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    ST. LOUIS (AP) — A former Southwest Airlines baggage handler was sentenced Tuesday to six months in prison after pleading guilty to knowingly possessing or receiving stolen guns. Federal prosecutors said Mark Hunter of St. Louis was charged after a passenger traveling through St. Louis Lambert International Airport reported that a pistol had been reported stolen from his luggage. Federal agents investigated and found seven reported thefts of guns from luggage checked on Southwest over a five-month period in 2020. After comparing Southwest scheduling records of baggage employees and the dates of the thefts, investigators focused on Hunter, who admitted to stealing five guns from checked bags, according to prosecutors. Hunter faces three years of supervised release after his prison time, prosecutors said. Copyright © 2021 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, written or redistributed.
    WAUKESHA, Wisc. – It could be a case to work smarter not harder – giving prosecutors less to prove but the same penalty if they secure a conviction against Waukesha parade suspect Darrell Brooks Jr. The Milwaukee man is accused of mowing down Waukesha’s Christmas parade. He has a violent past and had made anti-White and anti-Semitic Facebook posts before the social media giant took down his page last week. But even as Waukesha police quickly ruled out terror as a motive and have spoken little of his social media accounts, Brooks faces a half-dozen possible sentences of life in prison if convicted on six charges of first-degree intentional homicide. Darrell Brooks, charged with killing five people and injuring nearly 50 after plowing through a Christmas parade with his sport utility vehicle on November 21, appears in Waukesha County Court in Waukesha, Wisconsin, U.S. November 23, 2021. (Mark Hoffman/Pool via REUTERS) WAUKESHA SUSPECT DARRELL BROOKS DODGED JAIL IN DEADBEAT DAD CASE 5 DAYS BEFORE PARADE ATTACK Those charges are Wisconsin’s equivalent of first-degree murder. And prosecutors could still level...
    SAN JOSE, Calif. (AP) — One-time entrepreneur Elizabeth Holmes, under questioning by prosecutors, struggled Tuesday to recall key events that led to her facing criminal fraud charges for allegedly fleecing investors and customers of her failed blood-testing startup Theranos. Her cross-examination began the day after she shared painfully vivid memories of alleged abuse by her ex-lover and business partner, Sunny Balwani. In between bouts of hazy recollection, Holmes wept on the witness stand after the federal prosecutor interrogating her asked to read aloud some of the amorous texts that she and Balwani exchanged during a five-year period while they were running Theranos and living together in a stealth romantic relationship. “U are God’s tigress and warrior. You are extraordinary,” Balwani cooed to Holmes in a 2015 documents displayed in court Tuesday. Holmes quickly responded with this text: “Coming from my tiger means the whole universe to me.” While poring over the old texts, Holmes occasionally dabbed away tears and wiped her nose with a tissue while a jury watched and listened along with a packed courtroom that included one person...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — A federal appeals court on Tuesday directed the Justice Department to disclose certain redacted passages from special counsel Robert Mueller’s Russia investigation report that relate to individuals who were investigated by prosecutors but not ultimately charged. The ruling came in a public records complaint from the news organization BuzzFeed, which sued for an unredacted version of Mueller’s report examining Russian election interference and possible ties to Donald Trump’s 2016 presidential campaign. Though the three-judge panel said a lower court judge was correct in ruling that certain portions of the report should remain redacted, it said in its opinion that other passages that BuzzFeed fought to see can be disclosed because they involve facts available elsewhere in the report and “do not contain new facts or stigmatizing material.” In particular, the appeals court said the Justice Department must disclose redacted information about the Mueller team’s decision to not prosecute an unnamed person — whom BuzzFeed contends is likely Donald Trump Jr. — for campaign finance violations. The Mueller report explained how prosecutors looking at potential campaign finance...
    A bipartisan group of lawmakers led by New York Democratic Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand is pushing to ensure that an overhaul to how the military handles cases of sexual assault and other major crimes is not omitted from the National Defense Authorization Act. In a letter to the chair and ranking member of the Senate Armed Services Committee, 44 senators and 22 representatives called on the reforms to pass as part of the annual defense bill. “Sexual assault in the military is a serious concern and demands a real solution, not a watered-down provision slipped in the final bill behind closed doors,” the group wrote. “This provision is the only reform that will provide true independence for prosecutors in the military justice system and is essential to ensure that victims, accused, and the public all have full faith and confidence in the military justice process,” the letter added. (RELATED: Josh Hawley, Kirsten Gillibrand Team Up To Improve The Military’s Response To Sexual Assault) Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand speaks about the Military Justice Improvement and Increasing Prevention Actl military prosecutors. (Stefani Reynolds/Getty Images)...
    PITTSBURGH (KDKA) – Two men are set to plead guilty Tuesday to supplying the fentanyl-laced pills which lead to the 2018 overdose death of Pittsburgh native and rapper Mac Miller. Stephen Walter, 48, and Ryan Reavis, 38, will each plead guilty in federal court in downtown Los Angeles to one count of distribution of fentanyl, according to the U.S. Attorney’s Office. Both reached plea deals with prosecutors. READ MORE: Driver Of Vehicle Hits Pedestrian In Squirrel HillAccording to federal prosecutors, Reavis, at the direction of Walter, provided the counterfeit oxycodone pills laced with fentanyl to the third co-defendant in the case, 30-year-old Cameron Pettit of West Hollywood. Pettit then sold the pills directly to Miller, whose real name is Malcolm James McCormick, two days before he overdosed, federal prosecutors allege. Three days before Miller’s death, Pettit had agreed to supply Miller with 10 “blues,” the street term for oxycodone pills, along with cocaine and Xanax, prosecutors allege. However, instead of delivering genuine oxycodone pills, Pettit delivered Miller counterfeit pills. READ MORE: Foo Fighters Bringing 2022 Tour To PittsburghReavis admitted...
    Sen. Kirsten GillibrandKirsten GillibrandKlobuchar confident spending bill will be finished before Christmas Five ways Senate could change Biden's spending plan This Thanksgiving, skip the political food fights and talk UFOs instead MORE (D-N.Y.) on Tuesday led dozens of bipartisan lawmakers in a push to ensure that a military justice overhaul measure stays in the final version of the National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA). In a letter to leaders of the House and Senate Armed Services committees, the lawmakers asked that the Military Justice Improvement and Increasing Prevention Act stays in the final version of the bill. “Sexual assault in the military is a serious concern and demands a real solution, not a watered-down provision slipped in the final bill behind closed doors,” reads the letter. “This provision is the only reform that will provide true independence for prosecutors in the military justice system and is essential to ensure that victims, accused, and the public all have full faith and confidence in the military justice process,” the letter continues. The letter — which was signed by 44 senators and 22 representatives — comes as...
    DANVILLE (CBS SF) – Prosecutors in Contra Costa County have charged a man with multiple felonies in connection with a crime spree in Danville and San Ramon last week. The Contra Costa County District Attorney’s Office announced that 30-year-old Philander Johnson has been charged with robbery, assault with a deadly weapon, along with two counts of carjacking for kidnapping. As of Tuesday, Johnson is awaiting arraignment. READ MORE: OPD: 'Violent Robbery Caravans' Confronting Police On Oakland Streets“This brazen crime spree is a flagrant violation of community safety,” Contra Costa County District Attorney Diana Becton said. “Those who engage in such criminality will be prosecuted to the full extent of the law by the Contra Costa District Attorney’s Office.” According to prosecutors, Johnson and two unidentified accomplices entered the Ace Hardware in Blackhawk on November 24 and attempted to steal several power tools. After being confronted by store staff, prosecutors said he brandished a knife and escaped. READ MORE: Scott Peterson Moved From Death Row To San Mateo County JailProsecutors said Johnson, who had separated from the accomplices, then held a...
    MARTINEZ — A 30-year-old man, who was already facing prosecution in an earlier shoplifting case, has been charged with four felonies in connection to a case that started Nov. 24 with a robbery at a Blackhawk hardware store, authorities said Tuesday. Philander Johnson, whose place of residence was not released, has been charged with robbery, assault with a deadly weapon and two counts of carjacking for kidnapping, the Contra Costa County District Attorney’s Office said. The charges stem from a Nov. 24 suspected crime spree which began at the Ace Hardware in Blackhawk and culminated in Johnson’s arrest in San Ramon, prosecutors said. “This brazen crime spree is a flagrant violation of community safety,” said District Attorney Diana Becton. “My office is working in a coordinated effort with law enforcement partners throughout the Bay Area to identify perpetrators of organized retail theft. Those who engage in such criminality will be prosecuted to the full extent of the law by the Contra Costa District Attorney’s Office.” According to prosecutors, Johnson and two unidentified individuals entered the Blackhawk Ace Hardware and attempted...
    Jussie Smollett was allegedly seen on video conducting a dry run of his attack the day before it took place, further lending credence to the prosecution’s claims that he orchestrated the whole thing.  During opening arguments on Monday, special prosecutor Dan Webb told the jury that Smollett was upset that a threatening hate letter that was sent to the studio behind "Empire" wasn’t taken seriously enough. As a result, Webb is hoping to convince a jury that the actor hired brothers Abimbola and Olabinjo Osundairo to attack him.  One potentially damning piece of evidence teased during Webb’s opening arguments was that there is surveillance video showing Smollett and the two siblings, who he worked with on "Empire," doing a kind of "dry run" of the attack in the area the day before it allegedly took place.  The prosecution will allege what the Osundairo brothers have already told investigators, that they were cut a check for $3,500 after the dry run and given $100 in cash to get supplies to stage the attack at Smollett’s behest.  JUSSIE SMOLLETT ARRIVES TO COURT...
    (CNN)Federal prosecutors unsealed charges against a Rhode Island man on Monday who allegedly attempted to hop over security chains behind the FBI headquarters in Washington, DC, with two hatchets just hours after the US Capitol riot on January 6.Timothy Desjardins, 35, was caught on video using a broken wooden table leg to beat Capitol Police officers on the Lower West Terrace of the Capitol, the site of some of the most brutal fighting between officers and the mob, according to the charging documents. In the video, prosecutors say Desjardins was wearing a black leather jacket, a flat cap hat, and a camouflage backpack. Jesus Christ Superstar actor, an accused Capitol rioter, claimed divine authority in court hearingThen, at 2 a.m. on January 7, FBI agents reported a security breach when they found Desjardins attempting to climb over security chains outside FBI headquarters. The agents found "one or two hatchets" inside his backpack, according to court documents.Desjardins allegedly said that he was "good" at using the hatchets and admitted that he was at the Capitol but would not go into any...
    A Prince George’s County, Maryland, man pleaded guilty Monday to charges of trafficking heroin and cocaine, as well as gun charges. Charles Benjamin Stewart Jr., 46, of Upper Marlboro, pleaded guilty to conspiracy to distribute heroin and cocaine; illegally transporting a firearm obtained out of state; and possession with intent to distribute heroin and cocaine, federal prosecutors said in a statement Tuesday. The guilty plea is the latest development in the prosecution of a drug conspiracy, prosecutors said. Stewart admitted buying heroin from Patrick Nathan Broxton, 50, of Ellicott City, and selling some of it to several other people. He also admitted buying cocaine from Stephen Eugene Clark Jr., 57, of Laurel, for resale. Investigators followed Stewart during that time and saw him buy cocaine from Broxton, who worked at a drug rehabilitation facility, at a convenience store in Anne Arundel County, prosecutors said. They also tapped the phones of Stewart and others, recording conversations that showed Stewart knew the drugs he was selling were being resold by his customers to others. In July 2017, law enforcement seized cocaine, heroin,...
    LOS ANGELES (CBSLA) – Two men are set to plead guilty Tuesday to supplying the fentanyl-laced pills which lead to the 2018 overdose death of rapper Mac Miller at his home in Studio City. Stephen Walter, 48, and Ryan Reavis, 38, will each plead guilty in federal court in downtown Los Angeles to one count of distribution of fentanyl, according to the U.S. Attorney’s Office. Both reached plea deals with prosecutors. READ MORE: Woman Arrested, Taken For Mental Health Evaluation After Trying To Walk Onto LAX TarmacAccording to federal prosecutors, Reavis, at the direction of Walter, provided the counterfeit oxycodone pills laced with fentanyl to the third co-defendant in the case, 30-year-old Cameron Pettit of West Hollywood. Pettit then sold the pills directly to Miller, whose real name is Malcolm James McCormick, two days before he overdosed, federal prosecutors allege. Three days before Miller’s death, Pettit had agreed to supply Miller with 10 “blues,” the street term for oxycodone pills, along with cocaine and Xanax, prosecutors allege. However, instead of delivering genuine oxycodone pills, Pettit delivered Miller counterfeit pills. READ...
    The 59-year-old British socialite Ghislaine Maxwell is a "dangerous predator" who recruited and "served up" minor girls for deceased financier Jeffrey Epstein to abuse for a decade, prosecutors argued Monday during the first day of the long-awaited federal sex trafficking trial in Manhattan, New York. In her opening statement, prosecutor Lara Pomerantz emphasized how Maxwell and Epstein allegedly approached one of their victims, a 14-year-old girl named Jane, at her summer camp in 1994 while she was sitting at a picnic table with friends. Epstein introduced himself as a donor who gave money to students, and he and Maxwell invited the girl to his villa in Palm Beach, Florida, for tea.  The meeting began "a nightmare that would last for years," as the girl was pulled into a relationship with Maxwell and Epstein, who were "each more than double her age," Pomerantz said. Now an adult, that once-14-year-old victim is expected to take the stand herself during the course of the trial.  GHISLAINE MAXWELL'S ALLEGED VICTIM ARRIVES AT COURT Describing Maxwell and Epstein as "partners in crime" and the "best...
    German investigators searched offices of accountancy firm PricewaterhouseCoopers and the homes of current and former employees Tuesday in a probe of alleged tax evasion by tax advisers. The searches took place at offices in Frankfurt, Berlin, Duesseldorf, Hannover and Stuttgart, and at the apartments of four current senior employees and four former senior employees, prosecutors in Frankfurt said in a statement. The investigation centers on an alleged scheme used between 2012 and 2017 by the suspects, ages 50 to 67, to inaccurately declare revenue from tax advice to German clients as the proceeds of a Swiss partner company, they said. Prosecutors said that the scheme allowed them to evade taxes to the tune of more than 11 million euros ($12.4 million) over five years. The falsely declared proceeds stemmed from advising clients on declaring income from investments in Switzerland and payments of evaded taxes so that the clients could avoid prosecution, they added. PwC confirmed the searches and said it was cooperating fully with authorities, German news agency dpa reported. Copyright © 2021 The Associated Press. All rights reserved....
    WUAKESHA, Wis. -- Prosecutors added a sixth intentional homicide count Monday against a Wisconsin man accused of driving his SUV through a Christmas parade in suburban Milwaukee.Investigators allege Darrell Brooks Jr., 39, turned into the parade route in Waukesha on Nov. 21 and swerved the vehicle side-to-side without slowing down as he struck dozens of people. Authorities announced later that night that five people had died.RELATED: Waukesha vigil held for Wisconsin Christmas parade victims; 8 children still hospitalizedEMBED More News Videos Waukesha's mayor and the city council held a moment of silence Sunday at 4:39 p.m., exactly one week after the incident, to honor the victims of the parade tragedy. Police arrested Brooks shortly afterward as he knocked on a homeowner's door asking for help calling a ride.Waukesha County District Attorney Susan Opper filed five counts of first-degree intentional homicide against Brooks on Nov. 23, for victims ranging in age from 52 to 81.RELATED: Child hit in Wisconsin parade now recovering at home for ThanksgivingThe sixth charge is for Jackson Sparks, an 8-year-old boy who had been walking in the...
    CHICAGO (AP) — Jussie Smollett “is a real victim” of a “real crime,” his attorney said as the ex-“Empire” actor’s trial started Monday, rejecting prosecutors’ allegation that he staged a homophobic and racist attack in Chicago after the television studio where he worked didn’t take hate mail he had received seriously. Defense attorney Nenye Uche said two brothers attacked Smollett in January 2019 because they didn’t like him and that a $3,500 check the actor paid the men was for training so he could prepare for an upcoming music video — not as payment for staging a hate crime, as prosecutors allege. Uche also suggested a third attacker was involved and told jurors there is not a “shred “ of physical and forensic evidence linking Smollett to the crime prosecutors allege. “Jussie Smollett is a real victim,” Uche said. (AP Photo/Paul Beaty, File) Uche made his opening statement after special prosecutor Dan Webb told jurors that the actor recruited the brothers to help him carry out a fake attack, then reported it to Chicago police, who classified it as a...
    HOUSTON (AP) — A Houston man has been sentenced to more than nine years in prison after he was accused of using federal COVID-19 relief funding on a Lamborghini, a Rolex watch and trips to strip clubs, federal prosecutors said. Lee Price III, 30, was sentenced Monday to 110 months in prison. Price pleaded guilty in September to wire fraud and money laundering. “Mr. Price hopes that others will learn from his reckoning that there is no easy money,” Price’s lawyer Tom Berg said in an email to news outlets. “He has the balance of the 110-month sentence to reflect, repent and rebuild his misspent life.” Prosecutors accused Price of fraudulently using more than $1.6 million in funding from the Paycheck Protection Program, which gave low-interest loans to small businesses struggling during the pandemic. According to prosecutors, Price also used the money to buy an $85,000 pickup truck and to pay off a loan on a residential property. Copyright © 2021 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, written or redistributed.
    LOS ANGELES (CBSLA) – A lawyer who represented the city of Los Angeles in a lawsuit over the L.A. Department of Water and Power billing system has agreed to plead guilty to federal charges for receiving $2.2 million in a kickback scheme in which he also bribed multiple LADWP officials. Paul Paradis is expected to plead guilty to a single federal count of bribery, the U.S. Attorney’s Office announced Monday. READ MORE: Undisclosed Forensic Evidence Found In Search For Heidi PlanckThe case is believed to be the first criminal charge to arise out of a federal investigation into the city’s handling of the flawed LADWP system and resulting litigation. The failed system led to many customers receiving wildly inflated bills. Federal prosecutors Monday said Paradis has agreed to plead guilty to simultaneously representing LADWP and a ratepayer who was suing the city over the billing system. Prosecutors said Paradis received a $2.2 million kickback from another attorney stemming from the arrangement. As part of his plea agreement, Paradis, 58, of Scottsdale, Arizona, admitted to additional bribery schemes involving high-level DWP...
    ▶ Watch Video: Bill Cosby claims vindication, while accusers say the justice system failed Prosecutors announced Monday that they have asked the Supreme Court to review the ruling that overturned Bill Cosby’s 2018 sexual assault conviction, arguing that the Pennsylvania Supreme Court’s June decision sets a dangerous precedent with “far-reaching negative consequences.” The June ruling hinged on a press release issued in 2005 by Bruce Castor, the then-district attorney of Montgomery County, Pennsylvania, who had been tasked with investigating a criminal complaint against Cosby made by Andrea Constand. In the press release, Castor said his office would not charge Cosby for the crime because there was not enough “credible and admissible” evidence. Castor later said he issued that statement in an attempt to prevent Cosby from invoking his Fifth Amendment right and refusing to testify if he was sued in civil court. Cosby did testify when Constand sued him in civil court, and admitted to giving women drugs before sexual encounters. When that deposition was unsealed in 2015, the new Montgomery County District Attorney said they did not have to...
    CHICAGO (AP) — Testimony is set to begin Tuesday in the trial of ex-“Empire” actor Jussie Smollett, who prosecutors say staged a homophobic and racist attack in Chicago but whose defense attorney says is “a real victim” of a “real crime.” Special prosecutor Dan Webb told jurors during opening statements late Monday that Smollett recruited two brothers — who worked with him on the TV show — to help him carry out a fake attack in January 2019 because he believed the television studio didn’t take hate mail he had received seriously. Smollett then reported the alleged attack to Chicago police, who classified it as a hate crime and spent 3,000 staff hours on the investigation, Webb said. The actor told police he was attacked by supporters of then-President Donald Trump — igniting political divisions around the country. “When he reported the fake hate crime that was a real crime,” Webb said. Defense attorney Nenye Uche said the two brothers attacked Smollett because they didn’t like him and that a $3,500 check the actor paid the men...
    Ghislaine Maxwell and Jeffrey Epstein "were partners in crime," prosecutors said while introducing their case to the jury this Monday.   "Maxwell was Epstein’s best friend and righthand. … She was involved in every detail of Epstein’s life," Assistant U.S. Attorney Lara Pomerantz stated in her opening statement after judge Alison Nathan seated and instructed the jury on the law this afternoon in Manhattan federal court. Pomerantz went on to describe Jeffrey Epstein’s sexual abuse of teenage girls just to establish the defendant’s involvement in it for about a decade.  "The defendant helped Epstein find those girls. She helped him recruit girls for so-called massages. ... Sometimes she was even in the room for the massages herself and, sometimes, she touched the girls' bodies," the attorney said.  She added that even when Maxwell was not in the room, "she knew exactly what Epstein was going to do to those children when she sent them to him inside the massage rooms."  GHISLAINE MAXWELL'S TRIAL GETS UNDERWAY Per the government, the defendant performed an "essential role in this scheme" of abusing underaged...
    An attorney hired by City Atty. Mike Feuer’s office has agreed to plead guilty to one count of bribery in a nearly $2.2-million kickback scheme arising from the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power’s 2013 billing fiasco, prosecutors said Monday. Paul Paradis, 58, of Scottsdale, Ariz., also admitted to additional bribery schemes involving high-level officials at the DWP, the U.S. attorney’s office said. Paradis is cooperating with the federal criminal investigation, which is ongoing, prosecutors said. Paradis took part in a sweeping plan to settle a high-profile lawsuit brought against the DWP on terms that were favorable to the city and himself, prosecutors said. He simultaneously represented the DWP and a DWP customer who was the lead plaintiff in a class-action lawsuit against the city, prosecutors said. Paradis admitted to giving bribes to multiple DWP officials, including a DWP general manager and an DWP board member, prosecutors said. In exchange, the DWP officials helped secure a three-year, $30-million no-bid contract with the DWP in June 2017 for Paradis’ company, Aventador Utility Solutions, according to the U.S. attorney’s office. Paradis...
    Former Solicitor General Neal Katyal explained that Trump ally Steve Bannon is going to be highly unsuccessful in his efforts to beat criminal contempt charges. In a Sunday filing by the Justice Department, prosecutors said Bannon's attorney, Evan Corcoran, refused their attempts to negotiate on some kind of agreement. According to the 10-page filing, the prosecutors alleged Bannon's lawyers were using their filing as a press release instead of a legal filing. "The prosecutors called Steve Bannon's filing frivolous, so Bannon claimed that he wanted to make certain documents public and the Justice Department wasn't letting him," said Katyal. "And the Justice Department's response today was to call it frivolous and basically say, 'Oh, no, you didn't!' They point out that Bannon never even asked the Justice Department to try and make these documents public, and so this dispute is not going to go well for Bannon. Judges don't like it when parties can't work out stuff among themselves... and that's particularly true here, given Bannon's specific claim." At its heart, Katyal said that Bannon is complaining that he can't...
    (CNN)Prosecutors in Pennsylvania announced Monday they're appealing a court ruling in the case against Bill Cosby to the US Supreme Court, arguing that a statement from a previous district attorney that they would not file charges against Cosby does not mean that charges would never be filed. The Montgomery County district attorney, who led the high-profile court case against Cosby for sexually assaulting Andrea Constand, said in a news release that the main question of the appeal is the 14th Amendment and the right to due process. "The question presented to the Court is: 'Where a prosecutor publicly announces that he will not file criminal charges based on lack of evidence, does the Due Process Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment transform that announcement into a binding promise that no charges will ever be filed, a promise that the target may rely on as if it were a grant of immunity?' " the release states.As the decision stands now, it could have "far-reaching negative consequences" across the country, District Attorney Kevin Steele said in a statement. "Petitioning to ask the High...
    PHILADELPHIA (AP) — Prosecutors urged the U.S. Supreme Court to reinstate Bill Cosby’s sexual assault conviction, complaining in a petition released Monday the verdict was thrown out over a questionable agreement that the comic claimed gave him lifetime immunity. They said the Pennsylvania Supreme Court decision in June to overturn Cosby’s conviction created a dangerous precedent by giving a press release the legal weight of an immunity agreement. Montgomery County District Attorney Kevin Steele called the court’s decision “an indefensible rule,” predicting an onslaught of criminal appeals if it remains law. “This decision as it stands will have far-reaching negative consequences beyond Montgomery County and Pennsylvania. The U.S. Supreme Court can right what we believe is a grievous wrong,” Steele wrote in the filing, which seeks review under the due process clause of the U.S. Constitution. Cosby’s lawyers have long argued that he relied on a promise that he would never be charged when he gave damaging testimony in an accuser’s civil suit in 2006. The admissions were later used against him in two criminal trials. The only written evidence...
    A Maryland attorney and accountant who stole almost $2 million from an elderly client got a stiff prison sentence. On Monday, Montgomery County judge sentenced Jonathan Robbins to 40 years in prison – with all but 12 years suspended — for stealing $1.8 million from a woman who had asked him in 2013 for help managing her estate. The woman was an 88-year-old widow who wanted to ensure her daughter would be financially secure after her passing. Instead, Robbins methodically stole from her. Prosecutors said Robbins lived the high life for six years on the woman’s money, moving from a modest townhouse into a 6,600-square-foot house on 2.5 acres in Potomac, buying furniture, computers, artwork and watches. They also said he continued Robbins was indicted in 2019; he was convicted last June. Prosecutors had asked that Robbins be required to serve 18 to 20 years behind bars before being released on probation. They said Robbins had shown no remorse and was guilty of pure and simple greed. They said he “chose over and over again to betray the trust of...
    (CNN)Federal prosecutors have indicted a trio of alleged US Capitol rioters -- including one who is accused of assaulting DC police officer Michael Fanone -- for planning to be violent together on January 6, according to court records and a Justice Department statement on Monday. One defendant, Edward Badalian, a 26-year-old from California, allegedly wrote to his co-defendants "We need to violently remove traitors and if they are in key positions rapidly replace them with able bodied Patriots," according to the indictment. "We don't want to fight antifa lol we want to arrest traitors," he also wrote.The group communicated on Telegram under the name "Patriots 45 MAGA Gang," prosecutors said, riffing about their anger toward officials who supported the 2020 election result and gloating about the violence of the siege. They also attended pro-Trump and anti-coronavirus mask mandate rallies in Southern California, prosecutors said.Before January 6, they collected weapons and gear, including a stun gun, pepper spray, gas masks and walkie-talkies, and traveled together to the January 6 Stop the Steal rallies, according to the Justice Department. The day before...
    WAUKESHA, Wis. (AP) — Prosecutors added a sixth intentional homicide count Monday against a Wisconsin man accused of driving his SUV through a Christmas parade in suburban Milwaukee. Investigators allege Darrell Brooks Jr., 39, turned into the parade route in Waukesha on Nov. 21 and swerved the vehicle side-to-side without slowing down as he struck dozens of people. Authorities announced later that night that five people had died. Police arrested Brooks shortly afterward as he knocked on a homeowner’s door asking for help calling a ride. Waukesha County District Attorney Susan Opper filed five counts of first-degree intentional homicide against Brooks on Nov. 23, for victims ranging in age from 52 to 81. The sixth charge is for Jackson Sparks, an 8-year-old boy who had been walking in the parade with his 12-year-old brother Tucker, who also was hurt in the crash. Willy Medina, a spokesman for the state public defender’s office, which is representing Brooks, declined to comment on the added count. Brooks’ alleged motive remains unknown. Investigators have said he was fleeing the scene of a...
    Prosecutors urged the U.S. Supreme Court on Monday to review the ruling that overturned the sexual assault conviction of Bill Cosby, the Associated Press reported. Lawyers for Cosby had argued that the district attorney, Kevin Steele, was obligated by a promise his predecessor had made to the comedian not to prosecute him, the AP reported. The Pennsylvania Supreme Court concluded Cosby had relied on the “decade old” decision when he chose to make “incriminating statements” and overturned his conviction. The only written proof of the promise is a 2005 press release from the then-prosecutor, Bruce Castor, who said there was insufficient evidence to charge Cosby, the AP reported. Through a petition, prosecutors argued the ruling sets a dangerous precedent if all press releases are treated as immunity agreements. “This decision as it stands will have far-reaching negative consequences beyond Montgomery County and Pennsylvania. The U.S. Supreme Court can right what we believe is a grievous wrong,” Steele wrote in the petition, the AP reported. It asks the court to review the ruling under the due process clause of the U.S....
    Prosecutors asked the U.S. Supreme Court to review the Pennsylvania high court ruling granting freedom to Bill Cosby, arguing the reasoning for his release could set a dangerous precedent. Cosby’s lawyers argue the 84-year-old comedian relied on a promise that he would never be charged for sexual assault if he gave damaging testimony in an accuser’s civil suit in 2006 and that he never should have gone to trial because of a "non-prosecution agreement." However, the only written evidence of such a promise is a 2005 press release from then-prosecutor Bruce Castor, who said he did not have sufficient evidence for an arrest, and prosecutors are now raising concerns that press releases could be used as immunity agreements in the future, according to the Associated Press . “This decision as it stands will have far-reaching negative consequences beyond Montgomery County and Pennsylvania," Montgomery County District Attorney Kevin Steele wrote in the petition. "The U.S. Supreme Court can right what we believe is a grievous wrong.” REPUBLICANS POINT TO NUMBER OF TIMES GARLAND HAS POLITICIZED THE JUSTICE DEPARTMENT...
    Pennsylvania prosecutors have asked the U.S. Supreme Court to review the overturning of comedian Bill Cosby‘s conviction and to reinstate it. In June, after the Pennsylvania Supreme Court intervened, Cosby was released from prison, where he was serving a sentence of between three and 10 years in prison after he was convicted of assaulting a woman. “This decision as it stands will have far-reaching negative consequences beyond Montgomery County and Pennsylvania. The U.S. Supreme Court can right what we believe is a grievous wrong,” wrote Montgomery County District Attorney Kevin Steele in the petition to the Supreme Court. According to the Associated Press: Prosecutors said the ruling could set a dangerous precedent if convictions are overturned over dubious closed-door deals. They have also complained that the chief judge of the state’s high court appeared to misstate key facts of the case when he discussed the court ruling that overturned Cosby’s conviction in a television interview. … Cosby’s lawyers have long argued that he relied on a promise that he would never be charged when he gave damaging testimony in an accuser’s civil...
    WHEATON, Ill. (CBS) — Bond was set at $500,000 Monday for a Naperville man accused of driving drunk and causing a crash that killed three people back in October. DuPage County Judge Ann Celine O’Hallaren Walsh set the bond Monday for Brendan Wydajewski, 22. He is charged with three counts of felony aggravated driving under the influence causing a crash – as well as misdemeanor unlawful possession of a firearm and transportation or possession of open alcohol by a driver. READ MORE: Jury Selection Under Way In Jussie Smollett TrialProsecutors from the DuPage County State’s Attorney’s office said Wydajewski was driving west on Warrenville Road in Lisle at a speed of 122 mph when he crashed into another vehicle. His blood alcohol was .147, well above the legal limit, when taken at the hospital afterward, prosecutors said. At 1:18 a.m. Saturday, Oct. 30, Lisle police officers were sent to the intersection of Warrenville Road and Navistar Drive for a traffic crash involving two vehicles. Officers arrived and found one vehicle severely damaged with Andrew Purtill, 46, of Aurora dead inside....
    Pennsylvania prosecutors asked the U.S. Supreme Court on Monday to overturn a ruling that reversed Bill Cosby's conviction for sexual assault.  Cosby had served more than two years of a 10-year sentence when the state's highest court tossed the conviction in June, saying it agreed with former prosecutor Bruce Castor that a promise from his office prevented Cosby from being charged in the case. Montgomery County prosecutors argued that such a ruling could set a dangerous precedent if convictions are overturned due to closed-door deals.  "This decision as it stands will have far-reaching negative consequences beyond Montgomery County and Pennsylvania. The U.S. Supreme Court can right what we believe is a grievous wrong," Montgomery County District Attorney Kevin Steele wrote in the petition, which seeks a Supreme Court review under the Due Process clause of the U.S. Constitution. Cosby’s lawyers have long argued that he relied on a promise that he would never be charged when he gave damaging testimony in an accuser’s civil suit in 2006. The admissions were later used against him in two criminal trials. CLICK HERE...
    PHILADELPHIA -- Prosecutors asked the U.S. Supreme Court to review the ruling that overturned Bill Cosby's conviction, arguing in a petition Monday that a decision announced in a press release does not give a defendant lifetime immunity.Prosecutors said the ruling could set a dangerous precedent if convictions are overturned over dubious closed-door deals. They have also complained that the chief judge of the state's high court appeared to misstate key facts of the case when he discussed the court ruling that overturned Cosby's conviction in a television interview."This decision as it stands will have far-reaching negative consequences beyond Montgomery County and Pennsylvania. The U.S. Supreme Court can right what we believe is a grievous wrong," Montgomery County District Attorney Kevin Steele wrote in the petition, which seeks a Supreme Court review under the due process clause of the U.S. Constitution.Cosby's lawyers have long argued that he relied on a promise that he would never be charged when he gave damaging testimony in an accuser's civil suit in 2006.The admissions were later used against him in two criminal trials.The only written...
    PHILADELPHIA (AP/KDKA) — Prosecutors asked the U.S. Supreme Court to review the ruling that overturned Bill Cosby’s conviction, arguing in a petition Monday that a decision announced in a press release does not give a defendant lifetime immunity. Prosecutors said the ruling could set a dangerous precedent if convictions are overturned over dubious closed-door deals. They have also complained that the chief judge of the state’s high court appeared to misstate key facts of the case when he discussed the court ruling that overturned Cosby’s conviction in a television interview. READ MORE: WalletHub: Pittsburgh Is One Of The Best Cities For Singles“This decision as it stands will have far-reaching negative consequences beyond Montgomery County and Pennsylvania. The U.S. Supreme Court can right what we believe is a grievous wrong,” Montgomery County District Attorney Kevin Steele wrote in the petition, which seeks a Supreme Court review under the due process clause of the U.S. Constitution. Cosby’s lawyers have long argued that he relied on a promise that he would never be charged when he gave damaging testimony in an accuser’s civil...
    PHILADELPHIA (AP) — Prosecutors asked the U.S. Supreme Court to review the ruling that overturned Bill Cosby’s conviction, arguing in a petition Monday that a decision announced in a press release does not give a defendant lifetime immunity. Prosecutors said the ruling could set a dangerous precedent if convictions are overturned over dubious closed-door deals. They have also complained that the chief judge of the state’s high court appeared to misstate key facts of the case when he discussed the court ruling that overturned Cosby’s conviction in a television interview. READ MORE: Temple University Student Samuel Sean Collington Killed In Off-Campus Shooting In North Philadelphia“This decision as it stands will have far-reaching negative consequences beyond Montgomery County and Pennsylvania. The U.S. Supreme Court can right what we believe is a grievous wrong,” Montgomery County District Attorney Kevin Steele wrote in the petition, which seeks a Supreme Court review under the due process clause of the U.S. Constitution. Cosby’s lawyers have long argued that he relied on a promise that he would never be charged when he gave damaging testimony in...
    PHILADELPHIA (AP) — Prosecutors asked the U.S. Supreme Court to review the ruling that overturned Bill Cosby’s conviction, arguing in a petition Monday that a decision announced in a press release does not give a defendant lifetime immunity. Prosecutors said the ruling could set a dangerous precedent if convictions are overturned over dubious closed-door deals. They have also complained that the chief judge of the state’s high court appeared to misstate key facts of the case when he discussed the court ruling that overturned Cosby’s conviction in a television interview. “This decision as it stands will have far-reaching negative consequences beyond Montgomery County and Pennsylvania. The U.S. Supreme Court can right what we believe is a grievous wrong,” Montgomery County District Attorney Kevin Steele wrote in the petition, which seeks a Supreme Court review under the due process clause of the U.S. Constitution. Cosby’s lawyers have long argued that he relied on a promise that he would never be charged when he gave damaging testimony in an accuser’s civil suit in 2006. The admissions were later used against him in...
    In this courtroom sketch, Ghislaine Maxwell sits at the defense table during the final stages of jury selection. (AP Photo/Elizabeth Williams) Opening arguments began Monday afternoon in the high-profile trial of Ghislaine Maxwell, the British socialite and former confidante of Jeffrey Epstein , accused of helping him recruit, groom, and sexually abuse young women. Maxwell, 59, is the daughter of the late British media mogul Robert Maxwell and faces six counts of trafficking-related charges, including enticing minors to travel to engage in illegal sex acts. She is also accused of conspiracy, including using one of Epstein's alleged victims to recruit other girls to participate in "paid sex acts with Epstein." She's also charged with perjury for allegedly lying under oath during depositions in a civil lawsuit against her. Prosecutor Laura Pomerantz began her opening statement by telling the story of a 14-year-old girl named "Jane" who was attending a youth camp. "She was sitting at a picnic table for kids when a man and woman walked by," Pomerantz told the jury. "The man introduced himself as someone who gave...
    PHILADELPHIA (AP) — Prosecutors ask US Supreme Court to revive case against Bill Cosby, months after his conviction was overturned. Copyright © 2021 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, written or redistributed.
    Federal prosecutors filed a motion Sunday night to block former Trump adviser Steve Bannon from making public documents he receives from the Justice Department, in what they charge are an attempt to “try this case in the media rather than in court.” Bannon, who is charged with two counts of contempt of Congress for refusing to cooperate with the committee investigating the January 6th insurrection, has previously declared he will “go on the offense” against the charges. “The defense’s misleading claims, failure to confer, unexplained wholesale opposition, and extrajudicial statements make clear the defense’s real purpose: to abuse criminal discovery to try this case in the media rather than in court,” the prosecutors wrote in the filing. Bannon’s lawyers are working to unseal all evidence in the case, including grand jury testimony, which federal prosecutors are fighting against, claiming to do so would amount to “witness tampering.” “Allowing the defendant to publicly disseminate reports of witness statements will have the collateral effect of witness tampering because it will expose witnesses to public commentary on their potential testimony before trial...
    Two southeast Iowa teenagers charged with first-degree murder and conspiracy to commit murder in the death of their high school Spanish teacher pleaded not guilty in arraignment documents filed Monday.  Willard Noble Chaiden Miller and Jeremy Everett Goodale, both 16, are accused of killing Nohema Graber in Fairfield. Graber, 66, was reported missing Nov. 2 and her remains were found later that day at a Fairfield park where she was known to take daily walks. Earlier court filings stated that Graber suffered "inflicted trauma to the head."  Miller and Goodale waived their right to a speedy trial, which means prosecutors are not required to try them within 90 days of formal charges being filed Nov. 12. Both said they are being held in juvenile detention facilities.  JURY SELECTED FOR GHISLAINE MAXWELL’S TRIAL  Jefferson County authorities say Willard Noble Chaiden Miller (center) and Jeremy Everett Goodale (left) are charged as adults with first-degree homicide and conspiracy to commit first-degree homicide in the death of 66-year-old Nohema Graber (right). ( Fairfield Police Department via AP) Last week, lawyers for the teens asked a state...
    FAIRFIELD, Iowa (AP) — Two southeast Iowa teenagers charged with first-degree murder and conspiracy to commit murder in the death of their high school Spanish teacher pleaded not guilty in arraignment documents filed Monday. Willard Noble Chaiden Miller and Jeremy Everett Goodale, both 16, are accused of killing Nohema Graber in Fairfield. Graber, 66, was reported missing Nov. 2 and her remains were found later that day at a Fairfield park where she was known to take daily walks. Earlier court filings stated that Graber suffered “inflicted trauma to the head.” Miller and Goodale waived their right to a speedy trial, which means prosecutors are not required to try them within 90 days of formal charges being filed Nov. 12. Both said they are being held in juvenile detention facilities. Last week, lawyers for the teens asked a state court judge to lower their bond so they could be released to the supervision of their parents, but prosecutors resisted and said the bonds should be maintained at $1 million or even raised to $2 million. Assistant Iowa Attorney...
    James Comey's daughter, Maurene Comey, is one of the three lead prosecutors against Ghislaine Maxwell, a known associate of Jeffrey Epstein. Maurene Comey, 32, joins Assistant U.S. Attorneys Alex Rossmiller, Alison Gainfort Moe, Andrew Rohrbach, and Lara Elizabeth Pomerantz in leading the case against Maxwell, whose trial begins Monday. They have accused Maxwell of trafficking teenage girls for sex and sexually abusing them with Epstein. HUMA ABEDIN LAYS BLAME OF CLINTON LOSS SQUARELY AT COMEY'S FEET The Maxwell trial is not the first Epstein-related case Maurene Comey has worked on. When Epstein was indicted in July 2019 for numerous sex crimes, she served as one of the lead prosecutors against him before his alleged suicide a month later. Another case she worked on was on Nicholas Tartaglione, a brief roommate of Epstein at Manhattan's Metropolitan Correctional Center in 2019, according to Business Insider . Comey's LinkedIn page reveals she has worked as an assistant U.S. attorney at the Southern District of New York since 2015. She graduated from The College of William and Mary in...
    Prosecutors say Bannon is trying to manipulate the courts and have his contempt of Congress case tried in the media. Steve Bannon is trying to game the justice system and have his criminal contempt of Congress case tried in the media instead of in court, a manipulation that prosecutors say will lead to an “absurd” carnival-type atmosphere that could jeopardize potential witness testimony against Bannon later. Just before Thanksgiving, the former strategist to ex-President Donald Trump filed a request in federal court in Washington, D.C. asking for permission to publicly share a variety of court records tied to his impending trial. Bannon was indicted by a federal grand jury earlier this month after he spent weeks evading a subpoena from a congressional select committee investigating the Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol. He pleaded not guilty. Bannon claims the prosecution’s attempt to keep some discovery materials private is akin to the Department of Justice denying him a fair or speedy trial. During a recent motion hearing, the former Trump strategist said prosecutors did not have legal standing to pursue...
    CHICAGO (AP) — Two brothers stand at the center of the case that prosecutors will lay before jurors when the trial of Jussie Smollett begins this week. The former “Empire” actor contends he was the victim of a racist and homophobic assault in downtown Chicago on a frigid night in January 2019. The siblings, who worked with him on the TV show, say he paid them $3,500 to pose as his attackers. Smollett is accused of lying to police about the alleged attack and has been charged with felony disorderly conduct. A class 4 felony, the crime carries a sentence of up to three years in prison but experts have said it is more likely that if Smollett is convicted he would be placed on probation and perhaps ordered to perform community service. Whether Smollett, who is Black and gay, testifies remains an open question. But the siblings, Abimbola and Olabinjo Osundairo, will take the witness stand where they are expected to repeat what they have told police officers and prosecutors — that they carried out the attack at Smollett’s...
    CHICAGO (AP) — Two brothers stand at the center of the case that prosecutors will lay before jurors when the trial of Jussie Smollett begins this week. The 39-year-old former “Empire” actor, who is Black and gay, contends he was the victim of a racist and homophobic assault in downtown Chicago in January 2019. The siblings, who worked with him on the TV show, say he paid them $3,500 to pose as his attackers. Smollett is accused of lying to police about the alleged attack and has been charged with felony disorderly conduct. A class 4 felony, the crime carries a sentence of up to three years in prison but experts have said it is more likely that if Smollett is convicted he would be placed on probation and perhaps ordered to perform community service. The trial starts with jury selection Monday in a Chicago courtroom and is expected to last a week. It is not known whether Smollett will testify. But the siblings, Abimbola and Olabinjo Osundairo, will take the witness stand. They are expected to repeat what they...