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    Businesses in the US and abroad are being spammed with 'antiwork' manifestos delivered through receipt printers by hackers who are prompting workers to unionize, refuse 'poverty wages,' and ask for more pay. Workers on Twitter and Reddit have posted several pictures showing the rebellious message that alleged hackers are sending through their workplaces' receipt printers. 'ARE YOU BEING UNDERPAID? You have a protected LEGAL RIGHT to discuss your pay with your coworkers. POVERTY WAGES only exist because people are 'willing to work for them,' read one of the messages in a print receipt. The receipts directed workers to the r/antiwork subreddit, an online forum where users participate, comment and share their 'antiwork' and anti-capitalist sentiments - and strike for better work conditions. The subreddit has since gained momentum, with users sharing their own theories about the messages printed on receipts. Although many ventured to suggest that the pictures have been posted by people who have direct access to the printers instead of hackers, a cybersecurity analyst told VICE that network traffic going to insecure receipt printers indicates one or more...
    Jim Hoft of Gateway Pundit When Infowars and Alex Jones were slapped with a default judgment for their years-long smearing of the Sandy Hook families in October, I believed that it would likely have the effect of putting them out of business. Now it looks like another deplorable agitprop shop may be the next to be potentially sued into oblivion: Gateway Pundit and its impresario, Jim Hoft.  For much of December 2020 and January 2021 (and beyond), Ruby Freeman and her daughter, Wandrea “Shaye” Moss, were the target of a vicious trolling campaign that falsely accused them of being part of a nonexistent plot to steal Georgia for Joe Biden. This campaign originated in articles run by Hoft, a man long reckoned as “the dumbest man on the Internet.” Now Freeman and Moss are suing; from my non-lawyer’s perspective, they could potentially drive Gateway Pundit out of existence. Freeman and Moss accuse Hoft and his twin brother Joe of orchestrating “a campaign of lies” that triggered a vicious campaign of “intimidation, harassment and threats.” As NBC News reports, the saga started in December, after Trump campaign lawyer...
    Democrats are openly arguing that more wage-cutting migrants should be imported to shrink the inflation that is threatening President Joe Biden’s political future. The pro-migration LatinoRebels.com website reported the migrants-reduce-inflation claims on December 2: Rep. Jimmy Gomez (D-CA) understands inflation at the immigrant community level. The three-term Congressman from Los Angeles has a diverse immigrant constituency from Koreatown to Eagle Rock, Boyle Heights to Downtown. “If you have more people that are allowed to work in this country, then there’s gonna be less of a tight labor market,” said Gomez on Thursday, echoing Warren. The Democrats’ top advocate for amnesty and migration, Sen. Dick Durbin (D-IL), also backed the argument, according to Bloomberg: “Asked if immigration parole proposal in [the pending Build Back Better bill] would decrease inflation, Durbin says ‘Oh most certainly … If there are more workers filling those jobs, it’s deflationary.'” “Not enough people are seeking jobs. … As a consequence, that drives up the cost of doing business and the cost to the consumers. If there are more workers doing their jobs, it’s deflationary,” Durbin said, according...
    Xavier Lorenzo | Moment | Getty Images Some states are making it easier for Americans to collect unemployment benefits if they're fired for being unvaccinated against Covid-19. The governors of Florida, Iowa, Kansas and Tennessee signed laws in recent weeks that change eligibility rules for jobless benefits. Workers in these states who lose a job for refusing to comply with a workplace Covid-19 vaccine mandate now qualify for benefits.   That runs counter to typical state rules, which generally disallow aid if workers are fired for failing to adhere to certain workplace policies, whether related to vaccine requirements or mandatory drug tests, for example, according to labor experts. Three of the states (Florida, Iowa and Tennessee) are helmed by Republican governors. Kansas' governor is a Democrat. Republican lawmakers in other statehouses, including Arkansas, New York and Wisconsin, have introduced similar bills since September, according to a National Conference of State Legislatures database. "I wouldn't be surprised if other ones do it, especially when the legislatures get back in session [next year]," according to Andrew Stettner, a senior fellow at The...
    Ask your local pro-fascist mob whether livestock dewormer is right for you. Side effects include you don't want to know. Here's an NBC story about the new trend of people getting mad when they show up at hospitals with severe COVID-19 symptoms and the doctors refuse to give them horse dewormer to fix it. Well, it's mostly a story about the families of COVID-19 patients getting mad when their alleged loved ones aren't being given horse dewormer, since the actual patients may or may not be in a state where they can argue with anyone. It's worth reading for the brief rundown of the time a semiprominent Montana Republican octogenarian was hospitalized with COVID-19 and the family had the Republican freakin' state attorney general badgering the hospital to provide horse dewormer, including threatening to arrest hospital workers. She died, by the way. It's not explicitly written that she died of COVID-19. It's possible that she died from having shitty family members so wrapped up with trying to get junk "Republican" treatments shoved into her mouth that doctors couldn't focus on...
              more   The Bakery, Confectionery, Tobacco Workers and Grain Millers International Union, and Kellogg Company have met at a tentative agreement. Both the BCTGM and the Kellogg Company said that they would also meet at the end of the week to further discuss a resolution. Anthony Shelton, president of the BCTGM, said in the organization’s news release, “I want to thank and commend all of the members of the bargaining committee for their many, many hours of extremely hard work to reach this tentative agreement. As always in our Union, the members will have the final say on the contract.” According to the Kellogg Company’s negotiations webpage, the tentative agreement includes a 3 percent wage increase, an increased pension multiplier, and enhanced benefits for all employees. The agreement also included what Kellogg would set as its hourly wage based on how many years a transitional employee was with the company, and for new hires. For new hires, the wage would be set at $22.76, and for a transitional employee of six years, the wage rate would be $28.16. Kellogg also...
    NEW YORK (CBSNewYork) — New York City is imposing a new COVID vaccine mandate on all staff at private schools, including religious and non-government school workers. The order applies to about 56,000 employees at 938 schools across the city, CBS2’s Alice Gainer reported Friday. But is it enforceable? READ MORE: Suffolk County Police Officer Timothy Thrane Released From Hospital 1 Month After Being Hit By Alleged Drunk DriverMayor Bill de Blasio and the Department of Health announced all non-public school employees must get their first shot by Dec. 20. According to the city, the order aligns with what the CDC recommends — that teachers and staff be vaccinated as soon as possible. Officials said the city will offer vaccines to any schools that requests them for staff and students. The Archdiocese of New York released a statements that said, in part, “An increasing majority of our teachers and school staffs have already been vaccinated, and we continue to urge others to do so; those that are not vaccinated are tested weekly.” “We will review the mandate to determine this order’s...
    By KEVIN FREKING and LISA MASCARO WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden on Friday signed into law the stopgap spending bill that will keep the federal government running through Feb. 18, after congressional leaders defused a partisan standoff over federal vaccine mandates. The White House released a statement noting the bill signing and thanking congressional leaders for their work. Earlier in the day, Biden said it was worth praising bipartisanship, but “funding the government isn’t a great achievement, it’s the bare minimum of what needs to get done.” Both chambers of Congress passed the legislation Thursday avoiding a short-term shutdown of the government into the weekend. The bill keeps the federal government running for 11 more weeks, generally at current spending levels, while adding $7 billion to aid Afghanistan evacuees. “I am glad that in the end, cooler heads prevailed. The government will stay open and I thank the members of this chamber for walking us back from the brink of an avoidable, needless and costly shutdown,” said Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y. The Senate approved the measure by...
    Democratic Senators are suggesting they may block the huge green card giveaway to Fortune 500 investors in the Build Back Better bill, if the Senate’s parliamentarian rejects their parole amnesty for 6.5 million illegal migrants. Democrats will decide whether or not to push the historic visa giveaway once they get an answer back from the parliamentarian, Sen. Bob Menendez (D-NJ) told Bloomberg news. “It all depends on how it’s structured and what else we get,” he said. The underlying problem is that the parliamentarian might block the parole amnesty — yet also support the visa giveaways. That outcome could leave the Democrats supporting a huge white-collar jobs transfer to the Fortune 500’s imported workers — but without amnestying for blue-collar migrants. Sen. Robert Menendez, D-N.J., speaks during a Senate Banking, Housing and Urban Affairs Committee hearing on the CARES Act on Capitol Hill, Tuesday, Sept. 28, 2021 in Washington. (Kevin Dietsch/Pool via AP) That outcome would display the progressive Democrats as shills for Wall Street’s greedy investors — and as too feeble to win the noble-seeming prize of citizenship for poor,...
    Congress has voted to spend $1.6 billion to help cartels deliver children and job-seeking youths to cities and towns around the United States. The giveaway is buried within the continuing resolution, which was rushed through Congress late Thursday to keep government agencies operating until February. “This money is available through September 30, 2024, and its intended purpose is disguised in legislative language that says ‘for the account specified and for the activities specified, in section 141 of this Act,'” said a December 2 report by the Center for Immigration Studies (CIS). From February to October 2021, President Joe Biden’s deputies admitted roughly 125,000 younger migrants from Central America as “Unaccompanied Alien Children.” That inflow was six times larger than the 20,000 younger migrants who were admitted during the prior four months by President Donald Trump. Pro-migration groups — including lobbies for Fortune 500 investors — portray the cartel smuggling as a rescue effort for “children” trapped in crime-ridden countries. But the cartels are using a 2008 law that requires federal agencies to relay migrants to U.S. destinations if they claim to...
    BOSTON (CBS) — The Massachusetts Senate on Friday followed the lead of the House and unanimously passed a $4 billion spending bill that includes half a billion dollars for essential worker bonuses. The spending package, funded by the American Rescue Plan Act, is now headed to Gov. Charlie Baker’s desk. The bill also includes $500 million for the unemployment insurance trust fund, $400 million in mental health and behavioral support, and hundreds of millions of dollars for climate preparedness, education, housing, economic recovery and workforce development. “The one-time investments made in this bill address evident needs across all Massachusetts communities and sectors of the economy, particularly those who were disproportionately impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic,” House Speaker Ron Mariano said in a statement. The “Premium Pay” program calls for bonuses of between $500 and $2,000 for essential employees who worked in-person – not remotely – during the state of emergency that was declared on March 10, 2020 and lasted for more than a year. An advisory panel will determine which essential workers qualify for the bonuses.  Eligible employees may include...
    FatCamera | E+ | Getty Images Almost half of U.S. families with young children have faced a high risk of falling into poverty in the first six years of their children's lives, according to new academic research. What put those families at risk? Insecure or precarious parental work, according to a study from experts at New York University and Washington University. Four indicators were used to measure whether parents were in less than ideal employment situations: work schedules, occupation, hourly wages and weekly work hours. If those elements in parents' employment were unstable, their children were more likely to experience poverty in their early years, the research found. More from Personal Finance:House bill's child tax credit is a boon for low earnersHow lawmakers could compromise on paid family leaveDrop in U.S. birth rates amid Covid-19 could have lasting economic impact That had lasting consequences for the children studied, who are now young adults. The data included about 10,000 children born in the U.S. in 2001, and followed them through 2007. "The early childhood experiences of this young adult generation could...
    New York (CNN Business)A version of this article first appeared in the "Reliable Sources" newsletter. You can sign up for free right here.Major tech and media companies have set their third attempt at returning to the office en masse in early 2022. But with no end to the pandemic in sight, and with the shadow of uncertainty cast by the Omicron variant, some of those plans might be changing. Google on Thursday told staffers that the company will not be fully returning to offices in early January, after all. It will wait until 2022 to assess when workers will head back to a "stable, long-term working environment."But many Googlers have been back for months, of course. Future-of-work is one of those subjects that initially generated a sense of pandemic unity -- staffs working together to complete a sudden shift to remote production -- but now stirs division. I think we're starting to see divides between rival companies too, with some emphasizing an in-person work experience and others promoting more flexibility for staffers.Here's what I feel confident saying: The Drudge Report's...
    The Bank of America has reportedly told its Midtown employees to 'dress down' and avoid wearing company logos while commuting to the office as New York City experiences a surge in crime.  Senior executives at the Bryant Park location have been encouraging their younger staff to 'dress down' in order to attract less attention as they travel to work, sources told the New York Post.  They have reportedly warned staffers that wearing the company logo or dressing up could make them a target for assault, which is up 15 percent the past month. John Yiannacopoulos, a media relations executive for Bank of America, told DailyMail.com on Friday that the company does offer 'safety guidelines' to employees. Bank of America declined to let DailyMail.com view its guidelines.    One bank employee, who was not named, told the New York Post's On The Money column that he was on a high alert after seeing a stranger with a knife near the bank's office.  A top executive of a large money management firm even said he started carrying a Taser - which has been legal...
    Three Starbucks locations in upstate New York have announced their intent to vote on unionization, adding to three separate stores in the area that are already voting in a union election that may result in the first organized Starbucks locations in the country. A group calling itself Starbucks Workers United is representing employees at the three stores in Buffalo, New York, and hopes to join an affiliate of the Service Employees International Union. Voting is proceeding, and the results of the union drive could be known as soon as next Thursday. If successful, the stores would be the first in the United States to organize. The three additional Buffalo locations appeared before the National Labor Relations Board on Thursday and asked that it grant those stores permission to vote on whether they want to unionize, according to ABC News. The factors cited in the effort to organize were a perceived lack of training, issues with pay, understaffing, and stressful working conditions. BIDEN SPENDING BILL WOULD HAND UNIONS WIN WITH BIG PENALTIES FOR LABOR VIOLATIONS ...
    CEFutcher | Getty Images Jessica Duckett's Teddy Bear Day Care and Preschool is feeling the effects of the nation's hiring crunch firsthand. At her Fairfax, Virginia location, Duckett said she is as many as six employees short and has only 60 of a possible 109 children enrolled, simply because she's not staffed to care for them. Duckett said sometimes applicants don't even bother showing up. Others are not qualified or seeking wages she can't afford if she wants to keep costs down for parents. She's offering wages on average that range from $13 to $14, free childcare for staff, and benefits at her two locations. "There isn't really a hiring situation," Duckett said. "We are interviewing people that don't really qualify. People are applying but not showing up to interviews, people are coming to interviews agreeing to take the job, but not following through with background checks." The lack of child care workers is creating a larger ripple effect in the overall economy, keeping parents out of jobs, exacerbating broader shortages being felt in nearly every industry. Affordability is another...
    The National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) has just ruled that a historic union vote held earlier this year among Amazon warehouse workers in Bessemer, Alabama, by the Retail, Wholesale and Department Store Union (RWDSU) was not valid. The highly publicized vote, which took place over several weeks in February and March 2021, resulted in a resounding defeat for the union, with more than 70 percent of those voting choosing against union membership. Stuart Appelbaum, president of RWDSU, accused Amazon of engaging in “efforts to gaslight its own employees,” and filed a petition in April to nullify the vote. After investigating the union’s assertion, the NLRB decided that Amazon interfered so blatantly in its workers’ ability to vote that a second election is now in order. The ruling detailed how, in spite of the NLRB denying Amazon’s request to install a mail collection box right outside the warehouse entrance, the company did so anyway, giving workers the impression that it was involved in the vote counting. Additionally, the company distributed “vote no” paraphernalia to workers in the presence of managers, forcing...
    Lovers of corn flakes, rice crispies and other frosted flax had to resign themselves for a few weeks to find another way to lunch. Due to the strike of 1,400 workers at four Kellogg factories in the United States in early October, supermarkets here are finding it difficult to deliver the various products marketed by the American company. Posted on December 3, 2021 at 9:00 AM. Nathaelle Morissette Newspaper However, for those who can not do without the breakfast bowl cereal is a glimmer of hope: the conflict will end on December 5th. A policy-level agreement was reached between the two sides on Wednesday. Workers representing the International Union of Bakery, Snacks, Tobacco and Grinding Workers (BCTM) will go to the polls on Sunday. However, delivery delays can take weeks to resolve. Meanwhile, Franck Henot, co-owner of Intermarché Boyer on Avenue du Mont-Royal, confirms that “there are some products that Kellogg no longer offers”. “Corn flakes, frosted flakes, can no longer be with us,” he said. The grocery store temporarily replaced his cupboards to...
    Millions of health care workers across the U.S. were supposed to have their first dose of a COVID-19 vaccine by this coming Monday under a mandate issued by President Joe Biden’s administration. Thanks to legal challenges, they won’t have to worry about it, at least for now. Same goes for a Jan. 4 deadline set by the administration for businesses with at least 100 employees to ensure their workers are vaccinated or tested weekly for the virus. Judges responding to lawsuits brought by Republican-led states, businesses and other opponents have blocked some of Biden’s most sweeping initiatives intended to drive up vaccination rates. Numerous other legal challenges are pending, contesting the Democratic president’s vaccine requirements for federal employees and contractors and members of the military, as well as mask requirements for people using public transportation. More than four-fifths of adults nationwide already have received at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine. But Biden contends his various workforce vaccine mandates are an important step in curtailing the virus, which has killed more than 780,000 people in the U.S....
    Commuters arrive at Grand Central Station with Metro-North during morning rush hour in New York City.Angela Weiss | AFP | Getty Images The unemployment rate for Black women fell sharply in November, but labor market recovery from pre-pandemic levels remains uneven across race and gender lines. While the headline number for job growth came in lower than expected in November, the unemployment rate for U.S. workers overall dipped from 4.6% in October to 4.2% last month, the Labor Department reported Friday. For Black women, the employment picture showed even greater improvement. The unemployment rate for Black women fell from 7% to 5% in November — the largest drop when compared with other race and gender groups in the jobs report. And while Black women did leave the workforce in November, the employment to population ratio among Black women rose last month. That signals the unemployment rate drop could be attributed to job seekers landing gigs more so than workers exiting the labor force, according to economists. Black men also saw an improvement in employment last month with the unemployment rate...
    The November 2021 employment report was a mixed bag between disappointing jobs growth and a solid drop in the unemployment rate. But despite the perplexing headline numbers, most sectors in the U.S. economy added to their payrolls last month with professional and business services leading the gains. That industry added some 90,000 jobs in November, thanks to strong hiring for business consultants (12,000), accountants (7,600) and building service workers (10,400) like janitors, landscapers and pest exterminators. Transportation and warehousing also posted a strong November with a gain of 49,700 jobs as millions of Americans shopped online just ahead of the holiday season. Couriers and messengers, workers who pick up and deliver packages and mail, saw employment pop by 26,800 last month while warehousing and storage facilities added 8,800. Food manufacturers, which transform commodities like sugar cane and livestock into ready-to-consume products, helped lead the broader manufacturing sector higher in November with a gain of 7,400 positions. The entire manufacturing industry added 31,000 jobs last month. Construction also added 31,000 in November, thanks to broad-based hiring. Building construction workers, civil engineers...
    The U.S. Chamber of Commerce published a poll Thursday showing less than half of Americans who lost their job during the coronavirus pandemic and are currently unemployed are actively seeking employment. The Chamber polled 529 Americans between Nov. 2-9 who lost jobs throughout the pandemic and are still not working full time, according to the U.S. Chamber of Commerce. The poll had a margin of error +/- 4.3% at the 95% confidence level. Ahead of the November #jobs report tomorrow, our EVP & Chief Policy Officer @NeilBradleyDC explains why the labor force participation rate is the number to watch. Read more via @FoxBusiness below. #AmericaWorks https://t.co/SEh5DbjzHe — U.S. Chamber (@USChamber) December 2, 2021 The poll found that 56% of unemployed workers think they can go more than six months without returning to work full time, with 11% saying more than a year and 15% saying they will never need to work full time again. The Chamber’s Executive Vice President and Chief Policy Officer Neil Bradley believes the issue is larger than the pandemic. “For example, only 22 percent report...
    BERLIN (AP) — German public broadcaster Deutsche Welle said Friday it is suspending four employees and one freelancer during an investigation into allegations that they expressed anti-Israel and antisemitic views. Munich daily newspaper Sueddeutsche Zeitung this week quoted social media comments allegedly made by members of DW’s Arabic service, including some that appeared to downplay the Holocaust or perpetuate ant-Jewish stereotypes. DW said in a statement that it requested an independent external investigation into the allegations. The probe will be conducted by former German Justice Minister Sabine Leutheusser-Schnarrenberger and psychologist Ahmad Mansour. The broadcaster, which is funded by the German government, said all employees are required to abide by DW’s values and principles, which include a clear commitment to Israel’s right to exist and a rejection of antisemitism. The policy applies to employees’ private social media accounts. DW said the affected employees would be suspended for the duration of the investigation and that it would “immediately draw the necessary consequences” once the review is completed.
    Living in the San Francisco Bay Area, I find it’s nearly impossible to go a day without worrying about our region’s ever-worsening economic inequality. And the COVID-19 pandemic has only made things worse. Alison Lingane is co-founder of Project Equity, a San Francisco Bay Area-based nonprofit that raises awareness about employee ownership and provides hands-on consulting to transitioning owners. She is a founding partner of the EO Equals campaign. (Photo courtesy of Alison Lingane.)  According to the Public Policy Institute of California, 3 million jobs vanished from the state between February and May 2020. The consequences of this have been drastic — and unevenly distributed. In our region, data from the Bay Area Council Economic Institute suggests that workers in the bottom 10% of earners are faring far worse than those in the top 10%. Small businesses are also struggling. At least half of small businesses reported “large negative” effects of the pandemic at the start of 2021, and the San Francisco Chamber of Commerce reports area small-business revenue is down by nearly 50% as of June. Right now, we’re...
    BERLIN (AP) — German public broadcaster Deutsche Welle said Friday it is suspending four employees and one freelancer during an investigation into allegations that they expressed anti-Israel and antisemitic views. Munich daily newspaper Sueddeutsche Zeitung this week quoted social media comments allegedly made by members of DW’s Arabic service, including some that appeared to downplay the Holocaust or perpetuate ant-Jewish stereotypes. DW said in a statement that it requested an independent external investigation into the allegations. The probe will be conducted by former German Justice Minister Sabine Leutheusser-Schnarrenberger and psychologist Ahmad Mansour. The broadcaster, which is funded by the German government, said all employees are required to abide by DW’s values and principles, which include a clear commitment to Israel’s right to exist and a rejection of antisemitism. The policy applies to employees’ private social media accounts. DW said the affected employees would be suspended for the duration of the investigation and that it would “immediately draw the necessary consequences” once the review is completed. Copyright © 2021 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast,...
    New York (CNN Business)The US jobs recovery has picked up steam again in the final months of the year, bringing some good news in the face of persistently rising prices and a new Covid variant.Economists polled by Refinitiv expect another sizable jobs gain in Friday's November employment report — 550,000 positions. If that holds true, it would be the biggest monthly gain since July, when more than a million jobs were added.But even so, America's labor market is still not back to its pre-pandemic strength. If the forecasts are right, the nation would still be down more than 3.5 million jobs compared to February 2020.On Wednesday, ADP Chief Economist Nela Richardson said the recent strong numbers show "good potential for the rest of the year." ADP's own private payrolls report showed 534,000 jobs added in November.Read MoreMeanwhile, weekly claims for unemployment benefits fell last month below their pre-pandemic numbers for the first time since the recovery started, dropping below 200,000 to a level not seen since since 1969. In the latest Labor Department data, they were revised even lower to...
    Workers on the line at a Triumph Foods pork processing facility, April 28, 2017 in St. Joseph, Missouri.Preston Keres/Planet Pix via ZUMA Wire Fight disinformation. Get a daily recap of the facts that matter. Sign up for the free Mother Jones newsletter.A new bill, jointly released last week by Sen. Cory Booker (D-N.J.) and Rep. Ro Khanna (D-Calif.), seeks to address an injustice laid bare by the coronavirus pandemic: the gaping power differential between the people who process the US meat supply and the executives and shareholders who profit from their labor. It would do so by protecting meatpacking workers from repetitive stress injuries, which have become endemic to the occupation. The legislation would also likely bolster worker safety during future viral outbreaks.  “Meatpacking companies prioritized profits and production over worker safety.” In an important sense, the COVID-19 era has been a tale of two pandemics: one for people whose jobs require them to toil indoors at close quarters, and another for those who can make a living without facing such hazards. Few industries sum up the situation more neatly...
    toggle audio on and off change volume download audio ABC News Political Director Rick Klein tells WTOP 'governing around the brink' is the new normal in Congress WASHINGTON (AP) — The Senate passed a stopgap spending bill Thursday that avoids a short-term shutdown and funds the federal government through Feb. 18 after leaders defused a partisan standoff over federal vaccine mandates. The measure now goes to President Joe Biden to be signed into law. Earlier in the day, congressional leaders announced they had finally reached an agreement to keep the government running for 11 more weeks, generally at current spending levels, while adding $7 billion to aid Afghanistan evacuees. Once the House voted to approve the measure, senators soon announced an agreement that would allow them to vote on it quickly. “I am glad that in the end, cooler heads prevailed. The government will stay open and I thank the members of this chamber for walking us back from the brink of an avoidable, needless and costly shutdown,” said Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y. The Senate approved the...
    Tasos Katopodis/AP Fight disinformation. Get a daily recap of the facts that matter. Sign up for the free Mother Jones newsletter.On Thursday afternoon, the House passed a bill temporarily funding the government through the middle of February. The 221–212 vote comes after several days of concern that Democrats and Republicans in Congress would be unable to agree on a funding package ahead of the midnight Friday deadline, pushing the federal government into a shutdown that would furlough thousands of government workers, upend some federally funded services, and derail the economy just a few weeks before the holidays. While the House vote makes this less likely, the threat is not gone. The bill now moves to the Senate, where it will require unanimous agreement to quickly pass ahead of the government funding deadline on Friday. A few Republican senators, including Ted Cruz, have threatened to derail the funding bill unless it includes a measure to undo President Joe Biden’s business vaccine mandate. If they make good on this threat, they’ll tank the economy for hundreds of thousands of Americans just as they...
    Jim Hoft, publisher of the Gateway Pundit, listens as President Donald Trump speaks during the "Presidential Social Media Summit" in the East Room of the White House, Thursday, July 11, 2019, in Washington.Evan Vucci/AP Fight disinformation. Get a daily recap of the facts that matter. Sign up for the free Mother Jones newsletter.In the aftermath of the 2020 election, the Gateway Pundit—one of the country’s leading sources of pro-Trump misinformation—helped instigate a vicious harassment campaign against two Black Georgia election workers, according to a new lawsuit. As Republicans desperately tried to cast doubt on Joe Biden’s victory, the two women—Ruby Freeman and her daughter Wandrea “Shaye” Moss—were reportedly stalked by strangers, doxxed, inundated with death threats and racist taunts, and driven from their homes.  Now, Freeman and Moss are fighting back in court. On Tuesday, they filed a defamation suit against the Gateway Pundit, its founding editor Jim Hoft, and contributor Joe Hoft, accusing them of spreading “false and endlessly repeated accusations” about the women’s conduct on election night. The two women seek “compensatory and punitive damages” from the defendants, the...
              moreby Harry Wilmerding   The number of Americans who filed new unemployment claims totaled 220,000 in the week ending on Nov. 27 as employers fight to retain workers heading into the holiday season, the Department of Labor reported. The Labor Department figure shows a 28,000 claim increase compared to the number from the week ending on Nov. 20, when jobless claims dropped to a 52 year low of 199,000. Employers have been eager to hire and retain workers leaving their jobs at record rates, the WSJ reported. A record 4.4 million Americans quit their jobs in September, when job openings remained at historic levels. “Employers don’t want to lay off somebody who might in some way be productive,” said Marianne Wanamaker, an economist at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, said, according to the WSJ. “As steady declines in new jobless claims have demonstrated, the risk of job loss is relatively low as many employers focus on retaining and adding workers,” Mark Hamrick, senior economic analyst for Bankrate.com, told the WSJ. Meanwhile, the emergence of the Omicron coronavirus variant poses risks to the recovering labor market along with...
              moreby Steve Cortes   After intense negotiations, the United Auto Workers secured a new agreement with Ford, General Motors, and their suppliers that effectively prohibits a vaccine mandate for employees by requiring only “voluntary” disclosure of vaccination status for union members. This hard-won validation for workers points to a larger opportunity for the America First movement and organized labor to acknowledge that they are natural allies. On critical issues ranging from medical privacy to border security and foreign trade, the emerging populist and nationalist consensus of the New Right creates an obvious home for unionized Americans. The America First cause can, in turn, help revitalize private-sector unions and guarantee a more prosperous society for our country, with a stronger middle class through a better diffusion of economic and political power. Operating through the regulatory burdens of OSHA, President Biden is insisting on an unscientific (and possibly unconstitutional) vaccine mandate for most workers in the country. The Biden administration disregards the perfectly appropriate reasons millions of Americans choose to forgo the injections, including prior COVID infections and the low statistical risk posed to...
    WASHINGTON -- The Senate passed a stopgap spending bill Thursday that avoids a short-term shutdown and funds the federal government through Feb. 18 after leaders defused a partisan standoff over federal vaccine mandates. The measure now goes to President Joe Biden to be signed into law.Earlier in the day, congressional leaders announced they had finally reached an agreement to keep the government running for 11 more weeks, generally at current spending levels, while adding $7 billion to aid Afghanistan evacuees.Once the House voted to approve the measure, senators soon announced an agreement that would allow them to vote on it quickly."I am glad that in the end, cooler heads prevailed. The government will stay open and I thank the members of this chamber for walking us back from the brink of an avoidable, needless and costly shutdown," said Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y.The Senate approved the measure by a vote of 69-28.The Democratic-led House passed the measure by a 221-212 vote. The Republican leadership urged members to vote no; the lone GOP vote for the bill came from Illinois...
    BOSTON (CBS) — Massachusetts lawmakers are voting on a $4 billion spending package this week that includes “premium pay” bonuses of up to $2,000 for essential employees who worked in-person during the COVID state of emergency. House Speaker Ron Mariano and Senate President Karen Spilka announced that both chambers reached a compromise on plans to spend billions in federal aid from the American Rescue Plan Act. The House voted to approve the spending on Thursday morning, the State House News Service reports, and the Senate is scheduled to vote Friday. “The proposal filed this evening will provide hundreds of millions of dollars to build housing that is affordable, transform our public and behavioral health systems, prepare us for the impacts of climate change, strengthen our education system, assist struggling hospitals, and support our frontline workers by providing half-a-billion dollars in direct payments,” they said in a statement. Lawmakers were unable to reach a deal before their recess, meaning a single legislator could halt the bill. The compromise plan calls for bonuses of between $500 and $2,000 for essential employees who...
    OMAHA, Neb. (AP) — Kellogg’s has reached a tentative agreement with its 1,400 cereal plant workers that will deliver 3% raises and end a nearly two-month-long strike. The five-year deal with the Bakery, Confectionary, Tobacco Workers and Grain Millers International Union also includes cost of living adjustments in the second through the fifth years of the contract and it maintains the workers’ current health benefits, the company said Thursday. READ MORE: 87% Of Michigan's COVID ICU Patients Unvaccinated, Hospital Association SaysKellogg’s workers who have been on strike since Oct. 5 will vote on the new contract Sunday. The new deal covers workers at all its U.S. cereal plants in Battle Creek; Omaha, Nebraska; Lancaster, Pennsylvania; and Memphis, Tennessee where all of Kellogg’s well-known brands of cereal, including Frosted Flakes and Rice Krispies. The tentative agreement also addresses the two-tiered system of wages that had been a sticking point for the union. The system gives newer workers less pay and fewer benefits and it includes up to 30% of the workforce at the plants. READ MORE: Democrats Renew Push For Gun-Control...
    Photo of Jim Hoft, publisher of The Gateway Pundit, by Ben Jackson/Getty Images for SiriusXM. Two women who were Fulton County, Georgia election workers during the 2020 election have filed a defamation lawsuit against right-wing website The Gateway Pundit, the site’s founder and publisher Jim Hoft, and his twin brother who contributes articles, Joe Hoft. The lawsuit relates to false information they published that led to the women being targeted with death threats, racist slurs, and other harassment. As The New York Times noted in their reporting on the lawsuit, it was “among the first to be filed by individual election workers who found themselves unwittingly dragged into the alternate universe of far-right media that claimed, and still does, that [former President] Donald J. Trump won last year’s presidential election.” The complaint was filed by Ruby Freeman and her daughter Wandrea “Shaye” Moss in St. Louis, Missouri, where Jim Hoft resides (the website’s name is inspired by St. Louis’ landmark monument, the Gateway Arch), and accuses the defendants of targeting the women in a “campaign of lies” by accusing them of...
    UPS is laying off hundreds of workers in Atlanta, GA, Chicago, IL, Louisville, KY, and President Joe Biden’s hometown of Scranton, Pennsylvania. “UPS is transitioning some of the work currently done at one of our Global Business Services offices in Atlanta, GA, Chicago, IL, Louisville, KY, and Scranton, PA to another location,” UPS said. “We are having one-on-one meetings with the affected employees to discuss their next steps with the company, which includes the opportunity to apply for open positions at UPS.” 232 employees will work through the holiday season until their final day of work on February 25. Democratic presidential candidate former Vice President Joe Biden speaks during a campaign event, Wednesday, Oct. 23, 2019, in Scranton, PA. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke) “This layoff will be permanent, and ‘bumping rights’ (that is, the right to avoid termination by displacing another employee) do not exist,” UPS said in a letter to affected employees. Employees told local news outlets they feel like “we don’t matter” and that it is “just a terrible blow” for those who have worked for the company for years. As Newswatch...
    In this article GOOGLGoogle CEO Sundar Pichai speaks during the Google I/O keynote session at Shoreline Amphitheatre in Mountain View, California on May 7, 2019.Josh Edelson | AFP | Getty ImagesGoogle will not be requiring its employees to return to offices on Jan. 10 as expected after all, according to an email sent to employees Thursday and seen by CNBC. The company's security VP, Chris Rackow, wrote in the email to full-time employees that it will wait until the new year to assess when U.S. offices can safely return to a "stable, long-term working environment." None of the U.S. locations will adopt the hybrid working mandate on Jan. 10 as planned, his email said. The new guidance comes after several previous delays and as most of the company's employees were expected to return to physical offices three days a week. It also comes as a small but growing portion of the company's employees fight the company's vaccine mandate. Health officials in the U.S. and around the world say they are concerned that the new Covid-19 variant omicron, which has some...
    Nevada state workers and adult dependents who are covered under public employee benefits and remain unvaccinated will soon be hit with a surcharge of as much as $55 a month starting next July in an effort to alleviate COVID-19 testing costs, the Associated Press reported. Beginning in July 2022, unvaccinated state employees and their dependents will have to pay a monthly fee as a result of Nevada’s Public Employees’ Benefit Program Board voting in favor of a surcharge on Thursday, according to the news outlet. Weekly testing is mandated in Nevada workplaces, and it is estimated that for 2021 alone, over $6 million in COVID-19 claims will be filed by Nevada employees.  Some organizations have imposed policies similar to the approved surcharge in an effort to compel employees to get the vaccine while underscoring how expensive it can be to remain unvaccinated within a community. The largest health system in Louisiana said earlier this year that it would be charging $100 per pay period, or $200 monthly, to their workers if their partners or spouses that receive benefits through the employer remain unvaccinated. “We spent...
    More than half of Americans who lost their jobs in the pandemic and remain unemployed are not interested in returning to work, according to a new survey suggesting that the dire national labor shortage is likely to persist. The poll published on Thursday by the US Chamber of Commerce found that 53 percent of Americans who became unemployed during the pandemic say they are not active or only somewhat active in looking for work.  Fifty-six percent say they can get by for more than six months before it becomes essential to return to full time work, with 11 percent saying it will be more than a year before it is necessary to return to work, and 15 percent saying it will never be essential.  No detail was given on whether this cohort was comprised of retirees, or how they'll manage to survive without a job.   The poll is a troubling signal amid a worker shortage that is exacerbating supply chain issues and spurring inflation, with businesses across the country struggling to fill millions of open positions. As of September, the number...
    "Many of our schools view Covid vaccination as a matter most appropriately left to individual choice, not governmental fiat. This is an area where government should be using its bully pulpit to persuade, not its regulatory arm to coerce," Zwiebel said. *NEW* Rabbi David Zwiebel, chairman of the Committee of NYC Religious and Independent School Officials, wrote a letter to Mayor Bill de Blasio today opposing the vaccine mandate for private schools.pic.twitter.com/AV3R1ODzE1 — Emma G. Fitzsimmons (@Emma G. Fitzsimmons) 1638481968
    A far-right website known for spreading 2020 election conspiracies is being sued by election workers in Georgia who say they became the target of harassment and death threats as a result of the outlet's campaign to sow doubt about the legitimacy of President Joe Biden's victory. The Gateway Pundit, a fringe political site run by two brothers named Jim and Joe Hoft, falsely claimed last year that Ruby Freeman and her daughter, Shayne Moss, had manipulated ballots last November as part of their duties as poll workers for the Fulton County elections board, which covers the Atlanta metropolitan area. The conspiracies quickly spread after then President Donald Trump himself called them out by name last December — mentioning Freeman at least 18 times during his infamous call with Georgia Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger. Now, the pair is suing the outlet for running the evidence-free claims — following similar lawsuits by election equipment companies against right-wing publications, including Fox News, Newsmax and One America News. Freeman and Moss, both of whom are Black, are two of the first...
    (CNN)Only a few months after terminating federal pandemic unemployment benefits early, several GOP-led states are now expanding jobless payments to a different group of people affected by Covid-19: unvaccinated residents who are losing their jobs due to vaccine mandates.At least three red states -- Iowa, Tennessee and Florida -- have recently passed laws extending eligibility to these folks as part of broader measures restricting employer vaccine mandates. Kansas' GOP-led legislature approved a similar bill that Gov. Laura Kelly, a Democrat, recently signed. And in Arkansas, which is controlled by Republicans, a law curtailing vaccine mandates will take effect in January. Other states, including Wyoming and Wisconsin, have looked into such provisions, and more are expected to consider similar legislation when lawmakers return to their capitols in January.States need to approve these unemployment benefits measures because workers typically don't qualify if they quit their jobs voluntarily or are dismissed for violating company policies.Read MoreEmployers have significant authority to impose a range of mandates on their workers, said Jared Walczak, vice president of state projects at the right-leaning Tax Foundation. Noncompliance is...
              moreby Thomas Catenacci   The National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) ordered a new unionization election at an Amazon warehouse in Alabama, ruling that the company violated federal labor law during the first election. “Today’s decision confirms what we were saying all along – that Amazon’s intimidation and interference prevented workers from having a fair say in whether they wanted a union in their workplace – and as the Regional Director has indicated, that is both unacceptable and illegal,” Retail, Wholesale and Department Store Union (RWDSU) President Stuart Appelbaum said in a statement Monday. “Amazon workers deserve to have a voice at work, which can only come from a union,” he continued. The RWDSU, the union that attempted to unionize workers at Amazon’s Bessemer, Alabama, facility, challenged the results of the election in April, shortly after the votes were tallied. The union alleged that Amazon harassed, intimidated and threatened warehouse workers in an effort to prevent them from voting in favor of unionization. On April 9, the labor board announced that the vast majority of warehouse workers who voted in the election had rejected unionization....
              more   Georgia’s nursing and healthcare staff shortages have reached “crisis” levels after hospital networks in the state mandated that employees take the COVID-19 vaccine during the summer. Many news outlets and healthcare executives are blaming stress and long hours for the shortages, claiming that healthcare staffers are leaving their jobs because they are overworked. “What that means is the staff who are left are exhausted,” Katie Smith Sloan, CEO of LeadingAge told The Atlanta Journal Constitution. Sloan’s organization, a nonprofit, represents thousands of elder care providers around the country. “They are working probably longer shifts with little relief,” she said. “What it also means is that there are a lot of people who aren’t able to access care when they need it. We have a growing number of underserved older adults in need of services and supports. That’s a huge problem.” In an August 20 piece, AJC bemoaned the state’s nursing shortage, which it also described as a “crisis,” again blaming the workload from the pandemic. One of the hospitals that story mentioned, Piedmont Healthcare, over the summer alerted employees that...
              more   Staff at the Tennessee Department of Commerce and Insurance (TDCI) announced Tuesday that in 2022 workers’ compensation insurance premiums are likely to decline for most Tennessee businesses for the ninth consecutive year. TDCI officials, in a press release, attribute the savings to workers comp reforms that the state enacted in the previous decade. “Since Tennessee’s workers’ compensation system reforms began in 2014, loss cost reductions of over 59 percent have been approved, representing substantial savings for Tennessee employers,” according to the TDCI press release. “The reduced loss costs are also impacted by Tennessee employers seeing fewer significant workplace injuries.” TDCI Commissioner Carter Lawrence this month approved a 5.6 percent overall loss cost decrease beginning March 1, 2022 on new and renewal policies, the press release said. “Tennessee employers and employees have faced and overcome numerous challenges in recent years,” Lawrence said. “These reductions reflect the continued trend of safer workplaces and will mean Tennessee employers may now have more money to invest back into their businesses and employees which will help bolster Tennessee’s economy.” State legislators in 2014 enacted tort reform laws....
    "The Ingraham Angle" host Laura Ingraham questioned the normalization of remote work in the show's opening monologue Tuesday night, chiding "many" federal employees in particular for not having "returned to work full-time since the pandemic began." For example, the vacant offices of the Departments of Homeland Security, Health and Human Services and Transportation are "a complete travesty." That is "especially [the case] amidst an inflationary spiral, a supply chain crisis and a new Covid variant….," she continued. "…[I]n the twisted liberal mind, in-person work is expected for…store clerks, baristas…[,]janitors, [and] airport personnel but the average federal worker apparently believes staying home is their right." GOP SENATORS CALL ON FEDERAL EMPLOYEES TO RETURN TO OFFICE, CITING 'WIDESPREAD LACK OF RESPONSIVENESS' Ingraham called federal workers President Biden's "electoral bread and butter," citing a Biden administration plan to make telework permanent for federal employees.  According to the United States Office of Personnel Management's latest guidance, federal workers who have to commute at least twice a pay period should still be paid relative to the location of their in-person office. "No one believes that...