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    GOP Rep. Rodney DavisRodney Lee DavisOne congressional committee is rejecting partisanship to protect state votes Capitol Police dominate lawmakers in Congressional Football Game Illinois Democrats propose new 'maximized' congressional map MORE (Ill.) Tuesday announced he’s running for reelection to the House, taking himself out of contention in the Illinois gubernatorial race after it was rumored he was mulling a challenge to Gov. J. B. Pritzker (D).  Davis said in a statement that he will run in the newly created 15th Congressional District, which was drawn in the latest redistricting process and includes his hometown of Taylorville and much of his current congressional district.  “My family and I are excited to announce that I am running for re-election to Congress,” said Davis. “I’ve been proud to fight hard for and work on behalf of central Illinois families in this district for many years, both as a member of Congress and as a staffer to my good friend and mentor, former Congressman John ShimkusJohn Mondy ShimkusGOP ekes out win in return of Congressional Baseball Game Ex-Sen. Cory Gardner joins lobbying firm Lobbying...
    Sen. Ron JohnsonRonald (Ron) Harold JohnsonTucker Carlson gets Rittenhouse interview for Monday night NASCAR driver Bubba Wallace says Rittenhouse would have gotten life if he were Black Conservatives praise Rittenhouse jury verdict MORE (R-Wis.) claimed that Democrats can only get funding for “their giveaway programs,” apparently including provisions in their roughly $2 trillion social spending and climate bill, from the middle class. “The only place Democrats can get the money to fund all of their giveaway programs is from the middle class, because that's where the money is,” Johnson said Sunday in an interview with John Catsimatidis on WABC 770 AM. Johnson claimed that even if taxes on corporations were raised, the middle class would ultimately end up shouldering the costs. “They don't really bear the brunt of the tax increase," he said, referring to corporations. "They just pass it along to consumers and to their employees in lower wages and benefits. So yeah, it's the middle class that always pays." Johnson’s comments come after House Democrats passed their massive social spending and climate bill, known as the Build Back Better Act, on...
              moreby Casey Harper   Congressional Democrats passed a $1.75 trillion social spending plan Friday, putting the bill’s fate in the hands of a deeply divided Senate. The bill funds universal pre-kindergarten, climate change spending, Obamacare subsidies, an extension of the monthly child tax credit payment and more wide ranging spending items. House Republican Leader Kevin McCarthy spoke more than eight hours on the House floor overnight to delay the vote until Friday morning, but afterward it passed 220-213 along party lines with one Democrat opposed. “We are very excited for what it does for the children, for the families,” House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., said in a press conference after the bill’s passage. The vote comes after the the Congressional Budget Office published an official cost estimate Thursday for President Joe Biden’s “Build Back Better” plan and reported that the spending will increase the federal budget deficit, contrary to the administration’s previous claims. “CBO estimates that enacting this legislation would result in a net increase in the deficit totaling $367 billion over the 2022-2031 period, not counting any additional revenue...
              moreby J.D. Davidson   Business organizations and health care groups criticized the Ohio House after the passage of a bill that prohibits schools and public and private businesses from requiring students, employees or customers to receive any vaccination, including COVID-19, that has not been fully approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. The House’s action Thursday came little more than two weeks after House Speaker Bob Cupp, R-Lima, twice pulled a similar bill from the House floor and shutdown a committee hearing planned for another bill that would prohibit vaccination mandates. Cupp said at the time the House was moving on to other legislative matters. Instead, the House passed House Bill 218, which was introduced in March as a bill to extend curfews for bars and restaurants but had that language removed after a committee hearing Wednesday and replaced with language that adds a personal conscience exemption to vaccination mandates in the state. The bill now heads to the Senate. “The legislation approved today by the Ohio House is balanced and responsible,” Cupp said. “It protects the rights of...
    WESTBURY, N.Y. (CBSNewYork) — The U.S. House of Representatives took a major step toward repealing the SALT cap Friday when it passed the Build Back Better bill. The House voted to dramatically increase the cap, which limits the deductibility of state and local taxes, CBS2’s Carolyn Gusoff reported. READ MORE: Celebrities Flock To Harlem For Soul Train Awards At Apollo Theater“Wow, that’s fantastic. That’s really great,” said homeowner Carolyn Coleman, elated to hear about the deal. “No SALT, no deal” was the mantra of Rep. Tom Suozzi, who represents parts of Long Island and Queens. Suozzi led a coalition to reverse the 2017 tax cap on the deductibility of state and local taxes. “It’s basic fairness. You shouldn’t be taxed on taxes you’ve already paid,” Suozzi said. Suozzi hailed the vote as a “big victory” after years of salt in the wounds of high-taxed New Yorkers, essentially double-taxed, not allowed to deduct more than $10,000. The House raised the SALT deduction from $10,000 to $80,000. “Of course it makes a difference, absolutely. It’s about time they repealed it,” said David...
    U.S. Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) speaks during a news conference following the passage of the Build Back Better Act, in the U.S. Capitol, in Washington, November 19, 2021.Al Drago | Reuters The House of Representatives passed legislation Friday that would curb how wealthy Americans use retirement plans. The new rules are part of a broad restructuring of the tax code tied to the $1.75 trillion Build Back Better Act, which would represent the largest expansion of the social safety net in decades and the largest effort in U.S. history to fight climate change. House Democrats passed the bill along party lines, 220-213. It now heads to the Senate. More from Personal Finance:Billionaires like Peter Thiel may be spared big IRA tax bill in latest Build Back Better plan52% of workers feel they're behind on retirement savingsRetirees are 'unretiring' — and that's good for the labor market Wealthy individuals with more than $10 million in retirement savings would have to draw down their accounts each year, in a new type of required minimum distribution, or RMD. Lawmakers would...
    A medical research bill named for a congressman’s late wife unanimously passed through the House Energy and Commerce Committee, paving the way for a full House vote. Rep. Andy Barr introduced the Cardiovascular Advances in Research and Opportunities Legacy Act earlier this year to honor his late wife, Eleanor “Carol” Leavell Barr, who unexpectedly died in June 2020. The Fayette County Coroner's Office later attributed her death to an underlying heart condition known as mitral valve prolapse. The CAROL Act would create a grant program administered by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute to conduct research on valvular heart disease and recommend best practices for treating the condition. The bill would also direct the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to increase public awareness of symptoms that are cause for concern. In a February release about the bill, Barr’s office said many people may be unaware they have the typically benign condition, leaving some unprepared in the event of adverse effects. GOSAR CENSURED AND REMOVED FROM COMMITTEES OVER ANIME AOC VIDEO IN MOSTLY PARTY-LINE VOTE ...
    (CNN)Don't look now, but House Democrats may be inching closer to actually passing the Build Back Better plan this week. As they approach the end of the week and the much-anticipated Congressional Budget Committee analysis, Democratic members and aides remain confident that things are -- mostly -- on track to pass the Build Back Better plan before the House recesses for Thanksgiving. What to watch on WednesdayAny updates in the schedule. The House was supposed to begin debate on the Build Back Better bill Wednesday, but it appears that won't happen. Aides say that's largely because the resolution to censure Rep. Paul Gosar, Republican of Arizona, and strip him of his committee assignments is going to take center stage, but be on the lookout for how that affects the calendar. Majority Leader Steny Hoyer, a Maryland Democrat, said a vote could come as early as Thursday, but if debate doesn't kick-start until Thursday, that could push a vote to Friday or yes, even the weekend. A reminder not to count chickens before they hatchRead MoreYes, things seem to be moving...
    HARRISBURG, Pa. (AP) — A bill to allow people to carry concealed weapons without a permit was passed by a divided Pennsylvania House on Tuesday, but faces a veto threat from the governor. The parties were split in the vote, as occurred in the state Senate last week, with Republicans mostly supporting it and Democrats mostly opposed. READ MORE: Backpacks Banned From Sto-Rox High School After Student Killed In McKees Rocks ShootingSupporters said getting concealed carry permits under current law can be subject to the whims of county sheriffs and that concealed carry permit holders can forget when their licenses expire and therefore unknowingly violate the law. Opponents pointed out the proposal is unlikely to be enacted, as Democratic Gov. Tom Wolf’s office said he will veto the legislation, and argued the bill would make people less safe by making guns more readily accessible. READ MORE: Pittsburgh Penguins In 'Active' Negotiations To Be Acquired By Fenway Sports GroupPennsylvanians are generally allowed to openly carry loaded firearms, although current law is silent on it. Only in Philadelphia is a permit required...
    The Idaho state House passed a bill to provide compensation to workers if they get sick from an employer-mandated vaccine. The bill was passed in a 67-3 vote with Democrats and Republicans supporting the bill, The Associated Press reported. Those against the bill said workers are already compensated if they get ill with a vaccine. The bill comes as COVID-19 vaccine mandates have become more popular around the country with governments and private businesses.  The Idaho Senate and House both declared opposition to President BidenJoe BidenBiden restates commitment to 'one China' policy on Taiwan in call with Xi Biden raises human rights with China's Xi during four hour meeting Biden, Xi hold 'candid' discussion amid high tensions MORE’s vaccine mandate for employers with more than 100 employees on Tuesday in a voice vote. The bill was one of seven related to the coronavirus pandemic that were passed on Tuesday, according to the AP. In a 46-24 vote, a bill banning businesses from questioning the religious sincerity of someone asking for a religious exemption for vaccinations was passed.  A 42-28 vote...
    The House passed legislation on Monday that would expand access for veterans, their spouses and caregivers to receive vaccines for both the flu and COVID-19 through the Department of Veterans Affairs. The bill, passed by voice vote, would build upon a law enacted earlier this year that gave the VA authority to administer coronavirus vaccines to all veterans, as well as their spouses and caregivers. That marked a significant expansion from prior rules that limited the VA to administering vaccines to veterans enrolled in its health care system or family caregivers registered in its assistance program. Under the proposal approved on Monday, the VA could provide seasonal flu vaccines alongside the COVID-19 shots through April 29 of next year. "Public health officials are clear: It is completely safe to receive both inoculations even at the same time," said House Veterans Affairs Committee Chairman Mark TakanoMark Allan TakanoVA secretary pledges to house hundreds of homeless veterans in LA by end of year The Hill's 12:30 Report - Presented by Altria - Biden holds meetings to resurrect his spending plan Overnight Defense & National...
    US President Joe Biden delivers remarks on the passage of the Bipartisan Infrastructure Deal and the rule that will allow the passage of the Build Back Better Act in the State Dining Room at the White House in Washington, DC on November 6, 2021.Roberto Schmidt | AFP | Getty Images While many Democrats let out a sigh of relief when the House passed a bipartisan infrastructure bill on Friday, the party has a grueling few weeks ahead of it to enact the rest of its economic agenda. The more than $1 trillion package that would refresh transportation, broadband and utilities fulfills one part of President Joe Biden's domestic vision. Democrats now have to clear multiple hurdles to enact the larger piece, a $1.75 trillion investment in the social safety net and climate policy. Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer has said Democrats aim to pass the social spending bill by Thanksgiving. Meeting the deadline will require both chambers of Congress to rush while keeping nearly every member of a diverse Democratic caucus united — a challenge that has led to repeated...
    In this article PAVEU.S. President Joe Biden delivers remarks on infrastructure investments at the International Union of Operating Engineers Local 324 training facility in Howell, Michigan, October 5, 2021.Jonathan Ernst | ReutersStocks tied to infrastructure moved higher on Monday morning after the House of Representatives passed a $1 trillion bill over the weekend, giving President Joe Biden one of his signature achievements and rewarding investors who bet on his plan. The strength for those infrastructure stocks showed up in the Global X US Infrastructure Investment ETF, which trades under ticker PAVE, as it gained 1.5% and hit an all-time high in the opening minutes of the session. The fund's top holdings include stocks like Nucor and Vulcan Materials, which moved solidly higher on Monday morning.Loading chart... The need for significant infrastructure spending has for years been a talking point in Washington, but efforts had largely fallen flat before last week. "Investors have waited for a significant step-up in infrastructure spending for decades, and from Obama's 'shovel-ready projects' to Trump's 'infrastructure week' they have largely been disappointed. Accordingly, we view...
                      by Fred Lucas  The House passed a $1.2 trillion infrastructure spending bill late Friday night, advancing legislation held for ransom for months by Democrats’ left flank to ensure passage of a much more expensive social spending package. The House vote completed about 11:30 p.m. was 228-206, with 13 Republicans joining all but six Democrats in support of the infrastructure spending plan and sending President Joe Biden a much-needed victory for his signature. Six of the House’s most liberal Democrats voted against the measure, CNN reported: Reps. Jamaal Bowman of New York, Cori Bush of Missouri, Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez of New York, Ilhan Omar of Minnesota, Ayanna Pressley of Massachusetts, and Rashida Tlaib of Michigan. Democrats have 221 seats in the House, Republicans hold 213. One seat is vacant. The infrastructure bill, long touted as bipartisan because Senate Republicans helped craft it, includes billions for improving mass transportation, expanding broadband internet access, and increasing green energy subsidies. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and other Democrat leaders also pledged to pass a $1.75 trillion social spending bill...
    White House senior adviser Cedric RichmondCedric RichmondSunday shows preview: House passes bipartisan infrastructure bill; Democrats suffer election loss in Virginia Black Caucus pushes for priorities in final deal White House to host lawmakers as negotiations over agenda hit critical stage MORE touted the Democrats’ social spending package on Sunday after the House passed the $1.2 trillion infrastructure bill two days earlier, signaling that the administration is now focusing its attention on the larger package, which lawmakers have vowed to pass later this month. “We need to get it done,” Richmond told guest host Bill Hemmer on “Fox News Sunday” of the $1.75 trillion social spending package, which includes funding to expand social programs and address climate change. “We need to get it done now because if you look at the 17 Nobel Prize-winning economists, they said that it will ease inflationary pressures, help with the supply chain and invest in the human capital in this country all at one time,” Richmond added. Richmond said the White House is “optimistic we’re going to get it done.” His remarks came in response...
    The passage of a roughly $1.2 trillion bipartisan infrastructure bill in the House after weeks of infighting among lawmakers, and Democrats' loss in Virginia’s gubernatorial election are expected to dominate this week’s Sunday show circuit. Late Friday, moderate Democrats scored a win after the House voted 228-206 to move a $1.2 trillion bipartisan infrastructure bill to President BidenJoe BidenHouse passes trillion infrastructure bill, advances social spending plan Virginia Democrats concede loss of state House Liberals, moderates strike deal on Biden agenda, clearing way for votes MORE’s desk.  In a deal between the Congressional Black Caucus, Congressional Progressive Caucus and moderate Blue Dog Democrats, the three agreed to pass the infrastructure legislation while a procedural rule would be passed teeing up a vote on the Democrats’ social spending bill for the future. The agreement between the three also established that if the $1.75 trillion social spending bill filled with Democratic priorities received a Congressional Budget Office (CBO) score that aligned with that of estimates from the White House, moderates would vote for the bill. But the successful passage of the $1.2...
    By: KDKA-TV News Staff WASHINGTON D.C. (KDKA) — After months of legislative gridlock, a $1.2 trillion infrastructure bill is expected to be signed into law by President Joe Biden. READ MORE: West Virginia Man Gets Life Sentence For Killing Girlfriend’s DaughterThe House of Representatives passed the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act late on Friday night, with six Democrats voting against and 13 Republicans voting for the proposed bill, according to CBS News. “The United States House of Representatives passed the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act, a once-in-generation bipartisan infrastructure bill that will create millions of jobs, turn the climate crisis into an opportunity, and put us on a path to win the economic competition for the 21st Century,” Biden said. However, several Pennsylvania Republican representatives are not pleased with the bill’s passage. U.S. Representative Glenn Thompson and Guy Reschenthaler, representing Pennsylvania’s 15th and 14th Districts, voted against the bill and criticized House Speaker Nancy Pelosi. “There was an opportunity to come together and draft a bipartisan, bicameral bill to address America’s aging infrastructure. Rather, House Democrats...
    Sunrise hits the U.S. Capitol dome on September 30, 2021 in Washington, DC. Congress is facing a partial federal government shutdown at midnight if the House and Senate can not pass an extension of the current budget.Chip Somodevilla | Getty Images News | Getty Images The House passed a more than $1 trillion bipartisan infrastructure bill on Friday, sending it to President Joe Biden's desk in a critical step toward enacting sprawling Democratic economic plans. The Senate approved the revamp of transportation, utilities and broadband in August. The legislation's passage is perhaps the unified Democratic government's most concrete achievement since it approved a $1.9 trillion coronavirus relief package in the spring. The measure passed in a 228-206 vote. Thirteen Republicans supported it, while six Democrats voted against it. Biden could sign the bill within days. Washington has tried and failed for years to pass a major bill to upgrade critical transportation and utility infrastructure, which has come under more pressure from extreme weather. The White House has also contended passage of the bill can help to get goods moving as...
    House Democrats late Friday night clinched a long-sought victory on President BidenJoe BidenHouse sets up Friday votes for Biden agenda House leaders make last-minute change on drug pricing after dispute Aide who traveled with Biden to Europe tests positive for COVID-19: reports MORE’s domestic agenda, passing a $1.2 trillion bipartisan infrastructure bill — while preparing to advance an even larger social spending package — after months of stubborn infighting that’s bedeviled the party and helped deflate Biden’s public standing. The vote came after progressives caved on a key demand they’d maintained for months: their insistence that the climate and social spending package be passed on the same day as the more popular infrastructure proposal.  On Friday they shed that stipulation, threw their weight behind the public works bill — which had already passed the Senate — and helped send it along to Biden’s desk. A procedural vote on the social spending bill was scheduled for late Friday instead. The tally on the infrastructure bill was 228-206, with 13 Republicans crossing the aisle to support the measure, and six Democrats bucking Biden and party leaders...
    The House passed legislation on Thursday that would prohibit employers from discriminating against job applicants because of their age.Lawmakers passed the bill 224-200, with seven Republicans joining with all Democrats in support.The legislation would specifically expand the 1967 law prohibiting age discrimination in the workplace to allow older job applicants to bring claims of disparate impact discrimination against employers. Proponents of the measure argued that the need to clarify the existing law became particularly apparent during the COVID-19 pandemic as job applicants age 50 or older who were laid off from their jobs reported difficulties finding new employment, such as encountering an online job application with a drop-down menu that didn't list their birth year as an option."This bill will help people trying  to recover from this pandemic, including people who lost their job in the middle of their career who now fear they will never work again because of discriminatory hiring practices," said Rep. Sylvia GarciaSylvia GarciaDemocrats want to bolster working women, but face tortuous choices The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Alibaba - Gears begin to shift...
    The House on Tuesday approved two bills to strengthen the cybersecurity of small businesses, which have faced escalating threats during the COVID-19 pandemic.  The Small Business Administration (SBA) Cyber Awareness Act would require the SBA to issue a report on its cybersecurity capabilities and notify Congress in the event of a cybersecurity breach potentially compromising sensitive information. The legislation, sponsored by Reps. Jason CrowJason CrowThe United States must lead the way on artificial intelligence standards Colorado remap plan creates new competitive district Overnight Defense & National Security — Presented by AM General — Afghan evacuation still frustrates MORE (D-Colo.) and Young KimYoung KimLawmakers say innovation, trade rules key to small business gains GOP lawmakers pull support of candidate following comments about Chinese immigrants Sunday shows preview: Biden administration grapples with border surge; US mourns Atlanta shooting victims MORE (R-Calif.), was previously approved by the House in 2019 but failed to be signed into law during the last Congress. It was unanimously passed Tuesday by a vote of 423-0.  In advocating passage of the bill, Crow on Tuesday pointed to an...
                        Ohio is one step closer to passing what is colloquially known as Constitutional Carry, the right for the state’s residents to carry concealed firearms without a permit. HB 227 passed through the House Oversight Committee late last week, and is headed to a full vote on the Republican-dominated House floor. Co-sponsored by State Reps. Tom Brinker (R-Cincinnati) and Kris Jordan (R-Ostrander) the bill’s summary says it would “allow a person age 21 or older to carry a concealed deadly weapon without a license.” The bill does not ban licensure, but rather makes it optional. Such licensure would allow licensees reciprocity with other concealed carry states that do require licensure. It also eliminates the term “handgun license,” and changes it to “weapons license,” a move that would make it legal to “carry concealed all deadly weapons not otherwise prohibited by law.” HB 227 also removes the requirement of disclosing that a concealed weapons carrier is in possession of a concealed weapon if stopped by police for law enforcement purposes....
    Iowa state lawmakers on Thursday passed a bill that will allow state residents to qualify for unemployment benefits if they lose their job as a result of refusing to get vaccinated against the coronavirus. Under the bill, which was opposed by businesses and opponents of vaccine mandates, people who claim medical and religious exemptions from vaccine mandates and are fired as a result will be protected under state law. "I believe we have found a meaningful solution to protect Iowans and Iowa businesses from the Biden administration's extreme government overreach," Iowa House Speaker Pat Grassley (R) said in a statement after the bill passed the House, according to the Des Moines Register. The House approved the bill in a 68-27 vote on Thursday. It previously passed in the Senate in a 45-4 vote. Iowa Gov. Kim Reynolds (R) is expected to sign the legislation. Some lawmakers and those who oppose vaccine mandates argued that the bill did not go far enough to protect Iowans. State Rep. Jon Jacobsen (R) reported said that the bill marked an "incremental" improvement for state residents, but did not...
    CHICAGO (CBS/AP) — Illinois state lawmakers have approved legislation to repeal a 1995 law requiring parents or guardians to be notified when their child seeks an abortion, sending the measure to Gov. JB Pritzker, who has expressed his support. By a 62-51 vote late Wednesday night, the House approved legislation that would repeal a requirement that a parent or guardian be notified at least 48 hours in advance when a minor 17 or younger seeks an abortion. The Illinois Senate approved the legislation on Tuesday. The next step is to send the proposal to Pritzker, who has said he’s in favor of repealing the 1995 Parental Notification Act. READ MORE: CBS 2 Investigation Leads To Thousands Of Tossed Tickets: "Evidence Was Clear"The push to repeal the parental consent requirement has lately had a sudden sense of urgency among proponents. A new Texas law prohibits most abortions after a cardiac activity is detected — at about six weeks. And the U.S. Supreme Court will hear in December a challenge to a Mississippi law that bans most abortions after 15 weeks. “There...
    A controversial measure to change the Illinois Health Care Right of Conscience Act that would allow for health-related discrimination including the legal termination of workers who do not follow COVID-19 vaccine, mask or other health-related mandates heads to the House floor. House Sponsor Robyn Gabel said the proposed amendment doesn’t change the law, but clarifies it, “to protect all the people in this state.” The 1998 Health Right of Conscience Act bans discrimination against a person who declines to receive or participate in any form of health care services contrary to his or her conscience. Ashley Wright with the state Attorney General’s Office told a House committee that without the measure, there will be more lawsuits using the act as a defense against complying with Gov J.B. Pritzker's work-related COVID-19 mandates, and warns of negative health consequences. Wright noted recent temporary restraining orders issued by courts against firing employees in Kankakee County and Adams County  who declined to receive the vaccine. “Not passing this bill ultimately means that the state cannot keep people safe, and we’re talking about congregate...
    The House passed legislation on Friday that would expand workplace protections for nursing mothers to ensure they have accommodations to pump breast milk while at work. Lawmakers passed the bill on a bipartisan basis, 276-149, with 59 Republicans joining all Democrats in support. The measure builds upon a provision in the 2010 health care law that requires employers to allow “reasonable break time” and to provide private space other than a bathroom for nursing employees to pump breast milk. The 2010 law requiring nursing accommodations does not apply to workers who are exempt from overtime pay requirements under the Fair Labor Standards Act. However, some employers have been subject to providing accommodations for such employees if it was required by state laws.  House Oversight and Reform Committee Chairwoman Carolyn MaloneyCarolyn MaloneyHouse Oversight Democrats ask NFL for information from investigation into Washington Football Team New York City helicopter complaints skyrocket Trump company in late-stage talks to sell DC hotel: report MORE (D-N.Y.), the chief author of the legislation, said it would offer protections for as many as nine million more people...
    The House passed a bill Friday to expand federal requirements that employers provide break time and accommodations for nursing mothers to pump breast milk in a private, non-bathroom space. Dubbed the PUMP for Working Mothers Act , the bipartisan legislation led by Democratic Rep. Carolyn Maloney of New York and Republican Rep. Jaime Herrera Beutler of Washington would close a “loophole” or “coverage gap” under the 2010 Break Time for Nursing Mothers Act, which first mandated that workplaces provide nursing and pumping accommodations. Companion legislation has been introduced in the Senate by Republican Sen. Lisa Murkowski and Oregon Sen. Jeff Merkley. An estimated 9 million childbearing-age women are not currently covered under the current legislation, though, particularly those who are salaried workers and not entitled to overtime pay. "Without these protections, nursing mothers face serious health consequences, including the risk of serious illness and the inability to continue to breastfeed," Maloney said. "These basic protections would ensure that working moms who want to breastfeed can continue to do so and prevent nursing mothers from being singled out,...
    Share this: The House of Representatives on Wednesday passed a bill, sponsored by U.S. Rep. Carolyn Maloney (D-Greenpoint-Long Island City-Astoria-East Side Manhattan), to designate the Greenpoint Post Office as the “Joseph R. Lentol Post Office” after the well-known former Assemblymember. Lentol, a Democrat like most Brooklyn elected officials, represented the 50th Assembly District, comprised of Greenpoint, Williamsburg, Fort Greene and parts of Clinton Hill, for 48 years until he was defeated in the 2020 primary by Emily Gallagher. He currently  serves on the board of the New York State Public Defenders Association. Lentol comes from a political family — his father was State Senator and State Supreme Court Justice Edward S. Lentol. His grandfather also served in the Assembly. Before he was elected, Joe Lentol served as an assistant district attorney in Kings County. In 2001, he was elected as head of the Brooklyn Assembly Delegation.
    CHARLESTON, W.Va. (AP) — A bill to limit West Virginia employers in their ability to require workers to be vaccinated against the coronavirus passed the House of Delegates on Friday. The proposal, which would allow certain medical and religious exemptions to company COVID-19 vaccine mandates, passed the Republican-led chamber 68-30 with two delegates absent. It remains pending in the Senate. READ MORE: Boil Water Advisory Lifted For Borough Of MonacaThe bill covers businesses and state government agencies. Employers would be barred from penalizing or discriminating against current or prospective employees for pursuing the exemptions. Gov. Jim Justice added the bill to the Legislature’s special session this week. Justice, a Republican, lifted an earlier indoor mask mandate in June. While he has been adamant that residents get their COVID-19 shots in a state whose population has the lowest vaccination rate in the country, he opposes any new mask or vaccine mandates. Speaking about the bill at a regular news conference on the pandemic Friday, Justice said, “I don’t believe that really and truly we should just throw our freedoms and our...
                        Michigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer (D) has vowed to veto an election integrity bill that would require a voter casting an absentee ballot to prove their identity. Senate Bills 303 and 304, approved by the Michigan House of Representatives, would “require anyone who casts an absentee ballot or votes in person on Election Day to provide identification.” A related piece of legislation, House Bill 5007 removes the current $10 fee to obtain a state ID. “A consistent requirement for all voters to present an ID before receiving a ballot protects the voter and ensures they have a voice with their vote,” state Rep. Ann Bollin (R), one of the champions of the effort, said in a statement. “Providing free ID cards will ensure that every eligible voter can readily access a ballot and provide certainty that they can cure their ballot.” “As a former clerk, I fully understand what is involved in administering elections. I can assure you we do have checks and balances in our elections, but I...
    The Texas Senate passed legislation Friday that requires students to compete on school sports teams that correspond with the biological sex listed on their birth certificate. House Bill 25, which passed the Texas House of Representatives by a vote of 76-54 on Thursday, was introduced by Republican state Rep. Valoree Swanson and heads next to Republican Gov. Greg Abbott's desk. The only modified birth certificate allowed is that which has been amended "to correct a clerical error," according to the bill. "This is all about girls and protecting them in our [University Interscholastic League] sports," Swanson said in support of her bill, according to CBS News. "I'm excited that we have the opportunity today to stand up for our daughters, granddaughters, and all our Texas girls." Human Rights Campaign Texas State Director Rebecca Marques denounced the bill after the Texas House passed it, saying, "Texas legislators seem to take pride in passing discriminatory bills without any concern for the impact on Texans and the state’s growing negative national reputation." CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP "Transgender young people...
    The University Interscholastic League, which governs schools sports in the Lone Star State according to the Texas Tribune, already stipulates that gender should be identified based on an individual's birth certificate or similar government documents if a birth certificate is not available. The Tribune said that the UIL recognizes any legally altered birth certificate. "This is all about girls and protecting them in our UIL sports," state Republican Rep. Valoree Swanson declared Thursday on the House floor, according to the outlet. "The Texas House just voted to discriminate against trans kids and exclude them from playing sports as their authentic selves," the ACLU of Texas tweeted on Thursday. "For months, trans kids and advocates have been fighting against bills like HB 25. That fight doesn't end tonight." The bill is expected to pass in the state Senate.
    The Texas House of Representatives has approved a bill that would deny transgender athletes from taking part in school sports based on their gender identity. The bill, title HB 25, was passed in the Texas House by a vote of 76-54 after more than ten hours of emotional debate. It largely focuses on preventing trans women and girls from participate in women's sports at schools. The move puts Texas on track to becoming the state with the largest LGTBQ+ community in the nation to pass such a law.  The new law still needs final approval from the Texas Senate, which has previously approved similar legislation.  Passage there is considered in favor of Republicans in the state, who have supported the bill. Eight states, all backed by Republican legislatures, have brought legislation targeting transgender athletes into effect, while South Dakota Governor Kristi Noem signed an executive order similar to those laws in March this year.  However, the Texas bill, House Bill 25, will likely be seen as a crucial blow for local Democrats, given that Texas is home to the second-largest...
    UPDATE 9:15 PM: The House passed HB 25 by 76-54 margin. The House and Senate will have to hash out differences in their bills. Senate passed similar legislation earlier during the special session which ends next Tuesday night. AUSTIN, Texas (CBSDFW.COM) – A debate in the Texas House over transgender public school athletes continued into the evening hours Thursday, Oct. 14 after a day-long session. Under House Bill 25, athletes at school districts and open-enrollment charter schools would only be able to compete on teams based on their biological sex listed on their birth certificate and not on teams of their gender identity. Republican Representative Valoree Swanson of Spring advocated for the legislation at the Capitol. “I’m excited that we have the opportunity today to stand up for our daughters, grand-daughters, and all our Texas girls.” There are more than 800,000 7th through 12th grade athletes in public schools in Texas, including more than 300,000 girls. Swanson said if transgender girls are allowed to compete with girls, they would have a competitive advantage. “It also makes it where they have...
    AUSTIN (CBSDFW.COM) — After more than 14 hours of debate, the Texas House has signed off on a new state voting map. The lawmakers considered dozens of amendments to the proposed map during the session that began Tuesday and ended just before 3:00 a.m. Wednesday. The maps redraw the state’s congressional, Senate, House and State Board of Education maps. READ MORE: Launch Set For 9:30am | Hoping 'To See The Vastness Of Space' Capt. Kirk & Crew Prepare To Blast Into Space From TexasThe new borders are supposed to reflect population information taken from the latest census data. Those numbers showed that people of color across the Lone Star State fueled 95% of the population growth over the 10 years. As drawn, the map would fortify Republicans’ strength in the state House for the next decade. READ MORE: Hurricane Pamela Makes Landfall In Mexico, Remnants Expected To Bring Rain, Flooding To TexasThe final House vote on the new map was 83 to 63 — with most Republicans supporting it. Most Democrats don’t believe the new map accurately reflects the...
    The House voted Tuesday to extend the nation’s borrowing limit until early December, clearing the measure for President Joe Biden’s signature and averting a default that Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen warned could happen as soon as Oct. 18. The measure, which passed 219 to 206 with no Republicans voting in favor, provides Yellen $480 billion in new borrowing authority, but the temporary extension means Congress must address a major fiscal cliff in a matter of weeks. A short-term measure to keep the federal government funded also expires on Dec. 3. RETIRED JUSTICE ALLEGES 'SOME EVIDENCE' ELECTION OFFICIALS DID NOT FOLLOW STATE LAW Democrats used a special procedure to pass the increase by rolling it into a procedural measure. Conservatives balked at the move, which averted a direct vote on raising the debt limit. Adam Brandon, president of the advocacy group Freedomworks, called it “a cowardly way to deal with America’s financial troubles.” Democrats and Republicans remain at odds over raising the nation’s borrowing limit. The GOP refuses to back a long-term increase,...
    Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer, a Democrat from New York, speaks during a press conference at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, D.C., on Saturday, March 6, 2021.Ting Shen | Bloomberg | Getty Images The Senate on Thursday approved a bill to help the U.S. avoid a default on its debt in the next few weeks. In the most consequential vote of the night, 11 Republicans joined all 50 Democrats to provide the minimum 60 votes needed to end debate and move the bill to final passage, which required a simple majority. None of the Republicans who voted to end debate also then voted to pass the final bill. But for that, Democrats needed only 50 votes, because at least one Republican, Sen. Richard Burr of North Carolina, was not present. The U.S. risks economic calamity if Congress doesn't raise or suspend the borrowing limit by Oct. 18, Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen has warned. Senators signed off on legislation Thursday that would keep the nation from reaching its debt limit until early December.VIDEO4:2704:27Ohio Sen. Rob Portman on GOP's short-term deal to raise debt...
                        The House of Representatives passed Congressman Don McEachin’s (D-VA-04) Great Dismal Swamp National Heritage Act on Tuesday. If passed in the Senate, the bill will require the Secretary of the Interior to study potentially designating a Heritage Area in the region of the Great Dismal Swamp on the Virginia – North Carolina border. “The Great Dismal Swamp is an incredibly important historical, archaeological, and environmental site for the Commonwealth,” McEachin said in a press release. “The Swamp was once a home and refuge to African American and Indigenous populations and enabled robust economic activity between the communities that called it home. Not only does it have immense cultural significance, the Swamp also plays a crucial role in our continued fight against the climate crisis.” When dedicating the U.S.’ first National Heritage Area (NHA) in 1984, former President Ronald Reagan said NHAs are “a new kind of national park,” according to NPS.gov. NHAs are designated by Congress in recognition of a combination of natural, cultural, and historic resources, and...
    The House on Friday night passed legislation to reauthorize funding for highway and transit construction programs that lapsed the day before in an effort to avert thousands of worker furloughs and interrupted projects. Lawmakers passed the 30-day stopgap measure on a bipartisan basis with a vote of 365-51. The short-term extension now heads to the Senate, which is expected to clear it as soon as Saturday and send it to President BidenJoe BidenFrance (and Britain) should join the Quad Election denialists smacked down by Idaho secretary of state Under Biden, the US could fall further behind in the Arctic MORE’s desk. The roughly $1 trillion bipartisan infrastructure bill, which the Senate previously passed in August, would renew the lapsed highway and transit programs through the rest of this month. But since the House has yet to take up that bill amid Democratic infighting over negotiations for the sweeping social benefits package, the transit programs expired with the end of the fiscal year on Thursday. About 3,700 Transportation Department employees received furlough notices on Friday due to the lapse. State and local transportation...
                        The U.S. House of Representatives on Wednesday passed the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Contract and Reporting Act of 2021, introduced by Representative Diana Harshbarger (R-TN-01). The goal of the legislation is to provide both Congress and American citizens a better understanding of how DHS decides to utilize taxpayer funds, increasing transparency. “Today, I have delivered on my promise to play a part in holding the Biden administration accountable on their self-inflicted border crisis,” said Congresswoman Harshbarger in a statement. “The DHS Contract and Reporting Act will require transparent reporting on contract awards granted by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security so we taxpayers know how our federal tax dollars are being spent. This is important given the disturbing lack of transparency by Biden’s DHS on where migrants are going once they’re released into the United States, including those here in Tennessee. With greater transparency comes greater accountability. The Biden Administration must stop acting in secrecy.” Specifically, the bill would instruct DHS to publish a public, daily report...
    The House passed a government funding bill Thursday to avoid a government shutdown. The House passed H.R. 5305, the continuing resolution (CR), with 254 votes in favor and 175 votes against. The vote featured strong House Republican opposition to the bill. The continuing resolution will fund the federal government until December 3. It will not raise the debt ceiling, as Senate Republicans continue to fight against raising the debt ceiling while Democrats want to spend $3.5 trillion on a reconciliation bill that has little to do with infrastructure. The Senate passed the bill with bipartisan support, although Senate Democrats shot down Republican amendments. The bill goes to President Joe Biden’s desk, where the 46th president will likely sign the bill to avert the government shutdown. The federal government would have shut down if the government did not receive funding by the end of Thursday. President Joe Biden hands a pen to Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi after signing a bill in the Eisenhower Executive Office Building in Washington, DC, June 30, 2021. (Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images) Sean Moran...
                      by Andrew Trunsky  A short-term funding bill is set to land on President Joe Biden’s desk after it was overwhelmingly approved in the House Thursday afternoon. The continuing resolution, which funds the federal government through Dec. 3, passed the House on a 254-175 bipartisan vote less than two hours after it cleared the Senate. Biden plans to sign the bill later Thursday, avoiding a devastating government shutdown. While Congress was able to compromise on the package, which includes billions for wildfire and hurricane relief and to help resettle Afghan refugees, Democrats and Republicans remain at odds over raising the debt ceiling as the nation inches closer to a potential default. Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen has warned that it must be raised by Oct. 18, as not doing so would risk jobs and benefits for millions of Americans, but neither side has budged. Republicans have consistently opposed any effort to raise it, even killing an earlier bill on Monday that coupled government funding with raising the limit. They instead have demanded that Democrats raise the ceiling...
    By Kevin Freking | Associated Press WASHINGTON — With only hours to spare, Congress passed legislation that would avoid a partial federal shutdown and keep the government funded through Dec. 3, and sent the bill to President Joe Biden. The back-to-back votes by the Senate and then the House will help avert one crisis, but just delay another as the political parties dig in on a dispute over how to raise the government’s borrowing cap before the United States risks a potentially catastrophic default. The House approved the short-term funding measure by a 254-175 vote not long after Senate passage in a 65-35 vote. A large majority of Republicans in both chambers voted against it. The legislation was needed to keep the government running once the current budget year ended at midnight Thursday. Passage will buy lawmakers more time to craft the spending measures that will fund federal agencies and the programs they administer. The work to keep the government open and running served as the backdrop during a chaotic day for Democrats as they struggled to get Biden’s...
    A short-term funding bill is set to land on President Joe Biden’s desk after it was overwhelmingly approved in the House Thursday afternoon. The continuing resolution, which funds the federal government through Dec. 3, passed the House on a 254-175 bipartisan vote less than two hours after it cleared the Senate. Biden plans to sign the bill later Thursday, avoiding a devastating government shutdown. While Congress was able to compromise on the package, which includes billions for wildfire and hurricane relief and to help resettle Afghan refugees, Democrats and Republicans remain at odds over raising the debt ceiling as the nation inches closer to a potential default. Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen has warned that it must be raised by Oct. 18, as not doing so would risk jobs and benefits for millions of Americans, but neither side has budged. Republicans have consistently opposed any effort to raise it, even killing an earlier bill on Monday that coupled government funding with raising the limit. They instead have demanded that Democrats raise the ceiling on their own by putting it in their...
    Congress is one step closer to preventing a government shutdown after a short-term funding bill sailed through the Senate Thursday morning. The continuing resolution funds the federal government through Dec. 3, giving lawmakers two months to agree on a broader funding package for the next fiscal year. It passed 65-35 and now heads to the House, which is expected to overwhelmingly approve it, before landing on President Joe Biden’s desk. “I’m confident the House will approve this measure later this afternoon and send it to the president’s desk before funding runs out,” Majority Leader Chuck Schumer said on the Senate floor. “This is a good outcome, one I’m happy we are getting done.” The bill omitted a provision to lift the debt ceiling after Republicans vowed to oppose it. They filibustered an earlier version Monday that coupled federal funding with a debt ceiling suspension until December 2022, even as they said they supported the provisions to keep the government open. “We’re able to fund the government today because the majority accepted reality,” Minority Leader Mitch McConnell said on the Senate...
    The House on Wednesday passed bipartisan legislation aimed at strengthening the federal cybersecurity workforce, an issue that has garnered support following a year of massive information security incidents.  The Federal Rotational Cyber Workforce Program Act, sponsored by Reps. Ro KhannaRohit (Ro) KhannaLeft warns Pelosi they'll take down Biden infrastructure bill House passes sweeping defense policy bill Overnight Defense & National Security — Iron Dome funding clears House MORE (D-Calif.) and Nancy MaceNancy MaceLawmakers making Instagram appearance before Free Britney rally at Capitol GOP seeks to keep spotlight on Afghanistan as Dems advance Biden's .5T spending plan At least 90,000 students have had to quarantine because of COVID-19 so far this school year MORE (R-S.C.), would establish a program to allow cybersecurity professionals to rotate through multiple federal agencies and enhance their expertise.  The bill would also encourage federal agency leaders to identify cybersecurity positions that can be rotated through government, and give the Office of Personnel Management (OPM) jurisdiction over the Federal Rotational Cyber Workforce Program.  The bill was approved by the House by a vote of 410-15.  “We have to...
    The Biden White House is punting on the debt ceiling standoff, putting the responsibility for ensuring America can pay its bills squarely on the shoulders of Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer . White House press secretary Jen Psaki confirmed Tuesday that the administration backs Schumer's proposal for Democrats to "do it alone if Republicans refuse to help" but referred questions about the details to Schumer's office. WHITE HOUSE GOES ON OFFENSE AGAINST GOP ON DEBT CEILING AND TRUMP-ERA DEFICITS Her comments mark a departure from the White House 's prior position. Senior officials told the Washington Examiner in early September that President Joe Biden viewed addressing the debt limit as a bipartisan "responsibility." At the time, the White House sought to pressure GOP lawmakers into joining Democrats in raising the cap for what would have been the 81st time in the past seven decades. To that end, the White House tied a debt limit vote to the continuing resolution offered by the White House ahead of the Sept. 30 government funding deadline. But House Republicans killed that bill Monday...
    The House passed legislation on Tuesday that would eliminate the federal disparity in prison sentences for crack and powder cocaine offenses, in an effort to enact criminal justice reform on a bipartisan basis. The bill, which lawmakers passed 361-66, is meant to address a gap that its proponents say has largely fallen on Black people and other people of color.  The House passed the measure handily, but the vote divided Republicans. A majority of House Republicans voted for the bill with all Democrats, but the 66 votes in opposition all came from the GOP.  Crack cocaine, which is typically smoked, tends to be less expensive than powder cocaine, which is snorted in through the nose. The lower price of crack cocaine made it more easily accessible to people in lower-income communities, which subsequently meant that members of marginalized groups were more likely to face longer prison sentences compared to the lower ones for powder cocaine offenses.   “The burden has disproportionately fallen on African American communities,” said Rep. Hakeem JeffriesHakeem Sekou JeffriesDemocrats steamroll toward showdown on House floor Frederica Wilson rails...
    House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) speaks during a news conference about the House vote on H.R. 3755, the "Women's Health Protection Act" legislation to "establish a federally protected right to abortion access" at the Capitol in Washington, U.S., September 24, 2021.Kevin Lamarque | Reuters House Democrats on Friday approved wide-ranging legislation to protect abortion rights, a swift but mostly symbolic response to the Supreme Court's refusal to block a Texas law banning most abortions. The bill, which passed 218-211, is principally a show of solidarity, given that the bill, the Women's Health Protection Act, will face steep opposition from Senate Republicans and is not expected to advance through the chamber. Democrats believe the bill would guarantee the right to abortion through federal law and cement the decision of Roe v. Wade, the landmark 1973 Supreme Court decision that established a constitutional right to the procedure. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., worked quickly to schedule action on the bill after the high court earlier this month refused to block a controversial Texas law that prohibits abortions after roughly six weeks, before...
    Amid the looming deadlines, the U.S. House passed legislation on Tuesday that will prevent a government shutdown and suspend the debt limit beyond the month. Passing along party lines with a vote of 220-211, the bill, which sparked outrage among Republicans for removing a provision to provide $1 billion in funds for Israel’s Iron Dome defense, is expected to face heavy opposition in the Senate where at least 10 Republicans will need to side with Democrats and vote yes, according to The Hill. The Hill went on: Nearly every Republican senator has said that they will oppose a debt limit suspension, arguing that Democrats should instead act on their own through the budget reconciliation process that can circumvent a filibuster and is being used for the $3.5 trillion social spending package. “Democrats are nonetheless attaching the debt limit suspension through Dec. 16, 2022 to a must-pass bill to avoid a government shutdown on Oct. 1 in an attempt to pressure Republicans to drop their threats,” it added. House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer (D-MD) called upon Republicans to “be consistent” and...