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    New York Democratic Gov. Andrew Cuomo accused his critics of lying and blamed state Republicans and the New York Post for the controversy over nursing home deaths in New York and other states during the COVID pandemic. Cuomo, writing in his new memoir, "American Crisis," said, "The most painful aspect of the COVID crisis has been its devastating effect on our elderly in nursing homes," the New York Post reported. He accused the Trump administration of botching the federal response to the virus and Republicans of creating a false narrative to deflect blame for virus deaths on Democrats. "By early spring, Republicans needed an offense to distract from the narrative of their botched federal response — and they needed it badly," Cuomo wrote. "So they decided to attack Democratic governors and blame them for nursing homes." The Post reported that nearly 6,700 people have died in...
    Writing in his new memoir, Gov. Andrew Cuomo again blamed Republicans and The Post for the controversy surrounding his own policy barring nursing homes from turning away people on the basis of a coronavirus diagnosis. “The most painful aspect of the COVID crisis has been its devastating effect on our elderly in nursing homes,” writes Cuomo in “American Crisis,” out Tuesday. As of Sunday, nearly 6,700 people had died in nursing or adult-care facilities of confirmed or presumed cases of the coronavirus, according to state records. “By early spring, Republicans needed an offense to distract from the narrative of their botched federal response — and they needed it badly,” Cuomo continued. “So they decided to attack Democratic governors and blame them for nursing homes.” Under a state Department of Health mandate issued in March, nursing homes were prohibited from turning away residents on the basis of a positive COVID-19 test,...
    A coronavirus outbreak at a skilled nursing facility on California's central coast has killed nine people and infected more than 60 residents and staff, health officials said Wednesday. The outbreak at the Watsonville Post Acute Center in Santa Cruz County comes as the rates of new COVID-19 cases fall in that county and in California as a whole. The first case was discovered on September 17 when a resident tested positive for COVID-19 after going to a hospital for unrelated medical reasons, said Dr David Ghilarducci, deputy public health officer for the county.  Testing quickly showed another two dozen residents had the virus but weren't showing any symptoms, he said. A coronavirus outbreak at the Watsonville Post Acute Center (pictured) in Santa Cruz County has killed nine people and infected more than 60 residents and staff, health officials said Wednesday The first case was discovered on September 17...
    ALBANY — Gov. Andrew Cuomo denied this week that his state Health Department’s controversial March 25 order saying nursing homes could not bar admission or readmission to a resident based on a positive COVID-19 test had anything to do with the over 6,500 deaths in those facilities related to the virus. “That’s not why they lost a loved one in a nursing home. Your question — the premise of your question is just actually wrong. People were lost in nursing homes, were lost because that’s where the virus preys. “The virus preys on senior citizens,” insisted Cuomo, reprimanding a Finger Lakes News Radio reporter during a phone conference call with other members of the media on Wednesday. “There’s a whole report done with data. The way the virus got into nursing homes was from two possible carriers — before we even knew about it,” continued the governor, ignoring the seeming...
    ALBANY — Gov. Andrew Cuomo denied this week that his state Health Department’s controversial March 25 order saying nursing homes could not bar admission or readmission to a resident based on a positive COVID-19 test had nothing to do with the over 6,500 deaths in those facilities related to the virus. “That’s not why they lost a loved one in a nursing home. Your question — the premise of your question is just actually wrong. People were lost in nursing homes, were lost because that’s where the virus preys. “The virus preys on senior citizens,” insisted Cuomo, reprimanding a Finger Lakes News Radio reporter during a phone conference call with other members of the media on Wednesday. “There’s a whole report done with data. The way the virus got into nursing homes was from two possible carriers — before we even knew about it,” continued the governor, ignoring the seeming...
    New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo provoked outrage this week when he falsely claimed that his administration did not send elderly COVID-19 patients into nursing homes and boasted about the lives his policies saved. “Every time I see an interview where someone actually asks him about the nursing home policy,” said Janice Dean, a Fox News meteorologist whose in-laws contracted COVID-19 in assisted living facilities and died. “All of a sudden, you know, he gets very defensive pointing fingers and blame game and won't give answers.” Cuomo this week brushed off criticism of his mandate enacted in March that prohibited nursing homes and long-term care facilities from turning new residents away because they had tested positive for the coronavirus. He has argued that it was nursing home visitors and staff who exposed nursing home residents to the coronavirus, rather than newly admitted residents who had tested positive for COVID-19....
    ANNAPOLIS, Md. (WJZ) — Indoor visitation can begin immediately at Maryland nursing homes that are not seeing a current coronavirus outbreak and have not had any new cases of the virus in the past two weeks, Gov. Larry Hogan announced Thursday. The governor cited improving metrics statewide as helping loosen the guidelines. Hogan also announced the state would commit another $6 million to help test nursing home staff for the virus. Earlier Thursday, the state’s health department reported the COVID-19 positivity rate as 2.88% and no new deaths in the past 24 hours. Thursday was the first time the state reported no new deaths in a 24-hour period since late March. CORONAVIRUS RESOURCES:  Coronavirus Resources: How To Get Help In Maryland TIMELINE: Coronavirus In Maryland, Tracking The Spread Latest coronavirus stories from WJZ Latest CDC Guidelines Watch live on WJZ or WJZ.com. Stay with WJZ on this developing...
    New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo dismissed criticisms of his coronavirus response and said he sleeps at night knowing he saved lives. During a conference call with Orthodox Jewish leaders on Wednesday, the Democrat said that enforcement of his coronavirus policies is vital to keep the pandemic in check. He urged local leaders to enforce a mandatory mask policy rather than giving out warnings. "Assign a number of your police to a task force," Cuomo said. "I will do it in my name and you can blame me. I have no problem with that." "I put my head on the pillow at night saying I saved lives. That's how I sleep at night. And I know we have," Cuomo said. "Incompetent, ineffective government will cost lives," he added later. "We've seen it from Trump. He has cost lives. Why does this nation lose more people than any nation on...
    A New York lawmaker announced his support for a lawsuit brought against the state Department of Health in an effort to glean information about the impact COVID-19 had on nursing homes across the state. State Sen. Jim Tedisco, R-Glenville, filed an amicus brief Monday in the Empire Center for Public Policy’s suit. The Center took the DOH to court in order to get Health Emergency Response Data Systems (HERDS) information on the nursing homes. The state uses HERDS to gather daily totals of the number of COVID deaths, both confirmed and presumed, that take place both in and out of nursing homes and assisted living facilities. Lawmakers both in Albany and Washington, along with the U.S. Department of Justice, have asked the Cuomo administration for information about nursing homes for months. Shortly after the COVID-19 emergency began, the state directed nursing homes to admit anyone into their facilities,...
    BlazeTV host Steven Crowder will host a rally in Michigan to demand answers from the state government on how many lives COVID-19 claimed in senior care facilities. Crowder announced Monday that the first 1,000 people to attend his rally at noon ET Friday at the Michigan state Capitol in Lansing will get a "How Many Seniors?" sign. He wants to organize activists to pressure Michigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer (D) to release data on nursing home deaths during the coronavirus pandemic.I’ll be in Michigan Oct. 2nd, demanding answers on Gretchen Whitmer’s disastrous COVID nursing home policy. First 1… https://t.co/818z1iiJIh — Steven Crowder (@Steven Crowder)1601301947.0The COVID-19 death toll in all categories of long-term care facilities in Michigan remains a mystery. Although the state has reportedly been collecting data on coronavirus deaths since May 29, Michigan has not reported all of its data as other states have. At the onset...
    The state Health Department would finally have to reveal how many nursing home residents died of COVID-19 after being sent to hospitals, under a pair of bills introduced in the state Senate on Thursday. Separate pieces of legislation from both sides of the aisle aim to close a loophole through which only fatalities that actually take place in nursing homes are listed on the DOH website. A proposal sponsored by Committee on Health Chairman Gustavo Rivera (D-The Bronx) would force the DOH to post comprehensive, daily updates from its online Health Emergency Response Data System. The electronic database, known as HERDS, compiles real-time information from local health departments, hospitals, nursing homes, assisted living facilities and other sources to track disease outbreaks. “During the legislatures’ August 2020, joint public hearings on COVID-19 in residential health care facilities it became clear that several key pieces of information should be made more public...
    The state Health Department would finally have to reveal how many nursing home residents died of COVID-19 after being sent to hospitals, under a pair of bills introduced in the state Senate on Thursday. Separate pieces of legislation from both sides of the aisle aim to close a loophole through which only fatalities that actually take place in nursing homes are listed on the DOH website. A proposal sponsored by Committee on Health Chairman Gustavo Rivera (D-The Bronx) would force the DOH to post comprehensive, daily updates from its online Health Emergency Response Data System. The electronic database, known as HERDS, compiles real-time information from local health departments, hospitals, nursing homes, assisted living facilities and other sources to track disease outbreaks. “During the legislatures’ August 2020, joint public hearings on COVID-19 in residential health care facilities it became clear that several key pieces of information should be made more public...
    By The Associated Press OMAHA, Neb.— More than 40% of the deaths linked to the coronavirus in Nebraska have been at nursing homes, but the overall rate of deaths in the state’s nursing homes has remained relatively low compared with national figures. A total of 185 deaths linked to the virus have been confirmed at nursing homes in the state, which is reporting 442 deaths overall. The Omaha World-Herald reported Sunday that a federal database shows that 31 of the more than 200 nursing homes in the state have reported deaths linked to the coronavirus. Nationally, nursing home residents account for less than 1% of the U.S. population but more than 40% of the coronavirus deaths. The rate of deaths in Nebraska nursing homes has remained relatively low overall. Nebraska reported 18 deaths for every 1,000 nursing home residents, which is well below the national rate of 47.8 deaths per...
    The state Health Department is illegally withholding information about the number of nursing home residents who died of COVID-19 in hospitals so it can intentionally undercount fatalities and tout New York’s response to the pandemic, a new lawsuit charges. The Empire Center for Public Policy, an Albany-based think tank, filed a Freedom of Information Law request for the data on Aug. 3 and was later told that it couldn’t have the records until Nov. 5, the court papers filed Friday allege. The explanation given was that “a diligent search for responsive documents is still being conducted,” according to the Empire Center’s suit filed in Albany state Supreme Court. But daily tallies of all nursing home residents who’ve died from the coronavirus, “both within nursing home facilities and elsewhere,” are contained in the state’s Health Emergency Response Data System, or HERDS, according to the suit. The Empire Center says there’s “no...
    The state Health Department is illegally withholding information about the number of nursing home residents who died of COVID-19 in hospitals so it can intentionally undercount fatalities and tout New York’s response to the pandemic, a new lawsuit charges. The Empire Center for Public Policy, an Albany-based think tank, filed a Freedom of Information Law request for the data on Aug. 3 and was later told that it couldn’t have the records until Nov. 5, the court papers filed Friday allege. The explanation given was that “a diligent search for responsive documents is still being conducted,” according to the Empire Center’s suit filed in Albany state Supreme Court. But daily tallies of all nursing home residents who’ve died from the coronavirus, “both within nursing home facilities and elsewhere,” are contained in the state’s Health Emergency Response Data System, or HERDS, according to the suit. The Empire Center says there’s “no...
    Three Republican state lawmakers from New York announced on Wednesday the creation of a petition campaign that calls on their Democratic colleagues to push legislation that would create an independent investigation behind the COVID-19-related nursing home deaths across the state. State Sens. Jim Tedisco and Daphne Jordan were joined by Assemblywoman Mary Beth Walsh, R-Ballston, at the state Capitol in Albany on Wednesday for the announcement. The three are among the bipartisan sponsors of a bill that would empanel a temporary commission that would have subpoena power to learn more about what happened in the state-licensed nursing homes during the pandemic. The decision by the Cuomo administration to force nursing homes to admit COVID-19 positive patients into their facilities at the beginning of the crisis has been one that’s been questioned by state lawmakers and federal authorities. Shortly after that decision, the number of coronavirus deaths in...
    An upstate lawmaker launched an online petition Wednesday demanding that Gov. Cuomo fully disclose the number of nursing home residents who have died from the coronavirus. The state Health Department reports that more than 6,600 nursing home deaths are linked to COVID-19. But that figure doesn’t include gravely ill nursing home residents who died after being transported to hospitals. The Health Department has a tracking system from nursing homes and hospitals that has the information but is stonewalling requests to release it, critics say. The number of coronavirus-related deaths of nursing home and assisted living center residents would increase substantially — from accounting for about 20 percent of all COVID-19 fatalities in the state to 30 percent — if fatalities from hospitals are included, said Sen. James Tedisco (R-Glenville) who launched the online petition drive on his government website. He announced the effort accompanied by Assembly GOP Minority Leader Robert...
    An upstate lawmaker launched an online petition Wednesday demanding that Gov. Cuomo fully disclose the number of nursing home residents who have died from the coronavirus. The state Health Department reports that more than 6,600 nursing home deaths are linked to COVID-19. But that figure doesn’t include gravely ill nursing home residents who died after being transported to hospitals. The Health Department has a tracking system from nursing homes and hospitals that has the information but is stonewalling requests to release it, critics say. The number of coronavirus-related deaths of nursing home and assisted living center residents would increase substantially — from accounting for about 20 percent of all COVID-19 fatalities in the state to 30 percent — if fatalities from hospitals are included, said Sen. James Tedisco (R-Glenville) who launched the online petition drive on his government website. He announced the effort accompanied by Assembly GOP Minority Leader Robert...
    Maine health officials revealed that five deaths and 161 COVID-19 cases are now linked to an outbreak that happened last month at a local wedding.  The unsettling uptick came after the outbreak was reported in three separate towns, and an epidemiological investigation was launched at the church of the wedding's officiating pastor. The outbreak began on August 7 when people attended the indoor wedding and reception in the small town of Millinocket, according to Mine Center for Disease Control spokesman Robert Long. The official ceremony took place at Tri-Town Baptist Church and around 65 people attended the reception at Big Moose Inn. The state's limit on social gatherings is 50 people. The venue owner has since admitted that they misunderstood local capacity rules and overbooked the event, but by then the outbreak had already begun.  Outbreaks linked to a wedding held at Big Moose Inn last month in Millinocket,...
    A couple dozen protesters gathered outside of New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s office in Manhattan to demand he take responsibility for the thousands of nursing home deaths during the height of the coronavirus. Protesters were spotted holding signs on Saturday that read, “Cuomo killed my mother!” “Cuomo To Seniors: Drop Dead,” and “Let families in now,” referring to demands that he allow families to visit loved ones in nursing homes after six months of being denied entrance. The Democrat has been criticized for issuing an order on March 25 that required some recovering coronavirus patients to be placed into nursing homes. So far, at least 6,400 New York residents died in nursing homes from complications with the coronavirus. “It’s been six months since we have been allowed to visit our loved ones,” protest organizer Marcella Goheen told the New York Post. “We have been demanding to have essential...
    President Donald Trump blasted New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo over the number of people who died from coronavirus in New York nursing homes. In a Thursday morning tweet, Trump said Cuomo "has the worst record on death and China Virus." He added that "11,000 people alone died in Nursing Homes because of his incompetence!" Cuomo has been under scrutiny for an order he issued back in March that required nursing homes to accept coronavirus patients who were medically stable without testing them. The order was reversed, but thousands of people living in nursing homes died from the coronavirus. The governor has claimed that the deaths were caused by infected staff members who spread the virus to residents. He has dismissed calls for an independent investigation into the number of nursing home deaths related to COVID-19 as political.  Trumps Thursday attack on Cuomo comes just after the governor ripped the presidents...
    Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s Health Department has no shame — not over its deadly March 25 order forcing nursing homes to admit COVID-positive patients, and not in stonewalling anyone looking to learn how many lives that mandate cost. The latest is its laughable excuse for dodging a Freedom of Information Law request from the Empire Center, filed early last month. It sought the number of nursing-home residents who died of the coronavirus after being transferred to hospitals, numbers the state stopped releasing in May. The department response this week: It can’t comply until at least Nov. 5, “because a diligent search for relevant documents is still being conducted.” see also Top nursing home association begs Cuomo, Zucker to relax testing, visitation rules ALBANY — One of New York’s top nursing home associations... Bull. Health Commissioner Howard Zucker told state lawmakers Aug. 3 that he had the info — but...
    A government watchdog group is accusing Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s administration of sitting on data that would provide the full death tally of nursing home residents from the coronavirus. The Empire Center for Public Policy accuses the state Health Department of stalling on compliance with a Freedom of Information Law request seeking the information. Currently, New York’s tally of nursing home fatalities only counts those residents who died or are presumed to have died from COVID-19 inside those facilities. The figure excludes potentially thousands of nursing home residents who were transported to hospitals for treatment and died a few days later. “The state Health Department is offering a new explanation for why it won’t provide the full death toll of coronavirus in nursing homes: it can’t find the records,” said Bill Hammond, a health analyst for the Empire Center who submitted the legal request for the data in early August....
    LANSING, Mich. (AP) —  In a report released Tuesday, a task force urged Gov. Gretchen Whitmer that Michigan should modify a system in which nursing home residents infected with the coronavirus can be treated and isolated in those facilities, and to take steps to improve life for all long-term care residents amid the pandemic. The 20-member group was created by the governor to prepare for a potential second surge of COVID-19 after deaths and cases spiked in the spring. Nursing home residents account for 2,088, or 31%, of the state’s 6,767 confirmed or probable deaths related to the virus. Of the 28 recommendations, nearly half involve ways to better the quality of life inside homes that have been forced to stop communal dining and restrict visits during the outbreak. To reduce the effects of isolation, the panel urged allowing outdoor and window visits, limited communal dining and optional “pod”-like arrangements...
    The New York State Health Department announced an emergency rule Monday that requires increased testing to distinguish whether individuals are infected or die from the coronavirus or influenza as the flu season approaches. The new edict, which goes into effect immediately, requires coroners and funeral directors as well as hospital and nursing homes to test for both illnesses. Nursing homes are currently required to test all staffers for COVID-19 weekly, a rule operators want relaxed. “While the human toll this virus has taken on New Yorkers is immeasurable, these regulations will ensure we have the most accurate death data possible as we continue to manage COVID-19 while preparing for flu season,” Health Commissioner Dr. Howard Zucker said in a statement released Monday night. “Good quality health data helps inform good quality public health decisions, and this information will strengthen our contact tracing efforts and slow the spread of this...
    The New York State Health Department announced an emergency rule Monday that requires increased testing to distinguish whether individuals are infected or die from the coronavirus or influenza as the flu season approaches. The new edict, which goes into effect immediately, requires coroners and funeral directors as well as hospital and nursing homes to test for both illnesses. Nursing homes are currently required to test all staffers for COVID-19 weekly, a rule operators want relaxed. “While the human toll this virus has taken on New Yorkers is immeasurable, these regulations will ensure we have the most accurate death data possible as we continue to manage COVID-19 while preparing for flu season,” Health Commissioner Dr. Howard Zucker said in a statement released Monday night. “Good quality health data helps inform good quality public health decisions, and this information will strengthen our contact tracing efforts and slow the spread of this virus.”...
    The New York State Bar Association announced on Thursday that it is launching a task force to investigate why a disproportionate number of New Yorkers died in nursing homes and long-term care facilities early on during the COVID-19 pandemic compared to other states, and it’s relying on some Brooklyn attorneys. There have been an estimated 32,499 deaths in New York State due to COVID-19, according to the New York Times. Florida, California and Texas combined account for an estimated 35,640 coronavirus-related deaths, despite having more than four times the amount of reported cases. According to the Times, more than 6,600 of those New York deaths occurred in nursing homes or long-term care facilities.
    The United States Department of Justice has requested data from New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo after he issued an executive order that may have resulted in the deaths of nursing home residents during the COVID-19 pandemic. The DOJ announced this week that it is requesting information from governors of states that issued orders which “may have resulted in the deaths of thousands of elderly nursing home residents.”  Other states being probed are New Jersey, Pennsylvania, and Michigan. In March, before the outbreak peaked and projections were still daunting, Cuomo issued the order to send recovering COVID-19 patients from hospitals into nursing homes to free up beds for potential new COVID patients. Earlier story - COVID-19: Families Want Independent Investigation Of Cuomo's Handling Of Nursing Homes According to the Department of Justice, its Civil Rights Division is "evaluating whether to initiate investigations under the federal 'Civil Rights of Institutionalized Persons Act'...
    The Department of Justice is asking for data from states that required nursing homes to admit COVID-19 patients that the department alleges "may have resulted in the deaths of thousands of elderly nursing home residents." The Department of Justice's Civil Rights Division is also considering whether to begin investigations under the federal "Civil Rights of Institutionalized Persons Act."  In New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania and Michigan, the states' governors issued orders preventing nursing homes from refusing COVID-19 patients entry, despite the vulnerable populations in nursing homes.  But New York has pointed out that their actions did not violate the federal government's own guidelines.  Get Breaking News Delivered to Your Inbox A March 13 memo from the Centers for Disease Control reads, "A nursing home can accept a resident diagnosed with COVID-19 and still under Transmission Precautions for COVID19 as long as the facility can follow CDC guidance for Transmission-Based...
              The Civil Right Division of the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) has requested information about COVID-19 deaths in nursing homes from the state of Michigan. The request, made on Wednesday, will help the department determine if it will open up an investigation under the federal Civil Rights of Institutionalized Persons Act, which will identify if the state orders requiring coronavirus-positive patients to be admitted to nursing homes were responsible for the deaths of residents. “Protecting the rights of some of society’s most vulnerable members, including elderly nursing home residents, is one of our country’s most important obligations,” said Assistant Attorney General for Civil Rights Division Eric Dreiband said in a statement. “We must ensure they are adequately cared for with dignity and respect and not unnecessarily put at risk.” Current policy in Michigan requires nursing homes segregate patients that have tested positive for...
    NEW YORK (CBSNewYork) — The Department of Justice is now requesting data from governors of four states, including New York and New Jersey, about COVID-19 orders that may have resulted in nursing home deaths. The focus is on public nursing home residents. The DOJ says the information will help determine whether it will launch investigations under the Civil Rights of Institutionalized Persons Act. The governors of Pennsylvania and Michigan have also been asked to provide information to the DOJ. RELATED STORY: Families Of COVID-19 Victims Who Died In Nursing Homes Call For Investigation Into NYS Department Of Health’s Directive Gov. Andrew Cuomo and Michigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer released the following joint statement: “This is nothing more than a transparent politicization of the Department of Justice in the middle of the Republican National Convention. It’s no coincidence the moment the Trump administration is caught weakening the CDC’s COVID-19 testing guidelines to...
    The Civil Rights Division of the U.S. Department of Justice announced on Wednesday that it sent letters to four Democratic governors, demanding data on coronavirus pandemic-related executive orders which “may have resulted in the deaths of thousands of elderly nursing home residents.” New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo, New Jersey Gov. Phil Murphy, Michigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer, and Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Wolf were each on the receiving end of letters from the DOJ. The letter to Cuomo set the stage: I write to request information regarding COVID-19 and nursing homes run by, or for, the State of New York, as defined in more detail hereafter. The Civil Rights Division of the Department of Justice enforces the Civil Rights of Institutionalized Persons Act (CRIPA). See 42 U.S.C. § 1997. The Division is evaluating whether to open a CRIPA investigation of institutions “providing skilled nursing, intermediate or long-term care, or custodial or residential...
    The US Justice Department has opened a preliminary inquiry into the coronavirus nursing home policies of New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania and Michigan that it says “may have resulted in the deaths of thousands of elderly nursing home residents.” The Justice Dept. release says the state “required nursing homes to admit COVID-19 patients to their vulnerable populations, often without adequate testing.” The Justice Dept. particularly honed in on Gov. Andrew Cuomo and his Health Commissioner Dr. Howard Zucker’s controversial March 25 order that required nursing homes accept recovering COVID-19 residents discharged from hospitals while barring the facilities from screening them for the killer bug. The release even quotes from New York’s order which stated: “No resident shall be denied re-admission or admission to [a nursing home] solely based on a confirmed or suspected diagnosis of COVID-19. [Nursing homes] are prohibited from requiring a hospitalized resident who is determined medically...
    WASHINGTON - The U.S. Justice Department announced Wednesday that it is considering investigating four states over rules requiring nursing homes to take in COVID-19 patients, saying the mandates may have led to the deaths of thousands of elderly patients. The four states — New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania and Michigan — are all led by Democratic governors. Republican lawmakers and other critics have long claimed that the rules have caused disproportionately high numbers of deaths at long-term care facilities in those states. In separate letters to the governors of the four states, Assistant Attorney General Eric Dreiband requested a wide range of information, from the number of people who were admitted to nursing homes after contracting COVID-19 to the number of fatalities at these facilities. More than 40% of the nearly 180,000 COVID-19 deaths in the United States are linked to nursing homes, according to a New York Times...
    The Department of Justice (DOJ) is demanding COVID-19 data from the governors of New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania and Michigan to probe whether rules around testing nursing home patients caused the deaths of thousands of elderly people. The department sent letters to the Democratic governors Wednesday telling them it may investigate whether they violated the civil rights of elderly people through their handling of the pandemic.  New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, and Michigan all issued rules at the peak of the pandemic ordering nursing homes to accept COVID-19 patients back through their doors. The controversial move has come under intense scrutiny in recent months, especially given that elderly people and those with pre-existing health conditions are most vulnerable to the killer virus.  In New York - once the virus epicenter of the world - more than 6,600 nursing home residents have died from coronavirus.   The Department of Justice (DOJ) is...
    The Department of Justice on Wednesday requested data from the governors of four states who issued orders requiring coronavirus-patients be accepted at nursing homes, potentially resulting in the unnecessary deaths of thousands of elderly patients. The DOJ singled out Michigan, New Jersey, New York, and Pennsylvania for its policies, but focused heavily on New York, whose governor, Democrat Andrew Cuomo, has come under fire for the policy. On March 25, Cuomo’s health department issued an order saying: “No resident shall be denied re-admission or admission to [a nursing home] solely based on a confirmed or suspected diagnosis of COVID-19. [Nursing homes] are prohibited from requiring a hospitalized resident who is determined medically stable to be tested for COVID-19 prior to admission or readmission.” “According to the Centers for Disease Control, New York has the highest number of COVID-19 deaths in the United States, with 32,592 victims, many of them elderly. New York’s...
    The Department of Justice (DOJ) announced Wednesday that it is requesting data from governors of states that implemented coronavirus policies that may have resulted in deaths of the elderly at nursing homes. The DOJ said it would request data to determine whether it would initiate investigations under the Civil Rights of Institutionalized Persons Act into New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania and Michigan. “Today the Justice Department requested COVID-19 data from the governors of states that issued orders which may have resulted in the deaths of thousands of elderly nursing home residents,” the department wrote in a release. “New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, and Michigan required nursing homes to admit COVID-19 patients to their vulnerable populations, often without adequate testing.” CUOMO SHRUGS OFF CONCERNS OF CORONAVIRUS DEATH UNDERCOUNT  California Gov. Gavin Newsom also enforced a similar order. The DOJ specifically cited New York’s March 25 order: “No resident shall be denied re-admission or...
    The Justice Department is seeking data about “orders which may have resulted in the deaths of thousands of elderly nursing home residents,” sending letters Wednesday to the governors of New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania and Michigan. Officials say Wednesday that the Justice Department’s civil rights division is evaluating whether to initiate investigations under a federal law that protects the rights of people in state-run nursing homes and other facilities. Prosecutors are trying to determine whether state orders requiring admission of COVID-19 patients to nursing homes could have led to deaths. Assistant Attorney General Eric Dreiband says the federal government must ensure vulnerable nursing home patients “are adequately cared for with dignity and respect and not unnecessarily put at risk.”
    PHILADELPHIA (CBS/AP) — Pennsylvania and New Jersey are among four states the Justice Department is seeking data about “orders which may have resulted in the deaths of thousands of elderly nursing home residents.” The Justice Department sent letters to Govs. Tom Wolf and Phil Murphy, as well as the governors of New York and Michigan on Wednesday. BREAKING— Justice Department is eyeballing Pa. and NJ governors over COVID19 nursing home deaths. @CBSPhilly https://t.co/mU70P48BMN — Joe Holden (@JoeHoldenCBS3) August 26, 2020 Officials said Wednesday that the Justice Department’s civil rights division is evaluating whether to initiate investigations under a federal law that protects the rights of people in state-run nursing homes and other facilities. Prosecutors are trying to determine whether state orders requiring admission of COVID-19 patients to nursing homes could have led to deaths. Assistant Attorney General Eric Dreiband says the federal government must ensure vulnerable nursing home patients...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — The Justice Department is seeking data from the governors of four states about “orders which may have resulted in the deaths of thousands of elderly nursing home residents.” Officials say Wednesday that the Justice Department’s civil rights division is evaluating whether to initiate investigations under a federal law that protects the rights of people in state-run nursing homes and other facilities. Prosecutors are trying to determine whether state orders requiring admission of COVID-19 patients to nursing homes could have led to deaths. The letters were sent Wednesday to the governors of New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania and Michigan. (© Copyright 2020 The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.)
    The U.S. Justice Department demanded that several Democrat-led states hand over data on nursing home deaths due to COVID-19, to help it decide whether to launch a large-scale investigation. “Today the Justice Department requested COVID-19 data from the governors of states that issued orders which may have resulted in the deaths of thousands of elderly nursing home residents,” the Justice Department announced Wednesday, naming four states with Democratic governors asked to disclose the data — New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, and Michigan. The DOJ maintains that the four states allowed nursing homes to re-admit residents who had tested positive for the coronavirus, leading to widespread infections and deaths in long-term care facilities. The data will inform the decision by the Department of Justice’s Civil Rights Division whether to launch an investigation under the federal Civil Rights of Institutionalized Persons Act, which protects the civil rights of people...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — Justice Department seeks data from 4 states in inquiry of whether state orders led to COVID-19 nursing home deaths. Copyright © 2020 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, written or redistributed.
    Following individual human stories in a sprawling event like a global pandemic is a challenging task. Making thoughtful connections between the two is even harder. But this long read from The California Sunday Magazine on America’s first COVID-19 epicenter, a nursing home in Washington state, does the job with compelling and tragic precision. It focuses on two inhabitants of a single room in the nursing facility, the Life Care Center of Kirkland, part of the largest privately held chain of long-term care centers in the US. It tracks how the coronavirus spread through the facility “like a spectral haunting,” and how underpaid and overworked staff battled against the odds to bring it under control. Nursing home residents account for more than a quarter of all US COVID-19 deaths Around the world, nursing homes have been hit hard by the pandemic, which is no surprise considering that their residents are...
    By JOHN RABY, Associated Press CHARLESTON, W.Va. (AP) — Nursing home visits are being allowed again in West Virginia as the state focuses on coronavirus outbreaks in the general populations of individual counties without clamping down on areas without them. But Gov. Jim Justice warned Monday that the visits could end quickly in some places if further outbreaks occur within nursing homes themselves. Officials will use the same color-coded county alert system they've applied to public school systems to determine whether nursing homes will remain open. Counties with the lowest rates of community-spread virus cases will be depicted in green, followed by yellow, orange and red. Visits will be unrestricted in green and yellow counties, will be limited to compassionate care nursing home residents in orange counties and will be banned in red counties. Most of the state's 55 counties are coded green. The only one currently coded red is...
    The Trump administration will implement new mandatory federal COVID-19 testing and reporting rules for nursing homes this week in an effort to prevent the death toll that occurred in New York at the height of the virus, a new report says. The new rules will mandate that all nursing homes offer coronavirus tests to patients if anyone in the facility contracts COVID-19 or exhibits symptoms, the New York Post reports. The nursing homes will be required to report test results in most cases. “These new rules represent a dramatic ramp-up in our efforts to track and control the spread of COVID-19, especially in nursing homes,” Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services Administrator Seema Verma said in a statement. “One administration official was more blunt in describing the changes. ‘President Trump is mandating everything Gov. Cuomo failed to do in order to protect America’s seniors from this virus,’ the official said,”...
    During an interview broadcast on Friday’s “CNN Newsroom,” New York State Sen. James Skoufis (D) said that he thinks New York’s numbers underrepresent the number of coronavirus deaths in nursing homes and he believes that “at a minimum, we’re talking probably a couple of thousand additional deaths.” Skoufis said, “My gut sense is, at a minimum, we’re talking probably a couple of thousand additional deaths.” He also stated, “We need to understand what worked, what didn’t work, and we need to best prepare for next time, and the only way to do that is to get full information.” Follow Ian Hanchett on Twitter @IanHanchett
    Will Gov. Andrew Cuomo allow anything resembling an outside review of New York’s coronavirus nursing-home horrors? The test case is a bipartisan bill from state Sen. Jim Tedisco and Assemblyman Ron Kim. At the height of the pandemic, the state’s March 25 mandate put infected patients among the elderly — who Cuomo has acknowledged are the most vulnerable to the virus. The gov insists any criticism of that order is pure politics. The bill calls for an independent investigation to, as sponsors put it, “fully examine policies that led to the deaths of thousands of New Yorkers in nursing-home facilities” during the pandemic. Team Cuomo has stonewalled all efforts to get answers, and lawmakers are furious. “Some issues transcend partisan politics,” said Tedisco (R-Glenville), and the needless deaths of thousands is one of them. “Don’t be publishing a damn book right now. Take responsibility for what is happening,” an exasperated...
    New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo brushed off concerns that his administration was undercounting nursing home deaths due to COVID-19 by not counting nursing home residents who died in hospitals. Unlike the federal government and other states, New York is the only state to explicitly say it only counts residents who died on nursing home property from coronavirus in its count of nursing home deaths. Those who were transported to hospitals and died there are added to a separate count. “If you die in the nursing home, it’s a nursing home death. If you die in the hospital, it’s called a hospital death,” the Democratic governor told Albany public radio station WAMC on Wednesday. “It doesn’t say where were you before.” Cuomo explained that if the state were to count a death as a hospital death and a nursing home death it would lead to a “double count.” CUOMO REJECTS INDEPENDENT INVESTIGATION...
    NEW YORK (AP) — New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo responded Wednesday to an Associated Press report that his state’s coronavirus death toll in nursing homes could be a significant undercount, saying it makes sense to include only those residents who died on the home’s property. Unlike the federal government and every other state with major outbreaks, only New York explicitly says that it counts just residents who died on nursing home property and not those who were transported to hospitals and died there. “If you die in the nursing home, it’s a nursing home death. If you die in the hospital, it’s called a hospital death,” the Democratic governor said during an interview on Albany public radio station WAMC. “It doesn’t say where were you before.” Cuomo said if New York were to count a death as a nursing home death and a hospital death, that could lead to a...
    Albany lawmakers are pushing for an independent, bi-partisan commission that would investigate the COVID-19 deaths of at least 6,447 New Yorkers in state-regulated nursing homes and what role Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s mandate that virus-ridden patients be taken into the facilities may have played. The legislation, if passed, would establish a five-member commission to conduct an investigation with subpoena power and perform a top-to-bottom review of what happened in the state’s 613 nursing home facilities during the coronavirus pandemic. The commission — which would purposely not include a Cuomo appointee — would probe the measures taken by nursing homes to ensure the safety of their residents during the crisis, the coronavirus-related death rates of residents in the facilities, and the effectiveness of state and federal laws, as well as “executive orders, rules, regulations and recommendations governing the response of nursing homes to COVID-19,” the bill says. “We need closure — we...
    Gov. Andrew Cuomo again justified his administration’s decision to stop counting as nursing home deaths the COVID-19 fatalities of residents who succumbed after being transferred to hospitals, but finally admitted at least one mistake he made during the coronavirus crisis. “I was the first state in the nation to do masks, I should’ve done it earlier. I should’ve done masks earlier. That would’ve made a dramatic difference,” Cuomo told WAMC radio. The three-term Democratic governor issued a statewide mask order on April 15 — 45 days after New York had its first confirmed coronavirus case and during a period when the state was experiencing more than 600 virus-related deaths a day. Cuomo also admitted “we were wrong” to say that asymptomatic carriers of COVID-19 can’t spread the killer bug. “That was just wrong,” the governor said, adding, “We spent months saying you have to be sneezed or coughed on....
    By BERNARD CONDON and MARINA VILLENEUVE, Associated Press NEW YORK (AP) — New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo responded Wednesday to an Associated Press report that his state’s coronavirus death toll in nursing homes could be a significant undercount, saying it makes sense to include only those residents who died on the home’s property. Unlike the federal government and every other state with major outbreaks, only New York explicitly says that it counts just residents who died on nursing home property and not those who were transported to hospitals and died there. “If you die in the nursing home, it’s a nursing home death. If you die in the hospital, it’s called a hospital death,” the Democratic governor said during an interview on Albany public radio station WAMC. “It doesn’t say where were you before.” Cuomo said if New York were to count a death as a nursing home death and...
    Albany lawmakers are pushing for an independent, bi-partisan commission that would investigate the COVID-19 deaths of at least 6,447 New Yorkers in state-regulated nursing homes and what role Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s mandate that virus-ridden patients be taken into the facilities may have played. The legislation, if passed, would establish a five-member commission to conduct an investigation with subpoena power and perform a top-to-bottom review of what happened in the state’s 613 nursing home facilities during the coronavirus pandemic. The commission — which would purposely not include a Cuomo appointee — would probe the measures taken by nursing homes to ensure the safety of their residents during the crisis, the coronavirus-related death rates of residents in the facilities, and the effectiveness of state and federal laws, as well as “executive orders, rules, regulations and recommendations governing the response of nursing homes to COVID-19,” the bill says. “We need closure — we...
    TURLOCK (CBS13) — A total of 16 residents of a Turlock nursing home have died after a coronavirus outbreak at the facility. Brandel Manor reported on Monday that 52 residents and 37 employees have tested positive. Along with the 16 deaths, 5 other residents have been hospitalized. Stanislaus County’s coronavirus deaths reached 200 on Monday. A total of 12,668 cases have also been recorded, according to the county’s Health Services Agency. The county remains on the state’s watch list.
    New York Gov. Andrew CuomoAndrew CuomoThe Memo — Michelle Obama shines, scorching Trump Trump lashes out at Cuomo after his Democratic convention speech Trump kicks off effort to counter-message Democratic convention MORE (D-N.Y.) is writing a book focusing largely on his response to the coronavirus pandemic, according to its publisher.   "In his own voice, Andrew Cuomo chronicles in 'American Crisis' the ingenuity and sacrifice required of so many to fight the pandemic, sharing his personal reflections and the decision-making that shaped his policy, and offers his frank accounting and assessment of his interactions with the federal government and the White House, as well as other state and local political and health officials," Crown Books said in a statement on Tuesday. Cuomo's book, "American Crisis," is set for release in October, just three weeks before the presidential election.  "The questions are what do you do with the fear and would you succumb to...
    Fox News senior meteorologist Janice Dean, who recently lost her elderly in-laws to COVID-19, finally got to testify before New York State lawmakers on nursing home deaths on Monday after she was denied the opportunity the week before. Dean told “Fox & Friends” on Tuesday that New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo is not providing the exact numbers of those who died from COVID-19 in adult care facilities because “New York state does not count the numbers that we lost in hospitals from nursing homes.” “We need those numbers to move forward and help change the laws,” Dean said. “We need an independent bipartisan investigation that involves subpoena power so we can get the health commissioner on the hot seat and ask questions and get truthful answers.” Last week, Dean found out that she was taken off the list to testify at a hearing geared toward understanding why and how the pandemic took root in New York nursing homes. She said New York...
    New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo is publishing a book on his response to the coronavirus pandemic that has killed nearly 19,000 people in his state, his publishing company announced on Tuesday. "American Crisis: Leadership Lessons from the COVID-19 Pandemic" will go on sale on Oct. 13, Crown Publishing said. The news comes the day after Cuomo addressed the Democratic National Convention and called the virus' spread a metaphor for a country weakened by division. New York state has one of the lowest infection rates in the U.S., a welcome contrast to the spring, when it had one of the highest. CUOMO REJECTS INDEPENDENT INVESTIGATION OF NURSING HOME CORONAVIRUS DEATHS "In his own voice, Andrew Cuomo chronicles in 'American Crisis' the ingenuity and sacrifice required of so many to fight the pandemic," according to Crown, "sharing his personal reflections and the decision-making that shaped his policy, and offers his frank accounting and...
    Coronavirus cases in U.S. nursing homes saw a dramatic rise this summer and have surpassed all-time high levels, resulting from the virus spread across the Sunbelt states, according to a report on Sunday. Federal agency data shows there were 9,715 coronavirus cases in nursing homes the week of July 26, which eclipsed the previous high of 9,421 cases during the last week of May, according to a study by the American Health Care Association and National Center for Assisted Living (AHCA/NCAL). “With the recent major spikes of COVID cases in many states across the country, we were very concerned this trend would lead to an increase in cases in nursing homes and unfortunately it has,” said Mark Parkinson, president, and CEO of the AHCA and NCAL. TRUMP FIRES BACK AT CUOMO AFTER CORONAVIRUS CRITICISM IN DNC SPEECH FILE - In this June 25, 2020, file photo, residents at the Southern Pines nursing...
    Dear Moneyist, I wanted to ask you a moral or ethical question concerning COVID-19. Here’s my situation: my sister-in-law who currently lives with me has tested positive for COVID as of yesterday. I have not been tested within the past 30 days. I work in a long-term care facility/nursing home, in Pennsylvania as a certified nursing assistant. I informed my employer of the positive case in my home. I volunteered to stay home 14 days because I don’t want to risk infection to my residents I take care of, or fellow employees. My employer says they want me to wear a mask and face shield and come to work, and make sure other employees are wearing a mask properly OR go get tested again. I do NOT want to put my residents at risk and I refuse to go through that painful test again. They said they are...
    New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo (D-NY) on Wednesday attempted to shift blame for his state’s nursing home coronavirus deaths on to President Trump, saying he was merely following guidance from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Cuomo has received harsh criticism for a now-reversed March 25 directive regarding nursing homes, which reads: “No resident [of a nursing home] shall be denied re-admission or admission to the NH [nursing home] solely based on a confirmed or suspected diagnosis of COVID-19. NHs are prohibited from requiring a hospitalized resident who is determined medically stable to be tested for COVID-19 prior to admission or readmission.” This week, Rep. Elise Stefanik (R-NY) called for a federal investigation into Cuomo and his administration over the handling of this nursing home policy. As of Tuesday, over 5,800 nursing home and adult care facility residents have died from the illness. A partial transcript is as follows: ...
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    On Wednesday’s broadcast of “CNN Newsroom,” New York State Sen. and Chairman of the Senate Committee on Health Gustavo Rivera (D) questioned the state’s numbers on coronavirus deaths in nursing homes, and said that “the way the numbers are calculated in other states gives an idea that the percentages of deaths among people we know are more vulnerable to this disease are much higher.” Rivera also stated that it’s not possible to establish the best policy for the future without the best data. Rivera said that he doesn’t agree with the state health department’s assessment that they have been transparent, adding, “[W]hat you see is, the way the numbers are calculated in other states gives an idea that the percentages of deaths among people we know are more vulnerable to this disease are much higher. And listen, look, ultimately, this series of hearings that we’re doing — we’ve done 23...
    New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo continues to be treated as a "conquering hero" despite shirking any responsibility for state nursing home deaths from coronavirus, even after a new report details how the official totals are "outright wrong," according to New York Post columnist Karol Markowicz. Writing for The Spectator US, Markowicz noted that the Associated Press reported this week that "New York only counts residents who died on nursing home property and not those who were transported to hospitals and died there." The report was headlined "New York’s true nursing home death toll cloaked in secrecy" and estimated that thousands more nursing home residents had died in the pandemic than the official number of a little more than 6,600. CUOMO REJECTS INDEPENDENT INVESTIGATION OF NURSING HOME CORONAVIRUS DEATHS "Why does it matter if the nursing home deaths are counted correctly?" Markowicz asked. "For one thing, if we don’t, Cuomo can shrug his shoulders and deflect blame." In the...
    Dying residents of a New York nursing home were reportedly dumped at local hospitals amid the coronavirus pandemic, according to a report — raising even more questions about the Cuomo administration’s handling of such homes during the crisis. Over five weeks during the pandemic, a nurse with the Columbia County Health Department counted 18 hospital deaths of residents at the Grand Rehabilitation and Nursing at Barnwell in the town of Valatie, ProPublica reported Tuesday. The nurse, who was not identified, explained that all the residents had arrived at the hospital with orders saying no extraordinary measures were to be taken to keep them alive, leading health officials to make a troubling deduction. “For me,” Columbia County Department of Health Director Jack Mabb told ProPublica, “it appeared they were sending people to the hospital so they wouldn’t die in the facility.” Mabb suggested that the Cuomo administration’s decision in early May...
            by Chris White  New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo dismissed suggestions Monday that local officials are undercounting coronavirus deaths at nursing homes while a several reports indicate the state inaccurately measured how the virus affected long-term care facilities. New York will not conduct an investigation into nursing home deaths during the pandemic, Cuomo said during a press conference Monday. His insistence that there is no controversy comes after media reports show the state only counts people who died on nursing home property and not those who died after being transferred to hospitals. “I wouldn’t do an investigation whether or not it’s political, everybody can make that decision for themselves,” the New York Democrat said during a press conference. “I think you’d have to be blind to realize it’s not political.” Cuomo added: “Just look at where it comes from and look at the sources and look at their political affiliations...
    The coronavirus death toll in New York’s nursing homes may be significantly higher than previously documented, according to a new analysis. Some 323 nursing home residents died between early June and mid-July, according to an Associated Press review of federal data — 65 percent higher than the 195 deaths tallied by the state in that same period. If that rate is indicative of reporting disparities for the duration of the pandemic, it could account for thousands of additional coronavirus-linked deaths on top of the more than 6,400 the state has already confirmed or presumed in nursing homes. “It seems like all signs point to an undercount,” state Assemblyman Ron Kim (D-Queens) told The Post after reviewing the new data. The federal Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services have required nursing homes across the nation to report a slew of datasets on a weekly basis since mid-May, including the “total deaths...
    Gov. Andrew Cuomo rebuffed the idea of an independent investigation into deaths in New York nursing homes during the COVID-19 pandemic. Some politicians have been calling for investigations into the conditions that led to thousands of COVID-19 deaths reported in nursing homes and assisted living facilities since the virus started spreading five months ago. During a conference call with media members this week, Cuomo said that there’s no need to conduct an investigation into nursing home deaths, stating that it would be impossible to separate politics from facts. Cuomo has been insistent that the thousands of nursing home deaths had nothing to do with his order in March requiring nursing homes to accept COVID-19 patients who were medically stable without testing them, stating that the deaths were caused by infected staff members who spread the virus. According to the state Department of Health, which performed its own inquiry, there have...
    For many people who died of coronavirus, the suffering of their final days was accompanied by the pain of dying alone and isolated from their families, a new study reveals.  The odds that a US COVID-19 victim who died between February and May this year would do so in hospital were 11.5-times higher than the odds of dying in a hospital of any cause during the same period in 2018, according to Northwestern University research.  During that time period in 2020, nearly 70 percent of people who succumbed to COVID-19 died in hospitals or other medical facilities. Another 23 percent died in nursing homes.  And the researchers believe many of these victims were likely nursing home patients transferred to hospitals, given the high death toll of coronavirus among elderly Americans.   Long term care facilities and hospitals alike had to impose restrictions on visitors to reduce the spread of coronavirus, which...
    NEW YORK CITY – Riverdale Nursing Home in the Bronx appears, on paper, to have escaped the worst of the coronavirus pandemic, with an official state count of just four deaths in its 146-bed facility. The truth, according to the home, is far worse: 21 dead, most transported to hospitals before they succumbed. “It was a cascading effect,” administrator Emil Fuzayov recalled. “One after the other.” New York’s coronavirus death toll in nursing homes, already among the highest in the nation, could actually be a significant undercount. Unlike every other state with major outbreaks, New York only counts residents who died on nursing home property and not those who were transported to hospitals and died there. That statistic could add thousands to the state’s official care home death toll of just over 6,600. But so far the administration of Democratic Gov. Andrew Cuomo has refused to divulge the number, leading...
    By Bernard Condon, Matt Ssedensky and Meghan Hoyer | Associated Press NEW YORK — Riverdale Nursing Home in the Bronx appears, on paper, to have escaped the worst of the coronavirus pandemic, with an official state count of just four deaths in its 146-bed facility. The truth, according to the home, is far worse: 21 dead, most transported to hospitals before they succumbed. “It was a cascading effect,” administrator Emil Fuzayov recalled. “One after the other.” New York’s coronavirus death toll in nursing homes, already among the highest in the nation, could actually be a significant undercount. Unlike every other state with major outbreaks, New York only counts residents who died on nursing home property and not those who were transported to hospitals and died there. That statistic could add thousands to the state’s official care home death toll of just over 6,600. But so far the...
    Fox News senior meteorologist Janice Dean said Tuesday that she was told lawmakers were “uncomfortable” with her testifying about New York’s nursing home deaths. Dean first spoke with Brian Kilmeade on his radio show “The Brian Kilmeade Show” Monday and noted that she was originally told she could testify and then was cut. Dean first said she believed Cuomo or his administration made the decision to not invite her. She lost both of her in-laws to coronavirus in nursing homes. After speaking to Kilmeade and with Fox’s Tucker Carlson on “Tucker Carlson Tonight” Monday, Dean said she was contacted by Republican New York State Sen. Tom O’Mara about the testimony. (RELATED: EXCLUSIVE: New York Admits Knowingly Undercounting Nursing Home Deaths After Quietly Changing Reporting Rules) “Late last night, after I appeared on Tucker Carlson Tonight, a senator, Tom O’Mara, Republican senator of New York state, admitted that they were uncomfortable having me as...
    Gov. Andrew Cuomo dismissed criticisms of the way his state is counting coronavirus deaths inside New York’s nursing home, telling reporters Monday that, “I think you’d have to be blind to realize it’s not political.”  His comments come after media reports from the Daily Caller News Foundation in May and the Associated Press in August show the state only counts people who died on nursing home property and not those who died after being transferred to hospitals. AP reported Monday that more than 68,200 residents and staff at nursing homes across the country have died from the coronavirus, out of more than 163,000 overall deaths, New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo dismissed suggestions Monday that local officials are undercounting coronavirus deaths at nursing homes while a several reports indicate the state inaccurately measured how the virus affected long-term care facilities. New York will not conduct an investigation into nursing...
    New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo “fails to take any responsibility” for coronavirus-related nursing home deaths in the state, Fox News senior meteorologist Janice Dean, who recently lost her elderly in-laws to COVID-19, told “Fox & Friends” on Tuesday. Dean made the comment days after she found out that she was taken off the list to testify at a hearing geared toward understanding why and how the pandemic took root in New York nursing homes. “I filled out all the paperwork, I wrote the letter to all the lawmakers that needed to be written to and I got a confirmation that the chair was going to allow me to speak,” she said on Tuesday, adding that she was expecting to testify at the second hearing, which took place on Monday. “I was supposed to hear back on the weekend. I never heard word and I heard during the hearings yesterday that they couldn't accommodate me,” she continued. She said New...
    New York's official count of nursing home residents who died after Gov. Andrew Cuomo (D) forced such facilities to accept coronavirus-positive patients "could actually be a significant undercount," the Associated Press reported. According to the AP, New York only counts nursing home residents who died on the property in their tally of nursing home fatalities, meaning residents who were transported to a hospital before succumbing to the virus are not being counted. For example, Bronx-based Riverdale Nursing Home only had four resident deaths recorded, according to official state data. In reality, the nursing home lost a total of 21 residents to COVID-19, most of whom were transported out of the facility prior to passing away. The revelation likely adds thousands of nursing home deaths to New York's already bloated count, which officially stands at more than 6,600. From the AP: How...
    Fox News meteorologist Janice Dean became emotional on Tuesday as she talked about her exclusion from testifying about nursing home deaths in New York throughout the coronavirus pandemic. Dean emerged as one of New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s fiercest critics in recent months with regard to his handling of the health crisis. Dean’s parents-in-law both died from Covid-19 at assisted living facilities, and as such, she repeatedly slammed Cuomo for failing to protect seniors in nursing homes and refusing to accept responsibility for the consequences of his policies. On Monday, Dean said she was called to speak at a public hearing on New York’s nursing home deaths, but her invitation was revoked and she accused Cuomo or his administration of being behind that. Speaking with her Fox & Friends colleagues on Tuesday, Dean elaborated on how she was pulled off the witness list. “Late last night, after I appeared...
    Virus_Outbreak_Nursing_Home_Numbers_50291 FILE - In this June 15, 2020, file photo, New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo removes a mask as he holds a news conference in Tarrytown, N.Y. New York’s coronavirus death toll in nursing homes, already among the highest in the nation, could actually be a significant undercount. Unlike every other state with major outbreaks, New York only counts residents who died on nursing home property and not those who died in hospitals. AP Photo/Mark Lennihan, File Virus_Outbreak_Nursing_Home_Numbers_18010 FILE - In this April 17, 2020, file photo, emergency medical workers arrive at Cobble Hill Health Center in the Brooklyn borough of New York. New York’s coronavirus death toll in nursing homes, already among the highest in the nation, could actually be a significant undercount. Unlike every other state with major outbreaks, New York only counts residents who died on nursing home property and not those who died in...
    A new report alleges that the true extent of the number of deaths that New York’s nursing homes suffered under the leadership of Democratic Governor Andrew Cuomo may be far higher than what has been reported due to the way that the statistics are gathered and counted. “New York’s coronavirus death toll in nursing homes, already among the highest in the nation, could actually be a significant undercount,” the Associated Press reported. “Unlike every other state with major outbreaks, New York only counts residents who died on nursing home property and not those who were transported to hospitals and died there.” The AP gave one example as an illustration of the problem: the Riverdale Nursing Home in the Bronx. According to the AP, on paper, the nursing home only reported a total of four deaths from the coronavirus out of its nearly 150-bed facility. However, the true number is 21...
    By BERNARD CONDON, MATT SEDENSKY and MEGHAN HOYER, Associated Press NEW YORK (AP) — Riverdale Nursing Home in the Bronx appears, on paper, to have escaped the worst of the coronavirus pandemic, with an official state count of just four deaths in its 146-bed facility. The truth, according to the home, is far worse: 21 dead, most transported to hospitals before they succumbed. “It was a cascading effect,” administrator Emil Fuzayov recalled. “One after the other.” New York’s coronavirus death toll in nursing homes, already among the highest in the nation, could actually be a significant undercount. Unlike every other state with major outbreaks, New York only counts residents who died on nursing home property and not those who were transported to hospitals and died there. That statistic that could add thousands to the state’s official care home death toll of just over 6,600. But so far the administration of...
    New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo is against an independent investigation into the nursing home deaths during the coronavirus pandemic in the state, Fox News reports. Cuomo said he “wouldn’t do an investigation” during his Monday press conference citing calls for a probe are political. He said “you’d have to be blind” to think requests to take a deeper look into coronavirus deaths linked to state nursing homes amid the pandemic are “not political.” “Just look at where it comes from and look at the sources and look at their political affiliations and look at who wrote the letter in Congress and look at what publications raise it and what media outward networks raise it,” he said of the request for an investigation. “It’s kind of incredible.” Cuomo has claimed that the thousands of nursing home deaths are not related to his March 25 order that required nursing homes to accept...
    Fox News senior meteorologist Janice Dean, whose in-laws died from the coronavirus, railed against the hearings on the deaths in New York nursing homes on Monday’s The Brian Kilmeade Show — claiming that Gov. Andrew Cuomo (D) got her invitation to speak rescinded. Cuomo has claimed in the past that any criticism on his handling of the virus in nursing homes has been politically charged, and has dodged the blame, placing it on the federal government and the CDC.  Dean, however, blames the governor’s handling of the pandemic or the deaths of both of her parents-in-law, as they both died from the coronavirus at assisted living facilities. “Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s motto during the coronavirus pandemic has always been ‘New York Tough,’” Dean wrote in an op-ed for USA Today. “But when it comes to tough questions about his leadership during this time, Cuomo has shown he isn’t so tough after...
    Fox News senior meteorologist Janice Dean, who recently lost her elderly in-laws to COVID-19, told the “Brian Kilmeade Show” on Monday that she was taken off the list to testify at a hearing geared toward understanding why and how the pandemic took root in New York nursing homes. She said she believes New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo or his administration were behind the decision. “I was supposed to be on the list,” Dean said on Monday. “I actually filled out all the paperwork and sent the letter to all the lawmakers I believe July 28, a few days before the first hearing. They told me they couldn’t get me on that day, last Monday, but that I would be on today. I have several emails saying that that was happening.” She said she had correspondence with New York Assemblyman Kevin Byrne and that he was the one who was...
    New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo said there is no need for an independent investigation into his policy on nursing homes that critics say led to thousands of deaths during the coronavirus pandemic. Cuomo, a Democrat, told reporters during a teleconference on Monday that he doesn't trust such an examination of his now-reversed March 25 directive that prohibited nursing homes from turning away recovering coronavirus patients. "There is no such thing as a person who is trusted by all Democrats and Republicans. That person doesn't exist. The Department of Health — those are just numbers. They report our numbers. You can see what you want in the numbers, but the numbers are the numbers. You can politically spin numbers, but those numbers are numbers," Cuomo said. "And, as you know, the Department of Health review was then reviewed by credible industry experts ... so to your point about why...
    New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo on Monday said “you’d have to be blind” to think calls to further calls to investigate the coronavirus deaths linked to state nursing homes amid the pandemic are “not political.” Cuomo, during a press conference Monday, said he “wouldn’t do an investigation” into the nursing home deaths during the coronavirus pandemic in the state of New York. “I wouldn’t do an investigation whether or not it’s political, everybody can make that decision for themselves,” Cuomo said. “I think you’d have to be blind to realize it’s not political.” He went on to say, “Just look at where it comes from and look at the sources and look at their political affiliations and look at who wrote the letter in Congress and look at what publications raise it and what media outward networks raise it.” NEW YORK TIMES ACCUSED OF GOING SOFT ON CUOMO OVER NY...
    Nineteen people at a Texas nursing home have died due to the coronavirus and 24 employees have been infected, officials said. Missouri City said it received notification Wednesday about the deaths and infections at Paradigm at First Colony Nursing Home after Yolanda Ford, the city's mayor, sent a letter to the state's health department requesting notice about cases in the Houston-area city. "The city is concerned about the individuals and families who are affected by the Paradigm cases," Ford said. Nursing homes have been hit hard by the pandemic. Residents and staff represent a tiny share of the U.S. population but account for as many as 4 in 10 coronavirus deaths, according to some estimates. Get Breaking News Delivered to Your Inbox "This harrowing development speaks to the severity of this pandemic and how everyone needs to take it even more seriously," Ford said of the nursing home outbreak....
    MISSOURI CITY, Texas (CBSDFW.COM/AP) — Nineteen people at a Texas nursing home have died due to the coronavirus and 24 employees have been infected, officials said. Missouri City said it received notification Wednesday about the deaths and infections at Paradigm at First Colony Nursing Home after Yolanda Ford, the city’s mayor, sent a letter to the state’s health department requesting notice about cases in the Harris County city. “The city is concerned about the individuals and families who are affected by the Paradigm cases,” Ford said. There was no answer early Thursday at a telephone listing for the facility. Missouri City is about 20 miles southwest of Houston. Nursing homes have been hit hard by the pandemic. Residents and staff represent a tiny share of the U.S. population but account for as many as 4 in 10 coronavirus deaths, according to some estimates. Texas on Wednesday reported 236 new coronavirus...
    Fox News senior meteorologist Janice Dean, who recently lost her elderly in-laws to COVID-19, pushed for a “full” and “bipartisan” investigation into New York’s nursing home deaths during the coronavirus pandemic. Dean made the demand speaking on “Fox & Friends” one day after New York state lawmakers grilled  the state’s top health official about the steep, though ultimately unknown, death toll at nursing homes in the state amid the pandemic. Dean said on Tuesday that “we need a full investigation, a bipartisan investigation so that we can get [State Health Commissioner Howard] Zucker and other people from the administration on the hot seat so that we can get some of these answers.” “Right now these are hearings. We’re hearing a lot,” she continued. “We’re getting a lot of stones thrown, but to actually progress the law and make changes, we’re going to have to have a real investigation.” Members of the Democratic-led Legislature are holding hearings geared...
    Vice President Mike Pence pinned some of the coronavirus deaths that occurred in the state of New York on Gov. Andrew Cuomo. "Our hearts grieve for the fact that 1 in 5 of all the American lives that have been lost in the coronavirus pandemic were lost in the state of New York, and some of that was because of poor decisions by the state and by Gov. Cuomo," Pence said Monday on Fox News. "I liked it better when he said that President Trump's leadership in the pandemic was, in his words, was 'phenomenal.' He said that repeatedly." Critics have attacked Cuomo for a March 25 order that required some recovering coronavirus patients to be placed into nursing homes during the first few weeks of the pandemic. After initially praising Trump for assisting New York during the pandemic's initial surge, Cuomo, a Democrat, has been critical...
    By MARINA VILLENEUVE, Associated Press ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) — Democratic and Republican state lawmakers grilled New York's top health official Monday about the steep, though ultimately unknown death toll at the state’s nursing homes amid the coronavirus pandemic. Members of the Democratic-led Legislature are holding hearings geared at understanding why and how the pandemic took root in New York nursing homes. Lawmakers, who plan to hold another hearing next Monday, said they want to pass better policies to protect nursing home residents and staffers if infections surge again. The state Department of Health reports nearly 6,600 residents died at New York’s nursing homes and adult-facilities, including 6,400 nursing home residents. The state has not disclosed how many nursing home residents died at hospitals, or how many residents have been infected with COVID-19. A June report found that at least a quarter of the COVID-19 deaths in the United States were...