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    President Joe Biden’s massive Afghan resettlement operation, with no end date, has been funded by Congress to the sum of more than $13 billion thanks to 19 Senate Republicans who helped advance the plan. Late Thursday evening, House Democrats and Rep. Adam Kinzinger (R-IL) passed a government funding bill that will keep the federal government operating through mid-February. In the bill is more than $7 billion in funding for the Biden administration to resettle an unlimited number of Afghans across the United States. In the Senate, 19 Senate Republicans joined Senate Democrats to send the bill to Biden’s desk — now authorizing, in total, $13.3 billion for the administration to resettle Afghans after 49 House and Senate Republicans voted in September to fund the resettlement operation $6.4 billion. These 19 Senate Republicans who backed the bill are: Roy Blunt (R-MO) Richard Burr (R-NC) Shelley Moore Capito (R-WV) Bill Cassidy (R-LA) Susan Collins (R-ME) John Cornyn (R-TX) Lindsey Graham (R-SC) Cindy Hyde-Smith (R-MS) John Kennedy (R-LA) Mitch McConnell (R-KY) Jerry Moran (R-KS) Lisa Murkowski (R-AK) Rob Portman (R-OH) Mike Rounds...
    NEW YORK (WABC) -- "The Countdown" is here to get you caught up with all of the day's political news.You can watch it online, on the ABC7NY app or on our Connected TV apps for Fire, Roku, Apple TV and Android TV. Click here to learn more.Today's political headlines:Pandemic latestABC New Political Director Rick Klein says with coronavirus being a fact of life, the "idea of a mission accomplished moment... that is a distant dream." A jobs report today showed the U.S. economy is "markedly stronger" than it was a year ago with 210,000 new jobs in November and an unemployment rate at 4.2%. In terms of President Biden finding a way to push his agenda forward during this lull in the economy, Political Analyst Hank Sheinkopf says the President may forever be known as "bad luck Biden" because he "can't get anything going in his direction."Biden signs stopgap funding bill to keep government runningPresident Joe Biden has signed into law the stopgap spending bill that will keep the federal government running through Feb. 18. The White House thanked congressional...
    President Joe Biden signed legislation funding the federal government until mid-February, the White House said on Friday, avoiding a shutdown after some Republicans threatened a standoff over COVID-19 vaccine mandates. The move keeps federal agencies running until Feb. 18, giving Congress another 11 weeks to thrash out either another short-term fix or a longer agreement to keep the government running. 'Funding the government isn't a great achievement - it's a bare minimum of what we need to get done,' said Biden earlier in the day. He thanked the Senate for passing the bill in a bipartisan vote on Thursday night. 'And I want to urge Congress to use the time this bill provides to work toward a bipartisan agreement on a full year funding bill that makes the needed investments in our economy and our people, from public health education to national security,' he said.  The final vote on the short-term measure was 69 to 28, with Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell and 18 other Republicans joining Democrats to keep the government open.    'Funding the government isn't a great...
    Bill Burr voiced his opinion about cancel culture and how it doesn't affect his stand-up material in the slightest. The comedian appeared on The Pat McAfee show this week and shared his take on why he doesn't lose sleep worrying about being "canceled" online.  "This is a time to be irreverent, and it's also a time to be empathetic," Burr reasoned. "And you have to know how to do both. These people that are on the extreme right and left, I think, only represent about 15% of the population. And any time you're hardcore or extreme, you inevitably become intolerant. I just feel like 85% of the country on the right and the left is kind of sitting there, when are dad and mom going to stop screaming at each other." "The thing is, I don't do anything in my act that's malicious," he added. "I'm not going out there to hurt anybody. But like, I also have the right to say whatever I want to say and say it the way I want to say it." GRAMMYS NOMINATE LOUIS...
    There really is more responsible way to govern. The threat of having to spend a weekend together was enough to get the Senate to reach an agreement on on government funding, and it won’t be shutting down Friday at midnight. The Senate passed the continuing resolution to fund government through Feb. 18 Thursday evening, 69-28. That’s despite the efforts of Senate Republican extremists to shut it down over vaccine mandates on private companies. The likely suspects—Sens. Mike Lee (Utah), Ted Cruz (Texas), and Roger Marshall (Kansas)—insisted on a simple majority amendment vote to strip funding for President Joe Biden’s mandate. They were encouraged by Democratic Sen. Joe Manchin, who held out the possibility that he would vote with them. That meant it was within the realm of possibility that it got 51 votes despite the fact that it would end up shutting down government because the House, which passed the bill earlier in the day on a 221-212 vote, would never pass it with that amendment. The big majority of Republicans were not at all interested in being responsible for another shutdown. The assholes, however, could block...
    The largest parts of Minnesota’s $6.8 billion share of the $1.2 trillion federal Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act are headed to roads, bridges and public transportation. But the biggest slice after that will help address an issue that affects cities and towns throughout Minnesota: clean water. The state expects to get $680 million over the next five years to make infrastructure upgrades that improve wastewater discharge and drinking water. In total, the Environmental Protection Agency will allocate $7.4 billion to states, tribes and U.S. territories for 2022.  State officials and advocates say the money won’t solve longstanding problems with treatment plants and clean water distribution, issues the state has thrown hundreds of millions of dollars at in recent years to help fix. It also won’t accomplish a stated goal of President Joe Biden: remove all lead service lines, which connect water mains to people’s homes. But the cash is still significant, and will help Minnesota make health and safety upgrades like replacing many service lines and cleaning up water contaminated with PFAS, known as “forever chemicals” because they don’t break...
    Workers on the line at a Triumph Foods pork processing facility, April 28, 2017 in St. Joseph, Missouri.Preston Keres/Planet Pix via ZUMA Wire Fight disinformation. Get a daily recap of the facts that matter. Sign up for the free Mother Jones newsletter.A new bill, jointly released last week by Sen. Cory Booker (D-N.J.) and Rep. Ro Khanna (D-Calif.), seeks to address an injustice laid bare by the coronavirus pandemic: the gaping power differential between the people who process the US meat supply and the executives and shareholders who profit from their labor. It would do so by protecting meatpacking workers from repetitive stress injuries, which have become endemic to the occupation. The legislation would also likely bolster worker safety during future viral outbreaks.  “Meatpacking companies prioritized profits and production over worker safety.” In an important sense, the COVID-19 era has been a tale of two pandemics: one for people whose jobs require them to toil indoors at close quarters, and another for those who can make a living without facing such hazards. Few industries sum up the situation more neatly...
    It’s Friday and that means another week of “The David Hookstead Show” is in the books. This week, we had so many different tech errors that I don’t even know where to start, but we found a way to rebound! It’s not how you start. It’s all about how you finish. On our two episodes this week, I interviewed “Yellowstone” star Luke Grimes and talked about Bill Burr taking a stand against cancel culture. You can check out both episodes below. November 30: ‘Yellowstone’ Star Luke Grimes Talks Season Four, Kayce’s Story Arc And The Show’s Ending December 2: Bill Burr Rips People Trying To Cancel Comedy, Brian Kelly’s Goodbye Speech To His Notre Dame Players Is Comically Short, Georgia Is A Heavy Favorite To Win The National Title, Every Wisconsin Defensive Starter Wins All-Big Ten Honors, ‘Yellowstone’ Continues To Put Up Huge TV Ratings And ‘Stranger Things’ Star Opens Up About Season 4 Thanks for tuning in for another week of “The David Hookstead Show” and thanks for bearing with me through all the issues. Live can...
    Tasos Katopodis/AP Fight disinformation. Get a daily recap of the facts that matter. Sign up for the free Mother Jones newsletter.On Thursday afternoon, the House passed a bill temporarily funding the government through the middle of February. The 221–212 vote comes after several days of concern that Democrats and Republicans in Congress would be unable to agree on a funding package ahead of the midnight Friday deadline, pushing the federal government into a shutdown that would furlough thousands of government workers, upend some federally funded services, and derail the economy just a few weeks before the holidays. While the House vote makes this less likely, the threat is not gone. The bill now moves to the Senate, where it will require unanimous agreement to quickly pass ahead of the government funding deadline on Friday. A few Republican senators, including Ted Cruz, have threatened to derail the funding bill unless it includes a measure to undo President Joe Biden’s business vaccine mandate. If they make good on this threat, they’ll tank the economy for hundreds of thousands of Americans just as they...
              more   Patrick Witt, a Republican running for Georgia’s 10th Congressional District, this week said certain members of the GOP should blame themselves for what occurred in the state on November 3, 2020. Witt, according to his Twitter profile, was a member of former President Donald Trump’s post-election legal team. He also served as a senior official in the Trump administration. “We really have to look back over the last two decades at the disastrous decisions made by Georgia Republicans which led us up to that point. In 2005, shortly after Republicans had taken control of the state house, the state senate, and the governor’s mansion — for the first time in our state’s history — one of the first measures that they passed was a bill allowing for no-excuse absentee balloting without having to show your voter ID,” Witt said in a video he uploaded Monday to his Twitter account. “That’s right. Georgia Republicans in both chambers, including then-State Senator Brian Kemp, thought that it would be a good idea to enshrine into law a bill that allowed any voter...
    President Joe Biden's Tuesday speech featured a number of familiar lines on infrastructure that Democrats hope will lobby support for the president's social safety net spending bill and give the party a boost heading into the 2022 midterm elections. Biden traveled to Dakota County Technical College in Rosemont, Minnesota, and his remarks bore several similarities to addresses delivered in Maryland, New Hampshire, and Michigan following the passage of his $1.2 trillion infrastructure bill. BIDEN HAMMERS HOME LOCAL IMPACT OF INFRASTRUCTURE DEAL DURING NEW HAMPSHIRE VISIT The president opened by extending thoughts and prayers to the victims of a school shooting that occurred earlier in the day in Michigan. He then claimed that his dual spending bills would not have been possible without the help of Minnesota's congressional delegation, especially Sen. Amy Klobuchar, whom Biden called "a leader on many issues." "Her colleagues looked at her on everything from lowering the cost of prescription drugs to how to get broadband for the whole country," he continued. "Sen. Klobuchar and I have been friends for a while. She knows how...
    BOSTON (CBS) — The New England Patriots have won another football game. That’s becoming a bit of a theme. From 2-4 and looking somewhat hopeless, to 8-4 and fighting for the No. 1 seed in the conference, things have changed significantly in New England over the past six weeks. As such, they’ve steadily climbed up power rankings across the internet, rising from the bottom third of the league. Here’s where they stand after their Week 12 win over the Titans, who had been the top seed in the AFC prior to that loss. NFL.com: 5th The Patriots moved up a spot to fifth, behind only the Chiefs (fourth) among AFC teams. That rise, though, comes with a caveat. “The Pats have announced themselves as a player in the AFC, but a challenging three-game stretch that includes two matchups against the Bills will give us a greater understanding of where this team stands,” Dan Hanzus wrote. The Ringer: 4th “It was striking that despite the turnover from the past few seasons, and despite taking Brady out of the equation, the Patriots...
    Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen warned lawmakers Tuesday that the U.S. could suffer a 'deep recession' if they don't raise the debt ceiling by December 15.   'I cannot overstate how critical it is that Congress address this issue,' she urged the Senate Banking Committee. 'America must pay its bills on time and in full. If we do not, we will eviscerate our current recovery.'  Yellen said that in a 'matter of days' the majority of Americans would suffer financially if Congress didn't lift or suspend the debt ceiling.  Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen warned lawmakers Tuesday that the U.S. could suffer a 'deep recession' if they don't raise the debt ceiling by December 15 'As critical payments like social security checks and military paychecks would not reach their bank accounts and that would likely be followed by a deep recession,' Yellen predicted.    Earlier this month, Yellen told Congressional leaders that the federal government had more time than her initial estimate on when it would default on its debt.  Yellen had originally estimated the country wouldn't be able to pay its bills after December...
    West Virginia Democratic Senator Joe Manchin is throwing up another roadblock to his party's quest to pass President Joe Biden's $1.75 trillion social and climate package before the Christmas break. On Monday Manchin refused to commit to Democrat leaders' timeline to push Biden's Build Back Better bill ahead before the end of the year. Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer announced on the Senate floor yesterday that he wants his colleagues to pass the president's agenda before senators head home for the holidays on December 10. But Manchin told reporters he's concerned about the pricey package's impact on the US economy. He blamed his issues on how the government spending would impact already-record inflation and the uncertainty that the new COVID-19 Omicron variant brings. 'The unknown is great right now and it gets greater,' Manchin said according to Bloomberg. US inflation rates skyrocketed as the economy recovers from the worst effects of the coronavirus pandemic. In October the price of consumer goods went up 6.2 percent from the year before, a 31-year high. Joe Manchin told reporters on Monday that he...
    The House could vote as early as Wednesday on a temporary measure to fund the government through the beginning of next year as Democrats seek a way to starve off a shutdown. Government funding runs out Friday at midnight. The House measure would then go to the Senate for approval.  Democrats are seeking the stopgap solution as they struggle to deal with their December agenda, which includes keeping the government running, passing a critical defense bill, raising the debt ceiling and final approval for President Joe Biden's signature Build Back Better legislation. Any spending battle can devulge into bipartisan bickering and interparty warfare - Democrats are facing four of them this month.   A temporary government funding bill, that would keep things running through mid to late January, would buy lawmakers time, taking one of the major battles off the table.  'With so many critical issues, the last thing that the American people need right now is a shutdown. The last thing the American people need right now is a government shutdown, and Democrats are going to work this week to...
    President Joe Biden has taken to saying that the Democrats’ “Build Back Better” legislation will reduce inflation. This spin isn’t just unconvincing. It underscores the absurdity of the Democrats’ political project. The first weakness of Biden’s argument is that the timing is all wrong. On Nov. 10, the White House issued a prepared statement from Biden claiming that “17 Nobel Prize winners in economics have said that my plan will ‘ease inflationary pressures.’ ” What they actually said is that it will “ease longer-term inflationary pressures.” Several of these economists say that Biden’s spending plans aimed at climate change, education, child care, housing and many other social programs will increase inflation in 2022 by pumping more money into the economy. Any downward pressure on prices would come later, as productivity increases in response to new federal investments in people and infrastructure. But it’s the inflation that’s already happening that has Americans worried, which is surely why the White House erased the economists’ inconvenient qualifier. While this burst of inflation has lasted longer than many economists thought it would, it is...
                                Presented by Facebook     Welcome to The Hill’s Morning Report. It is Tuesday! We get you up to speed on the most important developments in politics and policy, plus trends to watch. Alexis Simendinger and Al Weaver are the co-creators. Readers can find us on Twitter @asimendinger and @alweaver22. Please recommend the Morning Report to friends and let us know what you think. CLICK HERE to subscribe! Total U.S. coronavirus deaths reported each morning this week: Monday, 776,639; Tuesday, 778,601. President BidenJoe BidenDearborn office of Rep. Debbie Dingell vandalized Pfizer to apply for COVID-19 booster approval for 16- and 17-year-olds: report Coronavirus variant raises fresh concerns for economy MORE on Monday told Americans the best way to prepare for the new omicron variant of COVID-19 is to get available vaccine jabs, including boosters, and use safety precautions without panicking as scientists spend the next few weeks gathering data about a constantly mutating coronavirus.    "This variant is a cause for concern, not a...
              more   RICHMOND, Virginia – Congressmen Abigail Spanberger (D-VA-07) and Donald McEachin (D-VA-04) touted the recently-passed $1.2 trillion Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act, highlighting funds for Virginia’s infrastructure and the benefits the measure will bring to Virginia workers. “Getting this legislation to President Biden’s desk and signed into law was one of my top priorities this year in Congress, because I know it’s a win for Virginia,” Spanberger said. “With the stroke of a pen we are finally addressing the needs of our roads, our bridges across the Commonwealth, the need for the expansion of broadband connectivity. We’re building out our electric vehicle network and boosting our efforts to build our resiliency against climate change. We’re making smart and long overdue investments in our electrical grid, our water infrastructure, our ports, and our rail systems. These investments will mean faster commute times, lower energy bills, safer drinking water, and faster trips throughout Virginia.” During the press conference, Democrats Spanberger and McEachin stood under a train trestle and were flanked by members of the Laborers’ International Union of North America (LIUNA)....
    PHILADELPHIA -- Prosecutors asked the U.S. Supreme Court to review the ruling that overturned Bill Cosby's conviction, arguing in a petition Monday that a decision announced in a press release does not give a defendant lifetime immunity.Prosecutors said the ruling could set a dangerous precedent if convictions are overturned over dubious closed-door deals. They have also complained that the chief judge of the state's high court appeared to misstate key facts of the case when he discussed the court ruling that overturned Cosby's conviction in a television interview."This decision as it stands will have far-reaching negative consequences beyond Montgomery County and Pennsylvania. The U.S. Supreme Court can right what we believe is a grievous wrong," Montgomery County District Attorney Kevin Steele wrote in the petition, which seeks a Supreme Court review under the due process clause of the U.S. Constitution.Cosby's lawyers have long argued that he relied on a promise that he would never be charged when he gave damaging testimony in an accuser's civil suit in 2006.The admissions were later used against him in two criminal trials.The only written...
    Getty Bill Belichick Legendary head coach is again getting the props he deserves from critics and analysts. CBS Sports’ Pete Prisco sees this current season as Belichick’s best ever and he believes the future Hall-of-Famer is wrapping up G.O.A.T honors with his moat recent coaching performance. Bill Belichick is the greatest NFL coach of all time, and it’s not going to be a debate at all when he finally retires. (Belichick has won more Super Bowls (six) than any other coach, but he’s also [40] victories away from tying Don Shula for the most victories in coaching history, a record that I used to think was unbreakable. If you would have said that after four weeks of the season, people would have thought you were nuts. But, in vintage Belichick fashion, he has put a slow start behind him and has his team surging at the right time.
    Congress returns to Washington this week after Thanksgiving break with two deadlines looming - they must pass a new spending bill by Friday to avert a government shutdown and pass fresh debt ceiling legislation by December 15.  And while President Joe Biden's $1.75 trillion Build Back Better bill passed the House before the break, now the Senate must pick it up. The most urgent matter is the funding bill, with House leaders expected to introduce a stopgap measure that would fund the government through late January, according to Punchbowl News.  The House of Representatives returns Tuesday and a stop-gap spending bill is expected to be introduced on the floor that day, with a potential vote Wednesday. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi speaks at an event last week in San Francisco during the Thanksgiving recess  Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer (left) must get Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (right) on board to pass a continuing resolution that would fund the government through mid-January in order to avoid a government shutdown on Friday  The short-term fix would be introduced when the House returns Tuesday...
    Chinnapong | iStock Editorial | Getty Images Cryptocurrency investors may face higher taxes as the infrastructure bill cracks down on future IRS reporting, financial experts say. The $1.2 trillion deal calls for mandatory yearly tax reporting from digital currency brokers starting in January 2023 to help pay for President Joe Biden's domestic spending agenda.  The measure may bring in nearly $28 billion over a decade, according to an estimate from the congressional Joint Committee on Taxation. While House lawmakers want to narrow the scope of which "brokers" must follow the rule, experts still expect a costly surprise for crypto investors who haven't been tracking activity. More from Personal Finance:4 year-end moves to slash your cryptocurrency tax billBuild Back Better Act would close tax loophole for crypto investorsWhat first bitcoin futures ETF means for cryptocurrency industry "A lot of these people probably have no idea what's coming," said enrolled agent Adam Markowitz, vice president at Howard L Markowitz PA, CPA in Leesburg, Florida. The IRS requires investors to disclose yearly cryptocurrency activity by checking a box on their tax returns. But many filers don't know which transactions to report. While buying...
    Bill Ackman, founder and CEO of Pershing Square Capital Management.Adam Jeffery | CNBC Investor Bill Ackman said the new omicron variant of the Covid-19 virus could actually give U.S. stocks a boost if symptoms turn out to be less severe. "While it is too early to have definitive data, early reported data suggest that the Omicron virus causes 'mild to moderate' symptoms (less severity) and is more transmissible," Ackman said in a tweet Sunday evening. "If this turns out to be true, this is bullish not bearish for markets." The founder and CEO of Pershing Square Capital Management added that it would be bullish for the equity market and bearish for the bond market. First detected in South Africa, the new Covid strain has now been found in more than a dozen countries, causing many to restrict travel from southern Africa. The World Health Organization labeled the omicron strain a "variant of concern" on Friday when the Dow Jones Industrial Average dropped 900 points to suffer its worst day since October 2020. Covid symptoms linked to the omicron variant have been described as...
    Senator John Barrasso (R-WY) said on this week’s broadcast of “Fox News Sunday” that President Biden’s Build Back Better Act was “Alice in Wonderland” logic. Barrasso said, “We have record inflation right now. I view this as a back-breaking bill for the country with the kind of expenses, the spending, the adding to the debt, the inflation, the taxes that are going to hit the American people. For Joe Biden to say ‘We have to spend even more money on top of inflation,’ to me, this is ‘Alice in Wonderland’ logic. He’s the Mad Hatter out here.” On raising the debt limit, Barrasso said, “Well, in my state, I was a member of the state Senate. Our Constitution demands that we balance our budget every year that we live within our means, just like families all across America need to do, and I think the federal government ought to do the same thing.” He added, “This is all about Democrat spending. This is 100 percent on them. If you get rid of all of the gimmicks of accounting, this bill...
    Republican Wyoming Sen. John Barrasso slammed President Joe Biden’s Build Back Better Act as “Alice in Wonderland” logic and compared Biden to “the Mad Hatter.” Barrasso appeared on Fox News Sunday and was asked about the $1.2 trillion infrastructure bill that passed the House with a 228-206 vote, as 13 Republicans and 6 Democrats voted for and against the bill. The Wyoming Republican did not hold back, saying he views the Build Back Better Act as a back-breaking bill for the U.S. and more. “Right now, I view this as a back-breaking bill for the country with the kind of expenses, the spending, the adding to the debt, the inflation, the taxes that are going to hit the American people,” Barrasso said. “For Joe Biden to say ‘We have to spend even more money on top of inflation,’ to me this is ‘Alice in Wonderland’ logic. He’s the Mad Hatter out here,” Barrasso added. (RELATED: EXCLUSIVE: Internal Memo From Republican Rep. Jim Banks Slams Biden’s Spending Plan As ‘Phase One Of The Green New Deal’) WATCH:  “This is all about...
    THE 2021 tax year is soon coming to a close. It's time to use the last few weeks to make sure your finances are in order so that you can see a refund or, at least, not owe the IRS money. 1Make sure you don't miss out on any tax breaks to boost your refund The 2021 tax year ends on December 31, 2021. Planning ahead assures you file an accurate tax return and avoid processing delays that can slow your refund. If you want to make sure you maximize your refund, it's important to put the time into outlining where you've been spending your dollars and how you've been saving. Most income is taxable. Gather your income documents to see if you're eligible for deductions or credits. Additionally, people who need to reconcile their advance payments of the child tax credit and premium tax credit will need their related 2021 information. Most read in moneyCASHING IN Demand for December stimulus payment after families sent 'surprise' $8,000 cashXMAS TOP-UP ‘Surprise’ & bonus stimulus check updates – States proposing...
    Cal Fire troops battle the Dixie Fire in Plumas County, California, July 2021.Noah Berger/AP Fight disinformation. Get a daily recap of the facts that matter. Sign up for the free Mother Jones newsletter.This story was originally published by High Country News and is reproduced here as part of the Climate Desk collaboration. Zack Bashoor was 19 years old when he joined the US Forest Service in northwestern Montana to fight wildfires. At the time, Bashoor saw firefighting as his career, but after three summers of running chainsaws, digging trenches around blazes and covering structures in protective wrap, he left to become a resource forester at a lumber mill. Many of his peers left firefighting, too, citing the industry’s toxic workforce culture and low compensation for a physically demanding job with a risk of injury or occasionally, death. “There’s this conundrum where a lot of brilliant young people come in and they eventually end up leaving,” Bashoor said. “They find something better to do that isn’t as dangerous and pays a little more money. There were very limited paths to permanent employment.”  But that...
    Bill Morlin, who died at 75 on Sunday, was a Pacific Northwest journalism legend who pioneered coverage of radical right-wing extremists in the region and nationally. When I first met Bill Morlin, he was already a legend among news reporters in the Pacific Northwest. I’ll admit I was a bit starstruck: This was the man—on paper, a simple crime reporter for the Spokane Spokesman-Review, but much more than that—who had relentlessly covered the Aryan Nations and The Order. He was the first to report on the Ruby Ridge standoff, before it was even a standoff. His journalism was not just first-rate, it was courageous and groundbreaking. It was early April 1996, and we both had come out to the frozen windblown wasteland of eastern Montana to cover the armed standoff by the far-right Montana Freemen at a ranch near Jordan. I had only begun covering right-wing extremism as a beat; Morlin was the first reporter any of us knew who had treated it as a beat—a true pioneer. Over the ensuing years, we became close friends. The two of us...
    Friday, Rep. Jeff Van Drew (R-NJ) sounded off on President Joe Biden’s so-called Build Back Better agenda amid the growth in inflation. Van Drew described inflation as “the Biden tax.” He argued it was “a complete waste of money” that was a result of “terrible” Biden policies. “This is without question the Biden tax. It is just one more tax on everybody. It is because of the terrible way he has led this country in so many ways,” Van Drew proclaimed. “And Congressman Jordan is right. When you talk about that Build Back Better bill, which I call the big bad bill — I wish I could get a country-western singer to do a song about it — when you talk about that bill and what it is going to do, 2.5 million for tree equity is in it. Tell me what tree equity is. Do we have to have the same amount of trees, the same shape, the same size, the same number? I don’t even understand half of what’s in that bill. It is a complete waste of...
    By Michael Hurley, CBS Boston BOSTON (CBS) — The Pro Football Hall of Fame has entered the Boston sports discussion this week. With Vince Wilfork and Richard Seymour making the list of 26 modern-era semifinalists, and with Rodney Harrison not making that list, opinions have been plentiful regarding the worthiness of the three former Patriots. READ MORE: It's An Interesting Time To Revisit Saints' Efforts To Trade Up To Draft Mac JonesNaturally, given his profound knowledge and appreciation for the history of the NFL, as well as his personal experience coaching those players, Bill Belichick was asked to chime in on the matter during his media availability on Friday morning. Specifically, the coach was asked about Seymour and Wilfork, and whether players at positions where statistics aren’t readily available to show their impact deserve more recognition. Before answering that question specifically, Belichick expressed his issue with Hall of Fame debates and discussions. “As I’ve said before, the Hall of Fame is out of my control. And since there’s no criteria for the Hall of Fame, it’s really hard to even have a conversation...
    TOTTENHAM have paid almost £90million to sacked managers in the last decade. The eye-watering sum was revealed after Nuno Espirito Santo became the latest Spurs boss to be given his marching orders. 3Nuno Espirito Santo was sacked by Tottenham earlier in NovemberCredit: Getty 3 The Portuguese coach trousered over £2m in wages before he was axed after just four months in charge. He was replaced at Tottenham Hotspur Stadium by current boss Antonio Conte - who on Thursday slammed the low standards at the club. The figure paid to Nuno is a fraction of the almost £46m made by Manchester United-target Mauricio Pochettino when he was in charge in North London. And Jose Mourinho made more than £21m despite only being in charge at the club for 17 months. Research by Managerial Payouts has calculated the money made by every Premier League manager sacked since the start of the 2011/12 season. The actual figures made by each coach could be even higher once severance packages and compensation are factored in. Most read in Premier LeagueLive BlogUNITED LATEST Rangnick deal reached...
    Democrats thought it prudent to pass a $1.7 trillion Build Back Better Act while Americans grapple with rising food costs ahead of Thanksgiving. President Joe Biden tasked his legislative majority with passing three major bills: the $1.9 trillion coronavirus bill, the American Rescue Plan, the $1.2 trillion so-called bipartisan infrastructure bill, or the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act, and the $1.7 trillion reconciliation bill, or the Build Back Better Act. Together these three bills represent trillions of dollars in social welfare programs. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) and Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-NY) passed the American Rescue Plan in March, and the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act in November, leaving the Congress to pass the Build Back Better Act. Pelosi and Schumer plan to use budgetary reconciliation to pass the legislation. Reconciliation amends budget spending and allows for Congress to pass the bill using only a simple majority in the Senate, although the bill must solely focus on spending and taxation. President Donald Trump used reconciliation to pass the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act in 2017; however, his GOP-led...
    CHICAGO (CBS) — For more than three years, the CBS 2 Investigators have been fixing bad water bills. And despite the fact that we’ve pointed out systematic billing issues time and time again, the City remains apathetic and refuses to right its wrongs.  Rodney Andrews — a Vietnam Veteran, a Chicago cabbie, and our main protagonist — was among those “Getting Hosed” by the City until we fixed his bill. Then, out of the blue, he got bulldozed.  READ MORE: One Man Killed, One Wounded In Knife Fight At Clark/Lake Loop 'L' Station“What’s Left Of It…” “So this is your garage?” CBS 2 Investigator Brad Edwards asked Mr. Andrews. “What’s left of it.” Mr. Andrews replied. The pair stand in an empty lot where the garage once stood. Now, all that remains is the demolition dust that has settled on the bare concrete foundation.  The Cliff Notes The CBS 2 Investigators first introduced Mr. Andrews back in 2019, when his a water bill ballooned to $10,700.57. Mr. Andrews’ problems began back in 2003, when he bought this home from a friend who...
    Former 2016 Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton suggested Tuesday night that Americans don't quite grasp the 'extraordinary accomplishments' of President Joe Biden. Clinton pointed out that Biden was able to get both the COVID relief bill and the bipartisan infrastructure deal to his desk, with the Build Back Better bill already passed thorugh the House.  'You know, democracy is messy. You know, a lot of people got, oh I think, kind of frustrated looking at the messy process of legislation,' Clinton told MSNBC's Rachel Maddow. 'And they didn't really appreciate that, within a year, the Biden administration has passed two major pieces of legislation through the House and the Senate.'    Former 2016 Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton suggested Tuesday night that Americans don't quite grasp the 'extraordinary accomplishments' of President Joe Biden during an interview with MSNBC's Rachel Maddow  Hillary Clinton pointed out how President Joe Biden, seen speaking in Washington Tuesday before leaving for Thanksgiving break, got two large pieces of legislation across his desk, with a probable third on the way  'By any measure those are extraordinary accomplishments and they...
    Growing up, Tom Hay helped to raise hogs and crops on the family farm, never thinking to protect his ears from the din of tractors, combines and other machinery. And while his United Steelworkers (USW) contract provided safety controls and protective measures during his decades at Titan Tire, he wasn't surprised when hearing tests revealed his ears aren't as sharp as they used to be. Right now, Congress is on the cusp of helping millions of Americans like Hay live better lives. In addition to enhancing access to prekindergarten and battling climate change, among many other overdue improvements, the Build Back Better legislation would expand Medicare to cover hearing aids and other auditory care for the first time. Hay knows that just like a strong heart and powerful lungs, robust hearing is essential for seniors' health, safety and fulfillment. They need to hear honking horns warning them that they've stepped into oncoming traffic. They need to hear the sirens of police cars and ambulances that zoom up behind them in traffic. And they need to hear the alarms alerting them...
    Marjorie Taylor Greene introduced a bill on Wednesday that would award Kyle Rittenhouse the congressional gold medal for 'protecting the community of Kenosha'. The jury in Rittenhouse's case found the 18-year-old innocent on all counts after he shot three people – killing two – in self defense during a Black Lives Matter riot in Wisconsin last year. The text of the HR6070 reads it is intended '[t]o award a Congressional Gold Medal to Kyle H. Rittenhouse, who protected the community of Kenosha, Wisconsin, during a Black Lives Matter (BLM) riot on August 25, 2020.'  If awarded, which there is little chance, this would give Rittenhouse the same medal as the cops who protected the Capitol during the January 6 attack and the troops killed in Kabul. The ruling in Rittenhouse's case was highly controversial as progressives deem it proof the criminal justice system is racist and favors white people.  Representative Marjorie Taylor Greene introduced legislation that, if passed, would aware Kyle Rittenhouse with the Congressional Gold Medal Greene posted a tweet with an image of Rittenhouse saying she 'greatly admires'...
    A digital upgrade to the country's 911 system was slashed from President Joe Biden's Build Back Better reconciliation bill.  Axios reported Wednesday that a proposed $10 billion upgrade to the country's 6,000 call centers was stripped from the bill in order to bring the pricetag from the original $3.5 trillion to $1.75 trillion - a move meant to appease moderate Democratic senators.   The money was supposed to go toward allowing Americans to send pictures, texts and video content to 911 operators - and then for centers to seamlessly share that content with one another.  A $10 billion 911 upgrade that was originally found in the Build Back Better bill has been stripped out, with only $470 million left in the bill that passed the House last week Currently only about 3,000 out of 6,000 of the nation's 911 call centers can accept text messages Currently, about 3,000 911 call centers can receive text messages, Axios said.       The House version of the Build Back Better act, which passed Friday morning, now only has $470 million to go toward the modernization effort.  'To say...
    Fox News’ Special Report got a bit tense after one guest suggested the Biden administration is becoming authoritarian. Bret Baier talked with his panel Tuesday night about the U.S. releasing 50 million barrels of oil to address rising gas prices, as well as earlier comments from Energy Secretary Jennifer Granholm. Bill Bennett, who served as Education Secretary in the Reagan administration, said this is “a very, very temporary thing.” “There’s a problem with the Biden administration right now that’s getting acute,” he continued, “and that is ‘keep saying things are getting better, things are okay, you think things are bad, don’t believe your own eyes. Don’t believe what you see at the gas pump, believe me.’ This is what happens in authoritarian countries. And it’s a very dangerous road, a very dangerous road to take.” Washington Post writer Charles Lane remarked that the U.S. “did have a president in the previous four years who did quite often what Bill just said, and that was, as he says, a symptom of authoritarianism.” “Get off Trump,” Bennett grumbled. Back in 2018, Trump...
    Kevin O'Leary, chairman of O'Shares Exchange Traded Funds, listens during the Milken Institute Global Conference in Beverly Hills, California, U.S., on Tuesday, April 30, 2019.Kyle Grillot | Bloomberg | Getty Images Voters in the U.S. are "pissed" about inflation and the Democrats are going to have a difficult time at next year's midterm elections, celebrity investor Kevin O'Leary told CNBC on Tuesday. "People are pissed," he told CNBC's "Capital Connection." "They're pissed about inflation, I don't have a better word than saying that." "They're unhappy. My employees are unhappy. They're going to vote with the cost of bread," said the "Shark Tank" investor. Consumer prices in the U.S. jumped 6.2% in October, the biggest surge in more than 30 years. Fed officials have consistently said the spike in prices will be temporary and is a result of supply chain disruptions, but O'Leary holds a different view. "We are seeing real inflation. We're seeing gasoline prices up remarkably, the price of food and bacon, just the basics that our employees buy — those are up materially," he said.The last thing we need is...
    MARTINEZ (KPIX) — Signature-gathering has begun to place an initiative on the 2022 ballot that would force the legislature to fund more water storage in California. But even supporters admit, the success of the measure may depend on the weather. With many reservoirs in the state drying up and no guarantee of a wet winter, some Central Valley farmers and Southern California water districts are pushing an initiative called the ‘Water Infrastructure Funding Act of 2022.’ If passed by the voters, it would require the state to spend two percent of the general fund on projects that would expand water supplies. READ MORE: Kelp Forest Loss An Ecological Disaster Requiring Creative Solutions In Age of Climate Change“That would be $3-to $4 billion per year to fund water supply projects. And we don’t choose specific projects, but we define categories that are eligible for funding,” said Edward Ring, a co-organizer and spokesperson for the campaign known as More Water Now. The effort to qualify the state-wide measure has just begun and many Bay Area water agencies aren’t even aware of it...
    President Joe Biden's polling appears to be in a slump. His approval average is 43 percent, with 52 percent disapproving. These numbers are perplexing, given a majority supports his legislative agenda. For example, a new Washington Post/ABC News poll recorded Biden's approval at 41 percent, whereas support for the bipartisan infrastructure bill was 63 percent and Build Back Better was 58 percent. The same poll also found that the GOP midterm advantage is higher than it's been since 1981. All despite the fact that Republican representatives largely oppose the agenda that voters support. These polling trends are likely due to multiple causes. Typically, new presidents start with high approval ratings. Those ratings fall as voters shift to favoring the out-party in midterms. So part of Biden's slump may just be typical political dynamics. READ: 'You were gullible': Federal judge torches Trump's election lies — and a rioter who believed them However, the decoupling of the president's approval and his agenda is unprecedented in modern American politics. Both previous presidents — Barack Obama and Donald Trump — experienced approval...
    Rep. Rashida Tlaib (D-MI) described the filibuster as an 'instrument of racism' in an interview broadcast on Sunday, as she warned that 'corporate' Democrats could kill off President Biden's $1.75 trillion spending bill.  She said the filibuster had repeatedly been used to stand in the way of progress for Black Americans. And she said that 'corporate' Democrats, not just Sens. Joe Manchin and Kysten Sinema - the main targets of progressives - were influenced by donors who 'don’t have the best interests of the American people in mind.' 'I'm fearful' of what might happen as the Senate takes up the bill, she told Axios.  'I'm fearful that those groups are gonna guide this agenda. It's gonna be the people that are gonna continue to profit off of human suffering.'   After months of haggling, and days after Biden signed a $1.2 trillion bipartisan infrastructure bill into law, the House of Representatives passed his Build Back Better plan on Friday. Now it must return to the Senate, where holdout Democrats have pared away key provisions and more than a trillion dollars from the...
    Spare yourself listening to the tired ‘turkey is overrated’ hot takes this week and pay attention to New England Patriots head coach Bill Belichick wax poetic about potatoes. Order has been restored in the AFC East, with New England once again controlling first place after the Buffalo Bills loss on Sunday, but that won’t make Belichick any more likely to say something interesting about the current state of his team. Instead, the usually reserved and often insolent head coach would like to tell you about Thanksgiving side dishes. During his weekly radio spot on WEEI’s The Greg Hill Show, Belichick was asked about his favorite Thanksgiving staple and the 69-year-old head coach couldn’t speak glowingly enough about potatoes. “It would be hard for me to turn down any type of potatoes,” Belichick firmly stated. “I’ll go with whatever. Mashed potatoes, scalloped, or, you know, baked, or however they’re made…Load em up…throw some butter on there and just starch me up.” Belichick easily could have given a more generic response and claimed he didn’t have a favorite to...
    Official Washington will be quiet this week, but the fallout from the Kyle Rittenhouse verdict will continue to divide America along the Trumpian fault lines of fear, violence, and racism. Closing arguments are scheduled today in the trial of three men charged with the killing of Ahmaud Arbery in Georgia. Though they chased him, they are claiming self-defense because, they say, Arbery tried to get control of a shotgun one of them was carrying. As with the Rittenhouse case, the trial raises questions of how self-defense laws will hold up as guns proliferate. Regardless of how it come out, the case also illustrates America's deepening split. Congress's continuing investigation into the January 6 insurrection reveals the same rift, as will the Supreme Court's expected decision on executive privilege in that investigation, and its likely move to strike down New York State's law requiring people seeking licenses to carry handguns in public to show a "proper cause," as violating the Second Amendment. The fault line has now extended into almost every facet of American lawmaking. When the "Build Back Better" bill...
                                          Presented by ExxonMobil     Welcome to The Hill’s Morning Report. It is Monday! We get you up to speed on the most important developments in politics and policy, plus trends to watch. Alexis Simendinger and Al Weaver are the co-creators. Readers can find us on Twitter @asimendinger and @alweaver22. Please recommend the Morning Report to friends and let us know what you think. CLICK HERE to subscribe! Total U.S. coronavirus deaths this morning:  771,118.      As of this morning, 69.2 percent of the U.S. population has received at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine and 59.1 percent is fully vaccinated, according to the Bloomberg News global vaccine tracker. From a pending Georgia jury verdict about race and a jogger’s death to a nearly $2 trillion Democratic spending bill now headed to the Senate, Washington’s political conversation this week tilts toward questions about justice.   The Wisconsin case of 18-year-old Kyle Rittenhouse, found criminally not guilty on Friday...
    Sen. Steve Daines (R-MT) slammed Democrats’ nearly $2 trillion social spending bill as “massive and reckless” on Sunday, and added that he is hopeful at least one Democrat will vote against it in the Senate. “This is a massive and reckless tax and spending bill. It’s as if the Democrats are launching cash cannons of borrowed money across our country,” Daines said in a Fox News interview. “It is going to raise the debt by $800 billion dollars in the first five years…This is a hyperinflation bomb that they’re dropping on the economy.” The bill passed the House on Friday with a 220-213 vote, with every Democrat except Rep. Jared Golden (D-ME) voting in favor. Daines then expressed concerns about inflation, saying that “those who can afford it the least get impacted the most.” Asked by anchor Jon Scott whether he sees the bill failing in the Senate, Daines said he thinks “there is a chance.” “I can tell you every single Republican is opposed to it,” he later added. “We just need one Democrat — just one — to oppose...
    In his first interview since his 8-hour plus floor speech Thursday night ahead of the passage of the Build Back Better act, Rep. Kevin McCarthy explained that part of what drove his marathon address was “wokeism” in the U.S. military. Appearing on Sunday Morning Futures, Fox News anchor Maria Bartiromo lauded the House minority leader for his historically-long remarks on the floor, despite Democrats passing the bill McCarthy was objecting to shortly after he concluded his remarks. “Congratulations!” Bartiromo said. “How is your voice doing after eight-and-a-half hours speaking?” “My voice is still strong, because it’s still strong for the American people,” McCarthy said. The House minority leader went on to explain his reasons for the long speech, in a commentary which — as it went on — took the shape of more generic complaints about the Democratic party, rather than specific objections to the House spending bill. At one point during his laundry list of grievances, McCarthy went after the military.” “[O]ur military is focused on woke-ism instead of defeating and winning war, and keeping up with China,” McCarthy...