Friday, Dec 03, 2021 - 12:05:17
1000 results - (0.002 seconds)

companies:

latest news at page 1:
    West Virginia Democratic Sen. Joe Manchin came out against President Joe Biden’s vaccine mandate for large businesses late Thursday, saying he would vote against the measure when it likely comes up next week. “Let me be clear, I do not support any government vaccine mandate on private businesses,” Manchin said in a statement. “That’s why I have cosponsored and will strongly support a bill to overturn the federal government vaccine mandate for private businesses.” “I have long said we should incentivize, not penalize, private employers whose responsibility it is to protect their employees from COVID-19,” Manchin said, going on to strongly encourage West Virginians to get vaccinated and touting the shots’ safety and efficacy. Manchin’s opposition to the mandate may give the measure enough votes to pass the 50-50 Senate, given that Republicans are unanimously against it. But even if it garnered enough support to pass the Democrat-controlled House of Representatives, Biden could still veto the block on his mandate if it lands on his desk. (RELATED: Republican Objections To Biden’s Vaccine Mandate Could Force Weeklong Government Shutdown) Tonight I...
    Detroit (CNN)As Michael Lundy cradles her newborn son, she's mentally preparing to pack up and leave her Detroit home again.She just got a shutoff notice from the power company, owes more than $2,400 and her debt has grown throughout the Covid-19 pandemic. And she's been trying to stay afloat after being out of work while also taking care of her 11-year-old daughter. In September, the utility company cut her power until she paid a portion of her debt, forcing her to leave home and stay with family. Now, the company is threatening to do it again."It's frightening," Lundy said. "I don't want to be nowhere else but home. I don't want my kids nowhere else but home... But if it happens, it's really out of my control."Record federal home heating aid available, but it likely still isnt enoughThousands of Americans have been racking up utility debt during the pandemic. Families now owe power companies close to $20 billion, up 67% from the average year, according to the National Energy Assistance Directors' Association. At the peak of the pandemic, that debt...
    Holiday Shopping Made Easy - These Are Nordstroms 20 Most Popular Gifts of 2021 Tomorrow’s route for No. 6 Notre Dame to reach the Playoff Lock In Refi Savings Before Rates Get Too High Ad Microsoft $200 Sign Up Bonus Just In Time For The Holidays Ad Microsoft
    Workers on the line at a Triumph Foods pork processing facility, April 28, 2017 in St. Joseph, Missouri.Preston Keres/Planet Pix via ZUMA Wire Fight disinformation. Get a daily recap of the facts that matter. Sign up for the free Mother Jones newsletter.A new bill, jointly released last week by Sen. Cory Booker (D-N.J.) and Rep. Ro Khanna (D-Calif.), seeks to address an injustice laid bare by the coronavirus pandemic: the gaping power differential between the people who process the US meat supply and the executives and shareholders who profit from their labor. It would do so by protecting meatpacking workers from repetitive stress injuries, which have become endemic to the occupation. The legislation would also likely bolster worker safety during future viral outbreaks.  “Meatpacking companies prioritized profits and production over worker safety.” In an important sense, the COVID-19 era has been a tale of two pandemics: one for people whose jobs require them to toil indoors at close quarters, and another for those who can make a living without facing such hazards. Few industries sum up the situation more neatly...
    In the eyes of the legal system, animals are property.  If a person shoots a dog, the court will ask: whose dog?  Was the owner scared, or sad?  What is the market value of the dog?  And if a person shoots a cow, or pig, or chicken, a court will rarely have any questions whatsoever. Given how the law—and society—views animals, it is difficult for lawyers to go to court and vindicate their rights.  So, animal lawyers invoke whatever laws and legal mechanisms can advance the interests of animals. The primary, federal statute protecting animals is Animal Welfare Act.  But this statute does not protect the vast majority of animals who need protection: the 9 billion animals per year that Americans raise and slaughter for food; or birds, mice, and rats that researchers use for experiments.  And even where the Animal Welfare Act does protect animals, the protections are minimal. Sometimes state laws increase these minimal protections.  But, by definition, state laws vary by state.  Some laws protect specific animals: the Endangered Species Act protects endangered animals and their...
    NEW YORK (CBSNewYork) — Office holiday parties are happening again. For some, it’s the first opportunity to meet co-workers in more than a year. But event spaces told CBS2’s Lisa Rozner recently that safety is as much a part of the party as the food. READ MORE: First U.S. Case Of Omicron Variant Detected In California“This is an outdoor dining room, event space and more. During COVID, we decided to install these heaters,” said Gary Wallach, director of food and beverage for Arlo SoHo. The heaters were installed when indoor dining was suspended last December, and now Arlo Soho says companies are booking holiday parties in its courtyard, on its rooftop, and even utilizing cabins shipped in from Canada that have porch access. “We are seeing a week-out emails piling in. Everyone is just watching the news,” Wallach said. COVID VACCINE New York State book online here or call 1-833-NYS-4-VAX New York City book online here or call 877-VAX-4NYC Track NYC vaccinations by zip code Nassau County more info here Suffolk County more info here Westchester County more info here New Jersey book online here or call 1-855-568-0545 Connecticut book...
    In this article DIDIA mobile phone shows the interface of Didi's APP in Yichang, Hubei province, China, July 4, 2021.Costfoto | Barcroft Media | Getty ImagesChinese ride-hailing giant Didi said Friday that it will start delisting from the New York Stock Exchange, and make plans to list in Hong Kong instead. It comes less than six months after the tech giant listed in the U.S. Didi said it reached that decision after careful consideration. Shares of Didi have plunged 44% since its IPO on June 30, and closed at $7.80 on Thursday. The stock fell sharply last week after reports that Chinese regulators have asked the firm's executives to formulate a plan to delist from the U.S. Regulators reportedly want Chinese ride-hailing giant Didi to delist from the New York Stock Exchange because of concerns about leakage of sensitive data. The delisting jeopardizes the massive stakes held by SoftBank and Uber, which combined own over 30% of Didi, according to FactSet. SoftBank shares in Japan were down 2.5% on Friday. Didi reportedly drew the ire of regulators when it pushed ahead...
    In this article NVDAJen-Hsun Huang, president and chief executive officer of Nvidia Corp., speaks during the company's event at Mobile World Congress Americas in Los Angeles on Oct. 21, 2019.Patrick T. Fallon | Bloomberg | Getty ImagesNvidia's $40 billion acquisition of U.K. chip designer Arm is looking increasingly unlikely to go through, according to Gartner semiconductor analyst Alan Priestley. The deal is facing a growing number of regulatory probes around the world, Priestley said, pointing to concerns in the U.K., the EU, the U.S. and China. "I believe it's highly unlikely it will go through," Priestley told CNBC Wednesday. Nvidia and Arm did not immediately respond to a CNBC request for comment. The deal was set to be completed by March 2022 but Nvidia CEO Jensen Huang admitted in August that it would probably go beyond that date. Arm was spun out of an early computing company called Acorn Computers in 1990. The company's energy-efficient chip designs are used in 95% of the world's smartphones and 95% of the chips designed in China. The company, bought by Japan's SoftBank in 2016 for...
    Jen-Hsun Huang, president and chief executive officer of Nvidia Corp., speaks during the company's event at Mobile World Congress Americas in Los Angeles, California, U.S., on Monday, Oct. 21, 2019.Patrick T. Fallon | Bloomberg | Getty Images The Federal Trade Commission on Thursday sued to block Nvidia's $40 billion acquisition of Arm from SoftBank on antitrust grounds. The deal has faced scrutiny from regulators since it was announced last year. The U.S. action is the biggest hurdle it has faced yet, and threatens whether the deal will be completed. "The proposed vertical deal would give one of the largest chip companies control over the computing technology and designs that rival firms rely on to develop their own competing chips," the FTC said in an announcement. Nvidia stock was up over 2% on Thursday before the announcement, and did not move significantly on the news. The FTC complaint is not yet public. Arm is a core supplier of architecture technology to most semiconductor companies. Its Arm instruction set is at the core of nearly all mobile processors powering smartphones, including those...
    VIDEO4:3504:35SEC to finalize rules that allow delisting of foreign firmsThe Exchange Foreign public companies that are listed in the United States may be delisted if their auditors do not comply with requests for information from U.S. regulators.  On Thursday, the Securities and Exchange Commission adopted amendments to finalize rules to implement the Holding Foreign Companies Accountable Act (HFCAA). The law was passed in 2020 after Chinese regulators repeatedly denied requests from the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (PCAOB), which was created in 2002 to oversee the audits of public companies, to inspect the audits of Chinese firms that list and trade in the United States. In 2020, Chinese firm Luckin Coffee fired its CEO and chief operating officer following an internal fraud probe, which increased calls for action.    The law permits the SEC to ban companies from trading and be delisted from exchanges if the PCAOB is not able to audit requested reports for three consecutive years. It also requires companies to declare whether they are owned or controlled by any foreign government. The rules adopted on Thursday establish a framework for...
    REUTERS/Yuri GripasPresident Donald Trump hugging the American flag at the 2019 Conservative Political Action Conference annual meeting.The fact that Donald Trump used the presidency in various ways to enrich himself will not shock anyone who has been paying attention. A great deal of the self-dealing from which Trump profited has been gathered by investigative reporter David Cay Johnston for his new book, “The Big Cheat: How Donald Trump Fleeced America and Enriched Himself and his Family.” I haven’t read it yet, but for a quick overview, watch the video, linked below, of a CNN interview with Johnson who logs between $1.6 and $1.7 billion in revenue that the Trump companies earned while he was in office. “A lot of it came from the taxpayers,” Johnson said. Trump “did everything he could to make sure that the taxpayers were putting money into his businesses, hundreds of millions of dollars.” Like all government officials, Trump had to sign a disclosure of the money that came to him through his public job, and how he spent the money. Johnson mentions in passing during...
    A consumer group has sent letters to multiple governors warning them about their states’ pension funds relying on an investment corporation with strong ties to China. Consumer’s Research distributed a report to the top 10 states whose pension funds are invested in BlackRock, a multinational money management firm. It is the first foreign-owned company to receive a license to operate in China’s $3.5 trillion mutual fund industry, Forbes reported. “The warning is meant to raise awareness among American consumers that BlackRock is taking their money and betting on China,” William Hild, executive director of Consumer’s Research, wrote a in letter sent to the governors. “In so doing they are putting American security at risk, along with billions of dollars from U.S. investors.” Washington has invested the most money, with $13 billion of its pension invested in BlackRock. The other states are Florida, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New York, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, South Carolina and West Virginia. Hill noted that BlackRock’s CEO, Larry Fink, has become a “trusted partner” of China’s leadership, who they’ve used as an adviser. In a March 2020 letter to shareholders,...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — Chinese companies will have to disclose more information about audits and whether they are controlled by a government or else leave U.S. stock markets under a rule approved by securities regulators. The rule approved Thursday by the Securities and Exchange Commission steps up a long-running standoff between Washington and Beijing over how much information companies with U.S.-traded shares must disclosed. Companies that used an auditor in a foreign jurisdiction will be required to confirm they are not “owned or controlled by a government entity” there, according to the SEC. Companies also will be required to disclose additional information in annual reports. “Trading prohibitions” can be imposed on some companies, the SEC said. Other governments cooperate with U.S. demands for more financial details from companies to prevent false reporting. But Beijing, citing security concerns, refuses to allow the U.S. Public Companies Accounting Oversight Board to review work of Chinese auditors. Hundreds of Chinese companies have raised tens of billions of dollars in U.S. financial markets, but their status is a matter of growing dispute with Beijing. The latest...
    SAN JOSE, Calif. (KGO) -- Stick with office reopening plans or push back timelines again? It's a dilemma many companies are continuing to face, after multiple delays due to COVID-19 mutations. Of course, the most recent being the omicron variant."I think almost anything that stimulates concern causes further delay," Bay Area Council President and CEO Jim Wunderman told ABC7 News. "Because companies don't want to be in the position of putting their employees at risk."Wunderman said it's hard to imagine the omicron variant won't impact return-to-office goals the way delta did.RELATED: How omicron COVID-19 variant is changing holiday travel plansOn Thursday, Google confirmed it is now waiting until the new year to assess when office locations are ready for the transition back.January 10th had long-been the earliest date Google would've ended its voluntary work-from-home period and kicked off a new hybrid work week."This is going to trickle down to you know, most of the companies," San Jose State University professor and tech expert Ahmed Banafa said. "The problem with it is we are dealing with the unknown. We have no...
              more  
    LOS ANGELES (AP) — When then-California Gov. Jerry Brown signed the nation’s first law requiring women on boards of publicly traded companies, he suggested it might not survive legal challenges. Three years later, a judge will begin hearing evidence Wednesday in Los Angeles Superior Court that could undo the law credited with giving more women seats in boardrooms traditionally dominated by men. The California law has spurred other states to adopt or consider similar laws. The conservative legal group Judicial Watch brought the lawsuit claiming it’s illegal to use taxpayer funds to enforce a law that violates the equal protection clause of the California Constitution by mandating a gender-based quota. “They are creating a classification that either prefers or discriminates against one class or in preference of another,” attorney Robert Patrick Sticht said. He said the state doesn’t have a compelling government interest to create the mandate. Another conservative legal group has filed a separate lawsuit in federal court claiming the law violates the equal protection clause of the U.S. Constitution. Former Sen. Hannah-Beth Jackson, who authored...
    CARMICHAEL (CBS13) — A new app is changing physical therapy and reducing fraud all at once. “You put this on and when it’s flashing green it’s ready to go,” said Bill Zachry. READ MORE: Why The New Omicron COVID Variant Is More ConcerningZachry is wearing the Recupe app by Plethy. “I push the button and move my arm up and down,” he said. He is following a set of physical therapy instructions on his smartphone. “The device will keep track of the range of motion and how much work I put into it,” Zachry said. It’s a sensor the size of a quarter that tracks data and relays it directly through your phone to your doctor. “This is the most sophisticated user interface that we’ve seen so far, for sure,” said Dr. Hunter Greene, an orthopedist specializing in sports medicine. Dr. Greene’s patients use it to track progress remotely while recovering from surgery or an injury. “If they go once every week, or two weeks with a structured physical therapist, this can fill in that void for them,” Greene said. All...
    LOS ANGELES (AP) — When then-California Gov. Jerry Brown signed the nation’s first law requiring women on boards of publicly traded companies, he suggested it might not survive legal challenges. Three years later, a judge will begin hearing evidence Wednesday in Los Angeles Superior Court that could undo the law credited with giving more women seats in boardrooms traditionally dominated by men. The California law has spurred other states to adopt or consider similar laws. The conservative legal group Judicial Watch brought the lawsuit that claims it’s illegal to use taxpayer funds to enforce a law that violates the equal protection clause of the California Constitution by mandating a gender-based quota. “They are creating a classification that either prefers or discriminates against one class or in preference of another,” attorney Robert Patrick Sticht said. He said the state doesn’t have a compelling government interest to create the mandate. Another conservative legal group has filed a separate lawsuit in federal court claiming the law violates the equal protection clause of the U.S. Constitution. Betsy Berkhemer-Credaire, CEO of the...
    A coalition of major media companies has filed a legal brief in support of former Trump chief White House strategist Steven Bannon as he fights a proposed protective order in court that would keep him from publicizing Jan. 6th documents and information. The media group – which includes CNN, ABC, NBC, plus the Washington Post, the New York Times, and the parent company of the Wall Street Journal – filed a motion to intervene as Bannon's fights the government's proposed order as part of his contempt of Congress case.  The order would severely limit what Bannon can do with the trove of information that the feds must share as part of the normal discovery process and have already begun handing over.  According to a prior government filing, this includes more than 1,000 pages of witness testimony, grand jury material, and even emails from staff for the House Jan. 6th Committee investigating the Capitol riot. The press group argues that the government's proposed order would violate the First Amendment – and takes on the government's own contention that allowing Bannon to...
    Even worse, according to Cramer, "We left vaccination policy to individual companies." "It’s just plain wrong, and most of us are sick of it," the anchor added, eventually stating, “It’s time to admit that we have to go to war against COVID. Require vaccination universally. Have the military run it.”Anything else?Mediaite noted that a federal vaccine mandate isn't something that a president can simply demand. The issue is nuanced, and a sweeping directive such as that would almost certainly end up in court. In fact, Biden's vaccine mandate for private companies has already been halted by a federal court order. And so has his vaccine mandate for health care workers. In the latter case, the ruling judge did not mince words when illuminating how Biden's mandate stood in opposition to America's republican system of government. "Congress did not clearly authorize CMS to enact ... this politically and economically vast, federalism-altering, and boundary-pushing mandate, which Supreme Court precedent requires," U.S. District Judge Matthew Schelp declared.
    New York (CNN Business)The Federal Trade Commission said Monday that it is ordering Amazon, Walmart, Kroger, Procter & Gamble, Tyson, Kraft Heinz and several major wholesalers to grocery stores to turn over information in a wide-ranging inquiry examining the causes of empty shelves and surging prices in the United States.The antitrust watchdog is looking into whether supply chain disruptions are creating anti-competitive practices among businesses and contributing to higher prices for consumers. The agency is not seeking this information for any specific law enforcement purposes. Instead, the FTC is sending these orders under a legal provision that allows it to conduct broad studies of competition. The companies have 45 days to respond. These major chains boomed as small retailers had to close up shopThe orders require the companies to turn over internal documents and information about the factors disrupting their ability to attain and deliver goods, increased costs and prices and the steps they are taking to minimize disruptions. The FTC also wants to know how they allocate products among stores when items are in short supply.FTC Chair Lina Khan...
    New York (CNN Business)So much for the house always winning. Casino stocks have had a brutal year. Penn National Gaming (PENN), which operates more than 40 US gambling locations, has plunged 40% this year. That makes Penn, which also owns a 36% stake in Dave Portnoy's Barstool Sports betting and entertainment company, one of the worst performing stocks in the S&P 500 so far this year.But Penn isn't the only gambling firm hurting in 2021: Shares of Wynn Resorts (WYNN) and Las Vegas Sands (LVS) are down more than 25% and 35% respectively. Several factors are hitting the industry hard, and on a global scale. Covid-19 concerns are continuing to impact travel, particularly in Macao, the former Portuguese territory that is now a special administrative region of China and has become Asia's gambling mecca. And now Beijing is cracking down on casino operators on Macao's Cotai Strip — continued bad news for Wynn and Sands, which each own properties there. Casino stocks crash as Macao considers crackdown on gamblingMeanwhile, stateside, the brutally competitive gaming business is making it tough for...
    Nissan Motor Corporation announced a long-term plan to add multiple battery-powered vehicles to its portfolio on Monday. The Japanese car giant said it will invest 2 trillion yen, approximately $17.5 billion, over the next five years, aiming to roll out 23 new electric car models by 2030, including 15 fully electric models, the company said in a press release. Additionally, the company targets 50% of its product line to be fully electric by 2030 and carbon neutral by 2050. (RELATED: Treasury To Reallocate Rental Assistance Money Based On State Demands) “The role of companies to address societal needs is increasingly heightened,” Nissan chief executive Makoto Uchida said in the press release. Nissan said it is investing 2 trillion yen ($17.6 billion) over the next five years and developing a cheaper, more powerful battery to boost its electric vehicle lineup. The Japanese automaker plans to build 15 new electric vehicles by fiscal 2030. https://t.co/lItQlbkOI0 — The Associated Press (@AP) November 29, 2021 “With Nissan Ambition 2030, we will drive the new age of electrification, advance technologies to reduce carbon...
    SACRAMENTO —  Offshore oil derricks dotting the California coastline continue pumping despite a history of catastrophic spills and vows from generations of politicians to send them to the scrapheap. They’ve even survived a modest attempt by state officials more than a decade ago to offer incentives to oil companies that chose to abandon their costly operations. Now, the failure of California’s “Rigs to Reefs” program, an effort to transform oil platforms into underwater artificial reefs, stands as a cautionary tale to those who have called for a drilling ban after thousands of gallons of crude washed ashore in Orange County in October. “The question that we’ve been grappling with is how do we minimize risks to taxpayers and maximize the speed with which we can get these things gone,” said state Sen. Bob Hertzberg (D-Van Nuys). “No one wants to deal with the oil companies, but the reality of the situation is you’re gonna have to create a structure that works for everybody. Otherwise, we’re going to continually be in this situation and there will be another spill.” Fed by concerns...
    Quick loans are the current financial source that has appeared on the market. This type of loan is quite attractive because it offers a quick way to get extra money in urgent situations. However, there is little choice for you to consider before applying. And so many factors need to be taken into account. Here you will know what this type of loan consists of and how to choose the one that best fits your needs: What can quick loans do? What can’t they do? The primary purpose of quick loans is usually to respond quickly when an emergency arises that requires additional money. With these devices, you will have access to cash in less than 24 hours. It’s an ideal solution for cases like not having enough money for the car repair, sudden illness, or you’re just lack of funds to pay an urgent bill. On the other hand, these loans are not intended to solve financial problems that arise over time. If you find that your income can’t cover all your expenses every month, this type of loan...
    UPDATE: Six firefighters were hospitalized with minor injuries Sunday in a stubborn hours-long blaze that broke out in a basement gun range, spread through a Rockland County shopping center and continued burning late into the night, authorities said. Firefighters from Mahwah, Montvale, Oradell and River Vale were among more than 100 from Rockland, Westchester and Bergen counties either at the Pearl River scene or in coverage through the afternoon and into the evening. The sneaky blaze began shortly before noon in the long-gun range at the Rockland Indoor Shooting Education Center -- commonly known as "The Rise" -- beneath the Dollar General store on North Middletown Road, Pearl River Fire Chief Jim Morrison said. The range was occupied at the time, Morrison told Rockland Video Productions. The shopping center was evacuated and area roads were closed as flames spread into a "void space" between the ceiling of the gun range and the floor of the stores above, travelling "all the way across the whole length of the building," the chief said. It continued to burn beneath Dollar General and the Dunkin...
    Two firefighters had to be hospitalized Sunday in a stubborn blaze that broke out in a basement gun range, spread through a Rockland County shopping center and continued burning for several hours, responders said. Firefighters from Mahwah, Montvale and River Vale were among more than 100 from Rockland, Westchester and Bergen counties either at the Pearl River scene or in coverage through the afternoon and into the evening. The sneaky blaze began shortly before noon in the long-gun range at the Rockland Indoor Shooting Education Center beneath the Dollar General store on North Middletown Road, Pearl River Fire Chief Jim Morrison said. The range was occupied at the time, Morrison told Rockland Video Productions. The shopping center was evacuated as flames spread into a "void space" between the ceiling of the gun range and the floor of the stores above, travelling "all the way across the whole length of the building," the chief said. It continued to burn beneath Dollar General and the Dunkin Donuts next door past nightfall, causing problems for firefighters who couldn't get to it, he said. "The...
    A recent article by the Guardian has shed light on phthalates, chemicals that are ubiquitous in everything from food packaging to household cleaners and cosmetics.  According to the Harvard Gazette, phthalates became prevalent during the plastics revolution because they make plastics flexible, and nearly every person in America has been exposed to them.  Consider, for example, the smell of nail polish or a new plastic shower curtain—phthalates. After conducting a study on phthalate exposure in 2003, the CDC recommended that researchers conduct further studies on these chemicals and their effect on human health.  The CDC recommendation led to widespread funding of phthalates studies, and in the past two decades, studies have connected phthalates to “asthma, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, breast cancer, obesity and type II diabetes, neurodevelopmental issues, behavioral issues, autism spectrum disorders, altered reproductive development and male fertility issues.” While phthalates include a myriad of different chemicals, the Guardian suggests that “[e]nough distinct phthalates have been studied to indicate that companies should proceed with caution when using any chemical in the phthalate class, particularly in products for pregnant women...
              moreby Ailan Evans   The U.S. Department of Commerce added several Chinese technology companies to its trade blacklist Wednesday for providing technological support to the Chinese military. The Commerce Department added the firms to its Entity List, which imposes severe trade restrictions on covered entities, characterizing the companies as “acting contrary to the national security or foreign policy interests of the United States.” “Global trade and commerce should support peace, prosperity, and good-paying jobs, not national security risks,” Secretary of Commerce Gina Raimondo said in a statement. “The Department of Commerce is committed to effectively using export controls to protect our national security.” Eight tech companies operating out of the People’s Republic of China (PRC) were added to the Entity List over fears of economic espionage. The companies could acquire and use U.S. emerging technologies “for the PRC’s quantum computing efforts that support military applications,” such as submarine cloaking technology and anti-encryption software, the Department of Commerce said. Those technologies would help modernize the Chinese military and pose a national security threat to the U.S., according to the Commerce Department. In addition to the...
    Joe Biden is the gift that keeps on giving. The gift, that is, of parallels with fellow Democrat Jimmy Carter. Most Americans have no memories of the actual Carter presidency, from 1977 to 1981, but this Baby Boomer sure does.  As for you youngins, you can can look him up, and you’ll see too: He was terrible in office. So terrible, in fact, that when he ran for re-election in 1980, he was thunderously defeated, losing to Ronald Reagan by almost ten points in the popular vote and by 489 to 49 in the electoral college.   Yes, Carter was that bad.   So it might seem strange that Biden seems to have chosen Carter as a role model. He is replicating, for instance, Carter’s policies on regulatory contraction and, at the same time, price inflation. Yes, it’s a strange emulation, and yet here we are in the early 2020s, replaying the late 1970s.  Here at Breitbart News, we’ve made something of a specialty of comparing the 46th president to the 39th president—just type in “Joe Biden Jimmy Carter” in the search...
    The Biden-Harris administration issued a report Friday to increase the price of oil leasing fees on federal lands in the United States by 50 percent—even while accusing oil companies of artificially increasing prices through illegal and anticompetitive actions. Despite record-high gasoline prices impacting American families across the country with winter around the corner, the Biden-Harris administration is recommending Congress hike the cost of oil leases on government lands from 12.50 percent to 18.75 percent. The 6.25 percentage point royalty rate increase on oil companies would contradict the administration’s promise to lower gasoline prices. In recent weeks, the Biden-Harris administration has asked OPEC to increase oil supplies and requested the Federal Trade Commission conduct an investigation into oil companies for “anticompetitive behavior.” The rate increase, according to the New York Times, would generate about an extra “$2.5 billion in new revenue by the end of the decade,” which oil companies would pay to the federal government, though consumers would absorb the increased cost the companies incur. So far, the Biden-Harris administration has collected $1.6 billion more from oil leases in 2021 than in 2020....
    Many people started holiday shopping earlier than usual amid worries supply chain issues would make it harder to get all of the presents on their lists in time; but advocates for local businesses say that’s all the more reason to “shop local.” “It’s always a good job creator and by shopping ‘made in America’ products, you support the creation of these good jobs,” said Elizabeth Brotherton-Bunch, a spokeswoman with the Alliance for American Manufacturing. “By supporting these small local businesses and supporting these American manufacturers, it’s one way to do your part.” More Local News More D.C. News More Holiday News Every year, the AAM puts out a Made in America Gift Guide that highlights companies that make their own products. This year’s edition includes multiple companies from all 50 states, as well as D.C. and Puerto Rico. “For a lot of small companies, for a lot of small brands, the holiday season really is a critical season for them,” said Brotherton-Bunch. “One of the companies we’re promoting in D.C. is a card maker, Second Story Cards, they...
    A consumer watchdog criticized the largest asset manager in the world, BlackRock, for "going woke" in the U.S. while investing heavily in China. BlackRock has prioritized investments in environmentally and socially conscious companies in the U.S., but has continued to pour money into Chinese companies that don't meet those standards, Consumers' Research executive director Will Hild told Fox News. WATCH:  Video"It's going woke here in the United States … while it's funneling U.S. investment dollars over to China," Hild said. Since China is considered a developing economy and the United States is a developed economy, Chinese corporations are subject to less strict guidelines on green and equity initiatives, putting American companies at a disadvantage, according to Hild.  LARRY FINK'S BLACKROCK TO BENEFIT FROM GOVERNMENT ESG PUSH FILE PHOTO: Larry Fink, chief executive officer of BlackRock, takes part in the Yahoo Finance All Markets Summit in New York, Feb. 8, 2017.  (REUTERS/Lucas Jackson/File Photo) Consumers’ Research, a nonprofit consumers watchdog group, recently kicked off a multimillion-dollar campaign that "highlights the ties between BlackRock and the Chinese government," according to its...
    LISBON, Portugal (AP) — Portugal’s new law on working from home makes the European Union country sound like a workers’ paradise. Companies can’t attempt to contact their staff outside working hours. They must help staff pay for their home gas, electric and internet bills. Bosses are forbidden from using digital software to track what their teleworkers are doing. There’s just one problem: the law might not work. Critics say the new rules are half-baked, short on detail and unfeasible. And they may even backfire by making companies reluctant to allow working from home at all. “The law is badly written and doesn’t meet anybody’s needs,” says José Pedro Anacoreta, an employment attorney at PLMJ, one of Portugal’s main law firms. “It’s no good for anyone. … It doesn’t make any sense.” In many places around the world, the COVID-19 pandemic has accelerated a prior trend toward the digitalization of work and more flexible work arrangements. Amid such a sudden and massive shift in the employment landscape, governments are scrambling to accommodate working from home in their employment laws....
    Two southern California utility companies are restoring power after purposely causing outages to reduce the risk of a wildfire.  Southern California Edison and ​San Diego Gas & Electric had said Wednesday there was a potential for public safety power shutoffs (PSPS) to reduce the fire risk from power lines. The warning came as the National Weather Service said ideal fire conditions were imminent from Wednesday through Friday.  Dry wind persisted over Thanksgiving with some areas getting hit with wind up to 89 miles per hour, The Associated Press reported.  The two companies shut off power to thousands, interrupting the holiday for many families.  San Diego Gas & Electric shut off power for less than 3,200 customers but up to 50,000 customers still face potential outages, according to The Associated Press.  More than 38,000 customers for Southern California Edison still do not have power with 123,000 customers still under the potential for shut offs.  Both companies were working Friday to restore power in some areas as the weather calms down. No fires were reported during the outages. Tags California Power outages
    Stocks that traded heavily or had substantial price changes Friday: Moderna, Inc., up $56.24 to $329.63. Stocks in companies that make vaccines against COVID-19 soared as a new variant emerged. Occidental Petroleum Corp., down $2.31 to $29.70. Energy stocks plunged on fears a resurgence of the pandemic will again pummel the overall economy. Carnival Corp., down $2.21 to $17.95. Travel companies were among the worst hit by renewed fears of possible lockdowns in response to the continuing pandemic. Live Nation Entertainment Inc., down $9.08 to $103.53. The concert and event promoter had its worst day since early in the pandemic amid fresh fears of pandemic-related cancellations and capacity limits. Delta Air Lines Inc., down $3.31 to $36.38. Airline shares sank after a slew of nations moved to stop air travel from southern Africa. Clorox Co., up $6.14 to $174.21. Investors poured money into the cleaning supplies maker, similar to what happened early in the pandemic. Kroger Co., up 60 cents to $43.14. Grocery chains benefited from investors’ bet that a new coronavirus strain...
    Milpitas restaurant owner Francisco Rodriguez was looking over his financial records last winter when he noticed something was off. DoorDash, the country’s largest food delivery company, was imposing 25 to 30% fees each time someone ordered food through the app from his restaurant, Taqueria Las Vegas — a violation of a city ordinance that, for now, caps third-party food delivery companies from charging restaurants at 15% for deliveries or 10% for pick-ups. Meanwhile, other delivery companies that he works with, like Uber Eats, had notified him they were lowering their fees in line with the city ordinance that went into effect in October 2020. After prodding from the city, DoorDash finally reimbursed Rodriguez between $7,000 and $8,000 after being overcharged for roughly two months in November and December 2020. Even so, Rodriguez has mixed feelings about it all as a majority of his orders come through DoorDash, he said, and it gave him business that kept him afloat during the pandemic. “I couldn’t hate DoorDash,” Rodriguez said in an interview as he was driving to his restaurant to help complete a...
    VIDEO7:4307:43The rich are getting richer — and they're fueling a private jet boomDubai Airshow Private jet demand is booming — to the extent that companies can't produce them quickly enough and buyers are facing extended wait periods for deliveries. Even secondhand business jets are vanishing from the market.      "If you look at today compared to 2019, the market has almost exploded," John Schmidt, global aerospace and defense industry lead at consultancy Accenture, told CNBC at the Dubai Air Show.   The pandemic has converted a lot of travelers to private flying, many for the first time. But analysts say the trend is primarily attributable to a wealth boom in the last year and a half, specifically at the top echelons of society as more companies go public, the stock market hits record highs and spenders enjoy an extended period of low interest rates.   Business jet take-offs and landings in the U.S. are up 40% year-on-year — and at their highest point since before the 2008 financial crisis, according to Morgan Stanley.   Public listings by companies in the U.S. have...
    In this article ZM NFLX EXPE VIDEO6:1106:11World Health Organization to discuss mutated B.1.1.529 Covid variantSquawk BoxShares of Zoom were up more than 10% before markets opened on Friday morning as a new Covid variant raised concerns in South Africa. Other stocks that have benefited from stay-at-home trends during the pandemic were also up. Peloton stock popped more than 8% before markets opened while Etsy, Shopify, Roblox, Netflix and Roku also showed small gains. Meanwhile, shares of companies that have benefitted from the reopening are down. Expedia was off by more than 7% this morning while Lyft, Airbnb and Uber stock were all down by more than 5% before markets opened. It's a reversal from earlier in the month, after travel companies like Delta, Airbnb, Expedia pointed to clear signs of recovery in recent earnings reports and as stay-at-home stocks like Peloton, Zoom and Netflix declined amid indications that the Covid-19 pandemic end might come sooner than expected. Zoom could erase losses from earlier in the week if the momentum holds. Shares of Zoom closed down 14.7% on Tuesday after...
    (CNN)Dayana Vera de Aponte had locked in her holiday plans after nearly two years of uncertainty fueled by the coronavirus pandemic, but then the unexpected happen: she lost her job because of an unprecedented US government backlog. Vera de Aponte, a registered behavior technician for special needs children in Florida, had to walk away from her job this month when her work permit that allows her to legally work in the United States lapsed. Her family has since adjusted their holiday plans, including no longer flying in her husband's mother, over financial concerns. "I had to talk to my daughter about the situation. ... It's not in my hands. It's frustrating and how do I explain that to her? I can't buy her Christmas gifts because I'm afraid to spend money," Vera de Aponte, who's seeking political asylum in the US, told CNN in Spanish. Vera de Aponte is one of thousands of immigrants who have lost their jobs -- or are on the cusp of losing them -- due to bureaucratic delays. US companies already reeling from a worker...
    In this article MSFT RCL DAL ZM A Delta airlines aircraft landing from Los Angeles at Kingsford Smith International airport on October 31, 2021 in Sydney, Australia.James D. Morgan | Getty ImagesCheck out the companies making headlines before the bell Friday: Travel and leisure stocks – Airline stocks are getting hit hard in the premarket by news of the new Covid-19 variant, including American (AAL), United (UAL), Southwest (LUV), Delta (DAL) and JetBlue (JBLU). Cruise stocks were also getting rocked: Royal Caribbean (RCL) slid 10.6%, Carnival (CCL) took a 10.5% hit, and Norwegian (NCLH) fell 10%. Stay-at-home stocks – Stocks that benefited from Covid-19 closures rebounded, with Zoom Video (ZM) gaining 7.8% in premarket trading, DocuSign (DOCU) up 3%, Netflix (NFLX) higher by 2.2% and Peloton (PTON) jumping 6.2%. Vaccine stocks – These are rising following the Covid variant news, with Moderna (MRNA) surging 8.6% in the premarket, Pfizer (PFE) jumping 5.6%, BioNTech (BNTX) surging 7.3% and Novavax (NVAX) rallying 5.3%. Merck (MRK) – The drug maker and its partner, Ridgeback Biotherapeutics, said their experimental Covid pill cut the...
    In catering, logistics, mass distribution, but also in pharmaceuticals and renewable energies, recruitment without CV is gaining momentum. This method is not new: recruitment by simulation was developed by Pôle emploi in the 1990s. But the difficulties companies face in recruiting make a difference. This year 100,000 people will be assessed in this way, and one-third will be hired. Pôle emploi wants to do even better in the years to come. It brings together Pôle emploi and company, process, trainings, skills and competencies that candidates must undertake. An example: to hire several hundred employees, Siemens factory in Le Havre, Which produces blades and nozzles for wind turbines, for example, asked candidates to follow a complex course in the form of a platform with a pen, without putting the sheet on the ground and going beyond the line. For these new trades, we rely more on skills than diplomas. The company takes care of training its new employees for their specific needs. With simulation recruitment, 45% of those hired are long-term job seekers and 70% do not come from this field....
    While the epidemic has accelerated the digital transformation of many companies in Colombia, the truth is that companies like Gropo Nutresa, For five years, they worked on a transformational model that covered an important area: capacity development. (Portfolio Awards 2021: Winners and Special Recognitions). That is why the company was awarded the first Digital Transformation Portfolio Award. It has 19 brands and reports annual sales of over US $ 50 million. The team defined that digital evolution begins with the human transformation of every employee, These include changing mental models, working methods, developing skills and hiring specialists who specialize in digital matters. To guide this process, Grubo Nutresa formed a working group headed by the head of Digital Transformation, who is part of the company’s top management. Likewise, this position is led by a team that specializes in strategy and digital experience, guiding processes, adding experts in analytics, digital media, and ways to explore and apply new technologies. All of these human skills allow us to combine the current needs of consumers and customers with the opportunities...
    Listings of apartments for sale displayed at a real estate office in Shanghai, China, on Monday, Aug. 30, 2021.Qilai Shen | Bloomberg | Getty Images BEIJING — Wild swings in Chinese real estate stocks and bonds are keeping investors on edge — these news headlines could cause troubles in the sector to spill into the rest of the economy, says S&P Global Ratings. While the plunge in Evergrande's shares has abated, the volatility in other Chinese real estate companies has continued this month. On Thursday, Kaisa shares briefly popped 20% after news it could stave off default. On the same day, a Shanghai-traded bond from developer Shimao plunged 30%, reminiscent of a sharp sell-off in the company's bonds earlier this month. "Headlines can hit sentiment and drive contagion," Charles Chang, senior director and Greater China country lead for corporate ratings at S&P Global Ratings, said in a report earlier this month. The risk Chang laid out is that news reports about defaults, or even the potential for default, could scare away Chinese homebuyers. And that drying up of demand would put developers out of...
    On Tuesday, the Cedar Oxygen Fund announced during a virtual conference that it had formed a “joint venture” with the Lebanese Economic Empowerment Fund (LEEF) with investment platform Bamboo Capital Partners (Bamboo). Thus, an initiative launched in 2020 and surpassing the initial goal of Luxembourg-based Cedar Oxygen, involves providing loans to Lebanese businessmen to finance the import of raw materials in the wake of the country’s economic and financial crisis. Has been going on for two years. Bamboo Managing Partner Florian Kemmerich announced that the joint venture, which will allow halving costs and risks, aims to raise “$ 500 million” to invest in Lebanese companies. At Cedar Oxygen, the central bank is the sole investor, almost three times the amount invested by the Lebanese bank ($ 175 million in five years, renewable every six months). This initial amount made it possible to lend to a dozen companies. If Cedar Oxygen now benefits from the international network of bamboo fund investors, there will be “no last word” on these two funds, Alexandre Hergas, CEO of Cedar Oxygen, has promised. Will...
    Wednesday, Rep. Byron Donalds (R-FL) criticized President Joe Biden’s Build Back Better bill as “an absolute joke.” Donalds told Fox Business Network’s “Kudlow” that the biggest winners from the bill are the “rich people in blue states and green companies.” “The two big winners in this are rich people in blue states and people who love the Green New Deal initiative and some of these green companies who are going to get a bunch of loans out of this climate bank they want to create as well,” Donalds advised. “This bill is an absolute joke. A lot of it works in complete opposite to each other. There is no need to do this stuff.” “Personally, I love people to keep their own money. I want to keep my money, too. I would rather not send it to the federal government, especially this federal government the way it operates,” he added. “But the reality is this — the Democrats favored their own interests. They favored the people in blue states who donate to them. They favored people in the climate change...
    WORKING on holidays may seem like an inconvenience at first, but many companies offer higher pay rates or bonuses. Here's everything we know about holiday pay. 2Many companies offer holiday payCredit: Getty Images - Getty How much is holiday pay? While paid holidays are not required in the United States, some employers do provide extra compensation or paid time off to their employees on days that are considered holidays. Under federal law, holidays do not require overtime pay, and working on a holiday is not considered overtime. However, a majority of companies do treat the holidays as such. As a way of encouraging employees to work over the holidays, some employers may offer double-time or time-and-a-half pay, meaning that their regular rate is increased depending on the chosen pay rate. For double-time pay, the rate is multiplied by two. For time-and-a-half pay, the rate increases by 50 percent. Under the Fair Labor Standards Act, companies are not obligated to pay employees for time not worked, such as vacation or sick days. However, many companies...
    The U.S. Department of Commerce added several Chinese technology companies to its trade blacklist Wednesday for providing technological support to the Chinese military. The Commerce Department added the firms to its Entity List, which imposes severe trade restrictions on covered entities, characterizing the companies as “acting contrary to the national security or foreign policy interests of the United States.” “Global trade and commerce should support peace, prosperity, and good-paying jobs, not national security risks,” Secretary of Commerce Gina Raimondo said in a statement. “The Department of Commerce is committed to effectively using export controls to protect our national security.” Eight tech companies operating out of the People’s Republic of China (PRC) were added to the Entity List over fears of economic espionage. The companies could acquire and use U.S. emerging technologies “for the PRC’s quantum computing efforts that support military applications,” such as submarine cloaking technology and anti-encryption software, the Department of Commerce said. Those technologies would help modernize the Chinese military and pose a national security threat to the U.S., according to the Commerce Department. People stand outside a Huawei...
    Hong Kong/Washington (CNN Business)The Biden administration is piling more pressure on Chinese companies it claims could undermine US national security. The US Commerce Department on Wednesday added a dozen Chinese companies to a trade blacklist, saying that some of the firms have supported the modernization of China's army.US officials called the move part of an effort to prevent emerging US technologies from being used for quantum computing efforts that would support China's military, such as "counter-stealth and counter-submarine applications." The Commerce Department also cited concerns about China's "ability to break encryption or develop unbreakable encryption." And it said that several entities from China and Pakistan were added to the list for contributing to Pakistan's nuclear activities or ballistic missile program. Chinas disappearing ships: The latest headache for the global supply chainTensions between the United States and China that escalated under former President Donald Trump have continued to simmer under President Joe Biden. And despite a recent first virtual summit with President Xi Jinping, and collaboration on the climate crisis and oil reserves, his administration has so far done little...
    A technologist inspects a computer chip.Sefa Ozel | E+ | Getty Images GUANGZHOU, China — China's technology sector has taken a wild ride over the past year, with regulations tightened, billions of dollars wiped off companies' market value, and a continuing push from Beijing for technological self-sufficiency. Those are among the important themes that will be addressed at CNBC's annual East Tech West event in the Nansha district of Guangzhou in southern China. Here's a look at the top concerns and focuses of China's technology sector right now.China's tech crackdownIn November 2020, what would have been a world record-setting initial public offering of fintech giant Ant Group was suspended. Following that, Beijing introduced a slew of new rules in areas from antitrust for internet platforms and a bolstered data protection law. Both e-commerce giant Alibaba and food delivery firm Meituan have faced antitrust fines. That has weighed heavily on China's internet names. For example, Alibaba's shares are down 41% year-to-date. Several questions are swirling: Will China introduce more new regulation and in what areas? What companies could be targeted...