards, we have to apply it...
    People wait for a distribution of masks and food from the Rev. Al Sharpton in the Harlem neighborhood of New York. Bebeto Matthews/AP Fight disinformation. Get a daily recap of the facts that matter. Sign up for the free Mother Jones newsletter.During the COVID pandemic, life expectancy for Black Americans fell by 2.9 years. Latinx Americans, who typically live longer than Black Americans and whites, lost three years of their lives. Now, a new Centers for Disease Control and Prevention study published Friday found that Black, Latinx, and Native Americans/Alaskan Native adults have died at startlingly higher rates during the COVID pandemic than in typical years, illuminating the disparate suffering communities of color have faced in the last year and a half. In the CDC’s Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, researchers looked at the excess mortality incidence rates, a wonky term that means the number of people who have died in a population above their community’s expected number of deaths. They assessed the number of excess deaths per 100,000 people across the US between December 2019 and January 2021 by...
    (CNN)More than 150 years ago, leaders in Colorado issued proclamations urging citizens to kill Native Americans in the area. That order was never officially rescinded -- until now.On Tuesday, Colorado Gov. Jared Polis signed an executive order rescinding the proclamation, ordered by Territorial Gov. John Evans in 1864."The 1864 Proclamations were never lawful because they violated established treaty rights and federal Indian law. Further, when Colorado became a state, they never became law, as they were superseded by the Colorado Constitution, United States Constitution, and Colorado criminal code," the executive order reads. READ MORE: Losing languages, losing worldsThe proclamations issued by then-Gov. Evans warned that "all hostile Indians would be pursued and destroyed" unless they left their homes and gathered at certain camps. It authorized citizens of the territory to "kill and destroy ... hostile Indians" and steal the Natives' land and property, according to the executive order. Read MoreGov. Evans also supplied organized militias with arms and ammunition, according to the Sand Creek Massacre Foundation. The 1864 proclamations led to the Sand Creek Massacre later that year, where troops...
    Amazfit X Smartwatch Review Friday 5: Could NASCAR’s next great rivalry be Larson vs. Bell? Reservation Dogs Welcome to Episode 132 of TV’s Top 5, The Hollywood Reporter‘s TV podcast. Every week, hosts Lesley Goldberg (West Coast TV editor) and Daniel Fienberg (chief TV critic) break down the latest TV news with context from the business and critical sides, welcome showrunners, executive and other guests, and provide a critical guide of what to watch (or skip, as the case may be). This week’s five topics are: 1. Jeopardy went for the box. Exec producer Mike Richards is officially the host of the syndicated game show. But producers Sony TV spun reporters and viewers alike that the flagship series would have two hosts, with Big Bang Theory grad Mayim Bialik being tapped to oversee spinoffs and specials. This segment explores why Sony may have opted for the safe bet in Richards (despite his past). 2. The White Lotus return trip on the books. Mike White’s breakout social satire will return for a second season on HBO after its pandemic experiment of taking...
    The Romance Writers of America has rescinded its award for a novel that critics accused of 'glamorizing killing of Native Americans' with opening scene depicting the Wounded Knee Massacre. Karen Witemeyer's At Love's Command recently won the best romance with religious or spiritual elements of 2021 at the RWA's inaugural Vivian Awards. The Christian western romance novel, which centers around ex-cavalry officer Matthew Hanger and Dr Josephine Burkett who fall in love in 1890s Texas, opens with a scene depicting the Wounded Knee Massacre. After Witemeyer was given the award, it came under fire from critics who said it offensively romanticizes the battle in which an estimated 300 Lakota people were killed by soldiers of the United States Army on the Lakota Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota on December 29, 1890.    Karen Witemeyer's 'At Love's Command' recently won the best romance with religious or spiritual elements of 2021 at the RWA's inaugural Vivian Awards before it was rescinded  Outraged critics say that the scene romanticizes the Battle at Wounded Knee (pictured) in which and estimated 300 Lakota people were killed...
    On Tuesday’s edition of The Five, Jesse Watters took issue with an Independence Day tweet by Rep. Cori Bush (D-MO) in which the congresswoman said, “This land is stolen land and Black people still aren’t free.” When they say that the 4th of July is about American freedom, remember this: the freedom they’re referring to is for white people. This land is stolen land and Black people still aren’t free. — Cori Bush (@CoriBush) July 4, 2021 “Congresswoman Bush said two things,” said Watters. “Really dumb things. She says this land was stolen. This land wasn’t stolen. We won this land on the battlefield and we bought it, right? We purchased Spain–I mean we purchased Florida from Spain. We have the receipts. What, do you want to give Florida back to Spain?” “How about the Seminoles?” asked Geraldo Rivera. “Well, what about them, Geraldo?” retorted Watters. “We won that territory on the battlefield. It was an ugly, brutal battle, but we won it. We’re not just gonna give everything back to the indigenous people of this country.” During the...
    VIDEO9:4209:42Indigenous Americans call for reform of federally-guaranteed health careHealth Insurance American Indians and Alaska Natives are entitled to federally funded health care under treaties negotiated between tribal nations and the U.S. government.  "Our treaties say that we have a right to health care provided by the federal government," said Abigail Echo-Hawk, an enrolled member of the Pawnee Nation of Oklahoma and the executive Vice President of Seattle Indian Health Board. "This is meant to be quality health care provided to enrolled members of federally recognized tribes to health care free of charge in that we already paid for it with the land that the United States is on." But according to a 2018 report from the independent and bipartisan Commission on Civil Rights, the U.S. government has not adequately funded these programs, leaving many indigenous communities without the ability to provide quality care. "If we don't get the resources that we need, it's always going to be a struggle for us to begin to address the underlying health conditions that were built as a result of the colonial oppression and...
    A group of Native Americans have invited Prince Harry and Meghan Markle to meet over their fears the Sussexes are using holy water to irrigate the grounds of their California mansion.  The couple's $14.7 million luxury complex is built on land that once belonged to the Chumash people, a tribe which have roots in the area dating back nearly 11,000 years.  A number of homes in the area of Montecito use the water from the area's vast number of hot and cold springs and underground rivers. But the Chumash tribe leader Eleanor Fishburn, 60, said the water, which her people view as holy, should not be use to water their gardens, reports The Sun.  The couple's $14.7 million luxury complex is built on land that once belonged to the Chumash people, a tribe which have roots in the area dating back nearly 11,000 years A group of Native Americans have invited Prince Harry and Meghan Markle to meet over fears the Sussexes are using holy water to irrigate the grounds of their California mansion The Chumash tribe...
    SAN FRANCISCO (KGO) -- In the middle of the night on Nov. 20, 1969, a group of mostly young Native Americans escaped to Alcatraz, landing on the shores of Alcatraz Island, in the middle of San Francisco Bay.They occupied the former prison for 19 months, demanding that the federal government turn over the island to Indigenous Americans.The self-proclaimed Tribe of All Nations ignited a national movement that raised public awareness of the plight of Native American Indians.LaNada War Jack, Ph.D was one of the occupation's original organizers, she spoke with ABC7's Kristen Sze about her time on Alcatraz, and about what the occupation meant to Native Americans.Watch more of LaNada, and hear the story of occupation in the ABC7 Original documentary, "Escape to Alcatraz," available now on ABC7news.com, and our streaming apps.
    Rick Santorum is standing by the comments about Native Americans that recently got him fired from CNN. 'You get savaged for telling the truth,' Santorum told Fox News host Sean Hannity in an interview on Monday, defending his remarks last month to a conservative youth group. 'We birthed a nation from nothing. I mean, there was nothing here,' Santorum told the group on April 23, before being fired last weekend. 'I mean, yes, we have Native Americans, but candidly, there isn't much Native American culture in American culture.'  Santorum on Monday said that he 'misspoke' but defended the intent of his remarks, saying that he was referring to the founding of the United States government and blaming 'cancel culture' at CNN for his firing. In the wake of his firing, CNN has been accused of double-standards for failing to take action against primetime star Chris Cuomo, who last week admitted advising his brother, New York governor Andrew Cuomo, on how to handle media attention during his sexual harassment scandal.  Rick Santorum is standing by the comments about Native Americans that...
    Former Republican senator and TV analyst Rick Santorum addressed his departure from CNN on "Hannity" Monday, after the left-leaning network fired him over past comments about Native American culture. "You get savaged for telling the truth," Santorum said in his first public interview since he ousted from the network. The Republican political commentator was given the boot after an April 23 speech resurfaced where he told a young conservative crowd that immigrants had created a nation "from nothing" based on Judeo-Christian values. CNN WALKS BACK CORONAVIRUS WUHAN LAB LEAK THEORY COVERAGE "We birthed a nation from nothing," he said. "Yes, there were Native Americans, but there isn’t much Native American culture in American culture." Santorum later clarified on CNN's "Cuomo Prime Time"  that he "misspoke" and argued that he was speaking in the context of the founding of the United States government. Native Americans "had a huge impact, particularly in the west and many of the areas of our country where they have had a huge impact on American culture," he said at the time. On "Hannity" Monday night, Santorum appeared to stand by...
    Rick Santorum appeared on Fox News Monday night in his first TV appearance since being let go by CNN. To recap: Santorum came under fire several weeks ago for the following comments he made about Native Americans: You know, if you think of other countries like Italy and Greece and China and Turkey and places like that, they’ve all sort of changed over time. I mean, they’ve been there for millennia in many cases. And their culture has sort of evolved over time, but not us. We came here and created a blank slate. We birthed a nation from nothing. I mean, there was nothing here. I mean, yes, we have Native Americans, but candidly that — there isn’t much Native American culture in American culture. It was born of the people who came here, pursuing religious liberty to practice their faith. Santorum was widely condemned for those remarks, and Native American organizations called for his firing. A few days later Chris Cuomo confronted Santorum on air over it, and Santorum said that he “misspoke.” Santorum started Monday night by...
    (CNN)When Alaina E. Roberts started piecing her family's history together she made a surprising discovery that changed what it meant to be a Black American. Her father's ancestors in Oklahoma were once enslaved by Native Americans.Nearly a century before Tulsa's Greenwood District became a beacon of Black prosperity in the 1920s, Native American tribes and thousands of enslaved Black people arrived in the state. Members of the Five Tribes -- the Chickasaw, Cherokee, Choctaw, Creek and Seminole -- had been forced out of their homelands in the Deep South, leading to the exodus known as "Trail of Tears." "Owning slaves was a part of their strategy to assimilate into American society and it allowed them to be seen as different from other Native people and as more civilized," said Roberts, an associate professor of history at the University of Pittsburgh. Roberts tells the story of how Oklahoma became a melting pot and the decades of racial tensions that preceded the Tulsa Race Massacre in her new book "I've Been Here All The While: Black Freedom on Native Land." Read MoreAlaina...
    Rick Santorum has said he 'misspoke' when he told a forum of young conservatives last month that he believed there was 'nothing here' when the white settlers arrived.  Santorum, a former Republican presidential candidate and senator for Pennsylvania, spoke at the Young America's Foundation, a conservative youth group, on April 18.  'We birthed a nation from nothing. I mean, there was nothing here,' Santorum said.  'I mean, yes, we have Native Americans, but candidly, there isn’t much Native American culture in American culture.' On Monday night, pressed to explain his controversial comments, Santorum insisted he 'misspoke'. 'I was talking about - and I misspoke in this respect - I was talking about the founding and the principles embodied in the founding,' he told CNN.  'I would never - and people said I’m trying to dismiss what we did to the Native Americans, far from it.'  Rick Santorum (right) on Monday night told Chris Cuomo he 'misspoke' on April 13 Mediaite Privacy Policy Santorum has carved out a career for himself as a conservative commentator on CNN The 62-year-old,...
    Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan threatened to recognize the United States’ actions against Native Americans as a genocide in response to the United States’ recognition of Turkey’s 1915-1916 genocide against Armenians. “If you say genocide, then you need to look at yourselves in the mirror and make an evaluation. The Native Americans, I don’t even need to mention them, what happened is clear,” Erdogan said after a Monday cabinet meeting. He also suggested that the international community should “also talk about what happened to… blacks and in Vietnam.” LIVE — Erdoğan: US President Biden’s biased statement on 1915 events is destructive for Turkish-American bilateral relations. We believe that Mr. Biden’s statement was due to pressure from radical Armenian figures pic.twitter.com/JPyG0ZhtAy — DAILY SABAH (@DailySabah) April 26, 2021 The United States recognized the Armenian Genocide on Saturday. The Trump administration rejected a bipartisan resolution in 2019 that called for the State Department to do so, after Erdogan threatened to “oppose [the US] by reciprocating such decisions in parliament.” “Can we speak about America without mentioning [Native Americans]? It is a...
    Left-wing activist and Avengers star Mark Ruffalo said on Friday that Native Americans are “marginalized” and “mistreated” in the “colonial system” of the United States. Ruffalo praised the passage of the America Rescue Act, marketed by Democrats and leftist news media as “coronavirus stimulus” and “COVID-19 relief” legislation in an interview with Secretary of the Interior Deb Haaland. Mark Ruffalo framed Native Americans as the “most marginalized [and] mistreated” people in an America, a county he described as a “colonial system”: We’re going to talk about this part of this stimulus package that is being given to the Native American people of the United States. They are original people, our first people, and probably — in some ways — our most marginalized people or mistreated people of our country, and so we’re going to talk about their resilience. We’re going to talk about what this stimulus package means. We’re going to talk about what this moment in time for America’s original people is. We’re going to talk about how they’re finding their voice and their power within this colonial system that has...
    Every year thousands of school-aged children from across the Midwest make their way to downstate Illinois. Along the banks of the Mississippi River, wedged between St. Louis and the world’s largest catsup bottle, they spend a day touring the remains of one of North America’s oldest cities, now known as the Cahokia Mounds. Cahokia is a mysterious place. Shortly before it was abandoned in the 1300s, it had grown to be the same size as contemporary London. But, long before European settlers invaded the area, Cahokia’s more than 80 man-made hills and terraces had been largely empty for centuries. No one really knows who constructed the mounds or why. The only certainty is that they were the ancestors of modern-day Native Americans. That mystery — and that point of pride — is partly why game designer Connor Alexander chose Cahokia as the setting for Coyote & Crow. His tabletop role-playing game has been gathering steam for the better part of a month now, earning more than $816,000 in crowdfunding. That ranks it among the highest earning TTRPG campaigns of the...
    On Monday’s broadcast of MSNBC’s “Rachel Maddow Show,” Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-NY) praised the confirmation of Deb Haaland as Secretary of the Interior by stating that Haaland will “stop the rape of our great federal lands by the oil companies.” Schumer said, “Cabinet, we now have, by the end of this week, 16 of the Cabinet, almost all will be in there. You mentioned Deb Haaland. What a historic choice. Native Americans have never had a seat at the table, now they do. We put more money into the ARP bill for Native Americans than ever before, and she’ll stop the rape of our great federal lands by the oil companies.” Follow Ian Hanchett on Twitter @IanHanchett
    WASHINGTON - On October 13, 1652, after a day of fasting and prayer, 15 Native American men stood before a panel of Puritan church officials in Natick, Massachusetts. They had come to confess their sins and prove their commitment to Christianity. One of them was Waban, a member of the Nipmuc tribe. A portrait of Puritan missionary John Eliot by unknown artist.“Before I heard of God and before the English came into this country, many evil things my heart did work, many thoughts I had in my heart; I wished for riches, I wished to be a witch, I wished to be a sachem [chief]; and many such other evils were in my heart,” Waban stated.  Missionary John Eliot, who claimed proficiency in the local Algonquin dialect, translated the Native Americans’ statements, later publishing them as “Tears of Repentance.” History has dubbed Puritan missionary Eliot as “the apostle to the Indians” and celebrated him as the founder of the American missionary movement. Many Native Americans and some historians today see him as an agent of cultural genocide. The...
    (CNN)Native Americans are losing their elders to Covid-19. As death tolls continue to climb, tribes are struggling to protect some of their last remaining knowledge and language keepers. "Every time one of those elders leaves this world, it's like a whole library, a whole beautiful chapter of our history, of our ceremonies -- all that knowledge, gone," Clayson Benally, a member of Navajo Nation, said. "It's not written, it's not dictated, you're not going to find it on the internet."Native Americans were already decimated by a virus. Theyre scared it could happen againSelf-isolating in their Flagstaff, Arizona, homes, Clayson and his sister Jeneda Benally have been working to pass on the knowledge of their elder father, Jones Benally, during the pandemic. "I take it as the greatest responsibility I've ever had in my life to make sure that our knowledge keepers, to make sure that my parents, come out on the other side of this pandemic," Jeneda said.Native Americans are particularly susceptible to the coronavirus because they suffer from disproportionate rates of asthma, heart disease, hypertension and diabetes.Read MoreNavajo elder...
    (Photo: Adobe Stock) To celebrate Thanksgiving Day is to celebrate the butchering of Native Americans, and as a Black man living in America that is something that I will never be able to celebrate. This is a holiday that white people have established and have created a narrative around as something that is delightful for American families to commemorate, but it actually has a history rooted in the killing of Native people who were on this land before it became the United States of America we know today. As a graduate of Morehouse College, I have been conditioned early on to look beyond the information that is presented to me about the history of America and do further research outside of the lens of a Eurocentric perspective. Read More: Americans risk traveling over Thanksgiving despite warnings (Photo: Adobe Stock) America is a country that has been designed to uphold the white male patriarchy. Case in point: John Winthrop, an English Puritan lawyer and a leading figure in colonizing the Massachusetts Bay Colony instituted Thanksgiving Day. But...
    Peace between the English and the Wampanoag fell apart within a generation. Joe Raedle / Getty Images Most children in the US do not learn the real history of Thanksgiving in school. The well-known story of Thanksgiving is an account of how the English pilgrims and Native Americans came together for a celebratory meal in Plymouth, Massachusetts. In reality, peace didn't last between the English settlers and their one-time Wampanoag allies, and the two became embroiled in a devastating war just a generation after the famous feast. Some people view the holiday as a reminder of the systemic racism and oppression Native Americans continue to experience in the US. Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. While celebrations may look different this year in light of the ongoing pandemic, typically Thanksgiving is a time for family, parades, lots of delicious food, and, oftentimes, intense travel snarls. American schoolchildren are usually taught that the tradition dates back to the pilgrims, English religious dissenters who helped to establish the Plymouth Colony in present-day Massachusetts in 1620. As the...
    On Oct. 15 at 11:59 a.m. Hawaii Standard Time, the 2020 Census count came to a close, the result of a Supreme Court ruling that the Trump administration could end counting two weeks before a COVID-adjusted deadline of Oct. 31. The hundreds of thousands of Census Bureau employees who participated in field operations to count the American public seemed to have accomplished a mammoth task, resolving 99.9% of census cases across the United States for which an initial response hadn't been received, according to the bureau.[ READ: How One Native American Band in Minnesota Is Tackling COVID-19 ]But not everyone is celebrating just yet. "We needed that [extra] time, and it was taken from us," says Natalie Landreth, an attorney with the Native American Rights Fund, a nonprofit legal organization that works to defend the rights of Native American tribes, and an enrolled member of the Chickasaw Nation of Oklahoma. The Census Bureau has touted the non-response follow-up (NRFU) rate as evidence of a good census count. As of Oct. 16, on American Indian and Alaska Native lands, that...
    (CNN)As millions of Americans cast their ballots in the most important presidential election in recent history, and as Native communities grapple with the disproportionate toll of a once-in-a-century pandemic, Senate Republicans are focused on one thing: installing a right-wing judge on our nation's highest court. New Mexico Sen. Tom UdallMake no mistake: The Trump administration and Senate Republicans are trying to force a justice onto the court to finish the job they could not finish in Congress. They want to destroy the Affordable Care Act (ACA). We can be sure of it because, right now, Republican state attorneys general are in court trying to do exactly that. Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth WarrenThis Republican power grab is a threat to the health of all communities, but the consequences for Indian Country could be especially dire. If Senate Republicans have their way, Judge Amy Coney Barrett will be seated on the Supreme Court in time to rule on the Republican attempt to tear down the ACA — and with it, the health care of millions of Native Americans.Instead of taking up urgently needed...
    On Sept. 14, 2018, Ashley Johnson-Barr's body was discovered just outside the Inupiat community of Kotzebue, Alaska. For eight days, the smiling 10-year-old's missing person's case had dominated the state's news coverage. Having grown up just 25 minutes from Kotz myself, the news of her murder was devastating. While her killer was caught, justice remains out of reach for so many Indigenous victims of violence. For every Ashley, scores of families are left to wonder if their mother or daughter will ever be found or their killer apprehended. From Wyoming's Wind River Country to members of Canada's First Nations, the crisis of violence against Indigenous women and girls transcends state and national borders. Here in our own country, presidents of both parties have tried and failed to find lasting solutions.[ RELATED: How Native Americans in Minnesota Beat Back COVID-19 ]To his credit, President Donald Trump has remained committed to our cause. The U.S. Department of Justice, for example, recently awarded over $560 million in grants to support public safety, crime victims and youth programs in tribal communities. When Attorney General William...
    (CNN)At least two people were arrested in Santa Fe, New Mexico, Monday after a crowd toppled a monument that Native American community members have long called on to be removed.Demonstrations around the monument -- an obelisk found in the middle of the city's Plaza Park that activists say celebrated the killings of Native Americans -- began Saturday, Santa Fe Mayor Alan Webber said, when protesters chained themselves on the obelisk.A crowd swarmed the plaza Monday while city council members held an emergency meeting, the mayor said, and began tearing down the fence surrounding the monument before destroying the obelisk. One person was arrested for battery on a peace officer and resisting an officer and a second person was arrested for resisting an officer and criminal trespass. These states are ditching Columbus Day to observe Indigenous Peoples Day insteadThe monument's destruction took place as New Mexico celebrated Indigenous People's Day and comes following a summer of racial reckoning and unrest during which protesters have torn down other statues and monuments honoring controversial figures and racist parts of the country's past....
    It seems increasingly likely that a safe and effective novel coronavirus vaccine is coming, even if snags in ongoing trials continue to raise questions about when that might be. But that vaccine may be available last to some of the people who need it most: the roughly one million Native Americans who live in the country’s approximately 500 tribal communities. Native Americans are more than three times more likely to become infected with SARS-CoV-2, the novel coronavirus, than white Americans, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. And in part because they’re more likely to suffer underlying health conditions, they’re also more likely to die of COVID-19 than non-natives. Welcome to Rabbit Hole, where we dive deep on the biggest story. It’s for Beast Inside members only. Join up today.
    It’s that time of the year– a time to celebrate the indelible mark left by the Spanish empire on our cultural identities and the inextricable link between Spain, America, and Christianity: Columbus Day. In the past few decades, the holiday has been sabotaged by leftist movements seeking to turn Christopher Columbus into the sacrificial lamb of European America, calling for statues of the man to be taken down and the second Monday in October to be renamed “Indigenous Peoples’ Day.” While Columbus was the first European with the courage to venture west enough to find this hemisphere– hence becoming a lightning rod for anti-white sentiment– he was no successful conquistador, and his adventure is largely responsible for America (and greater Latin America) being a heavily Christian land. The discovery of the Americas by the Spanish empire, and not the English, also led directly to the formation of what is now modern human rights theory, and it was a Spaniard who applied the budding human rights concepts in Catholic doctrine to Native Americans for the first time. This, as Americans, we should celebrate. It has...
    Navajo Nation Vice President Myron Lizer opened the second night of the Republican National Convention and said that President Trump has repaired the relationship between the Navajo people and the federal government. “Our people have never been invited into the American dream. For years, we’ve fought congressional battles with past congressmen and senators that were part of a broken system that ignored us,” Lizer said. “That is, until President Trump took office.” “Whenever we meet with President Trump,” he said, “he has always made it a priority to repair the relationship with our federal family.” Lizer also highlighted that Trump has helped the Native American community by signing a proclamation recognizing missing and murdered Native Americans, as well as signing the CARES Act, which allocated $8 billion to tribal governments amid the coronavirus. Lizer’s speech comes after Navajo Nation President Jonathan Nez spoke at the Democratic National Convention last week, but Nez also warned Democrats that they don’t have the Native American vote locked down. "Let's not take the Native American vote for granted. I think...
    71 arrested in Breonna Taylor protests in Louisville A regional supermarket chain just filed for bankruptcy despite surging grocery sales Transfer VHS Tapes, Film, and Photos to Digital Ad Microsoft Motley Fool Issues Rare “All In” Buy Alert Ad Microsoft 20+ Gadgets We Bet You Haven't Seen Yet Ad Microsoft Full screen 1/52 SLIDES © Canva States with the most people below the poverty line Poverty is one...
    Myron Lizer, vice president of the Navajo Nation, said on Tuesday at the Republican National Committee’s 2020 convention that, until President Donald Trump was elected, Native Americans were ignored by Washington. “Many of our ancestral leaders sought to govern and lead a nation within a nation,” Lizer said. “They sought to lead their people into the promises of a better way of life for their children’s children.” “It is also where they have not been as successful as the rest of America,” Lizer said. “Our first nation’s people — the host people of the land — we are still here. Our creator placed us here and he knew that for such a time as this we would have the opportunity for an appeal to heaven.” “You see our people have never been invited into the America Dream,” Lizer said. “We for years fought past battles with congressmen and senators that were part of a broken system that ignored us. That is until President Trump took office.” Lizer went on to list the things that Trump has done for the Native...
    (CNN)As the US continues to grapple with the dual crises of coronavirus and racism, two things have become clear: People of color are being hit hardest by the virus, and systemic inequities are largely to blame.Eight months into the pandemic, race and ethnicity data on Covid-19 now paint a more complete picture than before. The numbers are stark, confirming what experts and minority communities have long suspected.Black, Latino and Native American people are nearly three times as likely to be infected with Covid-19 than their White counterparts. Those three groups are about five times as likely to be hospitalized. And people of color across the board are more likely to die of the virus. The statistics are no coincidence: Public health officials have long known that systemic racism is a public health issue. But the coronavirus pandemic, set against a national reckoning on race since the killing of George Floyd, has amplified the problem."What Covid-19 does is actually shine a light on a problem that was already there," said Dr. Lisa Cooper, director of the Johns Hopkins Center for Health...
    Native Americans make up a larger percentage of novel coronavirus cases than compared to their share of the US population, a new report finds. American Indians and Alaska Natives account for 0.7 percent of the population but at 1.3 percent of all COVID-19 cases, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) revealed on Wednesday.  What's more, indigenous people are 3.5 times more likely to contact the virus than Caucasian Americans.  Infections tended to be more common among those aged 18 and younger and not in those above age 65 as seen in the white population. Pictured: Navajo Nation President Jonathan Nez has his temperature checked while helping to distribute food, water, and other supplies to Navajo families in Huerfano, New Mexico, May 27 A higher percentage of indigenous people under age 18 were infected at 12.9% compared to 4.3% among whites. Pictured: A sign warning non-residents to stay out of the Navajo Nation town of Tuba City during the 57-hour curfew in Arizona, May 24 Recent studies have found that Native Americans and Alaska Natives are among the groups...
    Hardline Oklahoma prosecutors have received bad news about their capacity to force people who use drugs into “therapeutic” courts. That is one of the many implications of the far-reaching July 9 Supreme Court decision in McGirt v. Oklahoma. The case involved a Native American man challenging his child rape conviction on jurisdictional grounds—arguing that the portion of rural Wagoner County where his crime was committed actually fell within the geographic bounds of the Creek Reservation (pictured above). Hence, it was unlawful for state prosecutors to prosecute him. Siding with the court’s liberal wing, Justice Gorsuch wrote the 5-4 opinion that validated the argument, based on the 1833 Treaty with the Creeks. Refusing to punt the decision because of the traumatizing facts of McGirt’s conviction, Gorsuch wrote that “On the far end of the Trail of Tears was a promise. Forced to leave their ancestral lands in Georgia and Alabama, the Creek Nation received assurances that their new lands in the West would be secure forever.” Chief Justice John Roberts expressed great dismay in his dissent, on the basis that the ruling will invalidate countless...
    George Dvorsky4 minutes ago•Filed to:AnthropologyAnthropologyNative americanspolynesianshuman migrationspolynesiascienceSaveSunrise at the Tongariki site on Easter Island.Image: Andres Moreno-Estrada Indigenous South Americans reached islands in the South Pacific some 300 years before Christopher Columbus landed in the Americas, according to new genetic evidence. New genetic research published today in Nature links indigenous South Americans to Polynesian Islanders. Incredibly, it seems a group from what is today Colombia voyaged to the South Pacific around 1200 ACE, reaching islands thousands of miles away. Once there, they mingled with the local Polynesian population, leaving their genetic and possibly cultural legacy behind, according to the new research, co-authored by Stanford University biologist Alexander Ioannidis. Archaeologists and anthropologists have been wondering about this potential link for decades, but evidence has been limited, inconclusive, and speculative. While sailing through Polynesia during the 18th century, for example, Captain Cook documented the presence of sweet potatoes on South Pacific islands—a weird finding, given this root vegetable’s origins in South America. Scientists took this as evidence of indigenous South Americans traveling to the Pacific Islands or Polynesians traveling to South...
    Native Americans from modern-day Colombia reached Polynesia around 1200 AD on a Kon-Tiki-like voyage, colonising the area before Europeans reached Easter Island. Researchers from the US and Mexico used large-scale genetic analyses to show that modern-day Polynesian populations contain traces of Native American DNA. Statistical analysis revealed that prehistoric Polynesian populations first met and interbred with people from what is today Colombia around the year 1,150 AD. This event — which took place on the island of South Marquesas — occurred at  roughly the same time Polynesians first arrived in the area from the west. The finding finally confirms a long-running theory that the two groups had met — and explains why sweet potatoes from the Americas can be found in Polynesia. Native Americans from modern-day Colombia reached Polynesia around 1200 AD on a Kon-Tiki-like voyage, colonising the area before Europeans reached Easter Island, geneticists found. Pictured, an illustration showing the diverse genetic routes of modern Polynesians Researchers from the US and Mexico used large-scale genetic analyses to show that modern-day Polynesian populations contain traces of Native American...
    The Washington Post wants Native Americans to hate the name "Washington Redskins" so badly that that it is willing to mock its own study that proved otherwise. On the radio program Tuesday, Pat Gray and Stu Burguiere (filling in for Glenn Beck) discussed the "woke insanity" of the WaPo's most recent poll, which, like its 2016 counterpart, found that the vast majority of Native Americans are not offended by the NFL team's name. Watch the video below for all the details: Want more from Glenn Beck?To enjoy more of Glenn's masterful storytelling, thought-provoking analysis and uncanny ability to make sense of the chaos, subscribe to BlazeTV — the largest multi-platform network of voices who love America, defend the Constitution and live the American dream.
    President Trump said Monday that he didn't support renaming the Washington Redskins nor the Cleveland Indians.  'They name teams out of STRENGTH, not weakness, but now the Washington Redskins & Cleveland Indians, two fabled sports franchises, look like they are going to be changing their names in order to be politically correct,' Trump tweeted.  He then added that 'Indians, like Elizabeth Warren, must be very angry right now!'   President Trump said Monday that he was against the renaming of the Washington Redskins and the Cleveland Indians  President Trump dashed off this tweets shortly after a reporter had asked White House press secretary Kayleigh McEnany his view on teams' decision to conduct a review into the names  In reality, Native American groups have been pressuring the teams - especially the NFL team in Wasington - to change their names for years.  On Friday, the D.C. team announced that the name was now under review, with sources familiar with the discussions among owner Dan Snyder, NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell and NFL officials telling The Washington Post that the result is...
    President Donald Trump’s plans to kick off Independence Day with a showy display at Mount Rushmore are drawing sharp criticism from Native Americans who view the monument as a desecration of land violently stolen from them and used to pay homage to leaders hostile to native people. Several groups led by Native American activists are planning protests for Trump’s July 3 visit, part of Trumps “comeback” campaign for a nation reeling from sickness, unemployment and, recently, social unrest. The event is slated to include fighter jets thundering over the 79-year-old stone monument in South Dakotas Black Hills and the first fireworks display at the site since 2009. But it comes amid a national reckoning over racism and a reconsideration of the symbolism of monuments around the globe. Many Native Americans activists say the Rushmore memorial is as reprehensible as the many Confederate monuments being toppled around the nation. “Mount Rushmore is a symbol of white supremacy, of structural racism that’s still alive and well in society today,” said Nick Tilsen, a member of the Oglala Lakota tribe and the president...
    The official Twitter page for the Democratic National Committee has quickly taken down a tweet that suggested President Donald Trump's rally at Mt. Rushmore would be 'glorifying white supremacy.' In the since deleted Tuesday morning tweet, the DNC took Trump to task for the series of grievances he has enacted against indigenous communities in the United States.  'Trump has disrespected Native communities time and again. He’s attempted to limit their voting rights and blocked critical pandemic relief,' they said in the tweet. In the since deleted Tuesday morning tweet, the DNC took Trump to task for the series of grievances he has enacted against indigenous communities in the United States They then turned their attention to Trump's July 3rd visit to Mt. Rushmore in Sioux Falls, South Dakota, where he will host a massive rally that will include a firework display. Many Native American activist and protesters are planning on taking to the controversial monument to protest it and the president's visit. The DNC added in the tweet: 'Now he’s holding a rally glorifying white supremacy at Mount Rushmore —...
    An enumerator taking the 1990 census on horseback in New MexicoUS Census Bureau For indispensable reporting on the coronavirus crisis and more, subscribe to Mother Jones' newsletters.You don’t have to look far to see the devastating economic impact a community can face after the US Census screws up its population count. When the Treasury Department started doling out the funds from its mammoth CARES Act in March and April, it set aside $8 billion for Native American tribal governments, who were hurting from the closures of casinos and the general economic downturn that resulted from the indefinite suspension of life as we knew it. Of that $8 billion, $4.8 billion was to be divided among the nation’s 574 federally recognized tribes based on their populations. (Never mind that the rest, as my colleague Delilah Friedler reports, could go to corporations.) In April, tribes, upon the Treasury’s request, submitted the populations of their enrolled tribal citizens. But the Treasury allocated funds not by tribal citizenship, but by data from the US Census Bureau, which estimates that it undercounted Native Americans living on reservations...
    DENVER (CBS4) – Following the removal of multiple controversial statues in Denver, the American Indian Movement, Colorado (AIM) held a victory rally at the foot of the pioneer monument where Kit Carson statue once stood. The celebration on Friday was about letting the community know there are more wrongs to right. (credit: CBS) The group claimed it asked the city to be involved in the removal of the statue but were never contacted. “When the city decided to take the statue down we were not consulted as indigenous people,” said Sky Roosevelt-Morris with the AIM leadership council. Morris, a member of the White Mountain Apache and Shawnee Nations, has been a prominent voice behind the call to remove symbols of racism from around the state. (credit: CBS) “You don’t get to take down these racist symbols without us because we were the ones that brought this issue to light, and we should be present when these symbols are taken down because he was a murderer,” she said. There were just over 20 people who stood in the rain Friday. The...
    Native American groups are planning to protest against President Donald Trump's visit to Mount Rushmore at the start of the Independence Day weekend. Activists have long taken issue with the South Dakota monument to former US presidents, which was built on land sacred to the Sioux tribe. Mr Trump will bring fighter jets and fireworks to Mount Rushmore on 3 July as his campaigning tour continues. The controversial trip comes amid heightened racial tensions nationwide. Mount Rushmore features the 60ft (18.2m) high faces of four US presidents: George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, Theodore Roosevelt and Abraham Lincoln. The monument was carved into the granite rock face between 1927 and 1941. But the land the memorial lies on - the Black Hills of South Dakota - was taken from the indigenous Lakota Sioux by the US government in 1800s. Its sculptor was reportedly a white supremacist with ties to the Ku Klux Klan. Should Washington and Jefferson monuments come down? Mount Rushmore at 75: How did it come to be? The family out-sculpting Mount Rushmore Some Native American activists say...
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