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    (CBS) – CBS presents the 23rd Annual A Home For The Holidays At The Grove , featuring uplifting stories of adoption from foster care and raising awareness of this important social issue, to be broadcast Sunday, December 5th at 9:30-10:30 PM, ET/9:00-10:00 PM, PT on CBS, and available to stream live and on demand with Paramount+. The special, which was filmed at famed retail, dining and entertainment destination the Grove in Los Angeles, will enhance the inspirational stories of several American families with performances by extraordinary artists, including Justin Bieber, Kane Brown, Alessia Cara and Darren Criss. In addition, Kane Brown will introduce the Rodriguez family for a special live adoption. READ MORE: Baltimore Officials, Fire Department Holds Smoke Alarm Sweep Following Fire That Killed 3For the last two decades, the award-winning special has shined a light on the thousands of American children in foster care and has inspired tens of thousands of adoptions, moving these children into loving “forever families.” Currently, there are more than 400,000 children in foster care in the U.S. who are hoping for a “forever...
    BALTIMORE (WJZ) — Maryland reported 1,866 new COVID-19 cases and 15 new deaths, according to state health department data released Saturday morning. The percentage of people testing positive dropped slightly to 5.43%, aa decrease of 0.01%. READ MORE: Maryland Weather: Mild Saturday, With Temps Dropping SundayHospitalizations increased by 15to 782. Of those hospitalized, 585 adults are in acute care and 194 are in intensive care.   Three children are in acute care and three are in intensive care. The new data comes days after Maryland announced it has surpassed 1 million COVID-19 booster shots, which represents a significant milestone for the state’s vaccination effort. Since the pandemic began, there have been 592,679 total confirmed cases and 11,022 deaths. As of Friday there are 4,118,630 Marylanders fully vaccinated. The state has administered 9,472,600 doses. Of those, 4,304,197 are first doses, with 7,579 administered on Friday. Officials have given out 3,797,484 second doses, 9,484 of them on Friday. A total of 321,146 Marylanders have received the Johnson & Johnson vaccine, 492 on Friday. In November, Gov. Hogan announced that 99.9% of Maryland seniors...
    Judges in Kent County, Michigan, brought multiple families together on Thursday during the county’s 25th annual Adoption Day. Inside six different courtrooms, 27 children had the chance to change their last names while finalizing paperwork with their loved ones, WOOD reported. In 2019, there were over 2,100 adoptions in the state, but less than ten percent involved children aged 13 to 17. However, the Kent County Circuit Court announced it finalized paperwork for a record nine teens on the important day this year. The 17th Circuit Court “Family Division Bunch” will be celebrating its 25th annual Adoption Day via Zoom this Thursday,… Posted by Kent County, Michigan on Tuesday, November 30, 2021 One individual who was adopted this week was 14-year-old Pierce Overway. “They have taken me into their house and have loved me ever since I’ve been here,” he said of his family when the judge asked why he wished to be adopted. The court said he spent the past seven years in foster care and lived with ten different families during that time. Although many of the...
    MSNBC anchor Joy Reid said Friday on her show “The ReidOut” that the Republican Party was a death cult “waving the pro-life flag.” Reid said, “Republicans love to say they’re pro-life, but the more accurate term is they’re pro-birth. Because once that baby is born, they stop caring. Depending on the color of your skin, they may not see you as fully human. If they did care about children after they are born, they would be supporting universal health care, social services, food for kids whose family can’t afford it, fully funding education, and gun reform, so kids don’t have to do mass shooter drills. They would support the Build Back Better agenda, which invests in housing and the environment and acts as the biggest expansion on affordable health care in a decade. Not one Republican voted for that bill.” Reid added, “Pro-life, really? The more appropriate slogan, in my humble opinion, is anti-choice, as this same party passes regressive policies that harm women, children, and families by taking choices away from them. Or maybe it is pro-death as this...
    “Welcome to the new Gilead,” Joy Reid, declared, kicking off about segment on Mississippi’s controversial abortion law and the pro-life movement. The MSNBC host had previously claimed the religious right is “dreaming of a theocracy” à la the country of Gilead, which practices systematic rape and torture in the book and HBO series, The Handmaid’s Tale. “Women are not welcome here,” said Reid on Friday night. “Correction: women who do not exist solely as vessels for a fetus are not welcome here.” Reid addressed this week’s oral arguments over Mississippi’s abortion law before the U.S. Supreme Court. The law bans most abortions in the state after 15 weeks, which is about eight weeks sooner than the threshold allowed under Roe v. Wade. The consensus among the legal observers is that Roe will be substantially weakened, if not outright overturned when the court announces its decision in June. Reid said if Republicans were actually pro-life, they’d support robust social programs, gun control, and President Biden’s Build Back Better agenda: Republicans love to say that they’re pro-life. But the more accurate term...
    Alec Baldwin has a strong supporter in his wife Hilaria. Since the Oct. 21 shooting on the set of the actor's film "Rust," Hilaria has been an outspoken supporter of her husband despite intense media attention and scrutiny. On Thursday night, Baldwin, 63, addressed the shooting — which resulted in the death of cinematographer Halyna Hutchins — in a tell-all interview with George Stephanopoulos in which the actor said he may have taken his own life if he felt he were responsible for the ordeal. On Friday, Hilaria took to Instagram to share a photo of herself and her husband embracing and kissing, gushing over the "30 Rock" actor in the caption. CELEBRITIES RALLY AROUND ALEC BALDWIN WHILE THE PUBLIC CRITICIZES HIM FOLLOWING TELL-ALL 'RUST' INTERVIEW "'I am here, I love you, and I will take care of you.' These were the only words that came to me when we learned Halyna had died," she recalled. "I remember saying that phrase over and over again. The horrific loss, the torture to her family, and you, my husband, somehow put in...
    EXETER, NH (CBS) – Hospital leaders in New Hampshire are warning that the state’s healthcare system is under stress due to the latest increase in COVID-19 cases. “We want the public to know that the health system in all of New Hampshire is under the most duress I’ve seen in 25 years of working as an emergency physician,” said Dr. Neil Meehan, Chief Physician Executive at Exeter Hospital. READ MORE: UMass Memorial Health In Worcester Runs Out Of ICU BedsOn Friday, the New Hampshire’s Department of Health and Human Services announced 1,450 new positive cases. Meehan says 25 to 35 percent of patients at Exeter have COVID. Other patients have delayed care, causing overflow issues. “We are more than 100% capacity and that’s been going on for days. Our emergency room is housing people up to 125, 150% of our capacity,” Meehan said. The hospital is getting creative to deal with the influx by treating overflow patients in the surgical recovery area and even in a decontamination bay. READ MORE: Shakeel Bodden Charged With Murder In Stabbing...
    BOSTON (CBS) — The Massachusetts Senate on Friday followed the lead of the House and unanimously passed a $4 billion spending bill that includes half a billion dollars for essential worker bonuses. The spending package, funded by the American Rescue Plan Act, is now headed to Gov. Charlie Baker’s desk. The bill also includes $500 million for the unemployment insurance trust fund, $400 million in mental health and behavioral support, and hundreds of millions of dollars for climate preparedness, education, housing, economic recovery and workforce development. “The one-time investments made in this bill address evident needs across all Massachusetts communities and sectors of the economy, particularly those who were disproportionately impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic,” House Speaker Ron Mariano said in a statement. The “Premium Pay” program calls for bonuses of between $500 and $2,000 for essential employees who worked in-person – not remotely – during the state of emergency that was declared on March 10, 2020 and lasted for more than a year. An advisory panel will determine which essential workers qualify for the bonuses.  Eligible employees may include...
    The traditional media is letting them get a way with a whole lot of bullshit. A large group of advocacy organizations has penned an open letter to “Reporters, Editors, Producers, and Anchors” pleading with them to actually try to inform the public about the Build Back Better plan. They are very polite about it, acknowledging that it’s a difficult thing to do. “The omnibus nature of this bill and the policies therein present many challenges to newsrooms hoping to present a clear understanding of its contents and potential impacts on your readers, your communities, and the economy at large,” the groups, spearheaded by the National Women’s Law Center, write. But doing so is essential, they say because the “role of federal programs supporting and investing in families remains heavily stigmatized.” They point out that the stigma is against women and against people of color, and that that ”fuels misinformation and misrepresentation about who benefits from public programs.” Despite the fact that the majority of the bill is focused on ameliorating the effects of climate change, and on creating jobs, and that...
    White House press secretary Jen Psaki gave a snarky reply Friday morning when Morning Joe co-host Mika Brzezinski pointed out that Americans care more about economic issues than social ones. Brzezinski was referring to data collected from a Virginia-based focus group of voters who had chosen President Joe Biden for president in 2020 and then voted for Republican gubernatorial candidate Glenn Youngkin, the race's winner.  'Democrats are losing really badly on economic issues, and that a lot of Americans care more about economic issues versus social issues and, of course, their health,' the anchor said. 'How do you respond? How do you think the White House can do better?'  'No you-know-what Sherlock! Of course they do!' Psaki replied.   Democratic pollster Brian Stryker said in a recent interview with The New York Times about his findings that the 'Democrats have a problem.'  'People think we're more focused on social issues than the economy - and the economy is the No. 1 issue right now,' he said was the party's main branding problem.   White House press secretary Jen Psaki gave a snarky reply Friday morning...
    CEFutcher | Getty Images Jessica Duckett's Teddy Bear Day Care and Preschool is feeling the effects of the nation's hiring crunch firsthand. At her Fairfax, Virginia location, Duckett said she is as many as six employees short and has only 60 of a possible 109 children enrolled, simply because she's not staffed to care for them. Duckett said sometimes applicants don't even bother showing up. Others are not qualified or seeking wages she can't afford if she wants to keep costs down for parents. She's offering wages on average that range from $13 to $14, free childcare for staff, and benefits at her two locations. "There isn't really a hiring situation," Duckett said. "We are interviewing people that don't really qualify. People are applying but not showing up to interviews, people are coming to interviews agreeing to take the job, but not following through with background checks." The lack of child care workers is creating a larger ripple effect in the overall economy, keeping parents out of jobs, exacerbating broader shortages being felt in nearly every industry. Affordability is another...
    (CBS DETROIT) – Detroit Animal Care is sending dogs and cats to a special adoption event being held at the Oakland Mall in Troy this weekend. Example of Kuranda Dog Bed | Credit: City of Detroit READ MORE: Teen's Parents Charged In Oxford High School ShootingOn Saturday, Dec. 4, from 10 a.m. until 3 p.m., the event will take place in partnership with the Michigan Humane Society and WCSX 94.7 Classic Rock Radio. Individuals are encouraged to stop by and visit with the cats and dogs or make donations of food and blankets. READ MORE: UAW Votes For Direct Election Of Leaders In Wake Of Scandal“We are delighted to be included in this very special adoption event. We are a ‘no-kill’ shelter based on our live release rate of more than 90 percent through today, and events like ‘Pets for Presents’ help us,” said Mark Kumpf, Detroit Animal Care Director. “Detroit Animal Care will send a friendly group of medium and large dogs and cats to ‘Pets for Presents’ this weekend. We have plenty more deserving, sweet animals who are...
    A nurse in Arizona was sentenced Thursday after pleading guilty to sexually assaulting an incapacitated woman and impregnating her. Nathan Sutherland, a former nurse at a long-term care facility, was sentenced to 10 years in prison, according to the Associated Press. Sutherland also received lifetime probation for abuse of a vulnerable adult. JUST IN: Nathan Sutherland, a man who sexually assaulted an incapacitated woman who later gave birth at a long-term care facility in Phoenix, has been sentenced to 10 years behind bars for the crime. https://t.co/Bsai0HuCPv — FOX 10 Phoenix (@FOX10Phoenix) December 2, 2021 Sutherland cared for the woman from 2012 to 2018 despite the state of Arizona telling the victim’s family that only women workers would care for the victim, reported AP. “It’s hard to imagine a more vulnerable adult than the victim in this case,” Superior Court Judge Margaret LaBianca said, AP reported. Workers at the Hacienda Healthcare facility discovered the victim was pregnant in December 2018 when a worker was changing her garments while giving birth, reported AP. A DNA test allegedly confirmed Sutherland was the...
    BALTIMORE (WJZ) — Maryland reported 1,700 new COVID-19 cases and 11 new deaths, according to state health department data released Friday morning. The percentage of people testing positive rose to 5.44%, an increase of 0.22%. READ MORE: Maryland Weather: A Warmup On Saturday Followed By A Sunday CooldownHospitalizations increased by 26 to 767. Of those hospitalized, 579 adults are in acute care and 180 are in intensive care. Five children are in acute care and three are in intensive care. The new data comes days after Maryland announced it has surpassed 1 million COVID-19 booster shots, which represents a significant milestone for the state’s vaccination effort. Since the pandemic began, there have been 590,813 total confirmed cases and 11,007 deaths. There are 4,118,630 Marylanders fully vaccinated. The state has administered 9,472,600 doses. Of those, 4,304,197 are first doses, with 7,579 administered in the past 24 hours. Officials have given out 3,797,484 second doses, 9,484 of them in the last day. A total of 321,146 Marylanders have received the Johnson & Johnson vaccine, 492 over the last day. In November, Gov....
    BRUSSELS (AP) — Belgium must tighten its coronavirus restrictions another notch as the latest surge in cases weighs heavily on health services and deprives people with other life-threatening diseases like cancer of necessary treatment, Prime Minister Alexander De Croo said Friday. Kindergartens and primary schools will now close for the holiday season a week early, on Dec. 20, and children must wear masks from the age of 6. The government capped attendance at indoor events at 200 people. “There are too many people who are not getting the treatment they need in hospital, so it is important to act quickly,” De Croo told reporters, noting that 40% of Belgium’s intensive care beds are currently filled by COVID-19 patients. “It’s a situation that cannot be tolerated.” It’s the third week in a row that De Croo’s government has tightened restrictions. Last Friday, the government closed nightclubs, and ordered bars and restaurants to shut at 11 p.m. for three weeks. There had been speculation that closing times of 8 p.m. were in the works, but the Cabinet decided against it, for...
    White House Press Secretary Jen Psaki almost said a swear when MSNBC’s Mika Brzezinski asked about polling suggesting Americans care more about the economy and Covid than they do about “social issues.” On Friday morning’s edition of MSNBC’s Morning Joe, Psaki took questions from the entire panel on a range of topics. Brzezinski asked about what she called “polling” — but were actually focus groups of Virginia voters — on voter priorities. Brzezinski said the data showed “Democrats are losing really badly on economic issues, and that a lot of Americans care more about economic issues versus social issues and of course, their health.” “How do you respond? How do you think the White House can do better?” Brzezinski asked. “No you-know-what Sherlock! Of course they do!” Psaki cracked. Psaki added that “The American people care about COVID, getting it under control, and they care about the economy. As a Virginia woman in the suburbs who has neighbors who are Democrats, Republicans, independents, I can tell you that’s what they care the most about.” On what the White House can...
    TALLAHASSEE (CBSMiami/NSF) – Florida hospitals had 1,319 patients with COVID-19, including 239 in intensive-care units, according to data posted Thursday by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The 1,319 inpatients were up from a total of 1,228 on Monday — though the numbers remained far below hospitalization totals during the summer when the delta variant of the coronavirus swept across the state. READ MORE: Miami Weather: Another Cool Morning, Slight Warm Up Over The WeekendThe 239 intensive-care unit patients was the same number reported Monday by the federal agency. READ MORE: Taste Of The Town: Casa Mariano In Doral Delights With A Blend Of Mediterranean and South American FlavorsAfter the summer surge in COVID-19, cases and hospitalizations dropped in September, October and November. MORE NEWS: Overnight Fire in Fort Lauderdale Condo Leaves One Dead, Another Hospitalized(©2021 CBS Local Media. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. The News Service of Florida contributed to this report.)
    LOS ANGELES (CBSLA) – A man was arrested Thursday morning during an FBI raid on a residence in the San Fernando Valley neighborhood of Northridge in connection with a hospice fraud investigation. Dec. 2, 2021. (CBSLA) Oganes Doganyan, 49, was taken into custody at around 5 a.m. in the 17600 block of Parthenia Street, an FBI spokesperson confirmed to CBSLA. Doganyan is under arrest along with 38-year-old Kristine Arutyunyan of Glendale. Both are accused with paying illegal kickbacks in a healthcare fraud scheme. According to a news release from the U.S. Attorney’s Office, the two “paid illegal kickbacks for the referral of Medicare beneficiary information that could be used to bill for purported hospice services.” The two caused fraudulent claims to be billed to Medicare for hospice services that were “medically unnecessary” and “not eligible for reimbursement.” Both are charged with federal counts of conspiracy to commit health care fraud, health care fraud, conspiracy to pay and receive kickbacks, and paying kickbacks. If convicted as charged, each faces a maximum sentence of up to 35 years in federal prison.
    BOSTON (CBS) — Massachusetts lawmakers are voting on a $4 billion spending package this week that includes “premium pay” bonuses of up to $2,000 for essential employees who worked in-person during the COVID state of emergency. House Speaker Ron Mariano and Senate President Karen Spilka announced that both chambers reached a compromise on plans to spend billions in federal aid from the American Rescue Plan Act. The House voted to approve the spending on Thursday morning, the State House News Service reports, and the Senate is scheduled to vote Friday. “The proposal filed this evening will provide hundreds of millions of dollars to build housing that is affordable, transform our public and behavioral health systems, prepare us for the impacts of climate change, strengthen our education system, assist struggling hospitals, and support our frontline workers by providing half-a-billion dollars in direct payments,” they said in a statement. Lawmakers were unable to reach a deal before their recess, meaning a single legislator could halt the bill. The compromise plan calls for bonuses of between $500 and $2,000 for essential employees who...
    SACRAMENTO (CBS13) — The pandemic is breeding another problem of more pets living on the streets. The growing number of homeless pets is now pushing shelters to their limits. That’s why Sacramento Animal Care Services is pushing for a new team dedicated to getting them the care they need. READ MORE: Yuba County Water Agency Could Ship Billions Of Gallons Of Water To Bay Area Amid DroughtThey’re not just street animals. They’re companions, protectors and support systems. “He wakes me up in the morning. He goes to bed with me. He’s just my buddy,” said Andrew Pendery. Pendery owns a one-year-old dog, Elvis, he calls his constant companion. For Angela Orourke, her little Bichon-mix, Baby, is everything. “When I don’t want to get out of bed, just taking care of her helps me to get up and be motivated to try,” said Orourke. READ MORE: Rio Linda Sandwich Shop Owner Recovering From StabbingSacramento has seen a growing number of homeless pets since the pandemic started, which is stretching resources thin. Animal Care Services wants a designated team focused on homeless...
    ST. PAUL (WCCO) — This coming Tuesday will mark the 80th anniversary of the attack on Pearl Harbor. It was the beginning of America’s involvement in World War II. That infamous date also has an interesting connection to a hospice home in St. Paul. “We are all inclusive. We include people of any faiths or no faiths,” said Lisa Sweeney. When a group of Catholic Dominican Hawthorne nuns opened the place now known as Our Lady of Peace, they worked in wards. Only curtains separated patients. But as the years passed, the amenities got better and so did the care. “It’s the hospice nurse with the dying cancer patient. It was a match made in heaven,” said Dr. Wayne Thalhuber. “It’s very close to my heart. Very meaningful.” Thalhuber was medical director for 40 years and was continually impressed by the compassion the sisters showed for patients during their final days. A place of peace whose doors opened during a time of war. “I think it’s an amazing coincidence that those two were put together,” said Thalhuber. The grand opening...
    Our words are failing us. Outdated terms such as “child care” and “day care” do not communicate the crucial importance of children’s first five years to their lifelong development, learning and health. Efforts to nurture and educate children before age 5 are foundational to our families and our nation. With the Build Back Better Act, now before Congress, and its inclusion of $380 billion for child care and preschool, we have an opportunity to support that foundation — 50 years after then-President Nixon vetoed a similar national plan. Early education is central in the Biden administration’s historic investment in human infrastructure. Our messaging must be clear and compelling this time to win the broad support of policymakers and the public. Yet the current hodgepodge of terminology in our field promotes utter confusion. “Child care” was featured in a majority of 2021 headlines about early childhood, used almost interchangeably with “daycare,” “early childhood education,” “early learning,” “early care and education,” “child development,” “nursery school” and “pre-school.” Although child care often refers to infants and toddlers, while preschool is generally for 3-...
    Alec Baldwin is gushing over his wife and family after opening up about the "Rust" movie set shooting. In a tell-all interview that aired Thursday night, the 63-year-old actor recalled what went down in New Mexico on Oct. 21 when a gun was discharged during a rehearsal, resulting in the death of cinematographer Halyna Hutchins. After the ABC News special aired, Baldwin took to Instagram to share a photo of himself holding one of his children while on the shore of a body of water. In the caption, the "30 Rock" star took a moment to reflect on his priorities and praise his wife Hilaria. EMOTIONAL ALEC BALDWIN RECALLS ‘RUST’ SHOOTING: 'IF I FELT THAT I WAS RESPONSIBLE, I MIGHT HAVE KILLED MYSELF' Alec Baldwin praised his wife Hilaria on Instagram and said that his "family is all I care about." (Getty Images) "No matter what happens to me. No matter what I suffer. If I win or lose, anything. Anything," he began. "No one can take away from me the joy and love you have given me, @hilariabaldwin."...
    ARLINGTON, Texas (AP) — At a playground outside a North Texas day care, giggling preschoolers chase each other into a playhouse. Toddlers scoot by on tricycles. Just uphill, Total Energies is pumping for natural gas. The French energy giant wants to drill three new wells on the property next to Mother’s Heart Learning Center, which serves mainly Black and Latino children. The wells would lie about 600 feet from where the children play. The prospect is raising fears among families and the surrounding community. Living too close to drilling sites has been linked to a range of health risks from asthma to neurological and developmental disorders. And while some states require energy companies to drill farther from day cares and homes, Texas has made it difficult for localities to fight back. On Tuesday night, the Arlington City Council voted 5-4 to approve Total’s latest drilling request, with expected final approval in the weeks to come. Last year, the council denied Total’s request at a time when Black Lives Matter protests after George Floyd’s murder by police led many American communities...
    Billie Eilish is opening up about how her life and career have changed since skyrocketing to fame. Every year since 2016, the 19-year-old star has sat down with Vanity Fair for the same interview, answering the same series of questions and reacting to her previous answers. In her latest version of the discussion, the star was once again asked about whether or not she feels pressure. "I feel a lot of pressure, but I would also say that back then [in the earlier years of her career], I was more loved," said the singer. "I was pretty overall loved, I would say, to be honest. I was scared because I wanted to keep that love." BILLIE EILISH ADMITS SHE HAS A 'TERRIBLE RELATIONSHIP' WITH HER BODY Billie Eilish said that ‘a ton of people hate’ her these days. (Photo by Jeff Kravitz/FilmMagic) Since then, things have changed, as has her attitude. "Now, like tons of people hate me so I'm not worried anymore," Eilish explained. "I'm like, ‘Oh, OK, well, if you like me, you like me, if you...
    Fox News meteorologist Janice Dean, who has sharply criticized former New York Governor Andrew Cuomo after losing both of her in-laws in care homes, believes his CNN host brother's suspension for advising him behind the scenes should be a 'cautionary tale' for journalists. Speaking to DailyMail.com on Tuesday night, shortly after Chris Cuomo's indefinite suspension was announced, Dean called the move 'the very least CNN could do' in light of the revelations. 'But is he still being paid? That needs to be clarified,' asked Dean, who called for Chris Cuomo to be fired. A spokeswoman for Cuomo did not immediately respond to an inquiry from DailyMail.com.  'I doubt he comes back from this, but I just hope people never forget the charade that went on between those two at the beginning of the pandemic,' added Dean.  'This story should be cautionary tale taught in journalism schools. That kind of behavior should never be tolerated again,' said Dean.  Dean's mother-in-law and father-in-law both died of COVID in New York care facilities last spring, shortly after Andrew Cuomo issued an executive order forcing...
    LOS ANGELES (CBSLA) — Los Angeles County’s Animal Care Foundation sought donations Tuesday to help fight animal cruelty and support other animal welfare programs. Donations will provide officer training, equipment and supplies for the county’s Department of Animal Care and Control so that the department can enforce animal cruelty laws and rescue abused and neglected animals. READ MORE: Fishing Resumes In 45 Miles Of Water Off Orange County Coast Previously Closed Due To October Oil SpillThe Animal Care Foundation has established multiple programs to help animals in need. The foundation also fundraises for spay-and-neuter programs, pet adoptions and public education. READ MORE: County Supervisors Vote To Move Girls Out of Juvenile DetentionThe county department serves an estimated 45,000 animals annually and provides services around-the-clock in unincorporated areas and 45 of the 88 cities in the county. MORE NEWS: Police Identify Man Shot And Killed In North HollywoodDonations can be made at lacountyanimals.org/give.
    With the U.S. Supreme Court set to hear opening arguments Wednesday in a case that could overturn Roe v. Wade and threaten abortion rights for millions of people across the country, right-wing anti-choice groups are preparing to ensure that anyone who becomes pregnant in the U.S. is forced to continue the pregnancy. The consideration of Mississippi's 15-week abortion ban represents a moment the anti-choice movement has been waiting for since 1973, when Roe v. Wade affirmed that pregnant people have the right to obtain abortion care until 24 weeks of pregnancy. After a number of extreme forced-pregnancy laws passed by right-wing state legislatures were overturned by federal courts in recent years, Mississippi officials are asking the high court to overturn Roe v. Wade in addition to allowing their law—which includes no exceptions for pregnancies that result from rape or incest—to stand. Former Vice President Mike Pence called on the Supreme Court Tuesday to "make history" by overturning the ruling—a move that would swiftly put in place abortion bans in 12 states that have "trigger bans," including Arkansas, Tennessee, and Kentucky,...
    A federal judge in Louisiana issued a nationwide preliminary injunction Tuesday against President Biden’s COVID-19 vaccine mandate for health care workers. Judge Terry A. Doughty in the U.S. District Court Western District of Louisiana ruled in favor of a request from Republican Louisiana Attorney General Jeff Landry to block an emergency regulation issued Nov. 4 by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services that required the COVID shot for nearly every full-time employee, part-time employee, volunteer, and contractor working at a wide range of healthcare facilities receiving Medicaid or Medicaid funding. Louisiana was joined in the lawsuit by attorneys general in 13 other states. OSHA SUSPENDS ENFORCEMENT OF COVID-19 VACCINE MANDATE FOR LARGE BUSINESSES Doughty argued in his ruling that the Biden administration does not have the constitutional authority to go around Congress by issuing such a mandate. "If the executive branch is allowed to usurp the power of the legislative branch to make laws, two of the three powers conferred by our Constitution would be in the same hands," he wrote. "If human nature and history teach anything, it...
    President BidenJoe BidenDearborn office of Rep. Debbie Dingell vandalized Pfizer to apply for COVID-19 booster approval for 16- and 17-year-olds: report Coronavirus variant raises fresh concerns for economy MORE on Tuesday traveled to Minnesota for the latest stop in his cross-country bid to sell the benefits of a bipartisan infrastructure law and rally support for a more ambitious social spending plan working its way through Congress. "Over the next several weeks I’m going to be traveling all over the country, and so will Vice President Harris and my Cabinet and folks throughout our administration to show how these investments are going to change your lives, change lives for the better," Biden said after touring Dakota County Technical College. Biden toured the local trade school and delivered remarks in Rosemount, Minn., located in the state's 2nd Congressional District. Rep. Angie Craig (D-Minn.) represents the area and is expected to face a tough re-election bid next November. The president pointed to multiple infrastructure projects in Minnesota that could use funding, including a local train crossing that has become a traffic bottleneck. He spoke about investments...
    SACRAMENTO (AP) — A new California policy could send dozens of quadriplegic, paraplegic or otherwise permanently incapacitated inmates from nursing homes back to state prisons. Prison officials say a change in federal rules led them to limit medical parole to inmates so ill they are hooked to ventilators to breathe, meaning their movement is so limited they are not a public danger. The state previously included a much broader range of permanent incapacities allowing inmates to be cared for in nursing homes outside prison walls. READ MORE: Coyote Likely Behind ‘Suspicious’ Animal Deaths In Citrus Heights, Police SaySteve Fama, an attorney with the nonprofit Prison Law Office, said the court-appointed federal office that controls health care in California prisons told him the change could affect about 70 of the 210 inmates approved for medical parole under the current system, started in 2014. “It’d be an awful shame if those people were returned to prison,” Fama said. “Those patients have been proven not to need a prison setting given their medical conditions.” The policy shift comes as the state has been...
    Abortion justice advocates rally at the Supreme Court in 2020. In yet another week without a Supreme Court decision on Texas’ six-week abortion ban, SB 8, abortion justice advocates aren’t taking our eyes off the ball just yet. Tomorrow, Dec. 1, the court will hear arguments regarding a Mississippi 15-week abortion ban in a direct challenge to Roe v. Wade. Lower courts prohibited the ban from going into effect, but the Supreme Court decided to accept the case and will consider “whether all pre-viability prohibitions on elective abortion are unconstitutional.” This is the kind of case abortion providers, funds, and advocates have been warning us of for years, trying to get through to the Susan Collinses of the world who believe extremist right-wing Supreme Court justices will automatically respect precedent. The alarming truth is that this case has the potential to drastically change the landscape of abortion access in the U.S. as we know it. Despite a large swath of the country already being in a post-Roe environment, the reality is that it can get much, much worse. No matter what...
    In July, President Joe Biden issued a series of rules requiring that federal workers, and workers at companies that receive federal contracts, must be vaccinated. That included health care workers who work for hospitals that receive Medicare or Medicaid payments. However, earlier this month, a three-judge panel in Texas blocked the implementation of the mandate for many large companies. Now, as The Washington Post reports, a federal district judge in Missouri has acted to block even the mandate for health care workers. That includes workers dealing face-to-(hopefully-masked-)face with COVID-19 patients in emergency rooms and workers caring for those most vulnerable to bad outcomes in nursing homes. What both rulings have in common is simple enough: Trump-appointed judges. Unsurprisingly, the ruling from District Judge Matthew Schelp is filled with the kind of political language that might be expected from a Trump appointee, with statements including claims that implementing the rule would create a “...politically and economically vast, federalism-altering, and boundary-pushing mandate...” The ruling also flatly accepts unsupported claims by a group of Republican state attorneys, headed by radical right Missouri attorney...
    A new California policy could send dozens of quadriplegic, paraplegic or otherwise permanently incapacitated inmates from nursing homes back to state prisons. Prison officials say a change in federal rules led them to limit medical parole to inmates so ill they are hooked to ventilators to breathe, meaning their movement is so limited they are not a public danger. The state previously included a much broader range of permanent incapacities allowing inmates to be cared for in nursing homes outside prison walls. Steve Fama, an attorney with the nonprofit Prison Law Office, said the court-appointed federal office that controls health care in California prisons told him the change could affect about 70 of the 210 inmates approved for medical parole under the current system, started in 2014. FILE - A wheelchair-bound inmate wheels himself through a checkpoint at the California Medical Facility in Vacaville, Calif., on April 9, 2008. California corrections officials have begun limiting medical parole only to inmates so ill they are on ventilators. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli, File) "It’d be an awful shame if those people...
    NEW YORK (CBSNewYork) – Three charities came together on Giving Tuesday to assemble kits filled with essentials to give to families in need. As CBS2’s Christina Fan reports, 50 holiday care packages filled with toys, backpacks and books will fill the stockings of homeless children across New York City this holiday season. READ MORE: Supply Chain Issues: How Are Global Shortages Affecting Local Customers?The mastermind behind this selfless operation? Chelsea Phaire, 12, who created Chelsea’s Charity. Chelsea Phaire helps assemble care packages on Nov. 30, 2021. (credit: CBS2) “It makes me feel amazing that we are helping so many people,” she said. Theee nonprofits worked together to make this donation possible on Giving Tuesday. Chelsea’s Charity provided art supplies. She says they have the power to heal. “Art is important to me because when my grandfather passed away, I was very upset. But my grandmother told me to draw him a picture and I put it in his pocket at his funeral at and it made me feel a lot better, because I felt that every morning when he...
    Q: I just want my own records from a hospital, but have to submit a specific form to comply with HIPAA.  The form seems burdensome. What is HIPAA and what is the reason for it? A.L., Long Beach Ron Sokol  A:  HIPAA is the federal Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act, which was enacted in 1996. The primary purpose of HIPAA is to protect patient privacy. Hence, sensitive patient health information cannot be given to others unless authorized or consented to by the patient. Privacy of your health records is considered very important. Note that HIPAA applies to health care providers, health plans, health care clearinghouses, and business associates engaged in such activities as claims processing, data analysis, utilization review and billing. HIPAA therefore impacts doctors, dentists, chiropractors, psychologists, nursing homes and hospitals, among others. Q:  If there is a HIPAA violation, what should be done and is there any real consequence? G.D., Marina Del Rey A:  If a HIPPA breach occurs, notice must be provided to: (a) the affected individual, (b) the federal Secretary of Health and Human Resources...
    SACRAMENTO (AP) — A new California policy could send dozens of quadriplegic, paraplegic or otherwise permanently incapacitated inmates from nursing homes back to state prisons. Prison officials say a change in federal rules led them to limit medical parole to inmates so ill they are hooked to ventilators to breathe, meaning their movement is so limited they are not a public danger. The state previously included a much broader range of permanent incapacities allowing inmates to be cared for in nursing homes outside prison walls. READ MORE: Bay Area Startup Sets Sights On Developing 'Perpetually Flying Drone'Steve Fama, an attorney with the nonprofit Prison Law Office, said the court-appointed federal office that controls health care in California prisons told him the change could affect about 70 of the 210 inmates approved for medical parole under the current system, started in 2014. “It’d be an awful shame if those people were returned to prison,” Fama said. “Those patients have been proven not to need a prison setting given their medical conditions.” The policy shift comes as the state has been reducing its prison...
    HARRISBURG, Pa. (AP) — Gov. Tom Wolf suggested Tuesday that he is not considering additional containment measures as the omicron variant of the coronavirus spreads overseas, but continued to urge people to get vaccinated. Wolf said there is no cause for panic, noting that no cases of the omicron variant have been discovered in the United States. READ MORE: COVID-19 In Pittsburgh: Allegheny County Reports 534 New Cases, 4 Additional Deaths“In Pennsylvania and around the country, the vaccine is still our strategy, so get your shot,” Wolf said on a regularly scheduled appearance on KDKA-AM radio in Pittsburgh. “Get your vaccine. That’s our strategy and it seems to be working.” Infections, hospitalizations and intensive-care unit cases are rising in Pennsylvania and many other states. About 3,600 patients are hospitalized with COVID-19 in Pennsylvania, according to Department of Health figures. Wolf called that “very few” and said he doesn’t “see any need for Pennsylvania to do anything draconian at this point,” such as limiting elective surgeries to clear up hospital space. READ MORE: COVID-19 In Pennsylvania: State Reports 5,766 New Cases,...