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    Congress is driving deeper toward the holidays, as lawmakers struggle to make progress on a lengthy year-end to-do list.  Both the House and Senate were scheduled to leave Washington, D.C., for the year at the end of the week.  The House, instead, has formally added a week to its schedule, meaning the lower chamber will now start its break by Dec. 20, while senators are warning they could remain in session right up until Christmas.  Congress passed a short-term government funding bill last week, taking one item off its plate.  But it still faces a legislative slog that could eat up weeks of floor time, with negotiations continuing this week on a sweeping defense bill, President BidenJoe BidenChina eyes military base on Africa's Atlantic coast: report Biden orders flags be flown at half-staff through Dec. 9 to honor Dole Biden heading to Kansas City to promote infrastructure package MORE’s social and climate spending plan and how to raise the debt ceiling.  Vaccine mandate Senate Republicans are set to net a temporary win on Biden’s vaccine mandate for larger employers.  After failing to block funding for the...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy appears to have settled on a strategy to deal with a handful of Republican lawmakers who have stirred outrage with violent, racist and sometimes Islamophobic comments. If you can’t police them, promote them. The path to power for Republicans in Congress is now rooted in the capacity to generate outrage. The alarming language, and the fundraising haul it increasingly produces, is another example of how Donald Trump, the former president, has left his mark on politics, changing the way Republicans rise to influence and authority. Success in Congress, once measured by bills passed and constituents reached, is now gauged in many ways by the ability to attract attention, even if it is negative as the GOP looks to reclaim a House majority next year by firing up Trump’s most ardent supporters. That has helped elevate a group of far-right lawmakers — including Reps. Lauren Boebert of Colorado, Marjorie Taylor Greene of Georgia and Rep. Paul Gosar of Arizona — whose inflammatory comments once would have made them pariahs. Rather...
    Sen. Amy Klobuchar (D-Minn.) addresses a rally at the US Capitol in September.Chip Somodevilla/Getty Fight disinformation. Get a daily recap of the facts that matter. Sign up for the free Mother Jones newsletter.On Wednesday, the Supreme Court heard arguments on the constitutionality of Mississippi’s Gestational Age Act, a controversial state law banning almost all abortions after 15 weeks of pregnancy. Through their lines of questioning, the court’s six conservatives strongly indicated that they’re likely to overturn—or at least gut—the court’s seminal ruling in Roe v. Wade, which prohibited abortion bans before the point of fetal viability, or about six months. On Sunday’s Meet the Press, Sen. Amy Klobuchar (D-Minn.) said the pro-choice response should come from her Congressional colleagues: Turn Roe‘s protections into federal legislation, taking Americans’ access to abortion out of the justices’ hands altogether. “I think the most sane route to get this done right now would be to bring this up before the US Senate to codify Roe v. Wade into law,” Klobuchar told host Chuck Todd. The 1973 Roe decision barred individual states from enacting restrictions...
    At 33 years old, freshman Florida Rep. Kat Cammack may be the youngest Republican woman in Congress, but she has her eye on being a ”superbroker of sorts” in her party to ensure that Republicans move swiftly and decisively on legislation should they win back the House after 2022. “My goal is one team, one mission,” Cammack told the Washington Examiner in an interview. “It's not going to be moderate. It's not going to be ultraconservative. It's going to be a hodgepodge of conservative agenda items, but we have to get it across the finish line. And we can't do that if we're divided.” What Cammack does not want is a repeat of what happened when Republicans had control of the House, Senate, and White House under former President Donald Trump. “The competing agenda items fractured the Republican Conference into a paralyzed state,” Cammack said. “My goal is to become a superbroker of sorts. I want to make sure that every single Republican voice is heard and that they have a seat at the table in some...
              moreby Debra Heine   Senator Rand Paul (R-Ky) on Thursday said he thinks Dr. Anthony Fauci, the director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease, should go to prison for five years for lying  to Congress. The Kentucky senator has repeatedly sparred with the NIAID director over the funding of gain-of-function experiments at the Wuhan lab. “Fauci should go to prison for five years for lying to Congress. They’ve prosecuted other people, they’ve selectively gone after Republicans, but in no way will they do anything about him lying,” he told Maria Bartiromo on Fox Business. Paul contends that Fauci lied to Congress when he denied that the National Institutes of Health funded “gain of function” research at the Wuhan Institute of Virology. Gain of function is highly controversial research that involves making pathogens and viruses more lethal and virulent in a laboratory. NIAID documents released in September confirm that starting in 2014, Fauci’s NIAID funded the New York-based research nonprofit EcoHealth Alliance with annual grants through 2020 for “Understanding the Risk of Bat Coronavirus Emergence.” A letter sent by the NIH’s principal deputy director to...
              moreby Newt Gingrich   Despite every effort of the Biden administration, the Justice Department, the Congressional Democrats, and the propaganda media, Hunter Biden is going to end up being investigated – and the impact on President Joe Biden, his administration, and his legacy is going to be enormous. As more stories about Hunter Biden’s meetings with foreign agents in Serbia, China, and elsewhere come out, serious scrutiny will become unavoidable. The evidence is overwhelming that Hunter Biden’s activities in Ukraine, Russia, and China have direct national security implications. We simply do not know how much the Biden administration’s weakness toward Communist China is influenced by the Chinese corruption of the Biden family and its allies. We do not know how much Vladimir Putin has been emboldened by his knowledge of the corruption of Hunter Biden – and through him the governing family of the United States. There has been a complete absence of honesty and inquiry from the FBI and the Justice Department. It is amazing that the Hunter Biden laptop has not already led to an indictment of President...
    An early Saturday morning Telegram call took an unexpected turn, as Jan 6 “Stop the Steal” rally organizer Ali Alexander—who Congress has subpoenaed—splattered a series of random thoughts against the brains of approximately 30 listeners while declaring that Congress wants to see him dead. The unhinged 45-minute phone call at 2 a.m. further divulged into topics ranging from plastic surgery, consuming acid, and taking life lessons from the Star Wars character Yoda. “I was actually moved to sadness. I was moved empathetically to mourn the loss of reason amongst otherwise well-intentioned people,” Alexander said at the start of the call, seemingly stringing a series of words together which he referred to as “very beautiful.” Alexander, who is no stranger to lengthy diatribes, went on to claim that he has been tasked with much of his own “legal preparation” in light of being subpoenaed by the House committee investigating the Capitol riot because one of his lawyers has been “hospitalized” in recent days and his other attorney came down with COVID-19. “I am doing all this legal preparation for myself,”...
    Chris Kleponis/Sipa via AP Fight disinformation. Get a daily recap of the facts that matter. Sign up for the free Mother Jones newsletter.Donald Trump had a plan to steal the 2020 election: he wanted GOP-controlled legislatures in key states Joe Biden won to override the will of their state’s voters and appoint their own electors for Trump, which Vice President Mike Pence would count when Congress met on January 6, nullifying Biden’s victory. This brazen attempt to overturn the 2020 election didn’t succeed, but Trump and his allies are doing everything they can to ensure a different outcome in 2024, and they’re helped by an obscure 1887 law called the Electoral Count Act that is in desperate need of a rewrite. The Electoral Count Act, which grew out of the disputed election of 1876, says that a legislature can appoint its own electors at odds with the winner of a state’s popular vote if it concludes that voters “failed to make a choice” on Election Day. The act does not specify what “failed” means, an ambiguity that provides an opening...
    TALLAHASSEE (CBSMiami/NSF) – Flags will be flown at half-staff Sunday to honor former U.S. Rep. Carrie Meek, who died this week at age 95. Meek, a Miami Democrat, was elected to Congress in 1992 after serving in the state House and state Senate. READ MORE: Investors Buying Tampa Bay Homes At Record RateShe was one of the first Black members of Congress from Florida since Reconstruction. She served in the U.S. House for a decade and was succeeded by her son Kendrick, also a former state lawmaker. READ MORE: Miami Weather: Warming Trend Continues, Muggier By Monday“She was never afraid to use her voice to speak out against inequality or to fight for the disenfranchised and the vulnerable,” the Florida Legislative Black Caucus said in a statement after Meek’s death Sunday. “Her legacy will continue to shape our community and the nation for generations to come.” Gov. Ron DeSantis on Friday ordered that flags be flown at half-staff from sunrise to sunset Sunday at the state Capitol, the Miami-Dade County Courthouse and Miami City Hall....
    WASHINGTON (AP) — If President Joe Biden’s $2 trillion social and environment package was a Broadway show, its seven months on Congress’ stage could qualify it as a hit. But lawmaking isn’t show business, and many Democrats worry that with the curtain falling soon on 2021, time is not their friend. Each passing day threatens to push final action into 2022, an election year when control of Congress will be at stake and lawmakers will become ever more wary of casting tough votes. Democratic Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer wants to end his party’s disagreements and finally squeeze the bill through his chamber before Christmas. Indeed, holiday deadlines are a time-tested way of prodding lawmakers to solve disputes so they can go home. And momentum toward approving Biden’s top domestic initiative — the House passed an initial version last month — seems to make prospects strong. Yet while Schumer and other Democrats express confidence that his target date will be met, some are anxious it won’t and are concerned about damaging consequences. The New York senator needs time to work...
    Former United States Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley visited former President Donald Trump weeks after he denied her such a meeting. The meeting between the two Republicans, both of whom are potential contenders in the 2024 presidential election, took place at Trump's Mar-a-Lago resort in Florida, and a source told The Hill it was as "positive." What exactly they discussed is unknown. NIKKI HALEY RIPS BIDEN, HARRIS, AND DEMOCRATS, SEES BIG GOP WINS Haley feuded with Trump publicly following the aftermath of the Jan. 6 riot at the U.S. Capitol. In a feature story in Politico , she blasted the former president for his refusal to concede the 2020 election and suggested he was responsible for the violence. Shortly after those remarks against Trump, he refused to meet with her in February at Mar-a-Largo. Since then, she has worked to make amends with the former president. Haley, who is also a former governor of South Carolina, is widely seen as a potential contender for the 2024 presidential election. In April, Haley said...
    If it seems like it was just yesterday that U.S. Congresswoman Marjorie Taylor Greene labeled the President of the United States and in fact every Democrat in the country “communists,” it was, which is why it might seem strangely hypocritical that the Republican from Georgia minutes ago was labeling herself the “most attacked” freshman member of Congress in all of U.S. history. “Joe Biden is a communist,” Greene declared strongly Thursday evening. “And that’s who the Democrats are – they’re communists.” “You know, a lot of people are swallowing down the word ‘socialist,’ but that’s not a good enough word for Democrats – they are communists,” Greene told her supporters, clearly ignorant of the words’ meanings. “That’s the word we need to keep using with them,” she continued. “Because they’re using these unprecedented, authoritarian, tyrannical controls on the American people to force people to comply.” Marge Greene today: \u201cJoe Biden is a communist. And that\u2019s what the Democrats are - they\u2019re communists. A lot of people are swallowing down the word \u2018socialist,\u2019 but .. they are communists.\u201dpic.twitter.com/agaGlwoi4N — Ron Filipkowski...
    Congress has voted to spend $1.6 billion to help cartels deliver children and job-seeking youths to cities and towns around the United States. The giveaway is buried within the continuing resolution, which was rushed through Congress late Thursday to keep government agencies operating until February. “This money is available through September 30, 2024, and its intended purpose is disguised in legislative language that says ‘for the account specified and for the activities specified, in section 141 of this Act,'” said a December 2 report by the Center for Immigration Studies (CIS). From February to October 2021, President Joe Biden’s deputies admitted roughly 125,000 younger migrants from Central America as “Unaccompanied Alien Children.” That inflow was six times larger than the 20,000 younger migrants who were admitted during the prior four months by President Donald Trump. Pro-migration groups — including lobbies for Fortune 500 investors — portray the cartel smuggling as a rescue effort for “children” trapped in crime-ridden countries. But the cartels are using a 2008 law that requires federal agencies to relay migrants to U.S. destinations if they claim to...
    U.S. President Joe Biden speaks about his administration's plan to fight the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) with the emergence of the Omicron variant, during his visit to the National Institutes of Health, in Bethesda, Maryland, U.S., December 2, 2021.Kevin Lamarque | Reuters President Joe Biden signed a short-term government funding bill on Friday, snuffing out one looming crisis as Congress turns its gaze toward two other big-ticket items. Biden's signature prevents a shutdown hours before an end of Friday deadline. The measure — which the House and Senate passed Thursday — will keep the government running through Feb. 18. With the threat of a disruptive funding lapse quashed, lawmakers will move to the next steps in a daunting December to-do list. The Democratic-led Congress will next try to stave off a potential default on U.S. debt, pass Biden's $1.75 trillion Build Back Better Act and approve an annual defense budget bill. Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen expects the U.S. will hit its debt ceiling on Dec. 15 if lawmakers do not raise or suspend the limit. Republicans have said they will not...
     Presented by Facebook    Welcome to The Hill’s Morning Report. It is Friday! We get you up to speed on the most important developments in politics and policy, plus trends to watch. Alexis Simendinger and Al Weaver are the co-creators. Readers can find us on Twitter @asimendinger and @alweaver22. Please recommend the Morning Report to friends and let us know what you think. CLICK HERE to subscribe!   Total U.S. coronavirus deaths reported each morning this week: Monday, 776,639; Tuesday, 778,601; Wednesday, 780,233; Thursday, 782,100; Friday, 785,912. Congress got its job done early. Both chambers on Thursday acted to fund the government temporarily through mid-February, which averted a looming government shutdown at midnight tonight.  The House on Thursday evening passed a continuing resolution, 221-212, to fund government operations at the previous year’s fiscal levels through Feb. 18, giving lawmakers more time to hammer out their differences. Retiring Rep. Adam KinzingerAdam Daniel KinzingerOn The Money — Congress races to keep the lights on House sets up Senate shutdown showdown McCarthy faces headaches from far-right House GOP MORE (R-Ill.) was the lone...
    The Senate averted a government shutdown that would have thrown President BidenJoe BidenManchin to vote to nix Biden's vaccine mandate for larger businesses Congress averts shutdown after vaccine mandate fight Senate cuts deal to clear government funding bill MORE’s agenda into limbo when Senate Majority Leader Charles SchumerChuck SchumerProgressive groups urge Schumer to prevent further cuts to T plan Collins says she supports legislation putting Roe v. Wade protections into law Biden should seek some ideological diversity MORE (D-N.Y.) struck a deal late Thursday with conservative Senate Republicans to fund the government until February.  The last-minute deal gives senators some hope that Congress isn’t completely dysfunctional and that another imminent standoff over raising the nation’s debt limit can be resolved in the same way without much carnage. In the end, senators on both sides of the aisle realized that a government shutdown — even a temporary one — would anger the public and both parties would wind up taking the blame. Some lawmakers hope their colleagues remember this lesson over the next two weeks as Congress tackles the more controversial task...
    The Senate on Thursday night passed a short-term funding bill to avert a government shutdown after a dayslong fight over President Biden’s vaccine mandate threw the legislation into limbo. Senators voted 69-28 to pass a stopgap bill to fund the government through Feb. 18. The legislation, which passed the House earlier in the evening, now goes to Biden’s desk where he has until the end of Friday to sign it. The quick votes are a U-turn from Thursday morning, when the path to avert a shutdown was far from clear. Leaders of the House and Senate Appropriations committees announced a stop-gap deal, but hurdles remained in the Senate amid a standoff with a group of conservatives. Those lawmakers wanted to use the short-term funding bill, known as a continuing resolution, to defund Biden’s vaccine mandate for larger businesses, federal employees and contractors, and the military. But the effort sparked quick Democratic backlash, with Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiCongress averts shutdown after vaccine mandate fight On The Money — Congress races to keep the lights on House sets up Senate shutdown showdown MORE (D-Calif.) hammering Republicans as...
    There are 10 working days between Congress’ just-concluded Thanksgiving recess and winter recess. In that short window, lawmakers are now attempting to follow through with all their promises made throughout the year. Democrats in particular have a long list of priorities they want to accomplish. With an election year on the horizon it’s in their best interest to get things done as quickly as possible. For now, the House and the Senate are only scheduled to be in session through December 10 before packing it up for the rest of the year. But, like many congressional deadlines, the timeline is likely to slip later into the month. Here’s Congress’ list of priorities to finish up before their winter break. Funding the government and raising the debt ceiling The most immediate issue Congress faces is avoiding a government shutdown at the end of the week. The government is set to run out of funding on December 3. A lapse in government funding can lead to furloughs of federal employees and temporarily shutting down some “non-essential” government services. Article continues after advertisement...
    For a week, lawmakers skirted closer and closer to what would have been one of the most pointless government shutdowns in recent memory. Everyone from Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-CA), to Senate GOP leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY), to President Joe Biden agreed that a shutdown would be an exceedingly stupid idea. But almost 24 hours from when the lights were slated to turn off, leaders were able snatch victory—in this case, the government meeting basic obligations—from the clutches of a vocal GOP minority willing to shut it all down in service to an anti-vaccine crusade. Earlier this week, a handful of hardline Republican lawmakers concocted a galaxy-brain gambit to use a stopgap government funding bill to stop vaccine mandates. Democrats, who didn’t seem to anticipate that anyone would seriously oppose a bill just to keep the government going as lawmakers negotiate a larger spending deal, didn’t leave themselves enough time to avoid handing over a small and temporary bit of leverage to any one Republican senator—and that left open the serious possibility that one of them would force a shutdown just...
    Congress has about 30 hours to pass a continuing resolution (CR) to allow the federal government to stay open past Friday midnight. And while nearly everyone is on board, from President Joe Biden to House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and even Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, some powerful members of Congress are trying to prevent the CR from passing. They include Republican Senators Ted Cruz and Mike Lee and Democratic Senator Joe Manchin, who oppose vaccine mandates and are trying to include an amendment to “defund” President Biden’s executive order. And then there’s Republican Congresswoman Marjorie Taylor Greene, who just wants to shut it down. Literally, those were her words: “shut it down.” “This government should be shut down,” Greene said minutes ago on the House floor, as Punchbowl News’ Jake Sherman reports. “Do not pass this CR. Shut it down.” Why is Greene demanding a full federal government shutdown? “Because the people in here cannot control themselves,” declared Greene, who was stripped of all her committee assignments almost immediately upon being sworn in to Congress. “The people in here don’t...
    (CNN)Congress averted a government shutdown Thursday evening when both chambers voted to pass a stopgap bill to extend funding through mid-February after party leaders brokered a deal to overcome GOP brinkmanship over vaccine mandates.The final tally in the Senate was 69-28. Passage of the stopgap bill ahead of a Friday at midnight deadline ended a standoff that had threatened to trigger a shutdown when a small number of Republican senators who object to President Joe Biden's vaccine requirements had held out the possibility of holding up a quick vote on the funding bill. To resolve the impasse, the two parties agreed to hold votes on the stopgap bill as well as a GOP amendment to prohibit the use of federal funding for Covid-19 vaccine mandates, which ultimately failed. Earlier on Thursday, the House passed a continuing resolution to fund the government through February 18. Read MoreThe final vote was 221-212. Rep. Adam Kinzinger of Illinois was the only Republican to join Democrats in voting for the resolution. Negotiators from both parties had announced a plan Thursday morning that would prevent...
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              moreby Eric Lendrum   In an unprecedented move, the Biden White House still has not yet released an official total of the number of illegal aliens who are currently occupying the United States, the Washington Free Beacon reports. Although the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) has given those numbers to Congress in a report, that report has not yet been made public. Common practice dating back to the Obama Administration has been to release the report publicly shortly after the Congressional briefing, with a focus on the number of possible visa overstays. Congress has warned that “the large number of annual in-country alien overstays threatens national security and the integrity of legal immigration.” The report in question is formally called the “Entry/Exit Overstay Report,” and documents foreigners who were originally approved to stay in the United States with a visa, but whose visas have since expired. The report is compiled using travel data across multiple agencies, including DHS and the State Department. “For whatever reason, it appears political appointees are not disclosing a report produced by career subject matter experts,” said Jon...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — Democratic Minnesota Rep. Ilhan Omar on Tuesday played a harrowing death threat recently left for her by voicemail, while imploring House Republican leaders to do more to tamp down “anti-Muslim hatred” in their ranks and “hold those who perpetuate it accountable.” Omar, one of only a handful of Muslim members of Congress, has been the subject of repeated attacks by conservative pundits and some Republicans in Congress, which she says have led to an increase in the number of death threats she receives. The most recent instance came after a video of first-term Colorado Rep. Lauren Boebert calling Omar a member of the “jihad squad” and likening her to a bomb-carrying terrorist went viral. READ MORE: Ilhan Omar Says She Hung Up On Lauren Boebert After She Refused To Publicly Apologize For 'Islamophobic Comments & Fabricated Lies'“When a sitting member of Congress calls a colleague a member of the ‘jihad squad’ and falsifies a story to suggest I will blow up the Capitol, it is not just an attack on me but on millions of American...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — Democratic Minnesota Rep. Ilhan Omar on Tuesday played a harrowing death threat recently left for her by voicemail, while imploring House Republican leaders to do more to tamp down “anti-Muslim hatred” in their ranks and “hold those who perpetuate it accountable.” Omar, one of only a handful of Muslim members of Congress, has been the subject of repeated attacks by conservative pundits and some Republicans in Congress, which she says have led to an increase in the number of death threats she receives. The most recent instance came after a video of first-term Colorado Rep. Lauren Boebert calling Omar a member of the “jihad squad” and likening her to a bomb-carrying terrorist went viral. “When a sitting member of Congress calls a colleague a member of the ‘jihad squad’ and falsifies a story to suggest I will blow up the Capitol, it is not just an attack on me but on millions of American Muslims across the country,” Omar said during a news conference Tuesday. “We cannot pretend this hate speech from leading politicians doesn’t have...
    A group of House Democrats called on GOP leaders Tuesday to discipline Rep. Lauren BoebertLauren BoebertOmar, Boebert blast one another after tense call GOP governor says McCarthy should condemn Boebert's anti-Muslim remarks GOP eyes booting Democrats from seats if House flips MORE (R-Colo.) for a series of Islamophobic comments she's lobbed in recent months against Rep. Ilhan OmarIlhan OmarOmar, Boebert blast one another after tense call The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - Biden to update Americans on omicron; Congress back GOP governor says McCarthy should condemn Boebert's anti-Muslim remarks MORE (D-Minn.) and other Muslim lawmakers in Congress. In an emotional press conference in the basement of the Capitol, Omar said she has received "hundreds" of threats on her life since joining Congress — threats "often triggered by Republican attacks on my faith." As evidence, Omar then took the remarkable step of playing a profane and racist voicemail she received on Monday, as her most recent feud with Boebert was gaining national attention, in which the caller characterized her as a "f-----g Muslim piece of s--t" — one...
    (CNN)After video surfaced of Colorado Rep. Lauren Boebert making anti-Muslim comments about Minnesota Rep. Ilhan Omar in mid-November, Congress must again contend with a major question: how to handle members who step out of line, offending and potentially endangering the wellbeing of their colleagues. Lincoln MitchellIn a video posted on Facebook before Thanksgiving, Boebert implied Omar had been mistaken for a terrorist -- or member of the "jihad squad" -- in a Capitol Hill elevator. On Friday, Boebert offered a weak apology on Twitter, saying she was sorry "to anyone in the Muslim community" she offended with her comment.This comes on the heels of Arizona Rep. Paul Gosar being censured and stripped of committees for tweeting a photoshopped anime video in which he attacks New York Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and President Joe Biden with swords. Now, some think Boebert should face a similar fate and, at the very least, censure.There is no question that Boebert's comments were deeply bigoted, that Gosar's violent fantasies are disturbing and that neither are conducting themselves the way most of us would like to...
    Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer said he’d consider new federal spending to help the nation deal with the omicron COVID variant. “I think it would be foolish for us not to try and address this in a timely way,” Schumer said Tuesday. The Biden administration is considering a request for $16 billion to fund updated vaccinations and treatments, such as monoclonal antibodies, that may be needed to deal with the variant, according to media reports. Schumer told reporters the Biden administration hasn’t asked Congress for new funding yet. “The administrator administration is not asking me for anything at this point,” Schumer said. “But if they do, I would hope we would follow their lead. Look at it carefully, but follow their lead and get something done.” CLICK HERE TO READ MORE FROM THE WASHINGTON EXAMINER Congress has passed five COVID aid bills costing several trillion dollars, including a $1.9 trillion COVID spending bill President Joe Biden signed in March. The last measure included more than $70 billion for vaccines, treatments, and other public...
    A coalition of major media companies has filed a legal brief in support of former Trump chief White House strategist Steven Bannon as he fights a proposed protective order in court that would keep him from publicizing Jan. 6th documents and information. The media group – which includes CNN, ABC, NBC, plus the Washington Post, the New York Times, and the parent company of the Wall Street Journal – filed a motion to intervene as Bannon's fights the government's proposed order as part of his contempt of Congress case.  The order would severely limit what Bannon can do with the trove of information that the feds must share as part of the normal discovery process and have already begun handing over.  According to a prior government filing, this includes more than 1,000 pages of witness testimony, grand jury material, and even emails from staff for the House Jan. 6th Committee investigating the Capitol riot. The press group argues that the government's proposed order would violate the First Amendment – and takes on the government's own contention that allowing Bannon to...
    Senate Majority Leader Charles SchumerChuck SchumerLawmakers take aim at 'Grinches' using bots to target consumers during holidays Democratic frustration growing over stagnating voting rights bills Schumer mourns death of 'amazing' father MORE (D-N.Y.) is planning to bring President BidenJoe BidenDearborn office of Rep. Debbie Dingell vandalized Pfizer to apply for COVID-19 booster approval for 16- and 17-year-olds: report Coronavirus variant raises fresh concerns for economy MORE's social and climate spending bill to the floor as soon as the week of Dec. 13, a source familiar confirmed to The Hill.  Schumer's plan is to bring the bill, known as Build Back Better, to the Senate floor once Democrats finish their conversations with the parliamentarian, who provides guidance on what can be included in a bill passed through budget reconciliation. "As soon as the necessary technical and procedural work with the Senate parliamentarian has been completed... the Senate will take up this legislation,"  Schumer told reporters during a press conference on Tuesday.  "Once that's complete, we're ready to move Build Back Better to the floor," Schumer added about the talks with the parliamentarian. ...
    Treasury Secretary Janet YellenJanet Louise YellenSchumer: 'Goal' is to pass Biden spending bill before Christmas The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - Biden to update Americans on omicron; Congress back No deal in sight as Congress nears debt limit deadline MORE on Monday warned senators that failing to reach a deal on raising the debt limit could "eviscerate" the U.S. economy recovery. Yellen gave this message while addressing the Senate Committee on Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs. She has issued similar notices in the time since the Senate reached a short-term debt hike to last until Dec. 15. Speaking to the committee, Yellen noted November job numbers that showed around 531,000 were added in the past month and stated, "Our economic recovery is on track." "At this point, I am confident that our recovery remains strong and is even quite remarkable when put it in context. We should not forget that last winter, there was a risk that our economy was going to slip into a prolonged recession, and there is an alternate reality where, right now, millions more people cannot find...
    MSNBC’s Chuck Todd went on an angry tear against Republicans for their “stupid” grandstanding with their refusal to raise the debt ceiling. Todd anchored Meet The Press Daily on Tuesday and recapped the news that Federal Reserve chairman Jerome Powell and Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen appeared before the Senate Banking Committee. Yellen offered an optimistic view of the U.S. economy, but she urged Congress to raise the debt ceiling before a default on the December 15th deadline. “America must pay its bills on time and in full,” Yellen said. “If we do not, we will eviscerate our current recovery. In a matter of days, the majority of Americans wld suffer financial pain as critical payments, like social security checks and military paychecks, would not reach their bank accounts and that would likely be followed by a deep recession.” From there, Todd went on an irate tangent directed at lawmakers who are keeping Congress in a stalemate over the debt ceiling: “Aren’t you embarrassed by the silliness of this debt limit thing that we go through? This shenanigan? Just, shame on...
    Mark Meadows has provided records to the House select committee investigating the Jan. 6 riot at the U.S. Capitol after weeks of resisting cooperating with the panel, shielding him from the committee holding him in contempt of Congress for the time being. The former White House chief of staff to Donald Trump will also sit for a deposition, committee Chairman Rep. Bennie Thompson said in a statement Tuesday. “Mr. Meadows has been engaging with the Select Committee through his attorney. He has produced records to the committee and will soon appear for an initial deposition,” Thompson said. “The Select Committee expects all witnesses, including Mr. Meadows, to provide all information requested and that the Select Committee is lawfully entitled to receive. The committee will continue to assess his degree of compliance with our subpoena after the deposition.” JAN. 6 PANEL TO VOTE ON HOLDING TRUMP DOJ OFFICIAL JEFFREY CLARK IN CONTEMPT Disputes over Meadows’s cooperation are not over, though. In a statement, Meadows’s attorney George Terwilliger confirmed the development but said that Meadows will not...
    Congressional investigators probing the deadly Jan. 6 riot at the Capitol said on Tuesday that Mark Meadows, former President Donald's chief of staff, has provided records to the panel and agreed to appear 'soon' for a deposition. Meadows, along with former trump strategist Steve Bannon, had refused to cooperate raising the prospect of criminal contempt proceedings. But that changed with the announcement that he had reached a deal.  'Mr Meadows has been engaging with the select committee through his attorney,' said its chairman Rep. Bennie Thompson. 'He has produced records to the committee and will soon appear for initial deposition.'  Former President Donald Trump urged his senior aides not to cooperate with the House Jan. 6 investigation but on Tuesday investigators said former White House Chief of Staff had begun sharing documents and would appear 'soon' for a deposition The House Jan. 6 committee is investigating the attack on the U.S. Capitol when hundreds of Trump supporters tried to stop Congress certifying the results of the 2020 election Jan. 6 panel considers whether to refer former Trump DOJ attorney Jeffrey...
    A member of the congressional "Squad" will have a biography written all about her. Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez , a New York Democrat, will be featured in a book set to be released on Feb. 1, 2022. The authors? Editors of New York Magazine and writer Lisa Miller. "I don't want to be a savior," Ocasio-Cortez proclaimed in one of the book's sections. "I want to be a mirror." AOC SAYS HER SOCIAL MEDIA IS '100%' HER FAULT Take Up Space: The Unprecedented AOC is written "through essays and reported stories on AOC’s meteoric rise and impact written by New York’s top-tier writers and commentators, including Rebecca Traister, Lisa Miller, Tim Shenk, David Wallace-Wells, Molly Fischer, and more, we get an in-depth look at one of the most prominent political and cultural stars in recent memory," according to publisher Simon & Schuster's description . CLICK HERE TO READ MORE FROM THE WASHINGTON EXAMINER The publishing company called the book "an engaging, all-encompassing biography of Congresswoman Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez in the bestselling tradition of Notorious RBG and Pelosi...
    (CNN)Republican Rep. Lauren Boebert of Colorado suggested to a crowd in September that Democratic Rep. Ilhan Omar of Minnesota, whom she called "black-hearted" and "evil," was a terrorist.In those same remarks, she said that she felt safe around Omar because the Democrat wasn't wearing a backpack while they were in an elevator together. It's another instance in which Boebert suggested Omar, who is Muslim and wears a hijab, was a terrorist. On Monday, the two lawmakers sent dueling statements about a phone call between the pair set up by Boebert after she apologized last week to "to anyone in the Muslim community I offended," when similar comments surfaced on social media.The video of Boebert's anti-Muslim comments, made in New York at a September Staten Island Conservative Party dinner, were posted on Facebook that month by an attendee running for borough president. "One of my I staffers, on his first day with me, got into an elevator in the Capitol. And in that elevator, we were joined by Ilhan Omar," Boebert told the crowd in September. "It was just us three...
    A federal judge has struck down one of President Joe Biden’s four COVID vaccine mandates, ruling that it violates federal law to force healthcare providers to fire doctors and nurses who object to the vaccination. One mandate down, three to go. The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) issued a mandate that any healthcare provider receiving money from its programs must demand COVID-19 vaccinations of its employees, and fire any healthcare workers who do not get a vaccination. CMS is part of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), which is led by Secretary Xavier Becerra. But Missouri Attorney General Eric Schmitt led a coalition of states to file a legal challenge to this vaccine mandate. On Monday, Judge Matthew Schelp of the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Missouri agreed with Schmidt and his fellow state attorneys general that Biden’s mandate is illegal. The judge issued a preliminary injunction blocking that mandate immediately. Government mandates come in all shapes and sizes. The Constitution gives some matters to the federal government and assigns other matters...
    Senate Majority Leader Charles SchumerChuck SchumerLawmakers take aim at 'Grinches' using bots to target consumers during holidays Democratic frustration growing over stagnating voting rights bills Schumer mourns death of 'amazing' father MORE (D-N.Y.) said he and GOP Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellOvernight Defense & National Security — US, Iran return to negotiating table Senate GOP blocks defense bill, throwing it into limbo On The Money — Biden stresses calm amid omicron fears MORE  (R-Ky.) had a “good conversation” about raising the debt ceiling and that talks are ongoing as Congress barrels toward a debt cliff.  Schumer, speaking on the Senate floor, said Congress needed to deal with the debt ceiling “soon,” after Treasury Secretary Janet YellenJanet Louise YellenSchumer: 'Goal' is to pass Biden spending bill before Christmas The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - Biden to update Americans on omicron; Congress back No deal in sight as Congress nears debt limit deadline MORE warned lawmakers that they have until Dec. 15 to raise the nation’s borrowing limit.  “I recently had a good conversation with the Republican leader about...
    The ugly clash following Rep. Lauren Boebert's attack on Rep. Ilhan Omar proliferated through the House GOP conference on Tuesday, with Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene calling fellow Republican Nancy Mace 'trash' after she condemned Boebert's anti-Muslim comments.  The latest round played out online, after Mace, a South Carolina Republican, condemned 'racist tropes' and 'disgusting comments' she said occurred on 'both sides,' following Boebert's comments about Omar – the first Somali American in Congress – who Boebert compared to a suicide bomber and called a member of the 'Jihad squad.' That defense of a Demoratic lawmaker did not sit well with Greene, who has clashed with lawmakers from both parties and had her committee assignments stripped after a House vote following her own incendiary comments.   .@NancyMace is the trash in the GOP Conference,' tweeted Greene. Rep. Nancy Mace (R-S.C.) defended herself online after fellow Republican Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene called her the 'trash' of the GOP Conference 'Never attacked by Democrats or RINO’s (same thing) because she is not conservative, she’s pro-abort. Mace you can back up off of @laurenboebert or just...
    Senator Tom Cotton (R-AR) called on National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases director Dr. Anthony Fauci to be investigated for lying to Congress in his denial that his agency funded gain-of-function research during testimony earlier this year during an appearance on FNC’s “The Ingraham Angle” on Monday. “Well, it’s just another example of the incompetence of the Biden administration. They think Tony Fauci remains a credible and impartial messenger about the Wuhan coronavirus,” he said. “I mean, you saw this weekend, he went out and became an open partisan attacking a sitting United States senator, who was democratically elected by the people as are the other 99 senators, as a nothing but a bureaucrat, who works for those people who democratically elected all 100 senators, attacking him in a partisan way.” “This is not Tony Fauci changing or turning over a new leaf,” Cotton continued. “This is who he’s been from the very beginning. And it is a simple fact that he testified to Congress, by the way, that he did not fund through his agency gain-of-function research in the...
    President BidenJoe BidenDearborn office of Rep. Debbie Dingell vandalized Pfizer to apply for COVID-19 booster approval for 16- and 17-year-olds: report Coronavirus variant raises fresh concerns for economy MORE’s sweeping social and climate spending bill is facing an uncertain future in the Senate, where Democrats are hoping to pass it by the end of the year.  The House passed the roughly $2 trillion bill before the Thanksgiving break, formally starting the clock in the Senate, where Democrats need to balance their 50 seats in an ambitious push to give Biden a win by passing the bill within weeks and competing December deadlines.  Senate Democrats are navigating potential land mines as they try to lock down the spending bill and quickly cut a final deal.  Biden and Democratic leadership don’t yet have 50 guaranteed “yes” votes to pass the bill or even start debate, a first step toward bringing the spending bill up on the Senate floor.  Sen. Joe ManchinJoe ManchinSchumer: 'Goal' is to pass Biden spending bill before Christmas The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - Biden to...
    Congress faces a government shutdown by week’s end and the expiration of the debt limit on Dec. 15, giving Senate Majority Leader Charles SchumerChuck SchumerLawmakers take aim at 'Grinches' using bots to target consumers during holidays Democratic frustration growing over stagnating voting rights bills Schumer mourns death of 'amazing' father MORE (D-N.Y.) and Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiNews media's sausage-making obsession helps no one Klobuchar confident spending bill will be finished before Christmas Five reasons for Biden, GOP to be thankful this season MORE (D-Calif.) two big challenges at the start of a very busy December.  Schumer on Monday said avoiding a shutdown would be a top priority in the week ahead.  “With so many critical issues, the last thing that the American people need right now is a shutdown. The last thing the American people need right now is a government shutdown, and Democrats are going to work this week to make sure we don’t have one,” he said.  Republicans on Monday complained that Schumer and Pelosi have let various must-pass bills pile up until the end of the...
    When your only skill is being a paranoid, gun-obsessed sedition-backing bigot... One House Republican is under investigation for trafficking minors. Another helped cover up the molestation of college athletes. A third partners with neo-Nazis and shows "humorous" invented clips of himself killing Democratic colleagues. A fourth was booted from House Committees for expressing support for political violence—even as that violence threatens her own colleagues. That Rep. Lauren Boebert can remain a serious candidate for Worst Person in Congress in that crowd is a testament to just how aggressively she works at it, but Boebert's claims to fame are many. She's mostly known at this point for being so virulently bigoted against her fellow lawmakers, against Muslims worldwide, and against Rep. Ilhan Omar in particular, that even her own caucus of deplorables has largely steered clear of defending her. For months, Boebert has made a game of inciting her base against Omar, and those repeated anti-Muslim tirades turned into another weekend's news when Boebert mocked Omar as a supposed terrorist to a crowd of supporters last weekend, calling her a member of the...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — Days after firebrand conservative Rep. Lauren Boebert of Colorado was harshly criticized for making anti-Muslim comments about Rep. Ilhan Omar, a Minnesota Democrat whom she likened to a bomb-carrying terrorist, the two spoke by phone Monday. By both lawmakers’ accounts, it did not go well. The conversation, which Boebert sought after issuing a tepid statement last Friday, offered an opportunity to extend a fig leaf in a House riven by tension. Instead, it ended abruptly after Boebert rejected Omar’s request for a public apology, amplifying partisan strife that has become a feature, not a bug, of the GOP since a mob of Donald Trump supporters stormed the Capitol on Jan. 6. Boebert previously apologized “to anyone in the Muslim community I offended,” but not directly to Omar. It’s just the latest example of a GOP lawmaker making a personal attack against another member of Congress, an unsettling trend that has gone largely unchecked by House Republican leaders. It also offers a test of Democrats’ newfound resolve to mete out punishment to Republicans. Earlier this month...
    Republican Rep. Lauren Boebert on Monday claimed Ilhan Omar hung up on her during a telephone call to ease tensions after she joked about the Democratic lawmaker being a suicide bomber, and then went on to accuse her rival of being anti-American and a terrorist sympathizer. If the phone call was meant to smooth over an ugly row, the Colorado Republican's video message will only enflame matters. According to Boebert's account, the two demanded apologies of each other.  'I told Ilhan Omar that she should make a public apology to the American people for her anti-American, antiSemitic anti-police rhetoric.  'She continued to press and I continued to press back and then representative Omar hung up on me. 'Rejecting an apology and hanging up on someone is part of cancel culture 101.' It comes after Boebert was caught on video making an Islamophobic joke about sharing an elevator with Omar. '"Well, she doesn't have a backpack. We should be fine,'" Boebert recalled while addressing supporters during the holiday break. "And I said, 'Oh look, the jihad squad decided to show up for...
    By Freida Frisaro | Associated Press FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. — Carrie Meek, the grandchild of a slave and a sharecropper’s daughter who became one of the first Black Floridians elected to Congress since Reconstruction, died Sunday. She was 95. Meek died at her home in Miami after a long illness, her family said in a statement. The family did not specify a cause of death. Meek started her congressional career at an age when many people begin retirement. She was 66 when she easily won the 1992 Democratic congressional primary in her Miami-Dade County district. No Republican opposed her in the general election. Alcee Hastings and Corrine Brown joined Meek in January 1993 as the first Black Floridians to serve in Congress since 1876 as the state’s districts had been redrawn by the federal courts in accordance with the 1965 Voting Rights Act. On her first day in Congress, Meek reflected that while her grandmother, a slave on a Georgia farm, could never have dreamed of such an accomplishment, her parents told her that anything was possible. “They always said...