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              moreby Eric Lendrum   In an unprecedented move, the Biden White House still has not yet released an official total of the number of illegal aliens who are currently occupying the United States, the Washington Free Beacon reports. Although the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) has given those numbers to Congress in a report, that report has not yet been made public. Common practice dating back to the Obama Administration has been to release the report publicly shortly after the Congressional briefing, with a focus on the number of possible visa overstays. Congress has warned that “the large number of annual in-country alien overstays threatens national security and the integrity of legal immigration.” The report in question is formally called the “Entry/Exit Overstay Report,” and documents foreigners who were originally approved to stay in the United States with a visa, but whose visas have since expired. The report is compiled using travel data across multiple agencies, including DHS and the State Department. “For whatever reason, it appears political appointees are not disclosing a report produced by career subject matter experts,” said Jon...
    PHOENIX — Draymond Green pulled up, exhausted, and watched as the nail dig into the coffin of the Warriors’ seven-game winning streak and their claim to sole possession of the NBA’s best record. Jae Crowder’s 3-pointer with 3:47 to go sealed the Warriors’ fate in a 104-96 loss to the Phoenix Suns in a matchup of the NBA’s top two teams that lived up to its billing. Green had just run the length of the court and back two times but failed to complete either of his attempts at the rim that could have stemmed the Suns’ game-clinching run. Instead, all he could was watch. Crowder’s 3 was the clincher in a 24-18 fourth quarter that gave the Suns their 18th consecutive win and pulled them even with Golden State atop the Western Conference standings at 18-3. Tuesday’s game was more than just an early season matchup for supremacy in the West. It was a battle of one team vying to regain its position and another looking to replicate the former’s dynastic reign. Suns coach Monty...
    Today in History Today is Wednesday, Dec. 1, the 335th day of 2021. There are 30 days left in the year. Today’s Highlight in History: On Dec. 1, 1862, President Abraham Lincoln sent his Second Annual Message to Congress, in which he called for the abolition of slavery, and went on to say, “Fellow-citizens, we can not escape history. We of this Congress and this Administration will be remembered in spite of ourselves.” On this date: In 1824, the presidential election was turned over to the U.S. House of Representatives when a deadlock developed among John Quincy Adams, Andrew Jackson, William H. Crawford and Henry Clay. (Adams ended up the winner.) In 1941, Japan’s Emperor Hirohito approved waging war against the United States, Britain and the Netherlands after his government rejected U.S. demands contained in the Hull Note. In 1942, during World War II, nationwide gasoline rationing went into effect in the United States; the goal was not so much to save on gas, but to conserve rubber that was desperately needed for the war effort by reducing the use...
    Sen. Steve Daines (R-MT) urged Americans to grasp the significance of the historic case before the U.S. Supreme Court Wednesday – one that offers the nine justices “the opportunity to reconsider a wrongly decided case that has since resulted in the death of 62 million innocent babies.” The chairman of the Senate’s Pro-Life Caucus said Tuesday afternoon that as the Court hears opening arguments in the case of Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health Organization, the justices will have the chance “to restore the Constitution and defend our most fundamental right—the right to life.” The case involves Mississippi’s Gestational Age Act, which would limit abortion after 15 weeks of pregnancy, and poses the most significant challenge in decades to the right to abortion created by the Supreme Court in its decision in Roe v. Wade in 1973. In explaining the nature of the case, Daines asserted: It’s very important that we are clear about what overturning Roe would mean for our country. Overturning Roe will not, will not, ban abortion nationwide, as many on the Left like to claim in an attempt to mislead Americans. Instead, it would return the power to state and federal lawmakers, allowing them to...
    Republican Louisiana Sen. John Kennedy advocated in favor of overturning the landmark 1973 Supreme Court decision Roe v. Wade, calling it “one of the most poorly reasoned decisions” on the Senate floor Tuesday. Kennedy addressed the case Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health Organization, which the U.S. Supreme Court agreed to take up in May. The case responds to a 2018 Mississippi law that bans abortion at 15 weeks of gestation, challenging the precedent that the right to an abortion is protected before fetal viability. Kennedy said that lawmakers have ongoing debates on ways to “protect” and “lift up” the powerless, including unborn and potential lives. The senator said Roe v. Wade gives the “managerial elite” the power to rule over moral decisions for the rest of the American people, stripping them of the right to make those decisions independently. “Now Roe v. Wade is about abortion, we know that. But it’s also about something else. Roe v. Wade is also about federalism. Roe v. Wade is also about the American people,” Kennedy said. “Roe v. Wade is about whether a...
    With the U.S. Supreme Court set to hear opening arguments Wednesday in a case that could overturn Roe v. Wade and threaten abortion rights for millions of people across the country, right-wing anti-choice groups are preparing to ensure that anyone who becomes pregnant in the U.S. is forced to continue the pregnancy. The consideration of Mississippi's 15-week abortion ban represents a moment the anti-choice movement has been waiting for since 1973, when Roe v. Wade affirmed that pregnant people have the right to obtain abortion care until 24 weeks of pregnancy. After a number of extreme forced-pregnancy laws passed by right-wing state legislatures were overturned by federal courts in recent years, Mississippi officials are asking the high court to overturn Roe v. Wade in addition to allowing their law—which includes no exceptions for pregnancies that result from rape or incest—to stand. Former Vice President Mike Pence called on the Supreme Court Tuesday to "make history" by overturning the ruling—a move that would swiftly put in place abortion bans in 12 states that have "trigger bans," including Arkansas, Tennessee, and Kentucky,...
    (CNN)This could be the moment when some combination of Republican-appointed Supreme Court justices agrees to break 50 years of precedent by removing the national right to an abortion recognized in Roe v. Wade. The court has a hearing over a Mississippi abortion law Wednesday, and the 6-3 conservative majority seems primed for action.A separate, notorious Texas abortion law is also before the court. But it is the Mississippi case that is a direct challenge to the landmark Roe v. Wade decision, which established a woman's constitutional right to end a pregnancy.Many states have been so intent and creative on chipping away at the precedent that even a half-measure by the court could create a post-Roe reality. For women who live in states with few abortion providers and numerous hurdles to gain access, it may feel like a post-Roe reality right now.But either by overturning Roe or scaling it back, the court could, when it hands down a decision next year, make it much easier for states to ban or more seriously restrict abortion rights.Read MoreWhat does Roe guarantee? The 1973...
    (CNN)The Supreme Court hears oral arguments Wednesday in a case that could result in the repeal of Roe v. Wade, the decision legalizing abortion nationwide that's been at the center of American politics for nearly 50 years. Here are the key details:How to listen and follow along Arguments begin at 10 a.m. ET. The court still doesn't allow TV cameras, but it has finally relented on live audio. You can listen on CNN.com and follow along with our live coverage. Read MoreWhat is the Mississippi law at issue? It bars most abortions after 15 weeks of pregnancy, a standard that violates Roe v. Wade. It's one of several laws passed in various states with the purpose of getting the Supreme Court to hear a direct challenge to Roe. The 5th US Circuit Court of Appeals -- perhaps the most conservative appeals court in the country -- blocked the law, saying it violated Roe and Supreme Court precedent. Mississippi appealed to the Supreme Court, which agreed last spring to hear the case. What does Roe say? Roe guaranteed a woman's right...
    A federal judge in Louisiana issued a nationwide preliminary injunction Tuesday against President Biden’s COVID-19 vaccine mandate for health care workers. Judge Terry A. Doughty in the U.S. District Court Western District of Louisiana ruled in favor of a request from Republican Louisiana Attorney General Jeff Landry to block an emergency regulation issued Nov. 4 by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services that required the COVID shot for nearly every full-time employee, part-time employee, volunteer, and contractor working at a wide range of healthcare facilities receiving Medicaid or Medicaid funding. Louisiana was joined in the lawsuit by attorneys general in 13 other states. OSHA SUSPENDS ENFORCEMENT OF COVID-19 VACCINE MANDATE FOR LARGE BUSINESSES Doughty argued in his ruling that the Biden administration does not have the constitutional authority to go around Congress by issuing such a mandate. "If the executive branch is allowed to usurp the power of the legislative branch to make laws, two of the three powers conferred by our Constitution would be in the same hands," he wrote. "If human nature and history teach anything, it...
    In an apparently serious article, the New York Times declared Monday that climate change is compelling some albatrosses, which usually mate for life, to “divorce” their partners. Citing a study published last week by New Zealand’s Royal Society, the article by Natasha Frost states that albatrosses are among the most monogamous creatures on the planet but “climate change may be driving more of the birds to ‘divorce.’” “The researchers, led by Francesco Ventura of the University of Lisbon, found that the divorce rate (sic) among the birds… increased in years in which the ocean was warmest,” it reads. The research reportedly involved 15,500 breeding pairs of black-browed albatrosses on New Island in the Falklands using data collected over 15 years. “Albatross divorce is typically very rare,” the article notes with no apparent irony, and the “most common trigger for permanent separation is an inability to successfully fledge a chick.” The article also states that albatross divorce is “the technical term used by the researchers” and foreshadows “a worrisome trend for seabird populations in general as temperatures rise globally.” The anthropomorphism...
    One of the cornerstones of President Joe Biden’s Build Back Better plan for families and children is universal pre-K—the opportunity for young children in every household to attend public preschool. “We’re going to make sure that every three- and four-year-old in America has access to quality preschool,” Biden has said in promoting the program. It’s a more than laudable goal which not only gives children a solid start in learning, but also frees up a big chunk of their families’ budgets, saving the cost of private daycare or preschool and allowing parents more freedom in choosing work opportunities. With every good idea a Democrat comes up with that helps regular people and boosts the economy, there’s a Republican saying “we’re not going to do that.” In this case, it’s a bunch of red states which are threatening to boycott the program. We’ve seen this before with Medicaid expansion under the Affordable Care Act. That legislation was written to make Medicaid expansion universal among the states, but the Supreme Court decided it had to do something to undercut the law, so they...
    (CNN)A federal judge on Tuesday blocked the Covid-19 vaccine requirement for federal contractors in Kentucky, Ohio and Tennessee -- the third time in recent weeks that President Joe Biden's federal mandate has been blocked in some capacity in certain parts of the country."The question presented here is narrow. Can the president use congressionally delegated authority to manage the federal procurement of goods and services to impose vaccines on the employees of federal contractors and subcontractors?" US District Judge Gregory Frederick Van Tatenhove, a President George W. Bush appointee, in Kentucky said in the 29-page opinion. "In all likelihood, the answer to that question is no."The judge said the President had exceeded his authority under the Federal Property and Administrative Services Act in issuing the requirement. "While the statute grants to the president great discretion, it strains credulity that Congress intended the FPASA, a procurement statute, to be the basis for promulgating a public health measure such as mandatory vaccination," the judge said.He also said he was "concerned that the vaccine mandate intrudes on an area that is traditionally reserved to...
    Vice President Mike Pence said Wednesday he believes Roe v. Wade will soon be overturned, as the Supreme Court is set to take up its biggest abortion case in 30 years. The court will soon decide the fate of a Mississippi abortion law, which bans the practice after 15 weeks into a pregnancy.  'Today as the Supreme Court prepares to hear oral arguments in those hallowed halls, we are here to declare with one voice 'no more,' he said at the National Press Club in Washington, D.C. at an event put on by the Susan B. Anthony list.  'I'm very hopeful and I do believe that Roe v. Wade will be overturned whether it's now or in the future,' he said.   He urged the high court to throw the Roe v. Wade decision to the 'ash heap of history.' At the forefront of the fight to end abortion is former Vice President Mike Pence, who urged the high court to send the Roe v. Wade decision to the 'ash heap of history' Here's a breakdown of what's at stake when...
    I was thinking about the theory of political union as opposed to the practice of political union when I came across this line from the founder of USA Today. In 1982, on the frontpage of the first edition of his fledgling daily, the late Gannet CEO Al Neuharth expressed his aspirations for a new venture. “USA Today hopes to serve as a forum for better understanding and unity to make the USA truly one nation.” That phrase jumped out at me -- truly one nation. The implications seem many and varied. On the one hand, America is not currently one nation. If it is, it’s not a true one. On the other hand, it’s becoming one, true nation. And if it’s becoming one true nation, what is it right now? Then there’s that phrase -- “better understanding and (better) unity.” The presumption seems to be that more facts and more knowledge strengthen the bonds between and among these united states. It’s a worthy goal, I’ll admit. It’s also a catchy slogan. But is any of it true? Is the...
    RIDING a bike is a popular form of transportation across the country but just like driving a car, there are rules of the road you need to follow. If you're riding a bike on the sidewalk, you aren't excluded from following the laws in your city. 1In some cities, riding a bike on the sidewalk is illegal Some bicyclists use sidewalks as a way to avoid traffic when the roads are congested. It's not illegal to ride your bike on the sidewalk, but it will depend on where you live. There are also other factors such as your age. Some cities have banned riding on the sidewalk to protect pedestrians. Other cities have become bike-friendly, creating designated bike lanes within city streets. Each city can pass their own law, so it's best to check before you start sharing the sidewalk with pedestrians. Most read in motorsFOOD FOR THOUGHT Can I be fined for eating while driving?COSTLY CRACK Is it illegal to drive with a cracked windshield?N-ICE TIP Woman’s clever towel hack will stop your car windscreen freezing overnightNOT FINE Drivers...
    (CBS4) – There’s been an uptick recently in the number of Americans leaving their jobs for better pay and benefits in other positions. And in Colorado the percentage of these job departures is higher than in other states, according to new statistics. Data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics shows Colorado saw 4.3% of workers in the state resign in September. Bureau of Labor Statistics quit rates in September were highest in these 10 states. (credit: CBS News) To compare, Hawaii (No. 1 for resignations) had just over 7%. Montana (No. 2) had just under 5%. Colorado is tied with Indiana and Alaska for the No. 4 spot at 4.3%. Hawaii: 7.1% Montana: 4.8% Nevada: 4.5% Alaska: 4.3% Colorado: 4.3% Indiana: 4.3% Idaho: 4.1% Oregon: 3.9% Louisiana: 3.8% New Hampshire: 3.8% So what’s driving workers away? States with more people quitting have issues beyond the pandemic. That includes an aging workforce or a low workforce participation rate. In states with low unemployment rates, workers are using that leverage to find more lucrative jobs. MORE FROM CBSNEWS.COM: Americans are quitting their...
    CHICAGO (CBS) — Chicago’s health department said its travel advisory stands at 38 states with California, Guam and North Carolina now off the list. Last week, the city’s travel advisory had 40 states and one territory with Connecticut and Maryland returning to the list. READ MORE: Red Cross Day Of Giving: Here's How You Can Help!According to the Chicago Department of Public Health (CDPH) the case rates for those removed from the list were below 15 per 100,000 residents for two consecutive weeks. “As of Tuesday, every state or territory except for Alabama, California, D.C., Florida, Georgia, Guam, Hawaii, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, Puerto Rico, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, and the Virgin Islands are on the Travel Advisory,” according to the CDPH. Maryland, Nevada, Oklahoma, Oregon, and Washington, with daily case rates under 15, could be removed from the list next week, if their daily COVID case rates remain below 15 per 100,000 residents for two weeks in a row. “The best protection you can have against COVID, no matter where you travel or what new variants emerge, is full...
    CHICAGO (WLS) -- The Chicago Department of Public Health removed two states and at territory to its weekly COVID-19 Travel Advisory Tuesday.The city's COVID-19 quarantine advisory now includes 38 states after California, North Carolina and Guam were added back on this week.States are removed from the Travel Advisory when they maintain a daily COVID case rate below 15 per 100,000 residents for two consecutive weeks.Note: The video in the player above is from a previous report. Connecticut's daily COVID case rate per 100,000 residents has rise to 20.7 from 11.1 over the past week. Maryland just passed the threshold at 15.1.As of Tuesday, every state or territory except for Alabama, California, D.C., Florida, Georgia, Guam, Hawaii, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, Puerto Rico, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, and the Virgin Islands are on the Travel Advisory.Maryland, Nevada, Oklahoma, Oregon, and Washington, all with daily case rates under 15, could be removed from the travel advisory next week, if their daily COVID case rates remain below 15 per 100,000 residents for a second consecutive week.Officials recommend that unvaccinated travelers should get tested...
    TALLAHASSEE (CBSMiami/NSF) – A lawsuit about whether a transgender student should have been allowed to use boys’ bathrooms at a Northeast Florida high school has become a battleground for states across the country. In two briefs filed at a federal appeals court, 40 states and the District of Columbia have chosen sides in the case stemming from a St. Johns County School Board policy that prevented Drew Adams from using boys’ bathrooms at Nease High School. READ MORE: Florida Regulators Urged To Back New Area Code In Palm Beach CountyThe latest salvo came Friday, when 22 states and the District of Columbia filed a brief at the 11th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals that sided with Adams and said the school-board policy violates constitutional equal-protection rights and Title IX, a federal law that bars sex-based discrimination. “The board’s policy needlessly denies Adams something most people take for granted: the ability to use a public restroom consistent with one’s lived experience of one’s own gender,” the brief said. “The policy singles out transgender students like Adams and forces them either to...
    PHOTO VIA ADOBE IMAGESA lawsuit about whether a transgender male student should have been allowed to use boys’ bathrooms at a Northeast Florida high school has become a battleground for states across the country. In two briefs filed at a federal appeals court, 40 states and the District of Columbia have chosen sides in the case stemming from a St. Johns County School Board policy that prevented Drew Adams from using boys’ bathrooms at Nease High School. The latest salvo came Friday, when 22 states and the District of Columbia filed a brief at the 11th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals that sided with Adams and said the school-board policy violates constitutional equal-protection rights and Title IX, a federal law that bars sex-based discrimination. “The board’s policy needlessly denies Adams something most people take for granted: the ability to use a public restroom consistent with one’s lived experience of one’s own gender,” the brief said. “The policy singles out transgender students like Adams and forces them either to forgo restroom use or to choose between two other detrimental options: using...
    In Massachusetts, where 71% of the eligible population is vaccinated, cases are up 32% and hospitalizations are up 44%. Finally, in New York and New Jersey, where 68% of the eligible population is vaccinated, cases are up 13% and 39% and hospitalizations are up 18% and 28%, respectively.What else?The inverse is true for the least vaccinated states in the country. According to the Times data, each of the seven states with the lowest vaccination rates — West Virginia, Idaho, Wyoming, Alabama, Mississippi, North Dakota, and Louisiana — are reporting significant declines in the number of COVID-19 cases and hospitalizations over the last 14 days. Of course, there are outliers to the apparent inverse relationship. In Washington state, where residents are 65% vaccinated, both cases and hospitalizations are down by double digits. Conversely, in both Missouri and Indiana, where just 51% of the population is vaccinated, both cases and hospitalizations are up by double digits. It could be that the virus is plaguing certain regions of the U.S., such as the Northeast and the Midwest, to a greater degree than the...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — The Biden administration formally revoked the terrorist designation of Colombia’s former FARC guerrilla army on Tuesday, but newly imposed the designation on commanders and offshoots of the group who have refused to lay down their arms. Lifting of the terrorist designation for FARC — the commonly used Spanish acronym of the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia — comes five years after the guerrilla army signed a peace deal aimed at winding down a half-century of political attacks and fighting, assassinations and kidnappings. Colombia says more than 220,000 people died in violence that was fueled by profits from drug trafficking. The foreign terrorist designation prohibits any foreign financial organizations from providing significant financial services to the targeted entities and makes it a crime to provide any material support to them. U.S. Secretary of State Antony Blinken said in a statement that FARC “no longer exists as a unified organization that engages in terrorism or terrorist activity or has the capability or intent to do so.” The group signed a peace deal in 2016 and in 2018 took part...
    Americans have started factoring a state's political ideology into their decision to move as the nation grows increasingly polarized. A survey from Redfin, a real-estate brokerage firm based in Seattle, predicted more people would vote with their feet in 2022, moving to states that align with their political beliefs about abortion, civil rights, mask mandates and critical race theory.  'Now that workers have more control over where they live, more people will seek out areas where there are like minded people with laws that fit their political beliefs,' wrote Daryl Fairweather, chief economist for Redfin.  'We will also see more blue enclaves grow within red areas and vice versa, as parents select school districts that align with their preferences regarding mask mandates, critical race theory and other controversial issues.'  A Redfin survey found about 25 per cent of its Los Angeles users preferred to stay in a blue state while nearly 10 per cent have chosen to go red in the third quarter of 2021 More and more people are moving to states that have abortion laws that fit their...
    STIMULUS checks are being issued in several US states before Christmas, with some residents receiving up to $3,000 in relief payments. Residents in Washington, Illinois, Maine, and California are among those receiving the relief cash while cities such as Seattle and Chicago are also offering stimulus programs. 1Stimulus checks will be issued in some US states before ChristmasCredit: Getty Seattle is giving $3,000 to residents who earn less than half of the city's median income as part of the $16million Seattle Relief Fund. It means individuals who earn less than $40,500 and families who earn less than $57,850 can receive the payment. The program is aimed at offering direct cash assistance to the city's most vulnerable low-income residents and homes that have been hit by the Covid crisis. Applications for the program closed on November 15 and decisions are due to be announced by December 6. Payments will then be sent after December 9. Chicago is offering relief payments through the Universal Basic Income Pilot Program. Most read in MoneyPAYDAY December deadline...
    Senior U.S. intelligence officials worry Iran will not scale back their nuclear program to 2015 Iran Deal levels ahead of another round of negotiations, according to an Axios report. On Monday, the United States, China, and other European powers met with Iranian negotiators in Vienna, Austria, to resume another round of talks regarding Iran’s nuclear program. The Vienna negotiations will be the seventh round of meetings between the countries. According to Axios: Top Biden officials are deeply worried Iran will go too far in its current nuclear development, making it too late to return to the 2015 agreement, the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA), according to sources familiar with internal administration discussions. Officials are reportedly concerned because Iranian scientists cannot unlearn any knowledge they gain after developing advanced nuclear technology. The 2015 Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action, commonly known as the Iran Deal, was negotiated by the Obama administration, members of the U.N Security Council, and former Iranian leader Hassan Rouhani. However, according to Axios, the new Iranian leader, Ebrahim Raisi, thinks of Rouhanui as “a weak accommodationist who negotiated a...
              moreby Joe Mueller   U.S. District Judge Matthew T. Schelp on Monday ordered a preliminary injunction against the Biden Administration, stopping mandated COVID-19 vaccinations for health care workers in Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) facilities. “Because it is evident CMS significantly understates the burden that its mandate would impose on the ability of healthcare facilities to provide proper care, and thus, save lives, the public has an interest in maintaining the ‘status quo’ while the merits of the case are determined,” Schelp wrote in a 32-page memorandum and order in the U.S. District Court in the Eastern District of Missouri. Missouri Republican Attorney General Eric Schmitt led a 10-state coalition filing the lawsuit on Nov. 5 to stop the CMS vaccine mandate. On the courthouse steps in St. Louis, Schmitt, a candidate for the seat of retiring Republican U.S. Senator Roy Blunt, stated many will benefit from the ruling. “This is a significant ruling and the first of its kind in the country,” Schmitt told reporters. “What the court said today was CMS and the Biden administration has no statutory...
              moreby Mackubin Owens   It has been clear for some time that the People’s Republic of China (PRC) seeks to displace the United States not only as a regional but also as a global hegemonic power. Indeed, we are now in the midst of a new “cold war,” not unlike its predecessor that pitted the United States against the Soviet Union. In the service of its goals, Beijing has pursued a coherent grand strategy. Although China seems to be effectively executing its grand strategy, its success is not foreordained. But countering it must be the strategic priority of the United States. “Strategy” describes the employment of limited means to achieve the goals of national policy. In general, strategy provides a conceptual link between national ends and scarce resources, both the transformation of those resources into means during peacetime and the application of those means during war. In the words of Edward Mead Earle: strategy is the art of controlling and utilizing the resources of a nation—or a coalition of nations—including its armed forces, to the end that its vital interests...
              more   A post-election report from ALG Research and Third Way found that Democrats’ losses in Virginia in November were due to both national and Virginia-specific challenges. Key findings from a swing-voter-focused study group included lackluster national brand for Democrats, the importance of education, and the failure of the Youngkin-equals-Trump messaging, combined with Youngkin’s positive persona and proactive issues. “We’re not saying this was a mistake, or that Terry had a better message he left on the table. We don’t know. But we do know that if our most–effective message in 2022 is that Republicans equal Trump, we’re going to get creamed,” the report states. “[Focus-group members] liked [Youngkin], related to him, and thought he was going to do something good for them,” the report states. Before the election, pundits said Republicans would have some help from Virginia’s tendency to vote against the party of a new president. That’s a pattern that also plays out in congressional midterms. The ALG report doesn’t merely blame Virginia Democrats’ performance on those predictable trends. The report is based on focus groups of 18...
              more   In a press conference Monday, Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis (R) is proposing raises and bonuses for law enforcement officers and first responders as part of his budget hopes ahead of the 2022 Florida legislative session. “Increasing salaries for state law enforcement by 20 and 25 percent respectively is going to make a real difference for those officers, it will make a real difference for the families, it will help retain a lot of the talented people we have as well as recruit new people,” DeSantis said. In 2021, DeSantis announced $1,000 bonuses for law enforcement officers, and DeSantis desires the same bonuses to be a part of budget talks for this upcoming year, as well. He is also asking for $73 million to raise the minimum entry salary for state level law enforcement positions. On Twitter, DeSantis added to his comments by saying Florida will continue to support its law enforcement community. “While other states defund their police, in Florida, we will always support our law enforcement,” DeSantis tweeted. While other states defund their police, in Florida, we...
    One year ago, then-candidate Joe Biden declared that, in light of the statistic of 220,000 Americans having died from coronavirus as of October 2020, that "anyone who is responsible for that many deaths should not remain as president of the United States." At the time, the demand was made of President Trump – however as of November 2021, by Biden's own standard, he should resign the office of president, Fox News host Sean Hannity said Monday. "[I]f you don’t hear anything else I say tonight, hear this. Anyone who is not responsible for taking control, in fact not saying I take no responsibility initially, anyone who is responsible for that many deaths should not remain as president of the United States of America," Biden said one year ago. JUDGE BLOCKS BIDEN VACCINE MANDATE FOR HEALTH CARE WORKERS IN TEN STATES The "Hannity" host noted that Biden has not been challenged on his mishandling of the coronavirus pandemic in the time since he took office.  "Based on Joe’s statement, he should not remain the president of the United States – 350,000...
    Missouri-based U.S. District Judge Matthew Schelp granted an injunction on Biden’s vaccine mandate for healthcare workers in 10 states on Monday, court documents show. The case applies to Medicare and Medicaid-certified medical establishments in North Dakota, South Dakota, Nebraska, Wyoming, New Hampshire, Missouri, Kansas, Iowa, Alaska, and Arkansas. The injunction concerns the federal vaccine mandate from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS). Under this mandate, healthcare employees, trainees, students, volunteers, or contractors who provide any care, treatment, or other services for a facility must be fully inoculated against COVID-19. The mandate applies to 15 categories of healthcare facilities. (RELATED: 12 More States Sue Biden Administration Over Vaccine Mandate) Schelp, who was appointed by former President Trump, decided in his 32-page preliminary injunction that there was a detrimental impact of losing qualified healthcare workers due to this mandate that outweighed the need for healthcare workers to be vaccinated. NEW YORK, NEW YORK – AUGUST 09: A person holds up a protest sign as people gather at City Hall to protest vaccine mandates on August 09, 2021, in New York...
    The Supreme Court is hearing oral arguments Wednesday in Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health, a case that could potentially overturn the Roe v. Wade precedent which enshrines elective abortions throughout the first six months of pregnancy nationwide. Overturning Roe would not outlaw abortion in the U.S., but would instead allow individual states to restrict abortion in the first two trimesters, according to The New York Times. Some states would enforce laws that restrict abortion, such as the six-week abortion ban in Texas which is at the center of another Supreme Court case. U.S abortion law is out of touch with the rest of the world. In fact, the U.S. is just ONE of SEVEN countries – including China and North Korea – that allows elective abortion past 20 weeks’ gestation.https://t.co/GuAevbRefC — March for Life (@March_for_Life) November 15, 2021 Lenient abortion laws in states like New York and California would not be effected by the end of Roe, the Times reported. Seven states have no abortion bans at any point during pregnancy, according to the Guttmacher Institute, and overturning...
    LOS ANGELES (CBSLA) – North America has now joined the list of continents with reported cases of the newest COVID-19 variant – Omicron. Two cases were reported in Canada on Monday, bringing the worldwide total of countries with a documented instance to over 14. Other countries include: Australia, Belgium, Botswana, Denmark, France, Germany, Hong Kong, Israel, Italy, Netherlands, South Africa, the United Kingdom and more. READ MORE: LA's Small Businesses Can Apply For $5,000 Comeback Checks Grant Program Starting TodayThe variant was first discovered in South Africa days before Thanksgiving. On Friday, the Netherlands held two planes that had arrived from South Africa on a tarmac at one of their airports in order to test all passengers onboard. The tests revealed 61 positive COVID-19 cases – 13 of which were of the Omicron variant. As of now, the Delta variant is still the dominant strain present in America, but experts predict that Omicron could soon take charge in the coming weeks. In response, the United States has announced a travel ban to and from eight African countries, including: Botswana, Eswatini, Lesotho,...
    (CBS/AP) — A federal judge on Monday blocked President Joe Biden’s administration from enforcing a coronavirus vaccine mandate on thousands of health care workers in 10 states, including New Hampshire, that had brought the first legal challenge against the requirement. The court order said that the federal Centers for Medicare & Medicaid had no clear authority from Congress to enact the vaccine mandate for providers participating in the two government health care programs for the elderly, disabled and poor. READ MORE: Local Researchers Test COVID Samples To Determine Prevalence Of Omicron Variant In Massachusetts“This is a big win for New Hampshire’s health care system,” New Hampshire Gov. Chris Sununu wrote on Twitter Monday. “Nursing homes were at risk of closure if the Biden mandate remained in place. This helps maintain the staff New Hampshire needs to care for our loved ones.” The preliminary injunction by St. Louis-based U.S. District Judge Matthew Schelp applies to a coalition of suing states that, along with New Hampshire, includes Alaska, Arkansas, Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, South Dakota and Wyoming. All those states...
    AMERICANS in certain states across the US will be getting surprise stimulus checks right before Christmas. The bonus cash is being sent as part of President Joe Biden’s American Rescue Plan. They are only available to specific residents living in 14 states 2Residents living in these 14 states might be eligible for extra cash in the upcoming monthsCredit: Getty Some of these states already have their own benefit programs for those who are eligible for stimulus payments. Congress has yet to agree on a fourth federal stimulus check which is why so many states have come up with their own. As with most stimulus checks, only people meeting specific requirements will be eligible to receive money. ARIZONA Out-of-work residents will be able to take advantage of the state’s back-to-work program.  Anyone who goes back to work part-time is eligible for $1,000. Those returning to full-time work could receive $2,000. CALIFORNIA California created the Golden State Stimulus program for residents who were required to file their 2020 tax return by October 15. Around half of the 9million residents received their money...
    Another Arizona official is using his office to voice opposition to ice cream maker Ben and Jerry’s over its boycott of Israel’s occupation of territories occupied by Palestinians. Attorney General Mark Brnovich announced said he’s joined 11 other states in urging Unilever and its subsidiary, Ben & Jerry’s Homemade Inc., to reverse their decision to boycott the State of Israel. “We must defend the laws of our states and oppose attempts by global corporations to engage in economic warfare against the State of Israel,” Brnovich said. Attorneys general from Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Kansas, Mississippi, Missouri, Indiana, Oklahoma, Texas, Utah, and West Virginia also signed on to the letter. “Despite the fact that the policies of most U.S. States opposing the boycotts of Israel are widely known, Unilever has embarked on an unfortunate and financially misguided path of testing our states’ resolve by refusing to stop Ben and Jerry’s from boycotting selected regions within the State of Israel,” the letter read. Vermont-based Ben and Jerry’s announced July 19 it no longer would sell its products in the West Bank, Gaza Strip...
    Left-wing media figures like NBC News anchor Charles Todd appear very concerned about the new coronavirus omicron variant discovered in Botswana – but not chiefly because it may or may not be extensively hazardous, the panel on "The Five" discussed Monday. On Sunday, Todd suggested President Biden should use the emergence of the new variant to "push back on all this vaccine misinformation from Republicans" and to try to use his political stature to take control of the vaccine mitigation narrative. On ABC's "Good Morning America," one pundit said the new variant poses a "challenge – particularly on the economic front – heading into an election year for the Biden administration, which is critical and could spell trouble." "The Five" host Jesse Watters remarked that the media is panicking over the wrong thing. Instead of analyzing the new variant's potential effect on the United States' current statistics, they're worried about their friend in the White House. "[Could be] trouble for Biden, but not for the people who could get sick," he said, paraphrasing the pundits. President Joe Biden points...
    Several large states and cities have exhausted their federal rental assistance, the Treasury Department said Monday, in a sign that spending on a massive program aimed at averting evictions has picked up speed. The federal government is forecasting that upwards of $30 billion or about two-thirds of money allocated for rental assistance will be disbursed or allocated by the end of the year. That is a dramatic change from this summer when housing advocates were complaining about the slow pace of distribution. But with the improved outcome of the $46.5 billion program has come concerns that some tenants will not get help. The first tranche of emergency rental assistance funds, known as ERA1, is for $25 billion and the second, known as ERA2 and meant to be spent over a longer period of time, is $21.5 billion. Texas has stopped accepting new applicants because it has allocated all its funds, while Oregon has stopped taking new applicants for now, the Treasury Department said. The state of New York has spent or committed nearly all of its money, as...
    School at the YMCA in Los Angeles, where the WiFi is free. One of the cornerstones of the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act signed into law this month, is the $65 billion it includes for broadband infrastructure, with $2 billion earmarked for rural communities. That money is intended to go to states and communities to bridge the digital divide. There’s a hitch in the plan, however. The agency tasked with carrying out that plan, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC), doesn’t have the information it needs to make sure all that money is spent where it needs to be. They don’t have accurate maps of internet dead zones. In fact, most states don’t have that information. What the FCC does have is from telecom providers and it vastly overstates broadband coverage, particularly in rural states. For example, the FCC’s estimate for Arkansas is that about 23% of the population doesn’t have broadband access. Broadbandnow, a data aggregation company that researches and monitors broadband, estimates that about 46% of Arkansans can’t get broadband. The FCC’s data says that 21% of Oklahomans don’t have broadband,...
    WASHINGTON -- A federal judge on Monday blocked President Joe Biden's administration from enforcing a coronavirus vaccine mandate on thousands of health care workers in 10 states that had brought the first legal challenge against the requirement.The court order said that the federal Centers for Medicare & Medicaid had no clear authority from Congress to enact the vaccine mandate for providers participating in the two government health care programs for the elderly, disabled and poor.The preliminary injunction by St. Louis-based U.S. District Judge Matthew Schelp applies to a coalition of suing states that includes Alaska, Arkansas, Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, Nebraska, New Hampshire, North Dakota, South Dakota and Wyoming. All those states have either a Republican attorney general or governor. Similar lawsuits also are pending in other states.The federal rule requires COVID-19 vaccinations for more than 17 million workers nationwide in about 76,000 health care facilities and home health care providers that get funding from the government health programs. Workers are to receive their first dose by Dec. 6 and their second shot by Jan. 4The court order against the health...
    DISTRACTED driving goes beyond the rules of talking on a cell phone. Many states have laws which includes what falls under distracted driving and eating and driving is on that list. 1Distracted driving is considered a moving violation in many states According the the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, 3,142 people died in 2019 from distracted driving. Decide to Drive, a campaign to stop distracted driving, found eating while driving is one of the most common forms of distracted driving. There are laws across the country for distracted driving, but the fines vary by state. Distracted driving goes beyond texting and driving. It's important to understand what you may face if you decide to take a sip of coffee or a bite of your burger while behind the wheel. Distracted driving is considered a moving violation in many states. Most read in moneyN-ICE TIP Woman’s clever towel hack will stop your car windscreen freezing overnightNOT FINE Drivers warned over parking tickets - as motorists risk having to pay even MOREHITTING THE ROAD What to know about driving without a licenseTAKE...
    PHILADELPHIA -- Prosecutors asked the U.S. Supreme Court to review the ruling that overturned Bill Cosby's conviction, arguing in a petition Monday that a decision announced in a press release does not give a defendant lifetime immunity.Prosecutors said the ruling could set a dangerous precedent if convictions are overturned over dubious closed-door deals. They have also complained that the chief judge of the state's high court appeared to misstate key facts of the case when he discussed the court ruling that overturned Cosby's conviction in a television interview."This decision as it stands will have far-reaching negative consequences beyond Montgomery County and Pennsylvania. The U.S. Supreme Court can right what we believe is a grievous wrong," Montgomery County District Attorney Kevin Steele wrote in the petition, which seeks a Supreme Court review under the due process clause of the U.S. Constitution.Cosby's lawyers have long argued that he relied on a promise that he would never be charged when he gave damaging testimony in an accuser's civil suit in 2006.The admissions were later used against him in two criminal trials.The only written...
    2021 — Alexia Putellas, Spain 2020 — Lucy Bronze, England 2019 — Megan Rapinoe, United States 2018 — Marta, Brazil 2017 — Lieke Martens, Netherlands 2016 — Carli Lloyd, United States 2015 — Carli Lloyd, United States 2014 — Nadine Kessler, Germany 2013 — Nadine Angerer, Germany 2012 — Abby Wambach, United States 2011 — Homare Sawa, Japan 2010 — Marta, Brazil 2009 — Marta, Brazil 2008 — Marta, Brazil 2007 — Marta, Brazil 2006 — Marta, Brazil 2005 — Birgit Prinz, Germany 2004 — Birgit Prinz, Germany 2003 — Birgit Prinz, Germany 2002 — Mia Hamm, United States 2001 — Mia Hamm, United States Copyright © 2021 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, written or redistributed.
    Four states with Republican legislatures have changed their laws to permit those who lose their jobs over vaccine mandates to still collect unemployment benefits. The governors of Florida, Iowa, Tennessee, and Kansas have all signed legislation that allows workers who are fired for their refusal to be vaccinated or who quit over vaccine mandates to collect unemployment. The changes are symbolic of Republican resistance across the country to President Joe Biden’s own federal mandates and could end up taking effect in other GOP-held states. Iowa was the first state to pass such a bill in late October. The legislation allows for medical and religious exemptions for workers and codifies their ability to collect benefits if they are terminated for refusing to be inoculated. Republican Gov. Kim Reynolds, who is also suing Biden over the mandates, said at the time that “no Iowan should be forced to lose their job or livelihood over the COVID-19 vaccine.” Florida’s Gov. Ron DeSantis, a possible 2024 Republican presidential contender and regular critic of Biden, signed legislation this month that prohibits private...
    TRENTON, N.J. (CBS) — New Jersey Gov. Phil Murphy said Monday it is inevitable that the coronavirus variant Omicron will reach the state and region. Murphy said the fact that Canada has found at least two cases means that the variant is probably already in the United States. “I’m not the expert, but I’ll be stunned if it’s not already in the United States,” Murphy said. “The reality is that our region is a hub of international travel and commerce, we must be ready now in anticipation of this variant hitting us.” Murphy said the New Jersey Health Department has the capability to look for cases of the Omicron variant.
    The Western States Scientific Safety Review Workgroup officially recommended expanding Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna booster eligibility to all adults 18 and older, allowing adults living in several West Coast states to get a booster shot ahead of the winter months. The workgroup, which independently reviews recommendations from the Food and Drug Administration related to COVID-19, issued its recommendation on Saturday to governors in California, Nevada, Oregon and Washington. The group concurred with guidance from both the FDA and Centers for Disease Control that says all adults 18 and older who received a Moderna or Pfizer vaccine at least six months ago can receive a booster shot. Previously, the CDC and FDA recommended that only individuals 65 and older, adults at higher risk for COVID-19 and those at occupational risk of contracting the disease receive a booster. “COVID-19 boosters provide additional protection for Nevadans ahead of the holiday season,” Nevada Gov. Steve Sisolak said in a statement. “Boosters – along with ensuring we have first, second and pediatric doses available – will help prevent cases, hospitalizations and deaths. I am deeply appreciative...
    Some U.S. states are grappling with severe coronavirus outbreaks as the omicron variant is spreading around the world.  Although there have not yet been any confirmed omicron COVID-19 cases on U.S. soil, Dr. Anthony Fauci said over the weekend that he would not be shocked to learn that it’s already here.  "We have not detected it yet," he told NBC’s ‘Weekend Today’ show. "But, when you have a virus that is showing this degree of transmissibility and you're already having travel-related cases that they've noted in Israel and Belgium and in other places – when you have a virus like this, it almost invariably is ultimately going to go, essentially, all over."  Eric Aviles, 6, receives the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine from pharmacist Sylvia Uong at a pediatric vaccine clinic for children ages 5 to 11 set up at Willard Intermediate School in Santa Ana, Calif., on Nov. 9. (AP/Jae C. Hong) CORONAVIRUS OMICRON COVERAGE: LIVE UPDATES  As of Monday, Michigan has the highest daily rate of new cases per 100,000 residents with 85, according to the New York Times, followed by New...