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    A majority of Los Angeles County voters back two new state laws designed to spur housing construction, including one that significantly changes traditional single-family zoning, a new poll finds. The poll, by the Los Angeles Business Council Institute, done in cooperation with the Los Angeles Times, provides one of the first tests of public reaction to the new laws, which could bring about a dramatic change to California’s development landscape. The laws, Senate Bills 9 and 10, take effect Jan. 1. They were a culmination of a years-long debate in Sacramento over local zoning restrictions that can drag down housing production. The fight stirred intense opposition among homeowner groups, especially in Los Angeles, where opponents said the proposals threatened to destroy single-family neighborhoods. So far, the poll indicates, a majority of voters have not adopted that dire view. Countywide, 55% of voters support Senate Bill 9, which lets property owners construct duplexes, and in some cases fourplexes, in most single-family-home neighborhoods statewide. By contrast, 27% were against the law while 18% were undecided. Senate Bill 10, which lets local...
    Submit your letter to the editor via this form. Read more Letters to the Editor. Better way to limit S.J. water use Thank you for your article on San Jose’s new water usage limits (“San Jose Water adopts drought restrictions,” Page A1, Nov. 19). For San Jose to take the lead in this makes me proud to live here. That said, I wish they’d establish maximum usage amounts instead of percentage reduction targets. The latter allows profligate users to continue doing so, just at slightly lower levels. This hurts all of us. It’s time for excessive users to wake up and smell their dead lawns. Craig Dunkerley San Jose ‘Neighborhood voices’ catalyst to housing crisis Dev Davis’ rant against SB 9 (“SB 9 takes away California’s neighborhood voices,” Page A8, Nov. 12) is loaded with factual errors and political cliches chosen for emotional impact. “Sacramento politicians know better than you do.” We, the people, chose those politicians to govern all of us. “Developers” just want to profit. Developers build our housing; if they don’t make a profit, they go out...
    NEW YORK (CBSNewYork) — With so many families on the brink of eviction, housing advocates are calling on lawmakers to step in while landlords say the proposals will do more harm than good. As CBS2’s Aundrea Cline-Thomas reports, a coalition of housing advocates, tenants and lawmakers are launching a statewide campaign to address New York’s housing crisis. READ MORE: New Yorkers Sound Off: Why Go Ahead With Congestion Pricing When MTA Just Had $25 Billion Fall Into Its Lap?This comes as funding for rental assistance is running out and the eviction moratorium is set to expire in January. “We really feel like the time has come for permanent and transformative protections coming out of the pandemic,” said Sumathy Kumar, with Housing Justice For All. Protections in the form of legislation, including providing permanent rental assistance for homeless families or those on the brink, prohibiting landlords from removing tenants except for what’s outlined as good cause evictions and not as a means to sharply increase rent, and ending tax breaks for developers building new market rate and affordable units. “Who is...
    BOSTON (CBS) — Boston Mayor-Elect Michelle Wu made her first big announcement Wednesday on how she’ll handle the situation at the troubled intersection dubbed “Mass and Cass.” The incoming mayor named the team she’s appointed to tackle the public health crisis in the area. Wu, who said throughout her campaign that the issues of homelessness and substance abuse are a top priority, appointed former Massachusetts Commissioner of Public Health Dr. Monica Bharel as a cabinet-level senior adviser. For at least the next six months, she will lead the city’s response to public health and housing challenges. Wu also announced that she’ll elevate Boston Public Health Commission Executive Director Dr. Bisola Ojikutu to her cabinet. Wu plans to reappoint housing chief Sheila Dillon and have Marty Martinez, who leads health and human services in the city, assist the transition as a senior adviser. Former head of MA Public Health Monica Bahrel appointed head of Boston Mayor-elect Michelle Wu’s new cabinet to address the addiction & homelessness crises that has played out most visibly at Mass & Cass. #wbz pic.twitter.com/KTBfuRZ0Uz — Christina...
    Nearly two years have passed since San Jose State President Mary Papazian and other top university administrators vowed to address housing insecurity on campus and ensure that every student had a safe and secure place to live. And while the university has recently made some positive steps toward this ambitious goal, a group representing thousands of unhoused students on campus is frustrated by the pace at which school administrators are moving — and what they see as policies hindering access to university assistance. “Instead of broken promises, we want to see action toward change,” said San Jose State senior Samantha Shinagawa. “We want hard dates, open communication with our students and efforts made toward helping the struggling population of housing insecure at San Jose State that is ever-growing.” SAN JOSE, CALIFORNIA – November 04: San Jose State University senior Samantha Shinagawa speaks during a rally on Thursday, Nov. 4, 2021, in San Jose, Calif. A group of San Jose State University students and homeless advocates held the rally to call on the school to better address the housing crisis and offer...
    When Ajwang Rading reels off the qualifications he says make him the right candidate to represent Silicon Valley in Congress, he includes a personal history nearly unheard of in politics — a decade of off-and-on homelessness. Rading, a 29-year-old lawyer from the Peninsula, has never held an elective office. But he does know what it’s like to grow up sleeping in a car, washing in a public restroom and finishing your homework at fast-food restaurants because there’s nowhere else to go. And he says that experience, which allows him to see eye-to-eye with those living at the margins of the Bay Area, makes him particularly well-suited to take on longtime incumbent Anna Eshoo in the race for California’s 18th Congressional district next fall. STANFORD, CALIF. – OCT. 22: Ajwang Rading, who was homeless growing up in LA, and is now running for California’s 18th Congressional District, is photographed Friday, Oct. 22, 2021, in Stanford, Calif. (Karl Mondon/Bay Area News Group)  “I have a very different vantage point of this district,” he said. “That actually is a value add to the...
    (CNN)The nation faces a dramatic housing shortage, sending home prices and rents through the roof all over the country. The spike in housing costs is making it harder for some to buy their first home and for others to afford their rent, increasing demand for subsidized housing and widening the wealth gap between renters and homeowners. It is also forcing more families to live farther from jobs, increasing commute times, undermining labor force participation and slowing economic growth.Fortunately, Congress has an opportunity to address the problem in the Build Back Better legislation currently on the table. Unfortunately, it appears the housing solutions that dominate the package are more focused on addressing the symptoms of this growing crisis rather than its root cause. Since the days following the financial crisis more than a decade ago, the nation has built far too few homes to meet demand. The shortfall is currently close to 1.8 million homes -- or roughly the number of homes built in an entire year -- leading to a record low vacancy rate for homes for sale and close...
    Hong Kong (CNN Business)China's growth is seriously slowing down as the country lurches from one economic threat to another. And while some of the biggest pain points appear to be easing, an unfolding crisis in real estate is emerging as one of Beijing's toughest challenges in the coming year. The country's GDP grew at its slowest pace in a year last quarter, expanding just 4.9% from a year earlier. Compared to the prior quarter, the economy grew a mere 0.2% in the July-to-September period — one of the weakest quarters since China started releasing such records in 2011.Disruptions due to the global shipping crisis and a massive energy crunch contributed to the slowdown.Shipping delays and mounting inventories in China have hit smaller manufacturers that are now hurting for cash, resulting in lost orders and production cuts. And factory output has been dented in large part because of power shortages, a result of high demand for fossil fuel that has clashed with a national push to reduce carbon emissions.But some of the most significant concerns for growth are now rippling through...
    FRISCO, Colo. (CBS4) – There’s a concerted effort underway to make a dent in housing crisis in the high country. Summit County and the town of Breckenridge launched a program Oct. 15 and the town of Frisco plans to launch a pilot program beginning in November. “Our program is called Frisco Housing Locals, and it’s a pilot program, really small scale, to incentivize owners who might be interested in renting their property to help with the housing crisis,” said Eva Henson, Housing Manager for the town of Frisco. READ MORE: Suspect Arrested After Hostage Situation In Thornton (credit: CBS) The pilot program in Frisco, while smaller scale, is a more comfortable starting point for many homeowners. The lease commitment is just six months; the tenants are screened beforehand; and, the property is managed professionally. “For the homeowner, it actually gives them security of knowing that the tenants already been screened first and foremost it also allows them to sort of have that long-term lease in place, managed by the town and the management company overseeing it and sort of...
    Rents are rising, rental vacancy rates are at a three-decade low, and evictions are creeping up, with many more expected to come. And plans for affordable housing funding are on the chopping block as conservative Democratic Sens. Joe Manchin and Kyrsten Sinema continue to press President Joe Biden to cut back his agenda. A planned $200 billion increase in rental assistance for low-income tenants, introduced in the House as part of a $322 billion package, would help get another 750,000 households into rental assistance programs that currently cover two million households. Waiting lists for the current program are more than a decade long in some cities, and other cities have stopped accepting new people onto their waiting lists because it’s so hopeless. Three out of four of those renters eligible for assistance don’t get it, thanks to limited funding—so adding 750,000 households to rental assistance programs would only be a drop in the bucket, and now that drop is unlikely to happen. According to Goldman Sachs analysts, “Much of the proposed $400 billion in housing-related grants and tax subsidies is likely to be cut from the...
    Every eight years, cities across California have to plan for housing so that there’s enough room for people to live here. And we’re in the thick of that process right now. Even at a time when growth is slowing, the state’s hot economy and overcrowded living situations are pushing communities to have to set aside a lot of land for new homes. On this episode of “Gimme Shelter: The California Housing Crisis Podcast,” we discuss Gov. Gavin Newsom’s efforts to enforce the state’s zoning rules through a process that, as detailed in a 2017 Times investigation, historically has been toothless. One of the governor’s new initiatives is the creation of what he’s calling the Housing Accountability Unit, which is enlisting more than a two dozen employees in the state housing department to ensure local communities follow the law. Our guest is Victoria Fierce, director of operations for the California Renters Legal Advocacy, a group that has sued cities across the state over their denial of housing developments. Gimme Shelter: The California Housing Crisis Pod · California is increasing enforcement...
    OAKLAND (CBS SF) – U.S. Secretary of Housing and Urban Development Marcia Fudge visited Oakland’s Fruitvale Village on Thursday morning to see solutions to the nation’s housing crisis. She acknowledged that California has the most pronounced housing problem in the country. The visit to housing development Casa Arabella on East 12th Street kicked off a day of activities in Oakland for Fudge. She was also set to visit other Oakland housing solutions such as Clifton Hall, where formerly unhoused residents live following the conversion of a college dormitory with state Homekey funds. READ MORE: UPDATE: Mom Accused Of Hosting Drunken Teen Sex Parties Suspected Of Throwing Similar Parties In IdahoJoining Fudge were Rep. Barbara Lee, D-Oakland, and Oakland Mayor Libby Schaaf. “Every person should have a place like this,” Fudge said of Casa Arabella, a 94-unit affordable housing development across the street from the Fruitvale BART station, as well as shops and eateries. Fudge said the supply of housing is so small. “We really need people to say it’s OK to build in my backyard,” she said. The bottom line...
    SAN JOSE (BCN) – Santa Clara County officials, in collaboration with nonprofit housing partners and the city of San Jose are looking to house 1,200 homeless families within the next year. The program, launched Monday, is called HEADING HOME. It utilizes federal stipends that will cover rent for homeless families over the next decade. READ MORE: Facebook Whistleblower Frances Haugen Testifies On Capitol Hill; Tells Senators 'We Must Act Now'“This is a once in a generation opportunity with a new infusion of resources,” San Jose Mayor Sam Liccardo said at a news conference on Monday. The county estimates that there are 600 families currently experiencing homelessness – so they will be the first to receive stipends and be housed. A little less than 40 percent of those families are located in San Jose, Liccardo said. But even if the county houses those 600 already homeless families, officials anticipate that over the next year, 600 more families will fall into homelessness – which is where the 1200 number comes from. “We have to do more than just help the people that...
    SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP/CBS13) — California Gov. Gavin Newsom signed seven new laws on Wednesday aimed at addressing the state’s homelessness crisis, pleading with a skeptical public to have patience as the nation’s most wealthy and populous state struggles to keep people off the streets. Among California’s myriad of problems — including wildfires, historic drought and a changing climate impacting them both — homelessness is perhaps the most visible, with tens of thousands of people living in encampments in cities large and small across the state. READ MORE: New Child Sex Abuse Allegations Against 5 Former Priests Deemed Credible, Diocese Of Sacramento Says“We can’t nibble around the edges of the homelessness crisis, we need to implement bold, transformative solutions – investing more money than ever before to get folks off the street and provide the mental health and other services they need to stay off the streets,” Gov. Newsom said in a news release Wednesday. Today's legislation gets us one step closer to fully addressing homelessness â getting people into the housing and mental health services they need â with an...
    LOS ANGELES (CNS) –  Gov. Gavin Newsom, alongside Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti and L.A. County Board of Supervisors Chair Hilda Solis, Wednesday signed a legislative package aimed at reducing the state’s homelessness crisis by expanding mental health services and behavioral health housing. “We can’t nibble around the edges of the homelessness crisis, we need to implement bold, transformative solutions — investing more money than ever before to get folks off the street and provide the mental health and other services they need to stay off the streets,” Newsom said. “Today’s legislation, along with our overall $22 billion housing affordability and homelessness package, will move the needle on creating more housing for the homeless and will allow us to tackle the homelessness crisis in ways California has never done.” READ MORE: CDC Urges Pregnant Women To Get Vaccinated Against COVID-19The package includes a bill introduced by Assemblywoman Luz Rivas, D-Arleta, to reform the Homeless Coordinating and Financial Council into the California Interagency Council on Homelessness and improve its power through data mandates and oversight authorities. The council will be co-chaired...
    The sky-high rents in the Bay Area and Los Angeles garner most of the attention in debates about California’s housing affordability woes. But few places in the country have seen such dramatic growth in what it costs to rent an apartment as Fresno, the state’s fifth-largest city. The monthly rent for an average apartment in Fresno has gone up nearly 60% since 2017 to $1,469. Fresno’s median home value has risen almost as much over the same time and is now $331,000. On this episode of “Gimme Shelter: The California Housing Crisis Podcast,” we discuss what is causing the housing frenzy in Fresno. Unlike other big cities around the state, Fresno’s population is growing. New investors are snapping up small apartment complexes in central areas and raising rents. And it’s become very hard for residents in the region, which is one of the poorest in the state, to keep up. Our guest is Jovana Morales-Tilgren, a housing policy coordinator with Leadership Counsel for Justice & Accountability, a nonprofit that advocates for low-income tenants in the Central Valley. Gimme Shelter:...
    SACRAMENTO (CBS SF) – Two days after surviving the recall effort against him, Gov. Gavin Newsom signed several bills aimed at addressing the housing shortage and affordability crisis, one of the state’s most pressing issues. “Making a meaningful impact on this crisis will take bold investments, strong collaboration across sectors and political courage from our leaders and communities to do the right thing and build housing for all,” Newsom said in a statement. READ MORE: Beach Erosion Suspends All Metrolink, Amtrak Service Between OC, San Diego Among the measures Newsom signed into law include Senate Bill 9 by State Sen. President Pro Tem Toni Atkins (D-San Diego). The measure, also known as the California Housing Opportunity and More Efficiency (HOME) Act, would make it easier to build additional housing in areas zoned only for single family homes. “The intent of SB 9 is clear – to streamline the process so homeowners can create a duplex or subdivide their existing property up to four units – and aims to set California’s housing availability on a path of inclusion so that more families can attain...
    Over the past weeks, multiple crises have merged: a crisis of democracy with the most significant attack on voting rights since Reconstruction; a climate crisis with lives and livelihoods upended in the Gulf Coast and the Northeast by extreme weather events and in the West by a stunning fire season; and an economic crisis in which millions are being cut off from Pandemic Unemployment Insurance, even as August job gains proved underwhelming. There's also a crisis taking place in state legislatures with an ongoing attack on women's autonomy over our own bodies. The Supreme Court let a law go into effect that makes abortions nearly impossible in Texas and turns its enforcement over to vigilantes. And then, of course, there's the looming eviction crisis that could precipitate the worst housing and homelessness disaster in American history. Indeed, the Supreme Court's ruling on the Texas abortion ban was hardly its only horrific decision this summer. Its willingness to end a moratorium on evictions instantly put hundreds of thousands of people at risk of eviction, with tens of millions more in danger...
    A legal victory for housing advocates in the city of San Mateo could have far-reaching implications as the state continues to battle a major shortage of homes. In a sweeping show of support for the state’s ability to intervene in city planning decisions, an appeals court has sided with a developer attempting to build a 10-unit, four-story condo project — despite San Mateo officials’ claim that the development didn’t comply with their standards. It’s the first time the current version of California’s main housing accountability law has been tested in state appellate court, and experts say the ruling will impact future projects from the Bay Area down to Southern California. “It certainly is a really important decision,” said Matt Regan, senior vice president of public policy for the Bay Area Council. “We’ve been working really hard in Sacramento — a number of organizations — to pass laws to level the playing fields and make it easier for home builders to build homes. And this, I think, is a seminal kind of case where the court has recognized that it’s the...
    Submit your letter to the editor via this form. Read more Letters to the Editor. Make school lunch program national model The recent passing of free school lunches for all in California public schools (“California set to launch the largest free school lunch program in U.S.,” July 19) has been a game-changer. Previously, only about two-thirds of the state’s students qualified for free school lunches. The state allotting a suitable budget to cover meals for all public school students is huge. This new meal program for all students should improve the rates of food insecurity and students’ ability to focus better in school. Not having to worry about their next meal is important to not only the students but their families as well. The cost of living in the Bay Area is expensive, and if this can be one less thing families have to worry about, then I believe that the rest of the country should follow in California’s footsteps and expand to have free lunch programs for all. Anna Do San Jose SB 10 won’t solve state’s housing crisis Senate...
    'Getting misgendered, being housed in the wrong place, being turned away because they're wearing the wrong clothes ... those sorts of things are particular challenges for this group.' On Aug. 26, the Supreme Court released a decision that killed the Biden administration's eviction moratorium. In its opinion, the majority said Congress would have to act in order to keep the moratorium going. The decision leaves members of the LGBTQ community particularly vulnerable. The social stigma many LGBTQ people must live with, including in their own families, makes it hard for them to seek financial support or housing from them as well, according to experts. Research and surveys have shown that LGBTQ people face housing insecurity and discrimination, which puts them at particular risk of eviction and homelessness. According to the Williams Institute, a think tank out of the University of California, Los Angeles, 41% of LGBTQ people rent their homes compared to 25% of non-LGBTQ people. Nearly half of LGBTQ people who owe their landlord rent are worried about being...
    (CNN)California's homelessness crisis is a top-of-mind issue for many voters who are still weighing whether to return their ballots in the special election to recall California Democratic Gov. Gavin Newsom. They have watched their cities and towns transformed as scores of tent encampments have sprung up in their parks and residential neighborhoods. They worry about the safety of those living unsheltered on the streets who are vulnerable to crime, but they are also unnerved by the high number of unsheltered people who suffer from serious mental health issues and substance abuse problems living in close proximity to their homes. They are angry about the reams of trash, discarded clothing and belongings that have piled up along their roadways. Newsom has long promised progress for a problem that has been decades in the making. In July, he signed a funding package that will direct $12 billion toward addressing homelessness over two years and another $10.3 billion to building affordable housing. But many Californians are impatient for results -- and some plan to express that frustration either by voting to recall Newsom...
    It appears that just about every right-minded person in California agrees that we have a severe housing crisis on our hands. Homelessness rates are at all time highs, home prices are at stratospheric levels making the dream of ownership out of reach to all but the wealthy, and too many of our fellow Californians are being forced every day to leave the Golden State for a more affordable life elsewhere. Unfortunately, this, it would appear, is where the consensus ends, and it is generally true that the only thing that people dislike more than this housing crisis are any proposed solutions to it!  We are stuck in political gridlock where much heat is being generated, mostly by yelling at city council meetings and feverish hand wringing, but little light.  We are still mostly in the dark and disagreement as to the scale this crisis and as a result what actions are necessary to resolve it. In 2017, the Bay Area Council began working with Sen. Scott Wiener, D-San Francisco, on a bill, SB 828, that would overhaul how the state...
    Family walk up steps to their home after it was flooded during Hurricane Ida.Brandon Bell/Getty Fight disinformation. Get a daily recap of the facts that matter. Sign up for the free Mother Jones newsletter.This story was originally published by Grist and is reproduced here as part of the Climate Desk collaboration. Hurricane Ida has battered one of the poorest regions of the country, driving floodwaters into neighborhoods along the Gulf Coast and those along the Mississippi River in Louisiana. Its winds knocked trees through houses, and its rising waters sent people into their attics where they waited for rescue. Thousands will likely be without shelter for weeks or even months.   A move by the Supreme Court last Thursday could make the struggle to find housing even worse.  Despite a push from community organizations and members of Congress, the conservative court blocked the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention from enforcing a federal moratorium on evicting renters during the pandemic. In the South, the fight by housing advocates to maintain the eviction ban was undergirded by the knowledge that the states most likely to see evictions...
    With pandemic unemployment and eviction protections ending this month, the CEO of one of Silicon Valley’s biggest homeless services nonprofits is calling on corporate leaders to step up in a big way — by ponying up $250 million to open 10 emergency housing sites. The call to action underscores a question that’s become especially urgent in the face of the COVID crisis: What responsibility do the region’s tech companies have to address the dire problem of homelessness in their own backyards? Seattle-based Amazon recently became the latest tech titan to take up the cause, donating $100,000 to support New Haven Inn — a homeless shelter for LGBTQ+ residents in downtown San Jose. Facebook this week announced it has invested nearly $40 million to build almost 500 homes from Sunnyvale to the East Bay, the majority of which will be reserved for residents at the lowest rung of the socioeconomic ladder, or who were homeless. Aubrey Merriman, CEO of homeless shelter provider LifeMoves, is trying to tap into more of the region’s corporate wealth by convincing other companies to join the...
    08/27/2021 at 11:44 AM CEST Airbnb and its nonprofit organization (Airbnb.org) announced Tuesday that temporarily host 20,000 Afghan refugees for free. The effort, an evolution of the housing rental platform’s “Frontline stay” program for those most in need of housing, is a response to the refugee crisis caused by the withdrawal of the US military from Afghanistan and the takeover of the country by the Taliban. “It has become very clear that the displacement and resettlement of Afghan refugees here in the United States and elsewhere is a significant humanitarian crisis, and in the face of this need, our community is ready to go one step further“the company wrote in its announcement. Of course, this depends on existing Airbnb hosts agreeing to help. In a tweet thread announcing the plan, Airbnb’s CEO, Brian Chesky, appealed to Airbnb hosts interested in hosting Afghan families on Twitter. For participating hosts and households, free refugee accommodation will be available worldwide, paid for by Airbnb, Chesky and donors to the Airbnb.org Refugee Fund.
    SACRAMENTO (CBS / AP) — Spurred by an affordable housing shortage, spiking home prices and intractable homelessness, California lawmakers on Thursday advanced the second of two measures designed to cut through local zoning ordinances. Promoted by Senate leader Toni Atkins and supported by Assembly Speaker Anthony Rendon, both Democrats, Senate Bill 9 would make it easier to build smaller second units on what are now single-family properties. That could include up to four units, such as duplexes or homes with attached living units, if the lot is split into two equal parcels under the bill. READ MORE: Washington Fire Near Jamestown and Sonora Prompts Evacuations The goal is “opening the door for more families to pursue their version of the California Dream,” said Atkins, “whether that means building a home for an elderly parent to live in, creating a new source of income, buying that first house, or being welcomed into a new neighborhood.” The measure largely skirts local approval, though Atkins earlier added ways for local governments to block construction that might imperil public safety or public health or is...
    The U.S. agency wants to help 20,000 charities through the charity since Tuesday, August 24th. If the terms of operation are not yet clear, the Airbnb boss confirms “Duty to act” In the face of a humanitarian catastrophe. That’s one “Compassion”, A gesture “Generous”According to the Anglo-Saxon Press. The online accommodation booking site Airbnb announced on Tuesday that it would help Afghans leave their country at the hands of the Taliban. Shortly after the capture of Kabul, Related Defender, The U.S. agency has already partnered with several humanitarian associations to prepare the reception and shelter for the first 165 Afghan asylum seekers who came to the United States. The initiative – funded by the housing booking platform and its managing director and co-founder Brian Cesky – is expected to accommodate about 20,000 people from Afghanistan for free or through low-cost housing, provided by volunteer “sponsors”. It does not specify the duration of the ARPNP operation or the countries affected. “Tens of thousands of Afghan refugees are settling abroad, they are about to start a new beginning, for which they will...
    Anaheim, San Diego and Oakland are all hoping to give their sports arenas a boost by giving the surrounding real estate a makeover. In high-gloss renderings, developers promise walkable, transit-friendly cityscapes featuring housing, hotels, shops and restaurants with plenty of inviting green space. To borrow from “Field of Dreams,” if you build it they will come. And these cities are wagering the improvements will be enough to get professional sports teams to stay. There’s just one problem on the road to revitalization: In the eyes of the state, these projects haven’t included enough affordable housing. The San Diego city council chose to start over on the 48-acre Pechanga Arena project after the state declared the city failed to offer the site to affordable housing developers. Photo by Megan Wood, Voice of San Diego Anaheim and San Diego have been cited by California’s Department of Housing and Community Development for failing to comply with an affordable housing law as part of their multimillion-dollar stadium and arena plans. A third investigation into the Oakland Coliseum redevelopment project, which was triggered...
    Airbnb announced on Tuesday morning that its nonprofit, Airbnb.org, will provide temporary housing to 20,000 Afghan refugees, as the U.S. and its allies race to find ways to home thousands of people fleeing Afghanistan after the Taliban's takeover. The company said in a statement that it had become "abundantly clear" that the refugees are facing a "significant humanitarian crisis."  The cost of the temporary housing will be funded by contributions to the company's non-profit organization, as well as Airbnb co-founder and CEO Brian Chesky. Airbnb said it was working with resettlement agencies and partners to house the refugees.  "As tens of thousands of Afghan refugees resettle around the world, where they stay will be the first chapter in their new lives," Chesky said in a statement. "For these 20,000 refugees, my hope is that the Airbnb community will provide them with not only a safe place to rest and start over, but also a warm welcome home."  The announcement is an expansion on the company's ongoing efforts to help Afghan refugees, the company said. Over the weekend, 165 refugees...
    On a few of the vast, verdant lawns in East Sacramento, one of the capital city’s most popular and expensive neighborhoods, yellow-and-black yard signs urge passersby to “save neighborhoods” and keep Sacramento “livable and diverse.” The message symbolizes a big battle taking place at the state Capitol only a few miles away — whether to do away with sacrosanct single-family neighborhoods to address the California housing crisis. Senate Bill 9, one of several measures alluded to by the signs, would technically allow as many as two duplexes, two houses with attached units, or a combination — capped at four units — on single-family lots across California, without local approval. The bill would allow more building where it’s now illegal, with the intent of reducing California’s fast-rising home prices and increasing access to homeownership through a greater variety of options, according to state Senate leader Toni Atkins, a Democrat from San Diego who introduced the bill and similar versions in the past. To lessen concerns from more than 100 cities and neighborhood groups that oppose the bill, Atkins on Monday added...
    “Housing is a big crisis,” said council chair Orlando Gudes during the Aug. 16 meeting.Adobe On Monday evening, Tampa City Council held a special workshop solely focused on Tampa’s 2022 budget, which was presented by Mayor Jane Castor on Aug. 5. During the meeting, the most urgent need cited over and over again by council members was affordable housing. “Housing is a big crisis,” said council chair Orlando Gudes during the meeting. He said that the city needs to look out for everybody’s needs, especially the underprivileged who often need quality, accessible housing. Councilman John Dingfelder pointed out that the economy and people’s lives have been deeply impacted by the effects of COVID-19, and that affordable housing is urgently needed in Tampa, especially at a time when renters are currently facing an “avalanche” of evictions when the Center For Disease Control’s eviction moratorium expires.  Dingfelder suggested that one way to put more money into affordable housing in next year’s budget is to use the American Rescue Plan (ARPA) funds that are slated to go to Tampa’s solid waste department. Currently,...
    For years California lawmakers have grappled with how to allow more residential construction to combat a housing shortage that has pushed home prices up to inconceivable levels and accelerated the racial wealth gap, segregation and homelessness. This year, SB 9 — a bill that would allow homeowners to build a duplex on a single-family zoned parcel — has become the center of the debate over whether policymakers can succeed in addressing California’s housing crisis. By allowing homeowners to subdivide their lot, SB 9 would unlock opportunities for fixed-income homeowners to construct one or two units in their backyards, which could then be rented or sold. If passed, the bill could open an important avenue for homeowners to access the equity of their home without having to sell off their primary residence, while also creating new housing. However, many critics of the bill falsely frame it as the end of single-family suburbs in California. Many arguments against SB 9 echo harmful ideas that have been used to preserve all-White communities — warning of overcrowding and declining property values to stoke coded...
    Submit your letter to the editor via this form. Read more Letters to the Editor. SJ’s delay means more victims of tobacco Here’s the dirty little secret tobacco companies depend on: Delays are money. The longer they delay, the more products they can sell and the more kids and young adults they can turn into lifetime customers by getting them hooked on menthol and other candy- and fruit-flavored tobacco. When they convince councilmembers to keep delaying hearings, (“Will San Jose ban flavored tobacco?” Page B1, July 25) they addict more people and earn more profits with each passing day. When the San Jose Rules Committee delayed the Council vote from June until September, they gave Big Tobacco more time to find new people to addict among San Jose youth and communities of color. We know that delays really mean disease and death for those who will become dependent on tobacco products. Vote today on a comprehensive ordinance that ends the sale of all flavored tobacco, including e-cigarettes, shisha, menthol cigarettes and cigars. Pranav Medida Volunteer, American Cancer Society Cancer Action...
    California’s housing problems are well-known and straightforward: There are not enough homes, especially for low-income families. For years, California’s Legislature has tried to pass big bills that address these problems, but they’ve mostly failed. Measures that would have boosted homebuilding or substantially increased funding to build low-income housing all have bitten the dust in the face of opposition from powerful interest groups, such as the construction workers and Realtor lobbies. On this episode of “Gimme Shelter: The California Housing Crisis Podcast,” we discuss why it’s so hard to pass transformative housing legislation in Sacramento. Our guest is Annie Fryman, a former staff member for state Sen. Scott Wiener (D-San Francisco), who has introduced some of the most aggressive housing bills in recent years. Gimme Shelter: The California Housing Crisis Pod · Why is it so difficult to get housing bills through the California Legislature? “Gimme Shelter,”a biweekly podcast that looks at why it’s so expensive to live in California and what the state can do about it, features Liam Dillon, who covers housing affordability issues for the Los...
    On July 31, the national moratorium on evictions, which the Centers for Disease Control put into place as part of its statutory authority to "make and enforce such regulations as in [its] judgment are necessary to prevent the introduction, transmission, or spread of communicable diseases," expired. Millions of Americans faced eviction after job loss during the pandemic left them behind on rent. Actually, saying that the eviction moratorium "expired" doesn't do justice to what happened. The moratorium was killed by the United States Supreme Court's conservative majority. They ignored the federal agency's clear statutory authority and ruled, 5-4, that the CDC lacked the power to issue a national order halting evictions. Fortunately, the Biden Administration is working to put a new moratorium into place in the next few days, according to the Post. And now we'll see whether the Supreme Court has the nerve to scrap the new policy and throw a potentially huge number of Americans out onto the streets. (And what exactly five conservative lawyers with no relevant expertise are doing second-guessing an important piece of the...
                      by Addison Del Mastro   In recent years, an acute housing crisis has engulfed both America’s coastal metros and Rust Belt regions. California’s Bay Area, for example, confronts a crisis of affordability and limited supply that hastens a population exodus. Midwest cities like Detroit face low real-estate prices and low demand, intensifying urban decline. Pennsylvania is a microcosm of such alarming housing trends, especially east of the Susquehanna River, which is seeing an influx of metro New Yorkers relocating to the area. From the Keystone State’s middle-class suburbs to its post-industrial locales, the housing crisis is a major challenge. In the midstate, most notably in Harrisburg and Lancaster, housing has become significantly more expensive. In the northeast’s anthracite coal region, anchored by Scranton, rents are spiking. And in suburban Philadelphia’s Lansdale, a townhouse went for nearly $500,000. The Lehigh Valley, a populous metro region once synonymous with the steel industry, is particularly illustrative. In the Allentown-Bethlehem-Easton metro area, over half of all new apartments lease at $1,000 or more per month – a princely...
    BOSTON (CBS) — With housing prices soaring and a surge in evictions looming, Boston’s housing crisis is at a boiling point. The price for a one bedroom apartment in the city is up to an average of just over $2,800, and it continues to climb from there, with a two bedroom costing $3,500 while a three bedroom goes on average for just over $4,300 a month. READ MORE: Grateful That I Was There: Basketball Coach Saves Teen Who Collapsed During Foxboro Tournament It’s been 28 years since Massachusetts voters threw out rent control, and repeated efforts to bring it back have failed. But now, with the one-two punch of soaring costs and the pandemic’s economic damage pushing many renters to the brink, Boston City Councillor and mayoral candidate Michelle Wu is calling for a return to some form of rent control. “Boston is in the midst of a housing crisis,” she says, noting that aggressive efforts to promote more affordable housing construction have fallen short of what’s needed. “Protecting people in their homes and making sure in a targeted, specific...
    LOS ANGELES (AP) — David de Russy steered his bicycle through a sparse crowd of midweek visitors streaming down Los Angeles’ Venice Beach boardwalk between multimillion-dollar homes, T-shirt shops and eateries on one side and vendors peddling paintings, hawking crystals and offering tarot card readings on the other. For the first time in about a year, he was happy the view toward the ocean was largely unobscured with the misery of homeless camps that mushroomed along the sands during the coronavirus pandemic. “Thank God it’s getting cleared up,” de Russy said, though a remaining cluster of tents renewed what he described as “this sickening feeling that comes with seeing human beings in that condition.” An effort to house homeless people and remove clutter that proliferated is nearing completion. But residents upset over government inaction that allowed the problem to get out of control are warily watching how it unfolds and whether the cleanup takes hold. A problem once largely limited to the Skid Row section of downtown has spread to virtually all parts of Los Angeles. The nation’s...
    by Bryan Keogh, The Conversation The White House and city officials across the country are scrambling to avoid an eviction crisis. The federal housing eviction moratorium that the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention put in place in September 2020 expires on July 31, 2021. After that, millions of Americans who owe tens of billions of dollars in unpaid rent will lose that protection and may face eviction and a loss of their homes. Meanwhile, a group of landlords is suing the U.S. government to recover damages it says its members suffered from not being able to evict tenants who didn't pay rent. Although Congress allocated more than $46 billion for emergency rental aid, most of it hasn't reached many of the people who need it as state and local governments struggle to distribute the money. Many renters are unaware relief is available. We've been following the issue throughout the pandemic and picked three articles from our archive to get you up to speed. 1. Housing insecurity is a preexisting conditionMillions of Americans lost their jobs when the...
    In this article WMTEmily BenferSource: Emily BenferMost evictions have been banned in the U.S. since last September, but that protection is now set to end in days. In August, millions of families could be pushed out of their homes. The share of adult renters who remain behind on their housing payments — around 16% — has been slow to drop. The $45 billion in federal rental assistance allocated by Congress to address the crisis has been painfully slow to reach people, and the economic recovery has been uneven. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's national eviction moratorium has faced numerous legal challenges and landlords have criticized the policy, saying they can't afford to house people for free or shoulder the country's massive rental arrears, which could be as high as $70 billion. More from Personal Finance:Walmart to pay 100% of college tuition and books for its associatesHow much vaccine lottery winners could owe in taxesWays to make your monthly child tax credit payments grow CNBC spoke this week to the country's leading expert on evictions, Emily Benfer, about what we can expect...
    LOS ANGELES (CBSLA) — Steps taken to address the homelessness crisis in the Venice area are reaping rewards as more than 100 unhoused Angelenos have accepted a pathway to permanent housing. While homeless advocates say what Councilman Mike Bonin and St. Joseph’s Center are doing to transfer the unhoused to temporary housing is a step in the right direction, they also agree that more needs to be done. Meanwhile, businesses say they are feeling safer now that some encampments have been removed. Police have not definitively stated that crime in the area was primarily attributed to the local homeless population; however, some residents already say they feel it has become safer since the removal of some of the encampments. Since June 28, after Councilman Bonin’s Encampment to Home program, with the help of outreach teams from St. Joseph’s Center, Bonin says 160 people who used to live on the streets of Venice’s Boardwalk have since taken steps to acquire permanent housing with the city’s assistance. Most of the people who’ve been moved from the boardwalk are temporarily staying in motels...
    Policy expert and former journalist Ned Resnikoff sounded off on California's homeless crisis in a new guest essay for the New York Times, lamenting its "continual failure" to rein in its homelessness problem. The images of California's sprawling homeless camps in Venice Beach, Oakland, and Los Angeles "do not come close to capturing the scope of the state’s homelessness crisis," the author argued, before noting that California is home to 28 percent of the country's homeless population, according to federal statistics. "California’s continual failure to make inroads against widespread homelessness risks fomenting anger, cynicism and disaffection with the state’s political system. A state that appears powerless to address fundamental problems does not make a very persuasive case for its own survival," he wrote. LOS ANGELES COUNTY SHERIFF URGES LEADERS TO DECLARE STATE OF EMERGENCY OVER HOMELESS CRISIS California, Resnikoff argues, has "allowed homelessness to metastasize over the past few decades," morphing from a humanitarian crisis into a political crisis that in part led to the upcoming recall election of Gov. Gavin Newsom, D. He went on to blame racist policies...
    VAIL, Colo. (CBS4)– Mountain communities in Colorado are looking at potential restrictions on short-term rentals as the workforce continues to dwindle. (credit: CBS) “They’re leaving and I don’t really see a clear path of getting them back, so we need to do everything we can to keep the people that are still here,” said Brianne Snow, the Executive Director of the Family and Intercultural Resource Center (FIRC). “They are leaving every day, they come through the food pantry, and they tell us it’s the last time that they’re going to see us.” READ MORE: National Farmers Market Week Helps Kick Off Colorado Proud Month, Importance Of Supporting Local Growers The organization, which helps families find stability from across the high country, has lost employees itself. “We’re short-staffed here at FIRC, trying to help people that are short-staffed and so it’s incredibly difficult,” she said. According to a recent article from the Summit Daily, Steamboat Springs voted to extend a moratorium on short-term rentals, and other towns, while not quite prepared to go that far, are considering options. The towns of...
    LOS ANGELES (CBSLA) — Gov. Gavin Newsom Monday continued his campaign to try and get a handle on the homeless crisis, announcing billions in aid to be spread across the state to get people off the streets. Gov. Gavin Newsom spoke last Wednesday about the $100 billion California Comeback Plan in Bell Gardens. (Irfan Khan/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images) “The investments we’re making here today are the most historic,” he said. “The largest investments in mental health housing in California history.” READ MORE: AMC To Reopen Shuttered Theaters At Grove, Americana The funding includes $12 billion to tackle the homelessness crisis, including money to tackle mental health issues; $10.3 billion in affordable housing and $5.8 billion to add 42,000 new housing units. “It’s a renewed effort to take responsibility, to take accountability and to recognize the urgency of the crisis,” Newsom said. And while Newsom has been promoting the funding for several months, the additional resources cannot come soon enough as the state limps out of the worst of the pandemic. “I think there’s a lot of people doing...
    Since the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic, many have feared that a wave of evictions will devastate millions of renters — particularly low-income residents who have borne the brunt of the pandemic. So far in California, that wave has been averted, thanks in part to new laws passed at the local, state and federal levels that aim to block evictions for those affected by the virus. But those laws have significant gaps. By one estimate, nearly 10,000 households have been evicted statewide during the pandemic. Meanwhile, some landlords are owed tens of thousands of dollars in back rent, as their bills continue to pile up. And, despite the dire need, the state has struggled to allocate more than $5 billion in rental assistance for tenants and landlords. On this episode of “Gimme Shelter: The California Housing Crisis Podcast,” we talk about the status of California’s eviction protections, set to expire statewide Sept. 30, and how officials are trying to speed up the distribution of rental assistance dollars. Our guest is Assemblyman David Chiu (D-San Francisco), the chairman of the...
    LOS ANGELES—The California Department of Transportation paid more than $13 million to have security at 120 vacant homes, Fox 11 reported exclusively. The report said Caltrans paid $9 million to the state’s highway patrol from November to April and another $4 million to a private security firm for five months. Caltrans told the station in a statement that the homes were purchased 60 years ago when the state wanted to connect the 710 freeway to the 210 in Pasadena. "Now that the project is no longer moving forward, our goal is to sell these homes and provide current and former tenants, as well as those who qualify for the Affordable Sales Program, a path to first-time homeownership," the statement read. The statement said "regulatory changes" were needed to "expedite the sale" of these properties. Caltrans said it is in the process of securing the homes and the security costs have been reduced since the peaks in March and December. An estimated 161,000 people are experiencing homelessness in California, more than in any other. Advocates say they can’t house people quickly...
    Sacramento Mayor Darrell Steinberg has proposed a "right to housing" as the California homeless crisis continues to grow more severe.  The state has around 161,000 people struggling with homelessness, and the state’s leadership is coming up short with answers. As the most populous state, California has the highest number of homeless people, according to government statistics: The state also boasts the fourth-highest rate of homeless per capita in the U.S. Steinberg announced a plan Wednesday, during his State of the City address, that he believes will help his city and the state at large to better tackle the crisis: A "right to housing" along with an "obligation" for homeless people to accept shelter when offered.  LA CITY COUNCIL TO VOTE ON PROPOSAL TO BAN HOMELESS CAMPS IN SOME PUBLIC AREAS The first-of-its-kind measure would empower government and authorities to comply with federal rulings that have made it increasingly difficult to enforce laws against homeless camps if alternatives do not exist.  "I would rather have Sacramento bravely lead than follow," Steinberg said. "Let’s do it ourselves without a court order." "I don’t...