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    SACRAMENTO (CBS13) — It’s been a long three years of doctor visits, surgeries, and multiple rounds of chemotherapy for 63-year-old Peter Romero. “After a month I was clean, came back after three months, that was right before Christmas, and spots showed back up on the liver,” said Romero. READ MORE: Car Crashes Into Pole In VacavilleWhat started as colon cancer in 2018 eventually lead to spots on his liver. But Romero says he found a therapy that worked and he’s determined to let other cancer patients know about it. In July 2020, Romero was one of the first patients in the region to undergo targeted cancer therapy directed at the liver through a pump implanted under the skin. Now, just in time for the holidays, he’s cancer free. “It’s a concentrated way of giving chemotherapy to the liver and avoiding the side effects of getting it through the vein,” said Dr. Sepideh Gholami. Dr. Gholami at UC Davis Comprehensive Cancer Center, is one of the the few oncology surgeons performing hepatic artery infusions in the country. Romero is now one...
    OBESITY could be cured by turning off "hungry hormone" without dieting or exercise as the NHS launched a radical trial. The process would cut the desire to over-eat and reduce weight in just 40 minutes and would cost the NHS £1,500 – a quarter of the price of normal fat-loss surgery. 3People with obesity could turn off their "hungry hormone" through a procedure called bariatric embolisationCredit: Getty Images A trial, led by Ahmed R. Ahmed, a bariatric surgeon at London's St Mary's Hospital, will see nearly 80 volunteers go through the procedure called bariatric embolisation and have their ghrelin turned off, which is nicknamed the 'hungry hormone'. Due to expense and logistics, the NHS performs 6,000 bariatric procedures such as gastric bands, bypasses and sleeves a year, leading to long waiting lists. Speaking to the MailOnline, Mr Ahmed said that if bariatric embolisation became routine, patients could be out of hospital in two hours. "You could go in hungry and come out not hungry," he said. The doctor said the method's fast speed and low cost would...
    THE first at-home Covid pill could be available by CHRISTMAS in a bid to combat the Omicron variant. Sajid Javid is reportedly set to launch a national pilot of the "game changer" oral treatment - the Molnupiravir anti-viral pill, also known as Lagevrio - in the coming weeks. 2A Covid pill could be available before ChristmasCredit: Getty 2The oral treatment was declared 'safe and effective' by the UK drugs regulator last monthCredit: Reuters Last month, the UK's drugs regulator declared the pills as "safe and effective" at slashing hospitalisations and deaths in people who have caught the killer bug, becoming the first country in the world to license its use - a move described as a "game-changer" by Mr Javid. The Sunday Telegraph reports that under the plans, the NHS is expected to deliver courses of the tablet to clinically vulnerable and immunosuppressed patients within as little as 48 hours of them testing positive for Covid. It said hospitals and GPs have been told a series of Covid medicines delivery units were being established to ensure the treatment gets...
              moreby Jack Rowing   While the science community researches the newly discovered Omicron variant of Covid-19, treatments will become even more necessary where breakthrough cases are detected and those who choose to be unvaccinated are infected. What we already know from the Covid-19 variants is that they are not going away leading to the reality that we will be living with this virus for a long, long time. A vaccine focused approach misses the fact that treatments are going to be needed as a backstop. The facts surrounding the Omicron variant are emerging day-by-day. CNN reported on November 30, 2021, “there is still a lot we don’t know about the Omicron variant, but scientists are racing to determine its severity, transmissibility and whether it evades current vaccines.” The report indicates that 70 countries have imposed travel restrictions from hot zones in Africa and a growing number of countries outside of Africa are reporting cases. Moderna’s CEO, Stéphane Bancel, worries that the new variant may have an impact on vaccine efficacy while Pfizer’s CEO, Albert Bourla, said that the company is working on an updated vaccine if...
    HEWLETT, Long Island (WABC) -- Forget making lists - more than 100 kids got to pick their own presents Saturday on Long Island.They did it with help from 'Project Thank a Cop.'Organizers paired each kid with a police officer. They had $100 to spend on themselves and $50 to shop for young patients at Cohen Children's Medical Center.The event began last year as a one-time thing, but it was such a hit that organizers brought it back.ALSO READ | 2 New Jersey fire departments give holiday parade spectators a chance to 'Be Kind' with toy donationEMBED More News Videos Two fire departments in New Jersey delighted onlookers with their annual holiday parade on Saturday night and gave spectators a chance to 'Be Kind.' ----------* More Long Island news* Send us a news tip* Download the abc7NY app for breaking news alerts * Follow us on YouTube Submit a News Tip
    LOS ANGELES (CNS) -- The number of coronavirus patients in Los Angeles County hospitals surged past 600 Saturday, amid concern over another possible autumn and winter surge in infections and the presence of the new Omicron variant in Los Angeles County.There were 610 COVID patients at county hospitals as of Saturday, up from 572 on Friday, according to the latest state figures. Of those, 146 were in intensive care, up just one from Friday.The county also reported 2,307 new cases of COVID-19 on Saturday and 20 additional deaths associated with the virus, raising its cumulative totals to 1,534,720 cases and 27,442 fatalities since the pandemic began. The rolling average daily rate of people testing positive for the virus was 1% as of Friday.Meanwhile, a rapid-testing site opened at Los Angeles International Airport on Friday to offer free -- but voluntary -- COVID tests for arriving international passengers.The COVID testing at the Tom Bradley International Terminal is being offered strictly on a voluntary basis, since there is no federal requirement for inbound passengers to be tested."The federal government is highly recommending...
    A 16-year-old cancer survivor used his Make-A-Wish to donate electronics to the hospital where he received treatment to benefit children undergoing their own treatments. “I was thinking of a bunch of wishes and one came up in my head – why not just give back? And that’s what I did,” said high school junior Mason Rockmore of Westfield, New Jersey, per News 12.  The cancer survivor used his Make-A-Wish “to help enrich the lives of his fellow pediatric patients who spend days, weeks and sometimes months at the hospital,” Make-A-Wish New Jersey wrote in a Facebook post.  “I got a bunch of electronics so the kids on the inpatient floor would not be super bored,” he told News 12.  Posted by Make-A-Wish New Jersey on Tuesday, November 30, 2021 On Tuesday, Make-A-Wish provided the pediatric oncology unit with electronics “including several tablets, Amazon Fire Sticks, Apple TV, an XBox, PS5, and two Nintendo Switches, along with TV and gaming subscriptions like Disney Plus, Netflix and game passes,” according to TAPinto Westfield. Rockmore, who has been cancer-free for a little more than...
    SAN FRANCISCO (KGO) -- The CEO of Planned Parenthood Northern California says they are already seeing an increase in patients from Texas.It comes as the Supreme Court discusses abortion rights.Planned Parenthood expects to see a surge in women coming across state lines to have procedures done if they are banned in their home states.RELATED: Supreme Court Justices signal they may toss Roe v. Wade, allow new abortion limitsCEO Gilda Gonzales says this could put a strain on the state's clinics and make it more difficult for Californians to get services."If the Supreme Court does damage to Roe, we estimate that 26 other states will begin to deteriorate abortion access for their residents in their states. And it is estimated that California could see a 3,000 percent increase in patients coming to us," said Gonzales.Governor Gavin Newsom says the state is standing by the help provide additional funding and support.
    Irritable bowel syndrome, otherwise known as IBS, may be the result of an abdominal infection that triggers an allergic response, according to The New England Journal of Medicine. MODEL SHARES BLOATED IBS PHOTOS AND HARROWING SYNDROME STORY The journal noted gastrointestinal infections often cause abdominal pain after eating in both children and adults, with millions diagnosed with irritable bowel syndrome after a negative workup, frustrating patients because of the very few effective treatments that are available. Little boy holding hands over his stomach. "Moreover, clinicians often have the impression that the disease is all in the head," added Dr. Marc E. Rothenberg, the director of the division of allergy and immunology at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center. Man clutches aching stomach. The current theory suggests patients with IBS have abdominal pain during their daily activities because their intestinal nerves are more sensitive compared to those who don’t have the syndrome, but in times of emotional and physical stress, such as a gastrointestinal infection, these symptoms flare because of the way the nerve signals are processed in...
    Fish-shaped 'microrobots' could be used to deliver chemotherapy drugs directly into tumours, sparing cancer patients from some of the worst side effects of the treatment.  The microscopic robots, which are one-hundredth of a millimetre in size, have been made my Chinese scientists using a special 3D printing technique, from a gel that changes shape when exposed to different pH levels. They then bathed the 'fish' in an iron oxide solution, which makes them magnetic, before loading its 'mouth' with chemo medication.  It could be injected into a blood vessel then guided my magnets to the location of a tumour. Cancer cells cause the pH levels in the fluids surrounding them to become more acidic and, reacting to this, the robot changes shape and opens it's 'mouth' discharging chemotherapy drugs contained inside. The microscopic robots (pictured), which are one-hundredth of a millimetre in size, have been made my Chinese scientists using a special 3D printing technique, from a gel that changes shape when exposed to different pH levels They have only been tested in petri dishes so far and the experts...
    EVANSTON, Ill. (WLS) -- Paul Baffico served as platoon leader in the 101st Airborne Division in the Vietnam War."I flew 206 combat assaults, I had five of my men killed," he said. "When I came back, I had it all on my mind."Dan Adams served as an Army Civic Affairs medic on back to back tours of Afghanistan, Honduras and El Salvador."El Salvador is where things really got personally traumatic," he recalled. "We were a four person element and my team leader, on the Fourth of July, died."Adams and Baffico have both struggled with the guilt of not doing enough to save others. Like millions of veterans, they have been diagnosed with post-traumatic stress disorders, or PTSD."I was immature at the time to think time would take care of it," Baffico said."I wasn't prepared to admit I had a problem," said Adams. "My family is the reason I'm alive and the reason I got treatment."While anti-depressants and therapy have helped, Evanston-based biotech company Aptinyx have a pill in the pipeline that they hope will prevent the trauma that triggers PTSD."The...
    COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — A judge Friday refused to dismiss the 25-count murder indictment against an Ohio doctor accused of ordering excessive painkillers for hospital patients, meaning one of the biggest cases of its kind ever brought against a U.S. health care professional will proceed toward trial. William Husel, 46, has pleaded not guilty. His lawyers say he was providing comfort care for dying patients in the Columbus-area Mount Carmel Health System, not trying to kill them. READ MORE: Wife Of Greene County DA Granted A Protection From Abuse OrderMount Carmel’s review concluded Husel ordered excessive painkillers for about three dozen patients who died over several years, but the fired doctor was charged only in cases involving at least 500 micrograms of the powerful painkiller fentanyl. The previous prosecutor on the case, who wasn’t reelected, had said using dosages that large in nonsurgical situations — for people being taken off ventilators — pointed to an intent to end lives. Husel’s attorneys argued that during the still-secret grand jury proceedings, the prosecution must have misrepresented whether such dosages would surely be...
    THE NHS has apologised after a shocked paramedic revealed 22 ambulances were stuck outside a hospital for six hours. The student paramedic shared footage of the ambulances backed up outside Torbay Hospital in Devon - and claimed the queue didn't move for six hours. 1The student paramedic shared footage of the ambulances stacked up outside Torbay HospitalCredit: BPM Media According to Devon Live, the fed-up medic said: "Currently at the back of a 22 ambulance queue. No movement in 6 hours. Staff are broken, the hospital is full. This is not sustainable. "Patients are being affected and so are staff. The NHS in south Devon just broke. There was time to fix this, I don’t think so anymore." A member of the public said he had counted up to 26 ambulances in the queue. In a statement, the hospital said its emergency department has been under "sustained pressure" for several months now and apologised to anyone waiting for treatment. The hospital staff are facing huge pressures with reports of people waiting for up to 13 hours in A&E. Staff are also reeling...
    Gilead Sciences Inc. is recalling 55,000 vials of the COVID-19 drug remdesivir, pictured, in the US after after a complaint about glass particles was confirmed by a company investigation Gilead Sciences Inc. is recalling 55,000 vials of the COVID-19 drug remdesivir in the US after glass particles were found in the doses, the company said.  The recall is enough to treat 11,000 hospitalized patients, according to company spokesperson Chris Ridley. Ridley added the recall would not effect the company's supply of remdesivir in the US or abroad, with the company saying the drug is well-stocked.  Gilead released a statement saying it had no reported cases of adverse effects linked to the recall, which only impacted the US market.  'The administration of an injectable product that contains glass particulates may result in local irritation or swelling,' Gilead said in the statement posted on its website.  'If the glass particulate reaches the blood vessels it can travel to various organs and block blood vessels in the heart, lungs or brain which can cause stroke and even lead to death.' Remdesivir has been...
    Authorities identified five mildly symptomatic COVID-19 cases involving the Omicron variant in Alameda County, public health officials announced Friday. The patients are among 12 coronavirus cases in the area traced to a Nov. 27 wedding in Wisconsin, which one of the patients attended after traveling abroad, according to the Alameda County Public Health Department. A state lab used genomic sequencing to identify the five Omicron variant cases, but officials said such testing was not yet available for the remaining seven coronavirus cases. The patients are between the ages of 18 and 49, officials said. One person is a Berkeley resident; the remaining 11 are county residents. California Can Omicron overtake the Delta variant? Here’s what it will take Delta, so far, has been able to elbow out all other variants that otherwise might have spread more widely. Will that be the case with Omicron too? All 12 people were vaccinated and most had received boosters, officials said. None was hospitalized. Public health officials are notifying those who’ve been in close...
    SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — South Korea again broke its daily records for coronavirus infections and deaths and confirmed three more cases of the new omicron variant as officials scramble to tighten social distancing and border controls. The 5,352 new cases reported by the Korea Disease Control and Prevention Agency on Saturday marked the third time this week the daily tally exceeded 5,000. The country’s death toll was at 3,809 after a record 70 virus patients died in the past 24 hours, while the 752 patients in serious or critical conditions were also an all-time high. As the delta-driven surge threatens to overwhelm hospital systems, there is also concern about the local spread of the omicron variant, which is seen as potentially more infectious than previous strains of the virus. The country’s omicron caseload is now at nine after KDCA confirmed three more cases. The new cases include the wife, mother-in-law and a friend of a man who caught omicron from a couple he drove home from the airport after they arrived from Nigeria on Nov. 24. The couple’s...
    Soon after Supreme Court justices heard arguments about a Mississippi law banning abortions after 15 weeks of pregnancy on Wednesday — and sounded ready to restrict the right to abortion — Planned Parenthood Los Angeles announced a hacker had accessed the personal information of about 400,000 patients. Though the breach happened in October, the timing of the announcement could have been unsettling to those made vulnerable by the leak. Here is a breakdown of what happened and what you can do to protect yourself — financially and mentally. What information was taken? According to a Planned Parenthood letter sent to victims, the stolen information included names, dates of birth, addresses, insurance identification numbers, clinical data, diagnoses, treatments provided and prescription information. This could include highly sensitive private information, including whether patients have had abortions or other medical procedures. Medical record breaches are common, but hacks involving Planned Parenthood can be — or feel — extra personal or politically driven. The organization’s D.C. branch was hacked last year, and there was a data breach in 2015 that...
    EXETER, NH (CBS) – Hospital leaders in New Hampshire are warning that the state’s healthcare system is under stress due to the latest increase in COVID-19 cases. “We want the public to know that the health system in all of New Hampshire is under the most duress I’ve seen in 25 years of working as an emergency physician,” said Dr. Neil Meehan, Chief Physician Executive at Exeter Hospital. READ MORE: UMass Memorial Health In Worcester Runs Out Of ICU BedsOn Friday, the New Hampshire’s Department of Health and Human Services announced 1,450 new positive cases. Meehan says 25 to 35 percent of patients at Exeter have COVID. Other patients have delayed care, causing overflow issues. “We are more than 100% capacity and that’s been going on for days. Our emergency room is housing people up to 125, 150% of our capacity,” Meehan said. The hospital is getting creative to deal with the influx by treating overflow patients in the surgical recovery area and even in a decontamination bay. READ MORE: Shakeel Bodden Charged With Murder In Stabbing...
    WORCESTER (CBS) – It’s a dire situation at UMass Memorial Health in Worcester, about as bad as CEO Dr. Eric Dickson has ever seen. “We’re out of ICU beds, we have a list of people to move into ones that open over the course of the next 24 hours,” he said. Hospitalizations are well up over this time a year ago. It’s a surge in not just COVID cases, at least 120 in the hospital now, but also other illnesses that makes it more than Deja vu. READ MORE: Shakeel Bodden Charged With Murder In Stabbing Death Of Sister's Boyfriend At Somerville Home“We’re 10 percent worse off today than last year when COVID was starting to surge again. The emergency departments are more crowded, and the staffing situation is much worse,” said Dr. Dickson. Surgical technician Sarah Thorstenson sees it firsthand, sometimes 30 to 40 patients at a time waiting on a floor. “If there’s no bed a patient stays on the floor with the nurse, stays in a cubicle divided by curtains with no place else...
    CHICAGO (WLS) -- Illinois public health officials reported 7,558 new confirmed and probable cases of COVID-19 and 36 related deaths Friday, one day after the state reported a record high number of cases for 2021.There have been 1,835,076 total COVID cases, including 26,499 deaths in the state since the pandemic began.RELATED: Minnesota reports 2nd US case of omicron COVID-19 variant in resident who traveled to New York CityThe seven-day statewide test positivity rate from Nov. 27-Dec. 2 is 5.6%., down slightly from the day before. The seven day rolling case average is 6,080, the highest it's been since JanuaryWithin the past 24 hours, laboratories have reported testing 188,788 new specimens for a total of 39,650,009 since the pandemic began.Local health officials expect the omicron variant to inevitably show up in the state, but Governor JB Pritzker said Thursday there are currently no plans to impose any statewide restrictions."What we are watching are hospitalizations, and the seriousness of illness, as well as people going into hospitals and overall hospital capacity," he said.As of Wednesday night, 2,582 patients in Illinois were reported...
    COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — A judge Friday refused to dismiss the 25-count murder indictment against an Ohio doctor accused of ordering excessive painkillers for hospital patients, meaning one of the biggest cases of its kind ever brought against a U.S. health care professional will proceed toward trial. William Husel, 46, has pleaded not guilty. His lawyers say he was providing comfort care for dying patients in the Columbus-area Mount Carmel Health System, not trying to kill them. Mount Carmel’s review concluded Husel ordered excessive painkillers for about three dozen patients who died over several years, but the fired doctor was charged only in cases involving at least 500 micrograms of the powerful painkiller fentanyl. The previous prosecutor on the case, who wasn’t reelected, had said using dosages that large in nonsurgical situations — for people being taken off ventilators — pointed to an intent to end lives. Husel’s attorneys argued that during the still-secret grand jury proceedings, the prosecution must have misrepresented whether such dosages would surely be deadly, and that the resulting indictment should therefore be dismissed. They noted...
    MINNEAPOLIS (WCCO) —  With the omicron variant having been officially confirmed in Minnesota, the state’s health department reports that there have been 5,685 newly reported positive cases of COVID-19, along with another 62 deaths as the state nears the 10,000 fatality mark. Minnesota’s latest rolling seven-day average positivity rate has ticked down another notch, currently sitting at 10.3% from a recent peak of 11%. That’s still, however, above the line considered “high risk,” which is drawn at 10%. There are also a reported 64.2 daily new cases per 100,000 Minnesota residents, which puts the state well above the line considered high risk (which is all the way down at 10 per 100,000) but, again, significantly down from previous weeks. READ MORE: Anoka-Hennepin Extending Winter Break For Mental Health Needs, Staff ShortageAccording to the Minnesota Department of Health’s daily update, the state’s total number of people who have been infected by COVID has risen to 916,317 since the pandemic began, with 9,616 deaths attributed to the virus. Health officials say 10,614 have been reinfected since the start of the pandemic. Hospitalizations...
    TALLAHASSEE (CBSMiami/NSF) – Florida hospitals had 1,319 patients with COVID-19, including 239 in intensive-care units, according to data posted Thursday by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The 1,319 inpatients were up from a total of 1,228 on Monday — though the numbers remained far below hospitalization totals during the summer when the delta variant of the coronavirus swept across the state. READ MORE: Miami Weather: Another Cool Morning, Slight Warm Up Over The WeekendThe 239 intensive-care unit patients was the same number reported Monday by the federal agency. READ MORE: Taste Of The Town: Casa Mariano In Doral Delights With A Blend Of Mediterranean and South American FlavorsAfter the summer surge in COVID-19, cases and hospitalizations dropped in September, October and November. MORE NEWS: Overnight Fire in Fort Lauderdale Condo Leaves One Dead, Another Hospitalized(©2021 CBS Local Media. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. The News Service of Florida contributed to this report.)
    (CBS Detroit) — About 87% of COVID intensive care unit patients are unvaccinated, according to newly released data from the Michigan Health & Hospital Association (MHA). Additionally, officials said three out of four (76%) COVID patients are unvaccinated and 88% of COVID ventilator patients are unvaccinated. READ MORE: Striking Kellogg's Workers Receiving 3% Raises In New Contract“The data is clear: if you are unvaccinated, you are risking hospitalization or death,” said Elizabeth Hertel, director of the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services (MDHHS). “We have a safe and effective vaccine that is quite literally saving lives. Michigan residents absolutely need to get vaccinated to keep their loved ones safe this holiday.” About 87% of COVID intensive care unit patients are unvaccinated, according to newly released data from the Michigan Health & Hospital Association. (credit: Michigan Health & Hospital Association) This comes after officials say the number of hospitalized adults with COVID-19 in Michigan has reached a new pandemic high this week. The total of 4,181 surpassed the previous record of 4,158, which was set seven months ago...
    (CBS DETROIT) – Gov. Gretchen Whitmer’s request for additional staffing from the federal government was granted for a third Michigan hospital amid the COVID-19 surge. The Michigan Department of Health and Human Services announced that a 22-person medical team to Covenant HealthCare in Saginaw under the agreement. READ MORE: Striking Kellogg's Workers Receiving 3% Raises In New Contract“I’m grateful to our federal partners for delivering much-needed relief to Michigan’s hospitals and healthcare personnel who have been on the frontlines of the COVID-19 pandemic for over 18 months,” said Governor Whitmer. “We know that the vast majority of their patients are unvaccinated or have not yet received a booster dose. We can all do our part to help reduce the strain on our hospital systems by getting vaccinated, making an appointment to get a booster dose, and continuing to take precautions to keep ourselves and loved ones safe. We are in this together.” The staffing team being sent to assist Covenant Healthcare will include nurses, doctors, and respiratory therapists. They will begin working in Saginaw on Dec. 12 and assist for...
    MINNEAPOLIS (WCCO) — Gov. Tim Walz announced Thursday a third federal emergency medical team is on its way to Minnesota. A staff of 14 doctors and nurses from the Department of Human Services will arrive at M Health Fairview Southdale in Edina on Friday. READ MORE: Experts Still Learning About Omicron; Minnesota Case Detected Early Due To Virus Surveillance SystemThe medical teams are providing support during the surge of COVID-19 cases and ongoing hospital staffing shortages. A group from the U.S. Air Force started their work this week at St. Cloud Hospital. WCCO went along for one of their shifts. On the fifth floor of St. Cloud Hospital, Jim James is close to going home after a stay that began Monday. “We thought he was having a heart attack so we called an ambulance,” said his daughter, Cindy James. It was sepsis that had the 87-year-old waiting five hours for an open bed and for a doctor from 1,200 miles away. “He did not have COVID, and he needed immediate action and we got it,” James said. Dr. Ben Dahlberg,...
    ST. PAUL (WCCO) — This coming Tuesday will mark the 80th anniversary of the attack on Pearl Harbor. It was the beginning of America’s involvement in World War II. That infamous date also has an interesting connection to a hospice home in St. Paul. “We are all inclusive. We include people of any faiths or no faiths,” said Lisa Sweeney. When a group of Catholic Dominican Hawthorne nuns opened the place now known as Our Lady of Peace, they worked in wards. Only curtains separated patients. But as the years passed, the amenities got better and so did the care. “It’s the hospice nurse with the dying cancer patient. It was a match made in heaven,” said Dr. Wayne Thalhuber. “It’s very close to my heart. Very meaningful.” Thalhuber was medical director for 40 years and was continually impressed by the compassion the sisters showed for patients during their final days. A place of peace whose doors opened during a time of war. “I think it’s an amazing coincidence that those two were put together,” said Thalhuber. The grand opening...
    MINNEAPOLIS (WCCO) — On the same day officials announced the Omicron variant of COVID-19 was detected in Minnesota for the first time, Gov. Tim Walz said more federal help is coming to the state’s hospitals. Walz’s office said the Department of Health and Human Services will send a team of doctors, nurses and hospital staff to M Health Fairview Southdale Hospital in Edina. The team will arrive Friday to “support COVID-19 treatment and patient care.” READ MORE: Experts Still Learning About Omicron; Minnesota Case Detected Early Due To Virus Surveillance SystemFederal teams are already assisting at Hennepin Healthcare in Minneapolis and St. Cloud Hospital. As of Wednesday, there were 345 COVID-19 patients occupying intensive care unit beds in Minnesota, along with 1,204 patients in non-ICU beds. READ MORE: 'A Boost At The Right Time': Federal Teams Help Minnesota Hospitals Overwhelmed By COVIDThe Minnesota Department of Health announced Thursday it found the Omicron variant in a specimen from a Minnesotan who recently returned from an Anime convention in New York City. The Hennepin County man had “mild symptoms” that have since...
    A hacker accessed the personal information of roughly 400,000 patients of Planned Parenthood Los Angeles in October, the reproductive healthcare provider said Wednesday. Planned Parenthood Los Angeles said in a statement that there is no evidence so far that any patients’ information was used for fraudulent purposes, and it was notifying patients whose information was accessed. Staff members first noticed suspicious activity on their computer network Oct. 17, according to the statement. Planned Parenthood Los Angeles took its systems offline, notified law enforcement and retained a third-party cybersecurity firm to help investigate. The investigation, which is ongoing, has determined that a hacker got access to the healthcare provider’s network between Oct. 9-17, according to the statement, which also said the hacker installed “malware/ransomware” and took some files from the system. Ransomware is a kind of malware designed to hold a computer or entire network hostage by preventing access to the files until the owner pays the hacker. This year, alleged members of the Russia-linked gang REvil were arrested and charged in connection with a high-profile string of...
    The personal and clinical information of about 400,000 patients of Planned Parenthood Los Angeles (PPLA) was stolen in October in a ransomware attack, the organization announced Wednesday. In letters and emails sent to patients November 30 to notify them about the attack, Planned Parenthood wrote the files involved in the breach contained patients’ names, addresses, insurance information, dates of birth, and clinical data, such as diagnosis, procedure, and/or prescription information, the Daily Mail reported. “The breach is staggering both for the number of victims and for the highly personal information hackers stole, which could identify people who’ve had abortions and other procedures,” the Washington Post noted as well Thursday. According to the letter to patients, PPLA “identified suspicious activity” on its computer network on October 17. The organization wrote it “immediately took our systems offline, notified law enforcement,” and hired a “third-party cybersecurity firm” to assist in an investigation. House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) speaks to the crowd during a protest against the GOP health care plan, on Capitol Hill, July 26, 2017, in Washington, DC. (Photo by Drew...
    MARIN COUNTY, Calif. (KGO) -- As the demand for COVID-19 booster shots increases, we are getting reports of people showing up to local pharmacies and realizing their appointments were either canceled, or the pharmacy ran out of vaccines.25 million Californians are fully vaccinated. For many, it's been more than six months since their second shot, which means, it's time for a booster.Kathleen Gustin was hoping to get a booster this week, but on the CVS website she kept getting messages saying there were no appointments available."You put in a new date and then of the five places in Marin nobody had one. Then I would go another day in the five places and nobody. Finally Northgate had one in two weeks," said Gustin.RELATED: Demand for COVID boosters soars after California lifts eligibility restrictionsWe found the same story inside a CVS Pharmacy in Marin County. They ran out of vaccines on Friday.Liz Foley was scheduled to get her booster shot on Sunday,"We had the appointment made for about three weeks and it was the Sunday after Thanksgiving and I got a...
    Long Covid may lead to an increased risk of death in the year after a patient's diagnosis, a new study finds. Researchers at the University of Florida analyzed health records from over 13,000 patients, following them for 12 months.  Patients who had severe Covid symptoms were 2.5 times as likely to die over the next year after their diagnosis compared with those who tested negative for Covid. Younger patients (under age 65) who suffered severe symptoms had a particularly high mortality risk at 3.3 times as likely to die as patients under age 65 who tested negative. The study indicates that there's 'a substantial risk of dying' from unrecognized Covid complications, the study's lead author said. Vaccination can prevent such complications.  Patients hospitalized with severe Covid symptoms have an increased risk of dying - from all causes - in the next year, a new study finds. Pictured: Healthcare workers treat a Covid patient in an ICU in Tarzana, California, September 2021 It's now well-known among scientists and doctors that Covid infections can lead to symptoms for many weeks or months...
    PHILADELPHIA (CBS) — Merck is closer to getting authorization for its COVID pill. It’s the first drug Americans could take at home to treat the coronavirus. An FDA advisory panel has voted to recommend that the FDA and CDC authorize the use of an antiviral pill to treat the worst effects of COVID-19 in high-risk patients. READ MORE: Officials Investigating Gas Explosion Inside Home In South PhiladelphiaThe FDA’s Antimicrobial Drugs Advisory Committee voted 13 to 10 to recommend emergency authorization of pharmaceutical giant Merck’s antiviral pill, which is called molnupiravir. The pill has been shown to modestly reduce the risk of hospitalization and death from COVID. But, that close vote speaks to the hesitancy and outstanding questions which remain about its use, mainly, that its efficacy isn’t overwhelmingly good. READ MORE: GameStop Employee Shot During Attempted Robbery In Philadelphia's Lawncrest Section, Police SayIn a statement on their website this evening after the vote, Merck wrote, “The positive outcome of today’s FDA advisory committee meeting, following a comprehensive review of molnupiravir demonstrating a significant reduction in hospitalizations and deaths is a...
    CHICAGO (WLS) -- There is an outbreak of COVID-19 at the Jesse Brown Veterans Affairs Medical Center, officials confirmed.A spokesperson for the facility said 18 patients tested positive for the virus last week while there. In response, all staff are wearing N95 respirators at all times in high risk areas, and are required to wear goggles or a face mask when entering patients' rooms.The facility has also stopped all inpatient visitors except for end-of-life situations until further notice.Routine walkthroughs are being conducted to ensure proper mask wearing, the spokesperson said."We take this matter extremely seriously and our hope is that this will not occur again and that these measures will lead to the prevention of COVID-19 in the future for the health and safety of Veterans, their families, caregivers and our staff," they said in a statement.
    Pregnant women infected with COVID-19 are far more likely to require intensive care or die in childbirth compared to pregnant women who do not catch the virus, a new study finds. Researchers at the Université de Paris studied Covid's impacts on more than 200,000 pregnant women in France during the first wave of the pandemic, from January to June 2020. Mothers-to-be with Covid were 40 times as likely to die during childbirth compared to those who weren't infected with the virus. The Covid patients were also more likely to experience pregnancy complications, such as preeclampsia, gestational hypertension and hemorrhages, or end up in ICUs. The researchers encourage pregnant women to get vaccinated in order to protect them against severe Covid outcomes. Despite these risks, only 35 percent of pregnant women in the U.S. were fully vaccinated as of November 20, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Pregnant women infected with Covid face a much higher risk of being admitted to an ICU or dying, a new study finds. Pictured: A mother-to-be receives a Pfizer booster shot...
    PATIENTS face record NHS delays for years to come, with a real risk of waiting lists doubling by 2025, watchdogs warn. The number of people in the queue for hospital treatment will balloon from 5.8million to 12million in England, the National Audit Office predicts. 1Patients face record NHS delays and risk of waiting lists DOUBLING by 2025, watchdog warns The backlog is down to GPs referring 9.1million fewer patients during the pandemic. Up to 740,000 potential cancer cases were not sent for urgent hospital checks, the NAO said. And 60,000 people missed out on treatment for the disease altogether, it reported. Oncologist Prof Pat Price, from #CatchUpWithCancer, said: “We are in the biggest cancer catastrophe ever to hit the NHS.” Ministers are pumping £8billion into the NHS over the next three years to try to cut delays. But the report said cash alone was not enough and warned the backlog would take years to clear. The NHS is set to reveal imminently details of how it will tackle the problem — with plans to move patients around the country and...
    By: KDKA-TV’s Erika Stanish PITTSBURGH (KDKA) — Olympus Infusions in Pleasant Hills has expanded its number of available appointments by 50 percent to keep up with demand. READ MORE: FBI Investigates Slew Of Threats At Pittsburgh-Area School DistrictsThe clinic offers monoclonal antibody infusions to help patients who have tested positive for or who have been exposed to COVID-19. “We’re servicing about 100 to 120 people a day, filling a niche that the hospitals are struggling to keep up with. So, we’re doing our best to pitch into this fight,” said Adam Rice, owner of Spartan Olympus. The clinic was one of the first in the area to offer infusions to high-risk COVID-19 patients. Rice said the goal behind the treatment is to help patients recover without going to the hospital. “It feels great to give people some hope and peace of mind. Keeping them out of a hospital admission possibly or even worse,” Rice said. Rice said patients will typically see improvement in their symptoms within 36 hours of getting treatment. KDKA talked to...
    BOSTON (CBS) — Millions of patients who have had COVID-19 — many with only mild illness — still have symptoms months later. One local hospital has established a program dedicated to helping these patients heal. In March of 2020, Phil Baczewski developed fever, a cough, and trouble breathing. When the 47-year-old father of four went to the hospital, the doctor didn’t mince words. READ MORE: Black Lives Matter Mural Vandalized At Somerville Hair Salon“He said you’re really sick and if we don’t put you on life support you’re going to die,” Phil recalled. He had COVID-19, was in pulmonary failure, and was given a 10% chance to live. He spent 28 days in the hospital, 16 of them in a coma. “I couldn’t walk,” he explained. “My body was really weak still from being in a coma. From when I woke up to the day I left, it was like it was a struggle to even just use my hands to feed myself.” Over a year later, Phil still suffers from nerve pain, weakness, fatigue, shortness of breath, anxiety, depression,...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — A panel of U.S. health advisers on Tuesday narrowly backed the benefits of a closely watched COVID-19 pill from Merck, setting the stage for a likely authorization of the first drug that Americans could take at home to treat the virus. A Food and Drug Administration panel voted 13-10 that the drug’s benefits outweigh its risks, including potential birth defects if used during pregnancy. The group’s recommendation came after hours of debate about the drug’s modest benefits and potential safety issues. Experts backing the treatment stressed it should not be used by pregnant women and called on FDA to recommend extra precautions, including pregnancy tests for women before using the drug. The group’s vote specifically backed the drug for adults with mild-to-moderate COVID-19 who face the greatest risks, including those with conditions like obesity, asthma and old age. The FDA isn’t bound by the panel’s recommendation and is expected to make its own decision before year’s end. FDA authorization for the drug, molnupiravir, could be a major step in treating the virus. It would give doctors the...
    A U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) advisory committee recommended emergency use authorization of Merck & Co's experimental pill to treat mild-to-moderate COVID-19 patients on Tuesday. The drug, called molnupiravir, stops the virus from making copies of itself, which prevents it from spreading throughout the body.    Recent trial data have shown that it can reduce the risk of death or being hospitalized for those at high risk of severe Covid by 30 percent. On Tuesday, the Antimicrobial Drugs Advisory Committee (AMDAC) voted 13-10In favor of the drug. The FDA is not bound to follow the advisory group's recommendations but the agency rarely goes against the guidance of the group.  If authorized by the FDA and signed off by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Merck's drug could be the first oral antiviral medication for COVID-19 - and could allow patients to take the drug at home instead of requiring them to go to a hospital for treatment. An FDA advisory committee voted in favor of emergency use authorization of Merck & Co's pill to treat mild-to-moderate COVID-19 patients. Pictured:...
    Abortion justice advocates rally at the Supreme Court in 2020. In yet another week without a Supreme Court decision on Texas’ six-week abortion ban, SB 8, abortion justice advocates aren’t taking our eyes off the ball just yet. Tomorrow, Dec. 1, the court will hear arguments regarding a Mississippi 15-week abortion ban in a direct challenge to Roe v. Wade. Lower courts prohibited the ban from going into effect, but the Supreme Court decided to accept the case and will consider “whether all pre-viability prohibitions on elective abortion are unconstitutional.” This is the kind of case abortion providers, funds, and advocates have been warning us of for years, trying to get through to the Susan Collinses of the world who believe extremist right-wing Supreme Court justices will automatically respect precedent. The alarming truth is that this case has the potential to drastically change the landscape of abortion access in the U.S. as we know it. Despite a large swath of the country already being in a post-Roe environment, the reality is that it can get much, much worse. No matter what...
    Government health advisers on Tuesday weighed the benefits and risks of a closely watched drug from Merck that could soon become the first U.S.-authorized pill for patients to take at home to treat COVID-19. The Food and Drug Administration asked its outside experts whether the agency should authorize the pill, weighing new information that it is less effective than first reported and may cause birth defects. A vote was expected Tuesday afternoon. The panel’s recommendations aren’t binding but often guide FDA decisions. The meeting comes as U.S. infections are rising again and health authorities worldwide size up the threat posed by the new omicron variant. UNIVERSITY OF OXFORD ON OMICRON: NO PROOF COVID-19 VACCINES WON'T PREVENT AGAINST SEVERE DISEASE If authorized, Merck’s pill would be the first that doctors could prescribe for patients to take on their own to ease symptoms and speed recovery, a major step toward reducing hospital caseloads and deaths. The drug, molnupiravir, is already authorized for emergency use in the U.K. Given the ongoing threat, the FDA is widely expected to approve emergency use of Merck’s...
    CHICAGO (WLS) -- Illinois public health officials reported 5,714 new confirmed and probable cases of COVID-19 and 23 related deaths Tuesday.There have been 1,809,875 total COVID cases, including 26,414 deaths in the state since the pandemic began.The seven-day statewide test positivity rate from Nov. 24-39 is 5.2%.Within the past 24 hours, laboratories have reported testing 125,128 new specimens for a total of 39,115,497 since the pandemic began.As of Monday night, 2,379 patients in Illinois were reported to be in the hospital with COVID-19. Of those, 457 patients were in the ICU and 217 patients with COVID-19 were on ventilators.SEE ALSO: All vaccinated adults should get COVID-19 booster shot because of omicron variant, CDC says A total of 17,288,192vaccine doses have been administered in Illinois as of Tuesday, and 57.96% of the state's population is fully vaccinated. The seven-day rolling average of vaccines administered daily is 47,423.Chicago doctors tracking new omicron variantWith the new omicron variant spreading, the CDC is urging everyone 18 and older to get a booster shot. Doctors in Chicago are already tracking the new omicron variant's movement.Throughout...
    NEW YORK (CBSNewYork) — Officials say there has been a data breach at Huntington Hospital. The hospital notified about 13,000 patients that their personal information was illegally accessed. Administrators said a night shift employee had allegedly improperly accessed electronic medical patient records between October 2018 and February 2019. That hospital worker has since been fired and is charged with a criminal HIPAA violation.
    MINNEAPOLIS (WCCO) —  With federal teams now in place to help Minnesota’s taxed hospital systems, the state’s health department reports that there have been 12,632 newly reported positive cases of COVID-19. No new deaths were reported, as the health department did not update the data during the holiday break. The MDH says details of newly reported deaths will resume Wednesday. READ MORE: COVID Took His Wife And Left Him Hospitalized, Now He's Urging Others To Get VaccinatedMinnesota’s latest rolling seven-day average positivity rate has ticked down another notch, currently sitting at 10.6% from a recent peak of 11%. That’s still, however, above the line considered “high risk,” which is drawn at 10%. There are also a reported 75.6 daily new cases per 100,000 Minnesota residents, which puts the state well above the line considered high risk (which is all the way down at 10 per 100,000). According to the Minnesota Department of Health’s daily update, the state’s total number of people who have been infected by COVID has risen to 902,032 since the pandemic began, with 9,382 deaths attributed to...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — An experimental COVID-19 drug that could soon become the first U.S.-authorized pill to treat the coronavirus faces one final hurdle Tuesday: A panel of government experts will scrutinize data on the medication from drugmaker Merck. The Food and Drug Administration is asking its outside experts whether the agency should authorize the pill, weighing new information that it is less effective than first reported and may cause birth defects. The panel’s recommendations aren’t binding but often guide FDA decisions. Tuesday’s meeting comes as U.S. infections are rising again and health authorities worldwide scramble to size up the threat posed by the new omicron variant. If authorized, Merck’s pill would be the first that U.S. patients could take at home to ease symptoms and speed recovery, a major step toward reducing hospital case loads and deaths. The drug, molnupiravir, is already authorized for emergency use in the U.K. Given the ongoing threat of the pandemic the FDA is widely expected to approve emergency use of Merck’s pill. But new data released last week paint a less compelling picture...
    HAVING a baby can produce a whirlwind of emotions and can be tough for everyone involved. The coronavirus pandemic has been difficult for many pregnant women, with worries of infection and self isolation all making it that little bit harder to enjoy pregnancy. 1Pregnant women can have their coronavirus vaccines and have been urged to come forward to get jabbedCredit: Shutterstock One obstetrician has revealed her top advice to pregnant women as we head into the winter months and the risk from contracting the virus become higher. Chief scientific adviser for the Department of Health and Social Care, Lucy Chappell said the data published on how dangerous Covid can be for pregnant women has been 'heart breaking'. Around one in five patients receiving treatment through a special lung bypass machine were women who had not had their first jab, it was found. Just two weeks ago mums-to-be were urged to get their vaccines as 98 per cent of women in ICU with Covid-19 were found to be unvaccinated. Last week it was also found that Covid jabs are safe for...
    BATCHES of a common blood pressure drug have been recalled due to a chemical substance being present in the pill. A total of 44 batches of irbesartan are being pulled back from pharmacies and wholesalers as a precautionary measure, experts have said. 1Pills used to treat high blood pressure have been recalled due to fears of a chemical substance being presentCredit: Alamy Irbesartan is used to treat high blood pressure, in turn preventing heart attacks and strokes. These drugs are also used in patients who have recently had a heart attack or are living with heart failure. Experts testing the pill in labs found the presence of chemical substance AZBT. Long-term exposure to the chemical, and consuming 'above acceptable limits' may potentially increase the risk of cancer. Experts are however keen to highlight that there is no UK or international evidence that this substance has caused any harm to patients. Dr Alison Cave, MHRA Chief Safety Officer, said: “Patient safety is at the heart of everything we do. This recall is a precautionary measure to prevent further exposure to AZBT above the...
    A new drug cocktail is four times more effective at keeping Covid patients out of intensive care, initial tests have suggested. While the steroid dexamethasone was the first drug to be licensed for treating the virus, trials indicate that combining it with heart failure medication spironolactone yields better results. A study, conducted by former vice-chancellor of Newcastle University Sir Christopher Edwards, analysed hospital patients in Delhi. In hospitalised patients taking the ‘Spidex’ cocktail, just 5.4 per cent were admitted to intensive care compared to 19.6 per cent of just dexamethasone RELATED ARTICLES Previous 1 Next Omicron Covid variant causes the Australian share market to... Third Omicron case is suspected on flight from Africa as PM... Share this article Share He found that, in hospitalised patients taking the ‘Spidex’ cocktail, just 5.4 per cent were admitted to intensive care compared to 19.6 per cent of those taking dexamethasone alone. Now he is calling for wider trials of the Spidex regime as he believes more lives could be saved. His findings, published in the...